Changeset 25090 in main


Ignore:
Timestamp:
04/21/22 14:14:54 (4 weeks ago)
Author:
ChelseaLanger_NM
Message:

Update birth defects metadata.

Location:
adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/nmepht-content/xml/metadata
Files:
13 edited

Legend:

Unmodified
Added
Removed
  • adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/nmepht-content/xml/metadata/PrevalenceAnencephaly.xml

    r11544 r25090  
    55<citeinfo>
    66<origin>New Mexico EPHTN Project Manager</origin>
    7 <pubdate>20110518</pubdate>
     7<pubdate>20210914</pubdate>
    88<title>Prevalence of Anencephaly per 10,000 Live Births </title>
    99<onlink/>
     
    1111</citation>
    1212<descript>
    13 <abstract>This data set supports calculation of the frequency ("prevalence") of infants born with birth defect, which is anencephaly per number of live births among New Mexico residents.  Prevalence of anencephaly is the number of live-born infants with anencephaly per 10,000 live-born infants. The prevalence of anencephaly per 10,000 live births measure is presented by county, for 1998-2007.</abstract>
     13<abstract>This data set supports calculation of the frequency ("prevalence") of infants born with birth defect, which is anencephaly per number of live births among New Mexico residents.  Prevalence of anencephaly is the number of live-born infants with anencephaly per 10,000 live-born infants. The prevalence of anencephaly per 10,000 live births measure is presented by county, for 2015-2019.</abstract>
    1414<purpose>Dataset was created to provide data for the New Mexico Environmental Public Health Tracking Network in order to monitor spatial and temporal variation in the annual prevalence of anencephaly, one of the major birth defects consistent with Nationally Consistent Data and Measures (NCDMs.</purpose>
    15 <supplinf>The data are from the New Mexico Birth Defects and Surveillance System (NM BDPASS).  In January 2000 birth defects became a reportable condition; however, birth defects were collected prior to this date.  Our first year of consistent data is 1998.  Data are collected on births occurring in-state to NM residents.  We do not currently receive births for NM residents which occur out of state.  NM BDPASS collects birth defect data among live births as well as fetal losses, which include stillbirths, spontaneous abortions and elective terminations occurring at all gestational ages.  Birth defect cases are ascertained up to age 4; however, the majority of diagnoses are made by age 1.  Surveillance methods include a combination of active and passive case ascertainment.  Case finding/identification occurs through review of birth and death certificates, hospital discharge diagnoses, records from pediatric specialists and prenatal diagnostic providers.  The birth defects coding system is ICD-9-CM, supplemented with the CDC-BPA coding system for specific diagnoses. &#13;
    16 The following International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) codes were used to identify anencephaly: 740.0 - 740.10. In 1987, CDC put forth a set of 6 digit codes (the sixth digit provides greater specificity for diagnosis) based on the British Pediatric Association Classification of Diseases and the ICD-9-CM. If CDC/BPA codes are present, the following were used to identify anencephaly: 740.000 - 740.100.</supplinf>
     15<supplinf>The data are from the New Mexico Birth Defects and Surveillance System (NM BDPASS).  In January 2000 birth defects became a reportable condition; however, birth defects were collected prior to this date.  Our first year of consistent data is 1998.  Data are collected on births occurring in-state to NM residents.  We do not currently receive births for NM residents which occur out of state.  NM BDPASS collects birth defect data among live births as well as fetal losses, which include stillbirths, spontaneous abortions and elective terminations occurring at all gestational ages.  Birth defect cases are ascertained up to age 4; however, the majority of diagnoses are made by age 1.  Surveillance methods include a combination of active and passive case ascertainment.  Case finding/identification occurs through review of birth and death certificates, hospital discharge diagnoses, records from pediatric specialists and prenatal diagnostic providers. 
     16The following International Classification of Diseases, 9th and 10th Revisions Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM and ICD-10-CM) codes were used in 2015 to identify anencephaly: 740.0 - 740.1 and Q00.00 - Q00.1, respectively. Only ICD-10-CM code was used from 2016-2019.
     17In 1987, CDC put forth a set of 6-digit codes (the sixth digit provides greater specificity for diagnosis) based on the British Pediatric Association Classification of Diseases and the ICD-9-CM. If CDC/BPA codes are present, the following were used to identify anencephaly: 740.00 - 740.10.</supplinf>
    1718</descript>
    1819<timeperd>
    1920<timeinfo>
    2021<rngdates>
    21 <begdate>19980101</begdate>
     22<begdate>20150101</begdate>
    2223<begtime/>
    23 <enddate>20071231</enddate>
     24<enddate>20191231</enddate>
    2425<endtime/>
    2526</rngdates>
     
    4849<themekey>740.0-740.10</themekey>
    4950</theme>
     51<theme>
     52<themekt>ICD-10-CM</themekt>
     53<themekey>Q00.0-Q00.1</themekey>
     54</theme>
    5055<place>
    5156<placekt>FIPS 5-2 (State)</placekt>
     
    6772<city>Santa Fe</city>
    6873<state>NM</state>
    69 <postal>87502</postal>
     74<postal>87505</postal>
    7075<country>United States Of America</country>
    7176</cntaddr>
     
    9297<procstep>
    9398<procdesc>Dataset developed per the instructions found in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Recommendations for Nationally Consistent Data and Measures within the Environmental Public Health Tracking Network, version 1.3, (http://ephtracking.cdc.gov/docs/CDC_NCDM_Pt1_1.3.pdf). </procdesc>
    94 <procdate>20110518</procdate>
     99<procdate>20160203</procdate>
    95100</procstep>
    96101<procstep>
     
    120125rgis.unm.edu) or other servers hosted at UNM Earth Data Analysis Center.
    121126</procdesc>
    122 <procdate>20120417</procdate>
     127<procdate>20170920</procdate>
    123128</procstep></lineage>
    124129</dataqual>
     
    147152<city>Santa Fe</city>
    148153<state>NM</state>
    149 <postal>87502</postal>
     154<postal>87505</postal>
    150155<country>United States Of America</country>
    151156</cntaddr>
     
    166171</distinfo>
    167172<metainfo>
    168 <metd>20110518</metd>
     173<metd>20210914</metd>
    169174<metc>
    170175<cntinfo>
     
    179184<city>Santa Fe</city>
    180185<state>NM</state>
    181 <postal>87502</postal>
     186<postal>87505</postal>
    182187<country>United States Of America</country>
    183188</cntaddr>
     
    191196</cntinfo>
    192197</metc>
    193 <metstdn>EPHTN Tracking Network Profile Version 1.2</metstdn>
     198<metstdn>EPHTN Tracking Network Profile Version 3.0</metstdn>
    194199<metac>None</metac>
    195200<metuc>None</metuc>
  • adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/nmepht-content/xml/metadata/PrevalenceCleftLipCleftPalate.xml

    r22873 r25090  
    55<citeinfo>
    66<origin>New Mexico EPHTN Project Manager</origin>
    7 <pubdate>20110518</pubdate>
     7<pubdate>20210914</pubdate>
    88<title>Prevalence of Cleft Lip with or without Cleft Palate per 10,000 Live Births</title>
    99<onlink/>
     
    1111</citation>
    1212<descript>
    13 <abstract>This data set supports calculation of the frequency ("prevalence") of infants born with birth defect, which is cleft lip with or w/o cleft palate per number of live births among New Mexico residents.  Prevalence of cleft lip with or w/o cleft palate is the number of live-born infants with cleft lip with or w/o cleft palate per 10,000 live-born infants. The prevalence of cleft lip with or w/o cleft palate per 10,000 live births measure is presented by county, for 1998-2007.</abstract>
     13<abstract>This data set supports calculation of the frequency ("prevalence") of infants born with birth defect, which is cleft lip with or w/o cleft palate per number of live births among New Mexico residents.  Prevalence of cleft lip with or w/o cleft palate is the number of live-born infants with cleft lip with or w/o cleft palate per 10,000 live-born infants. The prevalence of cleft lip with or w/o cleft palate per 10,000 live births measure is presented by county, for 2015-2019.</abstract>
    1414<purpose>Dataset was created to provide data for the New Mexico Environmental Public Health Tracking Network in order to monitor spatial and temporal variation in the annual prevalence of cleft lip with or w/o cleft palate, one of the major birth defects consistent with Nationally Consistent Data and Measures (NCDMs).</purpose>
    15 <supplinf>The data are from the New Mexico Birth Defects and Surveillance System (NM BDPASS).  In January 2000 birth defects became a reportable condition; however, birth defects were collected prior to this date.  Our first year of consistent data is 1998.  Data are collected on births occurring in-state to NM residents.  We do not currently receive births for NM residents which occur out of state.  NM BDPASS collects birth defect data among live births as well as fetal losses, which include stillbirths, spontaneous abortions and elective terminations occurring at all gestational ages.  Birth defect cases are ascertained up to age 4; however, the majority of diagnoses are made by age 1.  Surveillance methods include a combination of active and passive case ascertainment.  Case finding/identification occurs through review of birth and death certificates, hospital discharge diagnoses, records from pediatric specialists and prenatal diagnostic providers.  The birth defects coding system is ICD-9-CM, supplemented with the CDC-BPA coding system for specific diagnoses.&#13;
    16 The following International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) codes were used to identify cleft lip with or without cleft palate: 749.1 - 749.14 or 749.2-749.25. In 1987, CDC put forth a set of 6 digit codes (the sixth digit provides greater specificity for diagnosis) based on the British Pediatric Association Classification of Diseases and the ICD-9-CM. If CDC/BPA codes are present, the following were used to identify cleft lip with or without cleft palate: 749.100 - 749.190 or 749.200 - 749.220 or 749.290. </supplinf>
     15<supplinf>The data are from the New Mexico Birth Defects and Surveillance System (NM BDPASS).  In January 2000 birth defects became a reportable condition; however, birth defects were collected prior to this date.  Our first year of consistent data is 1998.  Data are collected on births occurring in-state to NM residents.  We do not currently receive births for NM residents which occur out of state.  NM BDPASS collects birth defect data among live births as well as fetal losses, which include stillbirths, spontaneous abortions and elective terminations occurring at all gestational ages.  Birth defect cases are ascertained up to age 4; however, the majority of diagnoses are made by age 1.  Surveillance methods include a combination of active and passive case ascertainment.  Case finding/identification occurs through review of birth and death certificates, hospital discharge diagnoses, records from pediatric specialists and prenatal diagnostic providers.
     16The following International Classification of Diseases, 9th and 10th Revisions Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM and ICD-10-CM) codes were used in 2015 to identify cleft lip with or without cleft palate: 749.1, 749.2, Q36.0-Q36.9, and Q37.0-Q37.9, respectively. Only ICD-10-CM code was used from 2016-2019.
     17In 1987, CDC put forth a set of 6-digit codes (the sixth digit provides greater specificity for diagnosis) based on the British Pediatric Association Classification of Diseases and the ICD-9-CM. If CDC/BPA codes are present, the following were used to identify cleft lip with or without cleft palate: 749.10 - 749.19 or 749.20 - 749.29. </supplinf>
    1718</descript>
    1819<timeperd>
    1920<timeinfo>
    2021<rngdates>
    21 <begdate>19980101</begdate>
     22<begdate>20150101</begdate>
    2223<begtime/>
    23 <enddate>20071231</enddate>
     24<enddate>20191231</enddate>
    2425<endtime/>
    2526</rngdates>
     
