Changeset 25210 in main


Ignore:
Timestamp:
05/09/22 11:16:24 (12 days ago)
Author:
Paul Leo
Message:

Adding/Updating?:
Disaster topics selections
Climate Topics Index
Flooding topic page
Water Related disease topic page
Added a topic to water topics index

as per SMM

Location:
adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/nmepht-content
Files:
5 added
5 edited

Legend:

Unmodified
Added
Removed
  • adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/nmepht-content/xml/html_content/environment/climate/Flooding.xml

    r22951 r25210  
    116116                                                <ul class="Indent">
    117117                                                        <li>Maintain your private well and keep records of well maintenance</li>
    118                                                         <li>Keep chemical and other contaminants away from the well head including keeping animal waste piles located where water will not flow toward the well</li>
     118                                                        <li>Keep chemical and other contaminants away from the well head including keeping animal waste</li>
     119                                                        <li>piles located where water will not flow toward the well</li>
    119120                                                        <li>Make sure the well has a cap or sanitary seal</li>
    120                                                         <li>Have the well water <a href="environment/water/private_wells/Testing.html">tested</a> annually for bacteria, nitrates, pH and conductivity</li>
    121                                                         <li>Make sure that the ground is sloped away from the well so that surface water flows away instead of towards the well head.</li>
    122                                                         <li>A well contractor can assist with other protective measures including:</li>
    123                                                         <ul class="Indent">
     121                                                        <li>Have the well water <a href="environment/water/PrivateWellTesting.html">tested.</a></li>
    124122                                                                <li>Make sure that well casing extends at least 18 inches above land surface (NMAC 19.27.4).</li>
    125123                                                                <li>If you have a well pit, consider upgrading</li>
    126                                                         </ul>
    127                                                 </ul>
    128                                                 Learn more steps to take before, during, and after flooding on our <a href="environment/climate/WellsDroughtsDiasters.html">private wells and natural disasters page</a>.
    129                                                 <br/><br/>
    130                                                 <a href="environment/water/PrivateWells.html">Learn more about private wells and water quality</a>.
     124                                                </ul>                                           
     125                                                Learn more steps to take before, during, and after flooding on our <a href="environment/climate/WellsAndDisasters.html">private wells and natural disasters page</a>.
     126                                                <br/><br/>                                     
    131127                                        </CONTENT>
    132128                                </ibis:ExpandableContent>
  • adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/nmepht-content/xml/html_content/environment/water/WaterRelatedDisease.xml

    r22951 r25210  
    33<HTML_CONTENT xmlns:ibis="http://www.ibisph.org">
    44
    5         <TITLE>Private Wells and Water-Related Diseases</TITLE>
     5        <TITLE>Water Related Diseases</TITLE>
     6
     7        <HTML_CLASS>Topic Environment</HTML_CLASS>
     8        <OTHER_HEAD_CONTENT>
     9                <link href="css/Topic.css" rel="stylesheet" type="text/css"/>
     10                <link href="css/_SiteSpecific-Topic.css" rel="stylesheet" type="text/css"/>
     11
     12                <script src="js/jquery.scrollBlockListItems.js"/>
     13                <script>
     14                        $( document ).ready(function() {
     15                                $(".Topic #moreData           .Selections").scrollBlockListItems( {"maxSelectionsContainerHeight":120});
     16                                $(".Topic #downloadsResources .Selections").scrollBlockListItems( {"maxSelectionsContainerHeight":190});
     17                        });
     18                </script>
     19        </OTHER_HEAD_CONTENT>
     20<!--
     21                Community Water Systems page by Stephanie Moraga-McHaley 5/8/2022
     22-->
    623
    724        <CONTENT>
    8                 <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="2"><SHOW/>
    9                         <TITLE>Bacteria, viruses, and parasites in private well water</TITLE>
     25
     26                <header>
     27                        <img src="contentfile/image/environment/water/disease/ecoli.jpg" title="Gram-negative, rod-shaped, Escherichia coli bacteria of the strain O157:H7, which is a pathogenic strain of E. coli. CDC"/>
     28                        <h1>Water-related Diseases</h1>
     29                </header>
     30
     31
     32                <section>
     33                        <h2>Waterborne Organisms and Health</h2>
     34                                <p>
     35                                        Some microorganisms (germs) are naturally present in the environment and do not represent a health risk. Other organisms including bacteria, parasites, and viruses are found in human or animal waste and can get into groundwater (well water) and cause illness. The most common type of illness experienced is gastrointestinal with symptoms such as: stomach cramps or pain, diarrhea (sometimes bloody), vomiting, and fever. Depending on the organism, symptoms can last from 5 days to 6 weeks.
     36                                </p>
     37                                <p>
     38                                        For any health concerns, contact your healthcare provider. For questions about waterborne diseases, you can contact the Epidemiology and Response Division on-call number to speak with an epidemiologist at (505) 827-0006 or 888-878-8992.
     39                                </p>                           
     40                </section>             
     41                <section class="SubSectionsContainer">
     42                        <h3>Why is water quality in community water systems important?</h3>
    1043                        <CONTENT>
    11                                 <a href="about/Welcome.html">
    12                                 <img src="contentfile/image/environment/water/private_wells/BacteriaPathogensBannerIllness.jpg" alt="Bacteria and Parasites" style="float:left; width: 98%; margin:4px 10px 4px 10px;"/>
    13                                 </a>
    14                                 <br style="clear: both"/><br/>
    15                                 An estimated 20 percent of the population in New Mexico gets their drinking water from private wells. The water quality of a private well is unregulated in the state of New Mexico; therefore, well owners are the best protection of their water supply.
    16                                 <br/><br/>
    17                                 Well owners are responsible for <a href="environment/water/private_wells/Testing.html">testing</a> their water (for bacteria and chemicals), <a href="environment/water/private_wells/Treatment.html">treating</a> (when applicable) and protecting their water supply (<a href="environment/water/private_wells/Resources.html">learn more about private well resources</a>).
    18                                 <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="3">
    19                                         <TITLE>What are waterborne microorganisms?</TITLE>
    20                                         <CONTENT>
    2144                                                <table class="Info">
    2245                                                        <tr>
     
    5780                                                                <td></td>
    5881                                                                <td class="Italicize">
    59                                                                         Shigella <br/><img src="contentfile/image/environment/water/private_wells/Shigella.png" style="float: left; max-width:70%; width: 60%; margin:2px 2px 2px 2px;"  alt="Shigella" title="Shigella"/>
     82                                                                        Shigella <br/><img src="contentfile/image/environment/water/disease/Shigella.png" style="float: left; max-width:70%; width: 60%; margin:2px 2px 2px 2px;"  alt="Shigella" title="Shigella"/>                                     
    6083                                                                </td>
    6184                                                                <td class="Italicize">
    62                                                                         Giardia <br/><img src="contentfile/image/environment/water/private_wells/Giardia.png" style="float: left; max-width:70%; width: 60%; margin:2px 2px 2px 2px;"  alt="Giardia" title="Giardia"/>
     85                                                                        Giardia <br/><img src="contentfile/image/environment/water/disease/Giardia.png" style="float: left; max-width:70%; width: 60%; margin:2px 2px 2px 2px;"  alt="Giardia" title="Giardia"/>
    6386                                                                </td>
    6487                                                                <td class="Italicize">
    65                                                                         Rotavirus <br/><img src="contentfile/image/environment/water/private_wells/Rotavirus.png" style="float: left; max-width:70%; width: 50%; margin:2px 2px 2px 2px;"  alt="Rotavirus" title="Rotavirus"/>
     88                                                                        Rotavirus <br/><img src="contentfile/image/environment/water/disease/Rotavirus.png" style="float: left; max-width:70%; width: 50%; margin:2px 2px 2px 2px;"  alt="Rotavirus" title="Rotavirus"/>
    6689                                                                </td>
    6790                                                        </tr>
     