    4748<theme>
    4849<themekt>ICD-9-CM</themekt>
    49 <themekey>749.1-749.14, 749.2-749.25</themekey>
     50<themekey>749.1, 749.2</themekey>
     51</theme>
     52<theme>
     53<themekt>ICD-10-CM</themekt>
     54<themekey>Q36.0-Q36.9, Q37.0-Q37.9</themekey>
    5055</theme>
    5156<place>
     
    6873<city>Santa Fe</city>
    6974<state>NM</state>
    70 <postal>87502</postal>
     75<postal>87505</postal>
    7176<country>United States Of America</country>
    7277</cntaddr>
     
    9398<procstep>
    9499<procdesc>Dataset developed per the instructions found in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Recommendations for Nationally Consistent Data and Measures within the Environmental Public Health Tracking Network, version 1.3, (http://ephtracking.cdc.gov/docs/CDC_NCDM_Pt1_1.3.pdf). </procdesc>
    95 <procdate>20110518</procdate>
     100<procdate>20160203</procdate>
    96101</procstep>
    97102<procstep>
     
    121126rgis.unm.edu) or other servers hosted at UNM Earth Data Analysis Center.
    122127</procdesc>
    123 <procdate>20120417</procdate>
     128<procdate>20170920</procdate>
    124129</procstep></lineage>
    125130</dataqual>
     
    148153<city>Santa Fe</city>
    149154<state>NM</state>
    150 <postal>87502</postal>
     155<postal>87505</postal>
    151156<country>United States Of America</country>
    152157</cntaddr>
     
    167172</distinfo>
    168173<metainfo>
    169 <metd>20110518</metd>
     174<metd>20210914</metd>
    170175<metc>
    171176<cntinfo>
     
    180185<city>Santa Fe</city>
    181186<state>NM</state>
    182 <postal>87502</postal>
     187<postal>87505</postal>
    183188<country>United States Of America</country>
    184189</cntaddr>
     
    192197</cntinfo>
    193198</metc>
    194 <metstdn>EPHTN Tracking Network Profile Version 1.2</metstdn>
     199<metstdn>EPHTN Tracking Network Profile Version 3.0</metstdn>
    195200<metac>None</metac>
    196201<metuc>None</metuc>
  • adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/nmepht-content/xml/metadata/PrevalenceCleftPalate.xml

    r11544 r25090  
    55<citeinfo>
    66<origin>New Mexico EPHTN Project Manager</origin>
    7 <pubdate>20110518</pubdate>
     7<pubdate>20190914</pubdate>
    88<title>Prevalence of Cleft Palate without Cleft Lip per 10,000 Live Births </title>
    99<onlink/>
     
    1111</citation>
    1212<descript>
    13 <abstract>This data set supports calculation of the frequency ("prevalence") of infants born with birth defect, which is cleft palate w/o cleft lip per number of live births among New Mexico residents.  Prevalence of cleft palate w/o cleft lip is the number of live-born infants with cleft palate w/o cleft lip per 10,000 live-born infants. The prevalence of cleft palate w/o cleft lip per 10,000 live births measure is presented by county, for 1998-2007.</abstract>
     13<abstract>This data set supports calculation of the frequency ("prevalence") of infants born with birth defect, which is cleft palate w/o cleft lip per number of live births among New Mexico residents.  Prevalence of cleft palate w/o cleft lip is the number of live-born infants with cleft palate w/o cleft lip per 10,000 live-born infants. The prevalence of cleft palate w/o cleft lip per 10,000 live births measure is presented by county, for 2015-2019.</abstract>
    1414<purpose>Dataset was created to provide data for the New Mexico Environmental Public Health Tracking Network in order to monitor spatial and temporal variation in the annual prevalence of cleft palate w/o cleft lip, one of the major birth defects consistent with Nationally Consistent Data and Measures (NCDMs).</purpose>
    15 <supplinf>The data are from the New Mexico Birth Defects and Surveillance System (NM BDPASS).  In January 2000 birth defects became a reportable condition; however, birth defects were collected prior to this date.  Our first year of consistent data is 1998.  Data are collected on births occurring in-state to NM residents.  We do not currently receive births for NM residents which occur out of state.  NM BDPASS collects birth defect data among live births as well as fetal losses, which include stillbirths, spontaneous abortions and elective terminations occurring at all gestational ages.  Birth defect cases are ascertained up to age 4; however, the majority of diagnoses are made by age 1.  Surveillance methods include a combination of active and passive case ascertainment.  Case finding/identification occurs through review of birth and death certificates, hospital discharge diagnoses, records from pediatric specialists and prenatal diagnostic providers.  The birth defects coding system is ICD-9-CM, supplemented with the CDC-BPA coding system for specific diagnoses.&#13;
    16 The following International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) codes were used to identify cleft palate without cleft lip: 749.0 - 749.04 In 1987, CDC put forth a set of 6 digit codes (the sixth digit provides greater specificity for diagnosis) based on the British Pediatric Association Classification of Diseases and the ICD-9-CM. If CDC/BPA codes are present, the following were used to identify cleft palate without cleft lip: 749.000 - 749.090.</supplinf>
     15<supplinf>The data are from the New Mexico Birth Defects and Surveillance System (NM BDPASS).  In January 2000 birth defects became a reportable condition; however, birth defects were collected prior to this date.  Our first year of consistent data is 1998.  Data are collected on births occurring in-state to NM residents.  We do not currently receive births for NM residents which occur out of state.  NM BDPASS collects birth defect data among live births as well as fetal losses, which include stillbirths, spontaneous abortions and elective terminations occurring at all gestational ages.  Birth defect cases are ascertained up to age 4; however, the majority of diagnoses are made by age 1.  Surveillance methods include a combination of active and passive case ascertainment.  Case finding/identification occurs through review of birth and death certificates, hospital discharge diagnoses, records from pediatric specialists and prenatal diagnostic providers.
     16The following International Classification of Diseases, 9th and 10th Revisions Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM and ICD-10-CM) codes were used in 2015 to identify cleft palate without cleft lip: 749.0 and Q35.1 - Q35.9, respectively. Only ICD-10-CM code was used from 2016-2019.
     17In 1987, CDC put forth a set of 6-digit codes (the sixth digit provides greater specificity for diagnosis) based on the British Pediatric Association Classification of Diseases and the ICD-9-CM. If CDC/BPA codes are present, the following were used to identify cleft palate without cleft lip: 749.00 - 749.09.</supplinf>
    1718</descript>
    1819<timeperd>
    1920<timeinfo>
    2021<rngdates>
    21 <begdate>19980101</begdate>
     22<begdate>20150101</begdate>
    2223<begtime/>
    23 <enddate>20071231</enddate>
     24<enddate>20191231</enddate>
    2425<endtime/>
    2526</rngdates>
     
    4849<theme>
    4950<themekt>ICD-9-CM</themekt>
    50 <themekey>749.0-749.04</themekey>
     51<themekey>749.0</themekey>
     52</theme>
     53<theme>
     54<themekt>ICD-10-CM</themekt>
     55<themekey>Q35.1-Q35.9</themekey>
    5156</theme>
    5257<place>
     
    6974<city>Santa Fe</city>
    7075<state>NM</state>
    71 <postal>87502</postal>
     76<postal>87505</postal>
    7277<country>United States Of America</country>
    7378</cntaddr>
     
    9499<procstep>
    95100<procdesc>Dataset developed per the instructions found in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Recommendations for Nationally Consistent Data and Measures within the Environmental Public Health Tracking Network, version 1.3, (http://ephtracking.cdc.gov/docs/CDC_NCDM_Pt1_1.3.pdf). </procdesc>
    96 <procdate>20110518</procdate>
     101<procdate>20160203</procdate>
    97102</procstep>
    98103<procstep>
     
    122127rgis.unm.edu) or other servers hosted at UNM Earth Data Analysis Center.
    123128</procdesc>
    124 <procdate>20120417</procdate>
     129<procdate>20170920</procdate>
    125130</procstep></lineage>
    126131</dataqual>
     
    149154<city>Santa Fe</city>
    150155<state>NM</state>
    151 <postal>87502</postal>
     156<postal>87505</postal>
    152157<country>United States Of America</country>
    153158</cntaddr>
     
    168173</distinfo>
    169174<metainfo>
    170 <metd>20110518</metd>
     175<metd>20210914</metd>
    171176<metc>
    172177<cntinfo>
     
    181186<city>Santa Fe</city>
    182187<state>NM</state>
    183 <postal>87502</postal>
     188<postal>87505</postal>
    184189<country>United States Of America</country>
    185190</cntaddr>
     
    193198</cntinfo>
    194199</metc>
    195 <metstdn>EPHTN Tracking Network Profile Version 1.2</metstdn>
     200<metstdn>EPHTN Tracking Network Profile Version 3.0</metstdn>
    196201<metac>None</metac>
    197202<metuc>None</metuc>
  • adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/nmepht-content/xml/metadata/PrevalenceDownSyn35older.xml

    r11544 r25090  
    55<citeinfo>
    66<origin>New Mexico EPHTN Project Manager</origin>
    7 <pubdate>20110609</pubdate>
     7<pubdate>20210914</pubdate>
    88<title>Prevalence of Trisomy 21 (Down Syndrome) per 10,000 Live Births to Mothers 35 Years of age and Older at Delivery</title>
    99<onlink/>
     