    86109                                                        <tr>
    87110                                                                <td class="Italicize">Cryptosporidium</td>
    88                                                         </tr>
    89                                                         <tr>
    90                                                                 <td class="Bold">How do they get into drinking water (wells)?</td>   
    91                                                                 <td colspan="3">
    92                                                                         The well water gets contaminated with infected human or animal waste. Common sources are: septic systems, animals such as livestock, and fertilizer (manure). The well can become contaminated after maintenance or a disturbance (like a flood) if the well head is damaged or not properly maintained.
    93                                                                 </td>
    94                                                         </tr>
     111                                                        </tr>                                                   
    95112                                                        <tr>
    96113                                                                <td class="Bold">What kind of illness do they cause?</td>
     
    98115                                                                        Gastro-intestinal problems. Common symptoms include: Stomach cramps or pain, diarrhea (sometimes bloody), vomiting, fever, rotten egg smelling diarrhea (giardia).
    99116                                                                </td>
    100                                                         </tr>
    101                                                         <tr>
    102                                                                 <td class="Bold">What can I do?</td>
    103                                                                 <td colspan="3">
    104                                                                         <ul>
    105                                                                                 <li>Protect your water source from waterborne pathogens.</li>
    106                                                                                 <li>Treat your water.</li>
    107                                                                                 <li>Clean your well.</li>
    108                                                                                 <li>Boil water (if well water has tested positive for bacteria)</li>
    109                                                                                 <li>Prepare when flooding is likely.</li>
    110                                                                                 <li>Consider an alternative clean water source for drinking, cooking and bathing.</li>
    111                                                                                 <li>See a health care provider for any health concerns</li>
    112                                                                         </ul>
    113                                                                 </td>
    114                                                         </tr>
     117                                                        </tr>                                                   
    115118                                                        <tr>
    116119                                                                <td class="Bold">Susceptible populations</td>
     
    119122                                                </table>
    120123                                                <br/><br/>
    121                                         </CONTENT>
    122                                 </ibis:ExpandableContent>
    123                         </CONTENT>
    124                 </ibis:ExpandableContent>
    125                 <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="2">
    126                         <TITLE>Waterborne organisms and health</TITLE>
    127                         <CONTENT>
    128                                 Some microorganisms are naturally present in the environment and do not represent a health risk. Other organisms including bacteria, parasites and viruses are associated with human or animal waste and can get into groundwater (well water) and cause illness. The most common type of illness experienced is gastrointestinal with symptoms such as: stomach cramps or pain, diarrhea (sometimes bloody), vomiting, and fever. Depending on the organism, symptoms can last from 5 days to 6 weeks.
    129                                 <br/><br/>
    130                                 For any health concerns, contact your healthcare provider. For questions about waterborne diseases, you can contact the Epidemiology and Response Division on-call number to speak with an epidemiologist at (505) 827-0006 or 888-878-8992.
    131                                 <br/><br/>
    132                                 According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the top 5 causes of outbreaks in private water systems (wells) are infectious diseases.  These include:
    133                                 <br/><br/>
     124                                        </CONTENT>                             
     125                        <h3>Children and seniors</h3>   
     126                                <p>
     127                                        Children, the elderly, and immune-compromised people can be more susceptible to waterborne pathogens. Dehydration can result from diarrhea or vomiting. If contamination is known or suspected, use an alternate clean water source for bathing and drinking. If any possible symptoms of dehydration, vomiting or weight loss occur, visit your healthcare provider.
     128                                </p>
     129                                <p>
     130                        <h2>Private Wells and Water-Related Diseases</h2>
     131                                </p>
     132                                <p>
     133                                        According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the top 5 causes of outbreaks in private water systems (wells) are infectious diseases. These include:
     134                                </p>
    134135                                <table class="Info">
    135136                                        <tr>
     