    1111</citation>
    1212<descript>
    13 <abstract>This data set supports calculation of the frequency ("prevalence") of infants born with birth defect, which is Down syndrome per number of live births among New Mexico resident mothers 35 years of age and older at delivery.  Prevalence of Down syndrome among mothers 35 years of age and older at delivery is the number of live-born infants with Down syndrome among mothers 35 years of age and older at delivery per 10,000 live-born infants to mothers 35 years of age and older at delivery. The prevalence of Down syndrome per 10,000 live births measure is presented by county, for 2004-2007.</abstract>
     13<abstract>This data set supports calculation of the frequency ("prevalence") of infants born with birth defect, which is Down syndrome per number of live births among New Mexico resident mothers 35 years of age and older at delivery.  Prevalence of Down syndrome among mothers 35 years of age and older at delivery is the number of live-born infants with Down syndrome among mothers 35 years of age and older at delivery per 10,000 live-born infants to mothers 35 years of age and older at delivery. The prevalence of Down syndrome per 10,000 live births measure is presented by county, for 2015-2019.</abstract>
    1414<purpose>Dataset was created to provide data for the New Mexico Environmental Public Health Tracking Network in order to monitor spatial and temporal variation in the annual prevalence of Down syndrome, one of the major birth defects consistent with Nationally Consistent Data and Measures (NCDMs).</purpose>
    15 <supplinf>The data are from the New Mexico Birth Defects and Surveillance System (NM BDPASS).  In January 2000 birth defects became a reportable condition; however, birth defects were collected prior to this date.  The first year of consistent data is 1998. However, data for Down syndrome were not collected consistently until 2004. The most recent year of analyzed data is 2007.  Data are collected on births occurring in-state to NM residents.  We do not currently receive births for NM residents which occur out of state.  NM BDPASS collects birth defect data among live births as well as fetal losses, which include stillbirths, spontaneous abortions and elective terminations occurring at all gestational ages.  Birth defect cases are ascertained up to age 4; however, the majority of diagnoses are made by age 1.  Surveillance methods include a combination of active and passive case ascertainment.  Case finding/identification occurs through review of birth and death certificates, hospital discharge diagnoses, records from pediatric specialists and prenatal diagnostic providers.  The birth defects coding system is ICD-9-CM, supplemented with the CDC-BPA coding system for specific diagnoses. The following ICD-9-CM codes were used to identify Down syndrome: 758.0.  &#13;
    16 In 1987, CDC put forth a set of 6 digit codes (the sixth digit provides greater specificity for diagnosis) based on the British Pediatric Association Classification of Diseases and the ICD-9-CM. If CDC/BPA codes are present, the following were used to identify Down syndrome: 758.000 - 740.090.</supplinf>
     15<supplinf>The data are from the New Mexico Birth Defects and Surveillance System (NM BDPASS).  In January 2000 birth defects became a reportable condition; however, birth defects were collected prior to this date.  The first year of consistent data is 1998. However, data for Down syndrome were not collected consistently until 2004. The most recent year of analyzed data is 2019. Data are collected on births occurring in-state to NM residents.  We do not currently receive births for NM residents which occur out of state.  NM BDPASS collects birth defect data among live births as well as fetal losses, which include stillbirths, spontaneous abortions and elective terminations occurring at all gestational ages.  Birth defect cases are ascertained up to age 4; however, the majority of diagnoses are made by age 1.  Surveillance methods include a combination of active and passive case ascertainment.  Case finding/identification occurs through review of birth and death certificates, hospital discharge diagnoses, records from pediatric specialists and prenatal diagnostic providers.
     16The following International Classification of Diseases, 9th and 10th Revisions Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM and ICD-10-CM) codes were used in 2015 to identify Trisomy 21 (Down syndrome - combined births to mothers 35 years of age and older and under age 35): 758.0 and Q90.0-Q90.9, respectively. Only ICD-10-CM code was used from 2016-2019.  &#13;
     17In 1987, CDC put forth a set of 6-digit codes (the sixth digit provides greater specificity for diagnosis) based on the British Pediatric Association Classification of Diseases and the ICD-9-CM. If CDC/BPA codes are present, the following were used to identify Down syndrome: 758.00 - 758.09.</supplinf>
    1718</descript>
    1819<timeperd>
    1920<timeinfo>
    2021<rngdates>
    21 <begdate>20040101</begdate>
     22<begdate>20150101</begdate>
    2223<begtime/>
    23 <enddate>20071231</enddate>
     24<enddate>20191231</enddate>
    2425<endtime/>
    2526</rngdates>
     
    5455<themekt>ICD-9-CM</themekt>
    5556<themekey>758.0</themekey>
     57<themekey/>
     58</theme>
     59<theme>
     60<themekt>ICD-10-CM</themekt>
     61<themekey>Q90.0-Q90.9</themekey>
    5662<themekey/>
    5763</theme>
     
    7581<city>Santa Fe</city>
    7682<state>NM</state>
    77 <postal>87502</postal>
     83<postal>87505</postal>
    7884<country>United States Of America</country>
    7985</cntaddr>
     
    100106<procstep>
    101107<procdesc>Dataset developed per the instructions found in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Recommendations for Nationally Consistent Data and Measures within the Environmental Public Health Tracking Network, version 1.3, (http://ephtracking.cdc.gov/docs/CDC_NCDM_Pt1_1.3.pdf). </procdesc>
    102 <procdate>20110609</procdate>
     108<procdate>20160203</procdate>
    103109</procstep>
    104110<procstep>
     
    128134rgis.unm.edu) or other servers hosted at UNM Earth Data Analysis Center.
    129135</procdesc>
    130 <procdate>20120417</procdate>
     136<procdate>20170920</procdate>
    131137</procstep></lineage>
    132138</dataqual>
     
    154160<city>Santa Fe</city>
    155161<state>NM</state>
    156 <postal>87502</postal>
     162<postal>87505</postal>
    157163<country>United States Of America</country>
    158164</cntaddr>
     
    173179</distinfo>
    174180<metainfo>
    175 <metd>20110609</metd>
     181<metd>20210914</metd>
    176182<metc>
    177183<cntinfo>
     
    186192<city>Santa Fe</city>
    187193<state>NM</state>
    188 <postal>87502</postal>
     194<postal>87505</postal>
    189195<country>United States Of America</country>
    190196</cntaddr>
     
    198204</cntinfo>
    199205</metc>
    200 <metstdn>EPHTN Tracking Network Profile Version 1.2</metstdn>
     206<metstdn>EPHTN Tracking Network Profile Version 3.0</metstdn>
    201207<metac>None</metac>
    202208<metuc>None</metuc>
  • adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/nmepht-content/xml/metadata/PrevalenceDownSynLess35.xml

    r11544 r25090  
    55<citeinfo>
    66<origin>New Mexico EPHTN Project Manager</origin>
    7 <pubdate>20110609</pubdate>
     7<pubdate>20210914</pubdate>
    88<title>Prevalence of Trisomy 21 (Down Syndrome) per 10,000 Live Births to Mothers Less Than 35 Years of age at Delivery</title>
    99<onlink/>
     
    1111</citation>
    1212<descript>
    13 <abstract>This data set supports calculation of the frequency ("prevalence") of infants born with birth defect, which is Down syndrome per number of live births among New Mexico resident mothers less than 35 years of age at delivery.  Prevalence of Down syndrome among mothers less than 35 years of age at delivery is the number of live-born infants with Down syndrome among mothers less tha 35 years of age at delivery per 10,000 live-born infants to mothers less than 35 years of age at delivery. The prevalence of Down syndrome per 10,000 live births measure is presented by county, for 2004-2007.</abstract>
     13<abstract>This data set supports calculation of the frequency ("prevalence") of infants born with birth defect, which is Down syndrome per number of live births among New Mexico resident mothers less than 35 years of age at delivery.  Prevalence of Down syndrome among mothers less than 35 years of age at delivery is the number of live-born infants with Down syndrome among mothers less tha 35 years of age at delivery per 10,000 live-born infants to mothers less than 35 years of age at delivery. The prevalence of Down syndrome per 10,000 live births measure is presented by county, for 2015-2019.</abstract>
    1414<purpose>Dataset was created to provide data for the New Mexico Environmental Public Health Tracking Network in order to monitor spatial and temporal variation in the annual prevalence of Down syndrome, one of the major birth defects consistent with Nationally Consistent Data and Measures (NCDMs).</purpose>
    15 <supplinf>The data are from the New Mexico Birth Defects and Surveillance System (NM BDPASS).  In January 2000 birth defects became a reportable condition; however, birth defects were collected prior to this date.  The first year of consistent data is 1998. However, data for Down syndrome were not collected consistently until 2004. The most recent year of analyzed data is 2007.  Data are collected on births occurring in-state to NM residents.  We do not currently receive births for NM residents which occur out of state.  NM BDPASS collects birth defect data among live births as well as fetal losses, which include stillbirths, spontaneous abortions and elective terminations occurring at all gestational ages.  Birth defect cases are ascertained up to age 4; however, the majority of diagnoses are made by age 1.  Surveillance methods include a combination of active and passive case ascertainment.  Case finding/identification occurs through review of birth and death certificates, hospital discharge diagnoses, records from pediatric specialists and prenatal diagnostic providers.  The birth defects coding system is ICD-9-CM, supplemented with the CDC-BPA coding system for specific diagnoses. The following ICD-9-CM codes were used to identify Down syndrome: 758.0.  &#13;
    16 In 1987, CDC put forth a set of 6 digit codes (the sixth digit provides greater specificity for diagnosis) based on the British Pediatric Association Classification of Diseases and the ICD-9-CM. If CDC/BPA codes are present, the following were used to identify Down syndrome: 758.000 - 740.090.</supplinf>
     15<supplinf>The data are from the New Mexico Birth Defects and Surveillance System (NM BDPASS).  In January 2000 birth defects became a reportable condition; however, birth defects were collected prior to this date.  The first year of consistent data is 1998. However, data for Down syndrome were not collected consistently until 2004. The most recent year of analyzed data is 2019.  Data are collected on births occurring in-state to NM residents.  We do not currently receive births for NM residents which occur out of state.  NM BDPASS collects birth defect data among live births as well as fetal losses, which include stillbirths, spontaneous abortions and elective terminations occurring at all gestational ages.  Birth defect cases are ascertained up to age 4; however, the majority of diagnoses are made by age 1.  Surveillance methods include a combination of active and passive case ascertainment.  Case finding/identification occurs through review of birth and death certificates, hospital discharge diagnoses, records from pediatric specialists and prenatal diagnostic providers. 
     16The following International Classification of Diseases, 9th and 10th Revisions Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM and ICD-10-CM) codes were used in 2015 to identify Trisomy 21 (Down syndrome - combined births to mothers under age 35 and 35 years of age and older): 758.0 and Q90.0-Q90.9, respectively. Only ICD-10-CM code was used from 2016-2019.  &#13;
     17In 1987, CDC put forth a set of 6-digit codes (the sixth digit provides greater specificity for diagnosis) based on the British Pediatric Association Classification of Diseases and the ICD-9-CM. If CDC/BPA codes are present, the following were used to identify Down syndrome: 758.00 - 740.09.</supplinf>
    1718</descript>
    1819<timeperd>
    1920<timeinfo>
    2021<rngdates>
    21 <begdate>20040101</begdate>
     22<begdate>20150101</begdate>
    2223<begtime/>
    23 <enddate>20071231</enddate>
     24<enddate>20191231</enddate>
    2425<endtime/>
    2526</rngdates>
     
    5253<themekt>ICD-9-CM</themekt>
    5354<themekey>758.0</themekey>
     55</theme>
     56<theme>
     57<themekt>ICD-10-CM</themekt>
     58<themekey>Q90.0-Q90.9</themekey>
    5459</theme>
    5560<place>
     
    7277<city>Santa Fe</city>
    7378<state>NM</state>
    74 <postal>87502</postal>
     79<postal>87505</postal>
    7580<country>United States Of America</country>
    7681</cntaddr>
     
    97102<procstep>
    98103<procdesc>Dataset developed per the instructions found in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Recommendations for Nationally Consistent Data and Measures within the Environmental Public Health Tracking Network, version 1.3, (http://ephtracking.cdc.gov/docs/CDC_NCDM_Pt1_1.3.pdf). </procdesc>
    99 <procdate>20110609</procdate>
     104<procdate>20160203</procdate>
    100105</procstep>
    101106<procstep>
     
    125130rgis.unm.edu) or other servers hosted at UNM Earth Data Analysis Center.
    126131</procdesc>
    127 <procdate>20120417</procdate>
     132<procdate>20170920</procdate>
    128133</procstep></lineage>
    129134</dataqual>
     
    151156<city>Santa Fe</city>
    152157<state>NM</state>
    153 <postal>87502</postal>
     158<postal>87505</postal>
    154159<country>United States Of America</country>
    155160</cntaddr>
     
    170175</distinfo>
    171176<metainfo>
    172 <metd>20110609</metd>
     177<metd>20210914</metd>
    173178<metc>
    174179<cntinfo>
     
    183188<city>Santa Fe</city>
    184189<state>NM</state>
    185 <postal>87502</postal>
     190<postal>87505</postal>
    186191<country>United States Of America</country>
    187192</cntaddr>
     
    195200</cntinfo>
    196201</metc>
    197 <metstdn>EPHTN Tracking Network Profile Version 1.2</metstdn>
     202<metstdn>EPHTN Tracking Network Profile Version 3.0</metstdn>
    198203<metac>None</metac>
    199204<metuc>None</metuc>
  • adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/nmepht-content/xml/metadata/PrevalenceGatroschisis.xml

    r11544 r25090  
    55<citeinfo>
    66<origin>New Mexico EPHTN Project Manager</origin>
    7 <pubdate>20110606</pubdate>
     7<pubdate>20210914</pubdate>
    88<title>Prevalence of Gastroschisis per 10,000 Live Births</title>
    99<onlink/>
     
    1111</citation>
    1212<descript>
    13 <abstract>This data set supports calculation of the frequency ("prevalence") of infants born with birth defect, which is gastroschisis per number of live births among New Mexico residents.  Prevalence of gastroschisis is the number of live-born infants with gastroschisis per 10,000 live-born infants. The prevalence of gastroschisis per 10,000 live births measure is presented by county, for 1998-2007.</abstract>
     13<abstract>This data set supports calculation of the frequency ("prevalence") of infants born with birth defect, which is gastroschisis per number of live births among New Mexico residents.  Prevalence of gastroschisis is the number of live-born infants with gastroschisis per 10,000 live-born infants. The prevalence of gastroschisis per 10,000 live births measure is presented by county, for 2015-2019.</abstract>
    1414<purpose>Dataset was created to provide data for the New Mexico Environmental Public Health Tracking Network in order to monitor spatial and temporal variation in the annual prevalence of gastroschisis, one of the major birth defects consistent with Nationally Consistent Data and Measures (NCDMs).</purpose>
    15 <supplinf>The data are from the New Mexico Birth Defects and Surveillance System (NM BDPASS).  In January 2000 birth defects became a reportable condition; however, birth defects were collected prior to this date.  The first year of consistent data is 1998. For gastroschisis, the most recent year of analyzed data is 2007.  Data are collected on births occurring in-state to NM residents.  We do not currently receive births for NM residents which occur out of state.  NM BDPASS collects birth defect data among live births as well as fetal losses, which include stillbirths, spontaneous abortions and elective terminations occurring at all gestational ages.  Birth defect cases are ascertained up to age 4; however, the majority of diagnoses are made by age 1.  Surveillance methods include a combination of active and passive case ascertainment.  Case finding/identification occurs through review of birth and death certificates, hospital discharge diagnoses, records from pediatric specialists and prenatal diagnostic providers.  The birth defects coding system is ICD-9-CM, supplemented with the CDC-BPA coding system for specific diagnoses. &#13;
    16 In 1987, CDC put forth a set of 6 digit codes (the sixth digit provides greater specificity for diagnosis) based on the British Pediatric Association Classification of Diseases and the ICD-9-CM. If CDC/BPA codes are present, the following were used to identify gastroschisis: 756.710.</supplinf>
     15<supplinf>The data are from the New Mexico Birth Defects and Surveillance System (NM BDPASS).  In January 2000 birth defects became a reportable condition; however, birth defects were collected prior to this date.  The first year of consistent data is 1998. For gastroschisis, the most recent year of analyzed data is 2019.  Data are collected on births occurring in-state to NM residents.  We do not currently receive births for NM residents which occur out of state.  NM BDPASS collects birth defect data among live births as well as fetal losses, which include stillbirths, spontaneous abortions and elective terminations occurring at all gestational ages.  Birth defect cases are ascertained up to age 4; however, the majority of diagnoses are made by age 1.  Surveillance methods include a combination of active and passive case ascertainment.  Case finding/identification occurs through review of birth and death certificates, hospital discharge diagnoses, records from pediatric specialists and prenatal diagnostic providers.
     16The following International Classification of Diseases, 9th and 10th Revisions Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM and ICD-10-CM) codes were used in 2015 to identify gastroschisis: 756.73 and Q79.3, respectively. Only ICD-10-CM code was used from 2016-2019.
     17In 1987, CDC put forth a set of 6-digit codes (the sixth digit provides greater specificity for diagnosis) based on the British Pediatric Association Classification of Diseases and the ICD-9-CM. If CDC/BPA codes are present, the following were used to identify gastroschisis: 756.71.</supplinf>
    1718</descript>
    1819<timeperd>
    1920<timeinfo>
    2021<rngdates>
    21 <begdate>19980101</begdate>
     22<begdate>20150101</begdate>
    2223<begtime/>
    23 <enddate>20071231</enddate>
     24<enddate>20191231</enddate>
    2425<endtime/>
    2526</rngdates>
     
    4142<keywords>
    4243<theme>
    43 <themekt>PH_ProcedureClassification_ICD-9CM</themekt>
    44 <themekey>756.710</themekey>
     44<themekt>ICD-9-CM</themekt>
     45<themekey>756.73 (Prior to 10/01/2009, 756.79 was the shared ICD-9-CM code for omphalocele and gastroschisis. Beginning on 10/01/2009, ICD-9-CM code used for gastroschisis was 756.73).</themekey>
     46</theme>
     47<theme>
     48<themekt>ICD-10-CM</themekt>
     49<themekey>Q79.3</themekey>
    4550</theme>
    4651<theme>
     
    6772<city>Santa Fe</city>
    6873<state>NM</state>
    69 <postal>87502</postal>
     74<postal>87505</postal>
    7075<country>United States Of America</country>
    7176</cntaddr>
     
    9297<procstep>
    9398<procdesc>Dataset developed per the instructions found in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Recommendations for Nationally Consistent Data and Measures within the Environmental Public Health Tracking Network, version 1.3, (http://ephtracking.cdc.gov/docs/CDC_NCDM_Pt1_1.3.pdf). </procdesc>
    94 <procdate>20110606</procdate>
     99<procdate>20160203</procdate>
    95100</procstep>
    96101<procstep>
     
    120125rgis.unm.edu) or other servers hosted at UNM Earth Data Analysis Center.
    121126</procdesc>
    122 <procdate>20120417</procdate>
     127<procdate>20170920</procdate>
    123128</procstep></lineage>
    124129</dataqual>
     
    147152<city>Santa Fe</city>
    148153<state>NM</state>
    149 <postal>87502</postal>
     154<postal>87505</postal>
    150155<country>United States Of America</country>
    151156</cntaddr>
     
    166171</distinfo>
    167172<metainfo>
    168 <metd>20110606</metd>
     173<metd>20210914</metd>
    169174<metc>
    170175<cntinfo>
     
    179184<city>Santa Fe</city>
    180185<state>NM</state>
    181 <postal>87502</postal>
     186<postal>87505</postal>
    182187<country>United States Of America</country>
    183188</cntaddr>
     
    191196</cntinfo>
    192197</metc>
    193 <metstdn>EPHTN Tracking Network Profile Version 1.2</metstdn>
     198<metstdn>EPHTN Tracking Network Profile Version 3.0</metstdn>
    194199<metac>None</metac>
    195200<metuc>None</metuc>
  • adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/nmepht-content/xml/metadata/PrevalenceHypoplasticLeftHeart.xml

    r11544 r25090  
    55<citeinfo>
    66<origin>New Mexico EPHTN Project Manager</origin>
    7 <pubdate>20110606</pubdate>
     7<pubdate>20210914</pubdate>
    88<title>Prevalence of Hypoplastic Left Heart Syndrome per 10,000 Live Births</title>
    99<onlink/>
     