    151152                                                <td>5. <span class="Italicize">Cryptosporidium</span> and <span class="Italicize">Salmonella</span> (tie)</td>
    152153                                        </tr>
    153                                 </table>
    154                                 <br/>
    155                                 <a href="https://www.cdc.gov/healthywater/drinking/private/wells/diseases.html">Learn more about water-related diseases in private wells from the CDC.</a>
    156                                 <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="3">
    157                                         <TITLE>Children and Seniors</TITLE>
    158                                         <CONTENT>
    159                                                 Children and the elderly and immune-compromised people can be more susceptible to waterborne pathogens.  Dehydration can result from diarrhea or vomiting. If contamination is known or suspected, use an alternate clean water source for bathing and drinking. If any possible symptoms of dehydration, vomiting or weight loss occur, visit your healthcare provider.
    160                                                 <br/><br/>
    161                                                 Children may drink water frequently and therefore be more susceptible to waterborne illness. Supervise children's hand washing and bathing to limit potential exposure.
    162                                         </CONTENT>
    163                                 </ibis:ExpandableContent>
    164                         </CONTENT>
    165                 </ibis:ExpandableContent>
    166                 <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="2">
    167                         <TITLE>How do I know if harmful microorganisms are in my well water?</TITLE>
    168                         <CONTENT>
    169                                 <span class="Bold">Test your well water!</span>
    170                                 <br/>
    171                                 <ul class="Indent">
    172                                         <li><span class="Bold">Test your water annually for bacteria</span> - spring is best!</li>
    173                                         <li>
    174                                                 Test after any changes- flooding or other land disturbances, well maintenance, changes in water level or quality (smell, taste or color change).
    175                                         </li>
    176                                         <li>Test for a newly purchased home or a newly rented residence.</li>
    177                                         <li>
    178                                                 Bacteria is best analyzed in a clean environment like a laboratory, where cross contamination can be minimized. <a href="https://www.env.nm.gov/drinking_water/certified-labs/">Find a certified lab</a>.
    179                                         </li>
    180                                         <li>The water quality can affect what kind of treatment is appropriate. At a minimum test your water:</li>
    181                                         <ul class="Indent">
    182                                                 <li>
    183                                                         Annually:<br/> Fecal coliform bacteria (including <span class="Italicize">E. coli</span>) <br/> Nitrate
    184                                                 </li>
    185                                                 <li>
    186                                                         At least once:<br/> Nitrite <br/> Arsenic <br/> Uranium <br/> Lead <br/> Fluoride <br/>
    187                                                 </li>
    188                                         </ul>
    189                                         <li>
    190                                         <a href="environment/water/private_wells/Testing.html">Learn more about how and where to test your water</a>.
    191                                         </li>
    192                                 </ul>
    193                         </CONTENT>
    194                 </ibis:ExpandableContent>
    195                 <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="2">
    196                         <TITLE>How do microorganisms get into well water?</TITLE>
    197                         <CONTENT>
    198                                 Some microorganisms can be naturally present in the groundwater environment.
    199                                 <br/><br/>
    200                                 <span class="Bold">The only way to know if waterborne disease-causing microorganisms (pathogens) are in the water is to test it.</span>
    201                                 <br/><br/>
    202                                 <a href="about/Welcome.html">
    203                                 <img src="contentfile/image/environment/water/private_wells/ProtectYourWellWater.png" alt="Protect your well water" style="float:left; width: 94%; margin:4px 10px 4px 26px;"/>
    204                                 </a>
    205                                 <br style="clear: both"/><br/>
    206                                 Disease causing microorganisms can get into the water when it is contaminated with feces from infected animals or people. Contamination can occur from various sources such as:
    207                                 <br/><br/>
    208                                 Nearby septic systems. <a href="environment/water/private_wells/SepticSystems.html">Learn more about groundwater protection and your septic system</a>.
    209                                 <br/><br/>
    210                                 Proximity of animals such as livestock.
    211                                 <br/><br/>
    212                                 Proximity of animal waste such as manure.
    213                                 <br/><br/>
    214                                 Contamination after flooding.
    215                         </CONTENT>
    216                 </ibis:ExpandableContent>
    217                 <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="2">
    218                         <TITLE>Preventing contamination</TITLE>
    219                         <CONTENT>
    220                                 <a href="about/Welcome.html">
    221                                 <img src="contentfile/image/environment/water/private_wells/BacteriaWellsLocation.jpg" alt="Waterborne Organisms and Private Wells" style="float:left; width: 100%; margin:4px 10px 4px 8px;"/>