    1111</citation>
    1212<descript>
    13 <abstract>This data set supports calculation of the frequency ("prevalence") of infants born with birth defect, which is hypoplastic left heart syndrome per number of live births among New Mexico residents.  Prevalence of hypoplastic left heart syndrome is the number of live-born infants with hypoplastic left heart syndrome per 10,000 live-born infants. The prevalence of hypoplastic left heart syndrome per 10,000 live births measure is presented by county, for 2004-2007.</abstract>
     13<abstract>This data set supports calculation of the frequency ("prevalence") of infants born with birth defect, which is hypoplastic left heart syndrome per number of live births among New Mexico residents.  Prevalence of hypoplastic left heart syndrome is the number of live-born infants with hypoplastic left heart syndrome per 10,000 live-born infants. The prevalence of hypoplastic left heart syndrome per 10,000 live births measure is presented by county, for 2015-2019.</abstract>
    1414<purpose>Dataset was created to provide data for the New Mexico Environmental Public Health Tracking Network in order to monitor spatial and temporal variation in the annual prevalence of hypoplastic left heart syndrome, one of the major birth defects consistent with Nationally Consistent Data and Measures (NCDMs).</purpose>
    15 <supplinf>The data are from the New Mexico Birth Defects and Surveillance System (NM BDPASS).  In January 2000 birth defects became a reportable condition; however, birth defects were collected prior to this date.  The first year of consistent data is 1998. However, data for hypoplastic left heart syndrome were not collected consistently until 2004. The most recent year of analyzed data is 2007.  Data are collected on births occurring in-state to NM residents.  We do not currently receive births for NM residents which occur out of state.  NM BDPASS collects birth defect data among live births as well as fetal losses, which include stillbirths, spontaneous abortions and elective terminations occurring at all gestational ages.  Birth defect cases are ascertained up to age 4; however, the majority of diagnoses are made by age 1.  Surveillance methods include a combination of active and passive case ascertainment.  Case finding/identification occurs through review of birth and death certificates, hospital discharge diagnoses, records from pediatric specialists and prenatal diagnostic providers.  The birth defects coding system is ICD-9-CM, supplemented with the CDC-BPA coding system for specific diagnoses. The following ICD-9-CM codes were used to identify hypoplastic left heart syndrome: 746.7.  &#13;
    16 In 1987, CDC put forth a set of 6 digit codes (the sixth digit provides greater specificity for diagnosis) based on the British Pediatric Association Classification of Diseases and the ICD-9-CM. If CDC/BPA codes are present, the following were used to identify hypoplastic left heart syndrome: 746.700.</supplinf>
     15<supplinf>The data are from the New Mexico Birth Defects and Surveillance System (NM BDPASS).  In January 2000 birth defects became a reportable condition; however, birth defects were collected prior to this date.  The first year of consistent data is 1998. However, data for hypoplastic left heart syndrome were not collected consistently until 2004. The most recent year of analyzed data is 2019.  Data are collected on births occurring in-state to NM residents.  We do not currently receive births for NM residents which occur out of state.  NM BDPASS collects birth defect data among live births as well as fetal losses, which include stillbirths, spontaneous abortions and elective terminations occurring at all gestational ages.  Birth defect cases are ascertained up to age 4; however, the majority of diagnoses are made by age 1.  Surveillance methods include a combination of active and passive case ascertainment.  Case finding/identification occurs through review of birth and death certificates, hospital discharge diagnoses, records from pediatric specialists and prenatal diagnostic providers. 
     16The following International Classification of Diseases, 9th and 10th Revisions Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM and ICD-10-CM) codes were used in 2015 to identify HLHS: 746.7 and Q23.4, respectively. Only ICD-10-CM code was used from 2016-2019.  &#13;
     17In 1987, CDC put forth a set of 6-digit codes (the sixth digit provides greater specificity for diagnosis) based on the British Pediatric Association Classification of Diseases and the ICD-9-CM. If CDC/BPA codes are present, the following were used to identify HLHS: 746.70.</supplinf>
    1718</descript>
    1819<timeperd>
    1920<timeinfo>
    2021<rngdates>
    21 <begdate>20040101</begdate>
     22<begdate>20150101</begdate>
    2223<begtime/>
    23 <enddate>20071231</enddate>
     24<enddate>20191231</enddate>
    2425<endtime/>
    2526</rngdates>
     
    4142<keywords>
    4243<theme>
    43 <themekt>PH_ProcedureClassification_ICD-9CM</themekt>
    44 <themekey>746.700</themekey>
     44<themekt>ICD-9-CM</themekt>
     45<themekey>746.70</themekey>
     46<themekey/>
     47</theme>
     48<theme>
     49<themekt>ICD-10-CM</themekt>
     50<themekey>Q23.4</themekey>
    4551<themekey/>
    4652</theme>
     
    4854<themekt>PH_PublicHealthCaseRecordType_CDC</themekt>
    4955<themekey>birth defect, hypoplastic left heart syndrome</themekey>
    50 </theme>
    51 <theme>
    52 <themekt>ICD-9-CM</themekt>
    53 <themekey>746.7</themekey>
    5456</theme>
    5557<place>
     
    7274<city>Santa Fe</city>
    7375<state>NM</state>
    74 <postal>87502</postal>
     76<postal>87505</postal>
    7577<country>United States Of America</country>
    7678</cntaddr>
     
    9799<procstep>
    98100<procdesc>Dataset developed per the instructions found in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Recommendations for Nationally Consistent Data and Measures within the Environmental Public Health Tracking Network, version 1.3, (http://ephtracking.cdc.gov/docs/CDC_NCDM_Pt1_1.3.pdf). </procdesc>
    99 <procdate>20110606</procdate>
     101<procdate>20160203</procdate>
    100102</procstep>
    101103<procstep>
     
    125127rgis.unm.edu) or other servers hosted at UNM Earth Data Analysis Center.
    126128</procdesc>
    127 <procdate>20120417</procdate>
     129<procdate>20170920</procdate>
    128130</procstep></lineage>
    129131</dataqual>
     
    152154<city>Santa Fe</city>
    153155<state>NM</state>
    154 <postal>87502</postal>
     156<postal>87505</postal>
    155157<country>United States Of America</country>
    156158</cntaddr>
     
    171173</distinfo>
    172174<metainfo>
    173 <metd>20110606</metd>
     175<metd>20210914</metd>
    174176<metc>
    175177<cntinfo>
     
    184186<city>Santa Fe</city>
    185187<state>NM</state>
    186 <postal>87502</postal>
     188<postal>87505</postal>
    187189<country>United States Of America</country>
    188190</cntaddr>
     
    196198</cntinfo>
    197199</metc>
    198 <metstdn>EPHTN Tracking Network Profile Version 1.2</metstdn>
     200<metstdn>EPHTN Tracking Network Profile Version 3.0</metstdn>
    199201<metac>None</metac>
    200202<metuc>None</metuc>
  • adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/nmepht-content/xml/metadata/PrevalenceHypospadias.xml

    r11544 r25090  
    55<citeinfo>
    66<origin>New Mexico EPHTN Project Manager</origin>
    7 <pubdate>20110607</pubdate>
     7<pubdate>20210914</pubdate>
    88<title>Prevalence of Hypospadias per 10,000 Live Births</title>
    99<onlink/>
     
    1111</citation>
    1212<descript>
    13 <abstract>This data set supports calculation of the frequency ("prevalence") of infants born with birth defect, which is hypospadias per number of live births among New Mexico residents.  Prevalence of hypospadias is the number of live-born infants with hypospadias per 10,000 live-born infants. The prevalence of hypospadias per 10,000 live births measure is presented by county, for 2004-2007.</abstract>
     13<abstract>This data set supports calculation of the frequency ("prevalence") of infants born with birth defect, which is hypospadias per number of live births among New Mexico residents.  Prevalence of hypospadias is the number of live-born infants with hypospadias per 10,000 live-born infants. The prevalence of hypospadias per 10,000 live births measure is presented by county, for 2015-2019.</abstract>
    1414<purpose>Dataset was created to provide data for the New Mexico Environmental Public Health Tracking Network in order to monitor spatial and temporal variation in the annual prevalence of hypospadias, one of the major birth defects consistent with Nationally Consistent Data and Measures (NCDMs).</purpose>
    15 <supplinf>The data are from the New Mexico Birth Defects and Surveillance System (NM BDPASS).  In January 2000 birth defects became a reportable condition; however, birth defects were collected prior to this date.  The first year of consistent data is 1998. However, data for hypospadias were not collected consistently until 2004. The most recent year of analyzed data is 2007.  Data are collected on births occurring in-state to NM residents.  We do not currently receive births for NM residents which occur out of state.  NM BDPASS collects birth defect data among live births as well as fetal losses, which include stillbirths, spontaneous abortions and elective terminations occurring at all gestational ages.  Birth defect cases are ascertained up to age 4; however, the majority of diagnoses are made by age 1.  Surveillance methods include a combination of active and passive case ascertainment.  Case finding/identification occurs through review of birth and death certificates, hospital discharge diagnoses, records from pediatric specialists and prenatal diagnostic providers.  The birth defects coding system is ICD-9-CM, supplemented with the CDC-BPA coding system for specific diagnoses. The following ICD-9-CM codes were used to identify hypospadias: 752.61.  &#13;
    16 In 1987, CDC put forth a set of 6 digit codes (the sixth digit provides greater specificity for diagnosis) based on the British Pediatric Association Classification of Diseases and the ICD-9-CM. If CDC/BPA codes are present, the following were used to identify hypospadias: 752.600, 752.605, 752.606, 752.607, 752.625, 752.626, 752.627.</supplinf>
     15<supplinf>The data are from the New Mexico Birth Defects and Surveillance System (NM BDPASS).  In January 2000 birth defects became a reportable condition; however, birth defects were collected prior to this date.  The first year of consistent data is 1998. However, data for hypospadias were not collected consistently until 2004. The most recent year of analyzed data is 2019.  Data are collected on births occurring in-state to NM residents.  We do not currently receive births for NM residents which occur out of state.  NM BDPASS collects birth defect data among live births as well as fetal losses, which include stillbirths, spontaneous abortions and elective terminations occurring at all gestational ages.  Birth defect cases are ascertained up to age 4; however, the majority of diagnoses are made by age 1.  Surveillance methods include a combination of active and passive case ascertainment.  Case finding/identification occurs through review of birth and death certificates, hospital discharge diagnoses, records from pediatric specialists and prenatal diagnostic providers. 
     16The following International Classification of Diseases, 9th and 10th Revisions Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM and ICD-10-CM) codes were used in 2015 to identify hypospadias: 752.61 and Q54.0-Q54.9 (excluding Q54.4), respectively. Only ICD-10-CM code was used from 2016-2019.  &#13;
     17In 1987, CDC put forth a set of 6-digit codes (the sixth digit provides greater specificity for diagnosis) based on the British Pediatric Association Classification of Diseases and the ICD-9-CM. If CDC/BPA codes are present, the following were used to identify hypospadias: 752.60-752.62 (excluding 752.61 and 752.621).</supplinf>
    1718</descript>
    1819<timeperd>
    1920<timeinfo>
    2021<rngdates>
    21 <begdate>20040101</begdate>
     22<begdate>20150101</begdate>
    2223<begtime/>
    23 <enddate>20071231</enddate>
     24<enddate>20191231</enddate>
    2425<endtime/>
    2526</rngdates>
     
    5253<themekt>ICD-9-CM</themekt>
    5354<themekey>752.61</themekey>
     55</theme>
     56<theme>
     57<themekt>ICD-10-CM</themekt>
     58<themekey>Q54.0-Q54.9 (excluding Q54.4)</themekey>
    5459</theme>
    5560<place>
     
    7277<city>Santa Fe</city>
    7378<state>NM</state>
    74 <postal>87502</postal>
     79<postal>87505</postal>
    7580<country>United States Of America</country>
    7681</cntaddr>
     
    97102<procstep>
    98103<procdesc>Dataset developed per the instructions found in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Recommendations for Nationally Consistent Data and Measures within the Environmental Public Health Tracking Network, version 1.3, (http://ephtracking.cdc.gov/docs/CDC_NCDM_Pt1_1.3.pdf). </procdesc>
    99 <procdate>20110607</procdate>
     104<procdate>20160203</procdate>
    100105</procstep>
    101106<procstep>
     
    125130rgis.unm.edu) or other servers hosted at UNM Earth Data Analysis Center.
    126131</procdesc>
    127 <procdate>20120417</procdate>
     132<procdate>20170920</procdate>
    128133</procstep></lineage>
    129134</dataqual>
     
    152157<city>Santa Fe</city>
    153158<state>NM</state>
    154 <postal>87502</postal>
     159<postal>87505</postal>
    155160<country>United States Of America</country>
    156161</cntaddr>
     
    171176</distinfo>
    172177<metainfo>
    173 <metd>20110607</metd>
     178<metd>20210914</metd>
    174179<metc>
    175180<cntinfo>
     
    184189<city>Santa Fe</city>
    185190<state>NM</state>
    186 <postal>87502</postal>
     191<postal>87505</postal>
    187192<country>United States Of America</country>
    188193</cntaddr>
     
    196201</cntinfo>
    197202</metc>
    198 <metstdn>EPHTN Tracking Network Profile Version 1.2</metstdn>
     203<metstdn>EPHTN Tracking Network Profile Version 3.0</metstdn>
    199204<metac>None</metac>
    200205<metuc>None</metuc>
  • adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/nmepht-content/xml/metadata/PrevalenceLowerLimbDef.xml

    r24626 r25090  
    55<citeinfo>
    66<origin>New Mexico EPHTN Project Manager</origin>
    7 <pubdate>20110607</pubdate>
     7<pubdate>20210914</pubdate>
    88<title>Prevalence of Lower Limb Deficiencies per 10,000 Live Births</title>
    99<onlink/>
     
    1111</citation>
    1212<descript>
    13 <abstract>This data set supports calculation of the frequency ("prevalence") of infants born with birth defect, which is lower limb deficiencies per number of live births among New Mexico residents.  Prevalence of lower limb deficiencies is the number of live-born infants with lower limb deficiencies per 10,000 live-born infants. The prevalence of lower limb deficiencies per 10,000 live births measure is presented by county, for 2004-2007.</abstract>
     13<abstract>This data set supports calculation of the frequency ("prevalence") of infants born with birth defect, which is lower limb deficiencies per number of live births among New Mexico residents.  Prevalence of lower limb deficiencies is the number of live-born infants with lower limb deficiencies per 10,000 live-born infants. The prevalence of lower limb deficiencies per 10,000 live births measure is presented by county, for 2015-2019.</abstract>
    1414<purpose>Dataset was created to provide data for the New Mexico Environmental Public Health Tracking Network in order to monitor spatial and temporal variation in the annual prevalence of lower limb deficiencies, one of the major birth defects consistent with Nationally Consistent Data and Measures (NCDMs).</purpose>
    15 <supplinf>The data are from the New Mexico Birth Defects and Surveillance System (NM BDPASS).  In January 2000 birth defects became a reportable condition; however, birth defects were collected prior to this date.  The first year of consistent data is 1998. However, data for lower limb deficiencies were not collected consistently until 2004. The most recent year of analyzed data is 2007.  Data are collected on births occurring in-state to NM residents.  We do not currently receive births for NM residents which occur out of state.  NM BDPASS collects birth defect data among live births as well as fetal losses, which include stillbirths, spontaneous abortions and elective terminations occurring at all gestational ages.  Birth defect cases are ascertained up to age 4; however, the majority of diagnoses are made by age 1.  Surveillance methods include a combination of active and passive case ascertainment.  Case finding/identification occurs through review of birth and death certificates, hospital discharge diagnoses, records from pediatric specialists and prenatal diagnostic providers.  The birth defects coding system is ICD-9-CM, supplemented with the CDC-BPA coding system for specific diagnoses. The following ICD-9-CM codes were used to identify lower limb deficiencies: 755.30-755.39.  &#13;
    16 In 1987, CDC put forth a set of 6 digit codes (the sixth digit provides greater specificity for diagnosis) based on the British Pediatric Association Classification of Diseases and the ICD-9-CM. If CDC/BPA codes are present, the following were used to identify lower limb deficiencies: 755.300-755.390.</supplinf>
     15<supplinf>The data are from the New Mexico Birth Defects and Surveillance System (NM BDPASS).  In January 2000 birth defects became a reportable condition; however, birth defects were collected prior to this date.  The first year of consistent data is 1998. However, data for lower limb deficiencies were not collected consistently until 2004. The most recent year of analyzed data is 2019.  Data are collected on births occurring in-state to NM residents.  We do not currently receive births for NM residents which occur out of state.  NM BDPASS collects birth defect data among live births as well as fetal losses, which include stillbirths, spontaneous abortions and elective terminations occurring at all gestational ages.  Birth defect cases are ascertained up to age 4; however, the majority of diagnoses are made by age 1.  Surveillance methods include a combination of active and passive case ascertainment.  Case finding/identification occurs through review of birth and death certificates, hospital discharge diagnoses, records from pediatric specialists and prenatal diagnostic providers. 
     16The following International Classification of Diseases, 9th and 10th Revisions Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM and ICD-10-CM) codes were used in 2015 to identify lower limb deficiencies (lower and upper limb combined): 755.2-755.4 and Q71.0-Q71.9, Q72.0-Q72.9, Q73.0-Q73.8, respectively. Only ICD-10-CM code was used from 2016-2019. &#13;
     17In 1987, CDC put forth a set of 6-digit codes (the sixth digit provides greater specificity for diagnosis) based on the British Pediatric Association Classification of Diseases and the ICD-9-CM. If CDC/BPA codes are present, the following were used to identify lower limb deficiencies: 755.20-755.49.</supplinf>
    1718</descript>
    1819<timeperd>
    1920<timeinfo>
    2021<rngdates>
    21 <begdate>20040101</begdate>
     22<begdate>20150101</begdate>
    2223<begtime/>
    23 <enddate>20071231</enddate>
     24<enddate>20191231</enddate>
    2425<endtime/>
    2526</rngdates>
     
    5253<theme>
    5354<themekt>ICD-9-CM</themekt>
    54 <themekey>755.30-755.39</themekey>
     55<themekey>755.2-755.4</themekey>
     56</theme>
     57<theme>
     58<themekt>ICD-10-CM</themekt>
     59<themekey>Q71.0-Q71.9, Q72.0-Q72.9, Q73.0-Q73.8</themekey>
    5560</theme>
    5661<place>
     
    7378<city>Santa Fe</city>
    7479<state>NM</state>
    75 <postal>87502</postal>
     80<postal>87505</postal>
    7681<country>United States Of America</country>
    7782</cntaddr>
     
    98103<procstep>
    99104<procdesc>Dataset developed per the instructions found in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Recommendations for Nationally Consistent Data and Measures within the Environmental Public Health Tracking Network, version 1.3, (http://ephtracking.cdc.gov/docs/CDC_NCDM_Pt1_1.3.pdf). </procdesc>
    100 <procdate>20110607</procdate>
     105<procdate>20160203</procdate>
    101106</procstep>
    102107<procstep>
     
    126131rgis.unm.edu) or other servers hosted at UNM Earth Data Analysis Center.
    127132</procdesc>
    128 <procdate>20120417</procdate>
     133<procdate>20170920</procdate>
    129134</procstep></lineage>
    130135</dataqual>
     
    153158<city>Santa Fe</city>
    154159<state>NM</state>
    155 <postal>87502</postal>
     160<postal>87505</postal>
    156161<country>United States Of America</country>
    157162</cntaddr>
     
    172177</distinfo>
    173178<metainfo>
    174 <metd>20110607</metd>
     179<metd>20210914</metd>
    175180<metc>
    176181<cntinfo>
     
    185190<city>Santa Fe</city>
    186191<state>NM</state>
    187 <postal>87502</postal>
     192<postal>87505</postal>
    188193<country>United States Of America</country>
    189194</cntaddr>
     
    197202</cntinfo>
    198203</metc>
    199 <metstdn>EPHTN Tracking Network Profile Version 1.2</metstdn>
     204<metstdn>EPHTN Tracking Network Profile Version 3.0</metstdn>
    200205<metac>None</metac>
    201206<metuc>None</metuc>
  • adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/nmepht-content/xml/metadata/PrevalenceSpinaBifida.xml

    r11544 r25090  
    55<citeinfo>
    66<origin>New Mexico EPHTN Project Manager</origin>
    7 <pubdate>20110518</pubdate>
     7<pubdate>20210914</pubdate>
    88<title>Prevalence of Spina Bifida (without Anencephaly) per 10,000 Live Births </title>
    99<onlink/>
     
    1111</citation>
    1212<descript>
    13 <abstract>This data set supports calculation of the frequency ("prevalence") of infants born with birth defect, which is spina bifida (without anencephaly) per number of live births among New Mexico residents.  Prevalence of spina bifida (without anencephaly) is the number of live-born infants with spina bifida per 10,000 live-born infants. The prevalence of spina bifida per 10,000 live births measure is presented by county, for 1998-2007.</abstract>
     13<abstract>This data set supports calculation of the frequency ("prevalence") of infants born with birth defect, which is spina bifida (without anencephaly) per number of live births among New Mexico residents.  Prevalence of spina bifida (without anencephaly) is the number of live-born infants with spina bifida per 10,000 live-born infants. The prevalence of spina bifida per 10,000 live births measure is presented by county, for 2015-2019.</abstract>
    1414<purpose>Dataset was created to provide data for the New Mexico Environmental Public Health Tracking Network in order to monitor spatial and temporal variation in the annual prevalence of spina bifida (without anencephaly), one of the major birth defects consistent with Nationally Consistent Data and Measures (NCDMs.</purpose>
    1515<supplinf>The data are from the New Mexico Birth Defects and Surveillance System (NM BDPASS).  In January 2000 birth defects became a reportable condition; however, birth defects were collected prior to this date.  Our first year of consistent data is 1998.  Data are collected on births occurring in-state to NM residents.  We do not currently receive births for NM residents which occur out of state.  NM BDPASS collects birth defect data among live births as well as fetal losses, which include stillbirths, spontaneous abortions and elective terminations occurring at all gestational ages.  Birth defect cases are ascertained up to age 4; however, the majority of diagnoses are made by age 1.  Surveillance methods include a combination of active and passive case ascertainment.  Case finding/identification occurs through review of birth and death certificates, hospital discharge diagnoses, records from pediatric specialists and prenatal diagnostic providers.  The birth defects coding system is ICD-9-CM, supplemented with the CDC-BPA coding system for specific diagnoses.&#13;
    16 The following International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) codes were used to identify spina bifida without anencephaly: 741.0, 741.9 without 740.0 - 740.10. In 1987, CDC put forth a set of 6 digit codes (the sixth digit provides greater specificity for diagnosis) based on the British Pediatric Association Classification of Diseases and the ICD-9-CM.  If CDC/BPA codes are present, the following were used to identify spina bifida without anencephaly: 741.000 - 741.990 without 740.000 - 740.100.</supplinf>
     16The following International Classification of Diseases, 9th and 10th Revisions Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM and ICD-10-CM) codes were used in 2015 to identify spina bifida without anencephaly: 741.0-741.9 without 740.0-740.10 and Q05.0-Q05.9, Q07.01, Q07.03 without Q00.0-Q00.1, respectively. Only ICD-10-CM code was used from 2016-2019.
     17In 1987, CDC put forth a set of 6-digit codes (the sixth digit provides greater specificity for diagnosis) based on the British Pediatric Association Classification of Diseases and the ICD-9-CM.  If CDC/BPA codes are present, the following were used to identify spina bifida without anencephaly: 741.00-741.99 without 740.0-740.10.</supplinf>
    1718</descript>
    1819<timeperd>
    1920<timeinfo>
    2021<rngdates>
    21 <begdate>19980101</begdate>
     22<begdate>20150101</begdate>
    2223<begtime/>
    23 <enddate>20071231</enddate>
     24<enddate>20191231</enddate>
    2425<endtime/>
    2526</rngdates>
     