    222                                 </a>
    223                                 <br style="clear: both"/><br/>
    224                                 <span class="Bold">Maintain a safe distance between private wells and possible sources of contamination.</span>
    225                                 <br/><br/>
    226                                 <ul class="Indent">
    227                                         <li>Protect your water source from waterborne pathogens:</li>
    228                                         <ul class="Indent">
    229                                                 <li>
    230                                                         Keep possible contaminant sources a safe distance from any well. If you live in an area with a high density of private wells, you can be a good steward by not disposing of manure and chemicals on your property and by keeping possible contaminant sources on your property a good distance from the well head on your neighbor's property.
    231                                                 </li>
    232                                                 <li>Make sure your well has a sanitary cap or seal.</li>
    233                                                 <li>Make sure the ground is sloped away from the well so water flows away from the well head.</li>
    234                                                 <li>Make sure the casing extends 18 inches above the land surface (NMAC 19.27.4).</li>
    235                                         </ul>
    236                                         <li>Prepare when flooding is likely:</li>
    237                                         <ul class="Indent">
    238                                                 <li>Use sandbags to divert water away from the well head.</li>
    239                                                 <li>Protect any vented areas with tarp or duct tape.</li>
    240                                                 <li>
    241                                                         <a href="contentfile/pdf/environment/water/private_wells/Resources/Flood.prep.factsheet.revised.pdf ">Learn more about what to do before, during, and after floods</a>.
    242                                                 </li>
    243                                         </ul>
    244                                 </ul>
    245                         </CONTENT>
    246                 </ibis:ExpandableContent>
    247                 <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="2">
    248                         <TITLE>After contamination</TITLE>
    249                         <CONTENT>
    250                                 <ul class="Indent">
    251                                         <li>Treat your water:</li>
    252                                         <ul class="Indent">
    253                                                 <li>
    254                                                         Install filtration systems certified to remove bacteria or other disease-causing microorganisms (find certified products at <a href="http://www.nsf.org">NSF.org</a>)
    255                                                 </li>
    256                                                 <li>
    257                                                         Disinfect following safe guidelines. <a href="contentfile/pdf/environment/water/private_wells/Resources/DisinfectingDrilledWells_CDC.pdf ">Learn more about disinfecting drilled wells with chlorine bleach</a>.
    258                                                 </li>
    259                                                 <li>
    260                                                         Boil your water: if your water has tested positive for bacteria, boiling it to kill germs may be a good option. Water should be brought to a rolling boil for 1 minute. <span class="Bold">At altitudes greater than 6,562 feet, boil water for 3 minutes.</span> If the water contains other potentially harmful chemicals or constituents, boiling the water may concentrate them. The best way to know what is in your water is to test it. <a href="environment/water/BoilWater.html">Learn more about boil water guidelines</a>.
    261                                                 </li>
    262                                                 <li>
    263                                                         <a href="environment/water/private_wells/Treatment.html">Learn more about treatment</a>.
    264                                                 </li>
    265                                         </ul>
    266                                         <li>
    267                                                 Chlorine disinfection may be an appropriate temporary solution. It may be less effective long-term. Accumulated organic material left in the well may allow bacterial growth to re-occur. Cleaning your well may be a more effective long-term solution. <a href="http://wellowner.org/water-well-maintenance/residential-well-cleaning/ ">Learn more about cleaning your well from the National Groundwater Association</a>. <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q_sCq5LsjGk ">Watch a video on well cleaning</a>.
    268 
    269                                         </li>
    270                                         <li>
    271                                                 Cleaning or disinfection may be best performed by a well contractor. <a href="contentfile/pdf/How-to-Hire-a-Water-Well-Contractor.pdf">Learn about hiring a well contractor</a>.
    272                                         </li>
    273                                 </ul>
    274                         </CONTENT>
    275                 </ibis:ExpandableContent>
     154                                </table>       
     155                                        <p>
     156                                <h3>
     157                                        How  do they get into drinking water (wells)?
     158                                </h3>
     159                                        </p>
     160                                        <p>
     161                                                The well water gets contaminated with infected human or animal waste. Common sources are: septic systems, animals such as livestock, and fertilizer (manure). The well can become contaminated after maintenance or a disturbance (like a flood) if the well head is damaged or not properly maintained.