    4748<theme>
    4849<themekt>ICD-9-CM</themekt>
    49 <themekey>741.0, 741.9 without 740.0 - 740.10</themekey>
     50<themekey>741.0, 741.9 without 740.0-740.10</themekey>
     51</theme>
     52<theme>
     53<themekt>ICD-10-CM</themekt>
     54<themekey>Q05.0-Q05.9, Q07.01, Q07.03 without Q00.0-Q00.1</themekey>
    5055</theme>
    5156<place>
     
    6873<city>Santa Fe</city>
    6974<state>NM</state>
    70 <postal>87502</postal>
     75<postal>87505</postal>
    7176<country>United States Of America</country>
    7277</cntaddr>
     
    9398<procstep>
    9499<procdesc>Dataset developed per the instructions found in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Recommendations for Nationally Consistent Data and Measures within the Environmental Public Health Tracking Network, version 1.3, (http://ephtracking.cdc.gov/docs/CDC_NCDM_Pt1_1.3.pdf). </procdesc>
    95 <procdate>20110518</procdate>
     100<procdate>20160203</procdate>
    96101</procstep>
    97102<procstep>
     
    121126rgis.unm.edu) or other servers hosted at UNM Earth Data Analysis Center.
    122127</procdesc>
    123 <procdate>20120417</procdate>
     128<procdate>20170920</procdate>
    124129</procstep></lineage>
    125130</dataqual>
     
    148153<city>Santa Fe</city>
    149154<state>NM</state>
    150 <postal>87502</postal>
     155<postal>87505</postal>
    151156<country>United States Of America</country>
    152157</cntaddr>
     
    167172</distinfo>
    168173<metainfo>
    169 <metd>20110518</metd>
     174<metd>20210914</metd>
    170175<metc>
    171176<cntinfo>
     
    180185<city>Santa Fe</city>
    181186<state>NM</state>
    182 <postal>87502</postal>
     187<postal>87505</postal>
    183188<country>United States Of America</country>
    184189</cntaddr>
     
    192197</cntinfo>
    193198</metc>
    194 <metstdn>EPHTN Tracking Network Profile Version 1.2</metstdn>
     199<metstdn>EPHTN Tracking Network Profile Version 3.0</metstdn>
    195200<metac>None</metac>
    196201<metuc>None</metuc>
  • adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/nmepht-content/xml/metadata/PrevalenceTGA.xml

    r11544 r25090  
    55<citeinfo>
    66<origin>New Mexico EPHTN Project Manager</origin>
    7 <pubdate>20110606</pubdate>
     7<pubdate>20210914</pubdate>
    88<title>Prevalence of Transposition of the Great Arteries (Vessels) per 10,000 Live Births</title>
    99<onlink/>
     
    1111</citation>
    1212<descript>
    13 <abstract>This data set supports calculation of the frequency ("prevalence") of infants born with birth defect, which is transposition of the great arteries (vessels) or TGA per number of live births among New Mexico residents.  Prevalence of transposition of the great arteries (TGA) is the number of live-born infants with TGA per 10,000 live-born infants. The prevalence of TGA per 10,000 live births measure is presented by county, for 2004-2007.</abstract>
     13<abstract>This data set supports calculation of the frequency ("prevalence") of infants born with birth defect, which is transposition of the great arteries (vessels) or TGA per number of live births among New Mexico residents.  Prevalence of transposition of the great arteries (TGA) is the number of live-born infants with TGA per 10,000 live-born infants. The prevalence of TGA per 10,000 live births measure is presented by county, for 2015-2019.</abstract>
    1414<purpose>Dataset was created to provide data for the New Mexico Environmental Public Health Tracking Network in order to monitor spatial and temporal variation in the annual prevalence of TGA, one of the major birth defects consistent with Nationally Consistent Data and Measures (NCDMs).</purpose>
    15 <supplinf>The data are from the New Mexico Birth Defects and Surveillance System (NM BDPASS).  In January 2000 birth defects became a reportable condition; however, birth defects were collected prior to this date.  The first year of consistent data is 1998. However, data for TGA were not collected consistently until 2004. The most recent year of analyzed data is 2007.  Data are collected on births occurring in-state to NM residents.  We do not currently receive births for NM residents which occur out of state.  NM BDPASS collects birth defect data among live births as well as fetal losses, which include stillbirths, spontaneous abortions and elective terminations occurring at all gestational ages.  Birth defect cases are ascertained up to age 4; however, the majority of diagnoses are made by age 1.  Surveillance methods include a combination of active and passive case ascertainment.  Case finding/identification occurs through review of birth and death certificates, hospital discharge diagnoses, records from pediatric specialists and prenatal diagnostic providers.  The birth defects coding system is ICD-9-CM, supplemented with the CDC-BPA coding system for specific diagnoses. The following ICD-9-CM codes were used to identify transposition of the great arteries (TGA): 745.10, 745.11 (includes only double-outlet right ventricle, TGA type), 745.19.  &#13;
    16 In 1987, CDC put forth a set of 6 digit codes (the sixth digit provides greater specificity for diagnosis) based on the British Pediatric Association Classification of Diseases and the ICD-9-CM. If CDC/BPA codes are present, the following were used to identify TGA: 745.100 - 745.190.</supplinf>
     15<supplinf>The data are from the New Mexico Birth Defects and Surveillance System (NM BDPASS).  In January 2000 birth defects became a reportable condition; however, birth defects were collected prior to this date.  The first year of consistent data is 1998. However, data for TGA were not collected consistently until 2004. The most recent year of analyzed data is 2019.  Data are collected on births occurring in-state to NM residents.  We do not currently receive births for NM residents which occur out of state.  NM BDPASS collects birth defect data among live births as well as fetal losses, which include stillbirths, spontaneous abortions and elective terminations occurring at all gestational ages.  Birth defect cases are ascertained up to age 4; however, the majority of diagnoses are made by age 1.  Surveillance methods include a combination of active and passive case ascertainment.  Case finding/identification occurs through review of birth and death certificates, hospital discharge diagnoses, records from pediatric specialists and prenatal diagnostic providers. 
     16The following International Classification of Diseases, 9th and 10th Revisions Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM and ICD-10-CM) codes were used in 2015 to identify TGA: 745.10, 745.12, 745.19 (note: for CCHD, 745.10 only (d-TGA only) and Q20.3, Q20.5 (note: for CCHD, Q20.3 only), respectively. Only ICD-10-CM code was used from 2016-2019.  &#13;
     17In 1987, CDC put forth a set of 6-digit codes (the sixth digit provides greater specificity for diagnosis) based on the British Pediatric Association Classification of Diseases and the ICD-9-CM. If CDC/BPA codes are present, the following were used to identify TGA: 745.10-745.12, 745.18-745.19 (note: for CCHD, 745.10 (TGA complete, no VSD), 745.11 (TGA incomplete, with VSD), 745.18 (other specified TGA), 745.19 (unspecified TGA)).</supplinf>
    1718</descript>
    1819<timeperd>
    1920<timeinfo>
    2021<rngdates>
    21 <begdate>20040101</begdate>
     22<begdate>20150101</begdate>
    2223<begtime/>
    23 <enddate>20071231</enddate>
     24<enddate>20191231</enddate>
    2425<endtime/>
    2526</rngdates>
     
    5152<theme>
    5253<themekt>ICD-9-CM</themekt>
    53 <themekey>745.10, 745.11 (includes only double-outlet right venricle, TGA type), 745.19</themekey>
     54<themekey>745.10, 745.12, 745.19 (note: for CCHD, 745.10 only (d-TGA only))</themekey>
     55</theme>
     56<theme>
     57<themekt>ICD-10-CM</themekt>
     58<themekey>Q20.3, Q20.5 (note: for CCHD, Q20.3 only)</themekey>
    5459</theme>
    5560<place>
     
    7277<city>Santa Fe</city>
    7378<state>NM</state>
    74 <postal>87502</postal>
     79<postal>87505</postal>
    7580<country>United States Of America</country>
    7681</cntaddr>
     
    97102<procstep>
    98103<procdesc>Dataset developed per the instructions found in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Recommendations for Nationally Consistent Data and Measures within the Environmental Public Health Tracking Network, version 1.3, (http://ephtracking.cdc.gov/docs/CDC_NCDM_Pt1_1.3.pdf). </procdesc>
    99 <procdate>20110606</procdate>
     104<procdate>20160203</procdate>
    100105</procstep>
    101106<procstep>
     
    125130rgis.unm.edu) or other servers hosted at UNM Earth Data Analysis Center.
    126131</procdesc>
    127 <procdate>20120417</procdate>
     132<procdate>20170920</procdate>
    128133</procstep><procstep>
    129134<procdesc>NM EPHT data queries through nmtracking.org (NMTracking) result in
     
    152157rgis.unm.edu) or other servers hosted at UNM Earth Data Analysis Center.
    153158</procdesc>
    154 <procdate>20120417</procdate>
     159<procdate>20170920</procdate>
    155160</procstep></lineage>
    156161</dataqual>
     
    179184<city>Santa Fe</city>
    180185<state>NM</state>
    181 <postal>87502</postal>
     186<postal>87505</postal>
    182187<country>United States Of America</country>
    183188</cntaddr>
     
    198203</distinfo>
    199204<metainfo>
    200 <metd>20110606</metd>
     205<metd>20210914</metd>
    201206<metc>
    202207<cntinfo>
     
    211216<city>Santa Fe</city>
    212217<state>NM</state>
    213 <postal>87502</postal>
     218<postal>87505</postal>
    214219<country>United States Of America</country>
    215220</cntaddr>
     
    223228</cntinfo>
    224229</metc>
    225 <metstdn>EPHTN Tracking Network Profile Version 1.2</metstdn>
     230<metstdn>EPHTN Tracking Network Profile Version 3.0</metstdn>
    226231<metac>None</metac>
    227232<metuc>None</metuc>
  • adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/nmepht-content/xml/metadata/PrevalenceTetralogyFallot.xml

    r11544 r25090  
    55<citeinfo>
    66<origin>New Mexico EPHTN Project Manager</origin>
    7 <pubdate>20110607</pubdate>
     7<pubdate>20210914</pubdate>
    88<title>Prevalence of Tetralogy of Fallot per 10,000 Live Births</title>
    99<onlink/>
     