     162                                        </p>
     163
     164                                        <p>                                                                     
     165                                                <div>                                           
     166                                                        <h3>
     167                                                                What  can I do?
     168                                                        </h3>
     169                                               
     170                                                        <ul class="Indent">
     171                                                                <li>
     172                                                                        Protect your water source from waterborne pathogens.
     173                                                                </li>
     174                                                                <li>
     175                                                                        Treat your water.
     176                                                                </li>
     177                                                                <li>
     178                                                                        Clean your well.
     179                                                                </li>
     180                                                                <li>
     181                                                                        Boil water (if well water has tested positive for bacteria)                     
     182                                                                </li>
     183                                                                <li>
     184                                                                        Prepare when flooding is likely.
     185                                                                </li>
     186                                                                        Consider an alternative clean water source for drinking, cooking and bathing.
     187                                                                <li>
     188                                                                        See a health care provider for any health concerns
     189                                                                </li>                                                           
     190                                                        </ul>                           
     191                                                </div> 
     192                                        </p>
     193                                        <p>
     194                                                If you are on a community water system, pay attention to boil water advisories issued by your Public Water System provider.
     195                                        </p>
     196                        </section>
     197                        <section>               
     198                        <div class="NotifiableCondition">
     199                                <h3>Notifiable Diseases or Conditions in New Mexico (N.M.A.C 7.4.3.13)</h3>
     200                                <p>
     201                                        The following conditions are reportable to the New Mexico Department of Health: (b) suspected waterborne illness or conditions in two or more unrelated persons. Report to Epidemiology and Response Division, NM Department of Health, P.O. Box 26110, Santa Fe, NM 87502-6110; or call 505-827-0006.
     202                                </p>
     203                        </div>
     204                </section>
     205
     206
     207                <nav id="moreInformation" title="Links for more information">
     208                        <div id="downloadsResources">
     209                                <h3>Downloads and Resources</h3>
     210                                <div class="Columns">
     211                                        <div class="Selections">
     212                                                <ul>
     213                                                        <li><a href="https://www.env.nm.gov/drinking_water/boil-water-advisories/?msclkid=969ea2c1cf0a11ecb0d6a661a0f739c3" title="NMED Drinking Water Bureau: Boil Water" class="External">
     214                                                                New Mexico Environment Department Drinking Water Bureau: Boil Water Advisories
     215                                                        </a></li>
     216                                                        <li><a href="https://www.cdc.gov/healthywater/surveillance/index.html" title="CDC Waterborne Disease and Outbreak Surveillance Reporting" class="External">
     217                                                                CDC: Waterborne Disease and Outbreak Surveillance Reporting
     218                                                        </a></li>
     219                                                        <li><a href="https://www.cdc.gov/healthywater/drinking/private/wells/diseases.html" title="Overview of Water-related Diseases and Contaminants in Private Wells" class="External">CDC: Overview of Water-related Diseases and Contaminants in Private Wells
     220                                                        </a></li>
     221                                                        <li><a href="https://www.nmhealth.org/publication/view/general/5151/?msclkid=34faae98cf0d11ec8414409f4e6bce76" title="List of Notifiable Diseases in New Mexico" class="External"> List of Notifiable Diseases or Conditions in New Mexico NMAC 7.4.3.13
     222                                                        </a></li>
     223                                                       
     224                                                </ul>
     225                                        </div>
     226                                        <img src="contentfile/image/topic/downloads_resources.png"/>
     227                                </div>
     228                        </div>
     229
     230                        <ibis:TopicsMoreData topicSelectionsPath="../../../selections/environment/water/disease/"/>
     231                </nav>         
    276232        </CONTENT>
    277233</HTML_CONTENT>
    278 
  • adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/nmepht-content/xml/selections/environment/climate/topics.xml

    r22714 r25210  
    22
    33<SELECTIONS>
     4<!--
    45        <SELECTION>
    56                <TITLE>Temperatures</TITLE>
     
    78                <LOCAL_URL>environment/climate/ExtremeTemperatures.html</LOCAL_URL>
    89        </SELECTION>
     10-->     
    911        <SELECTION>
    1012                <TITLE>Drought</TITLE>
    1113                <DESCRIPTION></DESCRIPTION>
    1214                <LOCAL_URL>environment/climate/Drought.html</LOCAL_URL>
     15        </SELECTION>
     16        <SELECTION>
     17                <TITLE>Wells and Natural Disasters</TITLE>
     18                <DESCRIPTION></DESCRIPTION>
     19                <LOCAL_URL>environment/climate/WellsAndDisasters.html</LOCAL_URL>
    1320        </SELECTION>
    1421        <SELECTION>
  • adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/nmepht-content/xml/selections/environment/water/disease/topics.xml

    r22714 r25210  
    22
    33<SELECTIONS>
    4         <SELECTION>
    5                 <TITLE>Outdoor Air</TITLE>
     4<SELECTION>
     5                <TITLE>Community Water Systems</TITLE>
    66                <DESCRIPTION></DESCRIPTION>
    7                 <LOCAL_URL>environment/air/OutdoorQuality.html</LOCAL_URL>
     7                <LOCAL_URL>environment/water/CommunityWaterSystems.html</LOCAL_URL>
    88        </SELECTION>
    99        <SELECTION>
    10                 <TITLE>Indoor Air</TITLE>
     10                <TITLE>Private Wells</TITLE>
    1111                <DESCRIPTION></DESCRIPTION>
    12                 <LOCAL_URL>environment/air/IndoorQuality.html</LOCAL_URL>
     12                <LOCAL_URL>environment/water/PrivateWells.html</LOCAL_URL>
    1313        </SELECTION>
    1414        <SELECTION>
    15                 <TITLE>Radon</TITLE>
     15                <TITLE>Septic Systems and Private Wells</TITLE>
    1616                <DESCRIPTION></DESCRIPTION>
    17                 <LOCAL_URL>environment/air/Radon.html</LOCAL_URL>
     17                <LOCAL_URL>environment/water/SepticSystems.html</LOCAL_URL>
    1818        </SELECTION>
    1919        <SELECTION>
    20                 <TITLE>Fire and Smoke</TITLE>
     20                <TITLE>Private Wells and Natural Disasters</TITLE>
    2121                <DESCRIPTION></DESCRIPTION>
    22                 <LOCAL_URL>environment/air/FireAndSmoke.html</LOCAL_URL>
     22                <LOCAL_URL>environment/water/WellsAndDisasters</LOCAL_URL>
     23        </SELECTION>
     24        <SELECTION>
     25                <TITLE>Private Well Testing</TITLE>
     26                <DESCRIPTION></DESCRIPTION>
     27                <LOCAL_URL>environment/PrivateWellTesting.html</LOCAL_URL>
    2328        </SELECTION>
    2429</SELECTIONS>
  • adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/nmepht-content/xml/selections/environment/water/topics.xml

    r24776 r25210  
    3131                                <DESCRIPTION></DESCRIPTION>
    3232                                <LOCAL_URL>environment/water/PrivateWellTreatment.html</LOCAL_URL>
     33                        </SELECTION>
     34                        <SELECTION>
     35                                <TITLE>Private Well Testing</TITLE>
     36                                <DESCRIPTION></DESCRIPTION>
     37                                <LOCAL_URL>environment/water/PrivateWellTesting.html</LOCAL_URL>
    3338                        </SELECTION>
    3439                        <SELECTION>
Note: See TracChangeset for help on using the changeset viewer.