    1111</citation>
    1212<descript>
    13 <abstract>This data set supports calculation of the frequency ("prevalence") of infants born with birth defect, which is tetralogy of Fallot per number of live births among New Mexico residents.  Prevalence of tetralogy of Fallot is the number of live-born infants with tetralogy of Fallot per 10,000 live-born infants. The prevalence of tetralogy of Fallot per 10,000 live births measure is presented by county, for 2004-2007.</abstract>
     13<abstract>This data set supports calculation of the frequency ("prevalence") of infants born with birth defect, which is tetralogy of Fallot per number of live births among New Mexico residents.  Prevalence of tetralogy of Fallot is the number of live-born infants with tetralogy of Fallot per 10,000 live-born infants. The prevalence of tetralogy of Fallot per 10,000 live births measure is presented by county, for 2015-2019.</abstract>
    1414<purpose>Dataset was created to provide data for the New Mexico Environmental Public Health Tracking Network in order to monitor spatial and temporal variation in the annual prevalence of tetralogy of Fallot, one of the major birth defects consistent with Nationally Consistent Data and Measures (NCDMs).</purpose>
    15 <supplinf>The data are from the New Mexico Birth Defects and Surveillance System (NM BDPASS).  In January 2000 birth defects became a reportable condition; however, birth defects were collected prior to this date.  The first year of consistent data is 1998. However, data for tetralogy of Fallot were not collected consistently until 2004. The most recent year of analyzed data is 2007.  Data are collected on births occurring in-state to NM residents.  We do not currently receive births for NM residents which occur out of state.  NM BDPASS collects birth defect data among live births as well as fetal losses, which include stillbirths, spontaneous abortions and elective terminations occurring at all gestational ages.  Birth defect cases are ascertained up to age 4; however, the majority of diagnoses are made by age 1.  Surveillance methods include a combination of active and passive case ascertainment.  Case finding/identification occurs through review of birth and death certificates, hospital discharge diagnoses, records from pediatric specialists and prenatal diagnostic providers.  The birth defects coding system is ICD-9-CM, supplemented with the CDC-BPA coding system for specific diagnoses. The following ICD-9-CM codes were used to identify tetralogy of Fallot: 745.11, 745.2.  &#13;
    16 In 1987, CDC put forth a set of 6 digit codes (the sixth digit provides greater specificity for diagnosis) based on the British Pediatric Association Classification of Diseases and the ICD-9-CM. If CDC/BPA codes are present, the following were used to identify tetralogy of Fallot: 745.200, 745.210, 745.180, 746.00 plus 745.400, 747.310.</supplinf>
     15<supplinf>The data are from the New Mexico Birth Defects and Surveillance System (NM BDPASS).  In January 2000 birth defects became a reportable condition; however, birth defects were collected prior to this date.  The first year of consistent data is 1998. However, data for tetralogy of Fallot were not collected consistently until 2004. The most recent year of analyzed data is 2019.  Data are collected on births occurring in-state to NM residents.  We do not currently receive births for NM residents which occur out of state.  NM BDPASS collects birth defect data among live births as well as fetal losses, which include stillbirths, spontaneous abortions and elective terminations occurring at all gestational ages.  Birth defect cases are ascertained up to age 4; however, the majority of diagnoses are made by age 1.  Surveillance methods include a combination of active and passive case ascertainment.  Case finding/identification occurs through review of birth and death certificates, hospital discharge diagnoses, records from pediatric specialists and prenatal diagnostic providers. 
     16The following International Classification of Diseases, 9th and 10th Revisions Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM and ICD-10-CM) codes were used in 2015 to identify tetralogy of Fallot: 745.2 and Q21.3, respectively. Only ICD-10-CM code was used from 2016-2019.  &#13;
     17In 1987, CDC put forth a set of 6-digit codes (the sixth digit provides greater specificity for diagnosis) based on the British Pediatric Association Classification of Diseases and the ICD-9-CM. If CDC/BPA codes are present, the following were used to identify tetralogy of Fallot: 745.20-745.21, 747.31.</supplinf>
    1718</descript>
    1819<timeperd>
    1920<timeinfo>
    2021<rngdates>
    21 <begdate>20040101</begdate>
     22<begdate>20150101</begdate>
    2223<begtime/>
    23 <enddate>20071231</enddate>
     24<enddate>20191231</enddate>
    2425<endtime/>
    2526</rngdates>
     
    5556<theme>
    5657<themekt>ICD-9-CM</themekt>
    57 <themekey>745.11, 745.2</themekey>
     58<themekey>745.2</themekey>
     59<themekey/>
     60</theme>
     61<theme>
     62<themekt>ICD-10-CM</themekt>
     63<themekey>Q21.3</themekey>
    5864<themekey/>
    5965</theme>
     
    7783<city>Santa Fe</city>
    7884<state>NM</state>
    79 <postal>87502</postal>
     85<postal>87505</postal>
    8086<country>United States Of America</country>
    8187</cntaddr>
     
    101107<lineage>
    102108<procstep>
    103 <procdesc>Dataset developed per the instructions found in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Recommendations for Nationally Consistent Data and Measures within the Environmental Public Health Tracking Network, version 1.3, (http://ephtracking.cdc.gov/docs/CDC_NCDM_Pt1_1.3.pdf). </procdesc>
    104 <procdate>20110607</procdate>
     109<procdesc>Dataset developed per the instructions found in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Recommendations for Nationally Consistent Data and Measures within the Environmental Public Health Tracking Network, version 1.0, (http://ephtracking.cdc.gov/docs/CDC_NCDM_Pt1_1.3.pdf). </procdesc>
     110<procdate>20160203</procdate>
    105111</procstep>
    106112<procstep>
     
    130136rgis.unm.edu) or other servers hosted at UNM Earth Data Analysis Center.
    131137</procdesc>
    132 <procdate>20120417</procdate>
     138<procdate>20170920</procdate>
    133139</procstep></lineage>
    134140</dataqual>
     
    157163<city>Santa Fe</city>
    158164<state>NM</state>
    159 <postal>87502</postal>
     165<postal>87505</postal>
    160166<country>United States Of America</country>
    161167</cntaddr>
     
    176182</distinfo>
    177183<metainfo>
    178 <metd>20110607</metd>
     184<metd>20210914</metd>
    179185<metc>
    180186<cntinfo>
     
    189195<city>Santa Fe</city>
    190196<state>NM</state>
    191 <postal>87502</postal>
     197<postal>87505</postal>
    192198<country>United States Of America</country>
    193199</cntaddr>
     
    201207</cntinfo>
    202208</metc>
    203 <metstdn>EPHTN Tracking Network Profile Version 1.2</metstdn>
     209<metstdn>EPHTN Tracking Network Profile Version 3.0</metstdn>
    204210<metac>None</metac>
    205211<metuc>None</metuc>
  • adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/nmepht-content/xml/metadata/PrevalenceUpperLimbDef.xml

    r11544 r25090  
    55<citeinfo>
    66<origin>New Mexico EPHTN Project Manager</origin>
    7 <pubdate>20110607</pubdate>
     7<pubdate>20210914</pubdate>
    88<title>Prevalence of Upper Limb Deficiencies per 10,000 Live Births</title>
    99<onlink/>
     
    1111</citation>
    1212<descript>
    13 <abstract>This data set supports calculation of the frequency ("prevalence") of infants born with birth defect, which is upper limb deficiencies per number of live births among New Mexico residents.  Prevalence of upper limb deficiencies is the number of live-born infants with upper limb deficiencies per 10,000 live-born infants. The prevalence of upper limb deficiencies per 10,000 live births measure is presented by county, for 2004-2007.</abstract>
     13<abstract>This data set supports calculation of the frequency ("prevalence") of infants born with birth defect, which is upper limb deficiencies per number of live births among New Mexico residents.  Prevalence of upper limb deficiencies is the number of live-born infants with upper limb deficiencies per 10,000 live-born infants. The prevalence of upper limb deficiencies per 10,000 live births measure is presented by county, for 2015-2019.</abstract>
    1414<purpose>Dataset was created to provide data for the New Mexico Environmental Public Health Tracking Network in order to monitor spatial and temporal variation in the annual prevalence of upper limb deficiencies, one of the major birth defects consistent with Nationally Consistent Data and Measures (NCDMs).</purpose>
    15 <supplinf>The data are from the New Mexico Birth Defects and Surveillance System (NM BDPASS).  In January 2000 birth defects became a reportable condition; however, birth defects were collected prior to this date.  The first year of consistent data is 1998. However, data for upper limb deficiencies were not collected consistently until 2004. The most recent year of analyzed data is 2007.  Data are collected on births occurring in-state to NM residents.  We do not currently receive births for NM residents which occur out of state.  NM BDPASS collects birth defect data among live births as well as fetal losses, which include stillbirths, spontaneous abortions and elective terminations occurring at all gestational ages.  Birth defect cases are ascertained up to age 4; however, the majority of diagnoses are made by age 1.  Surveillance methods include a combination of active and passive case ascertainment.  Case finding/identification occurs through review of birth and death certificates, hospital discharge diagnoses, records from pediatric specialists and prenatal diagnostic providers.  The birth defects coding system is ICD-9-CM, supplemented with the CDC-BPA coding system for specific diagnoses. The following ICD-9-CM codes were used to identify upper limb deficiencies: 755.20-755.29.  &#13;
    16 In 1987, CDC put forth a set of 6 digit codes (the sixth digit provides greater specificity for diagnosis) based on the British Pediatric Association Classification of Diseases and the ICD-9-CM. If CDC/BPA codes are present, the following were used to identify upper limb deficiencies: 755.200-755.290.</supplinf>
     15<supplinf>The data are from the New Mexico Birth Defects and Surveillance System (NM BDPASS).  In January 2000 birth defects became a reportable condition; however, birth defects were collected prior to this date.  The first year of consistent data is 1998. However, data for upper limb deficiencies were not collected consistently until 2004. The most recent year of analyzed data is 2019.  Data are collected on births occurring in-state to NM residents.  We do not currently receive births for NM residents which occur out of state.  NM BDPASS collects birth defect data among live births as well as fetal losses, which include stillbirths, spontaneous abortions and elective terminations occurring at all gestational ages.  Birth defect cases are ascertained up to age 4; however, the majority of diagnoses are made by age 1.  Surveillance methods include a combination of active and passive case ascertainment.  Case finding/identification occurs through review of birth and death certificates, hospital discharge diagnoses, records from pediatric specialists and prenatal diagnostic providers. 
     16The following International Classification of Diseases, 9th and 10th Revisions Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM and ICD-10-CM) codes were used in 2015 to identify upper limb deficiencies (lower and upper limbs combined): 755.2-755.4 and Q71.0-Q71.9, Q72.0-Q72.9, Q73.0-Q73.8, respectively. Only ICD-10-CM code was used from 2016-2019.  &#13;
     17In 1987, CDC put forth a set of 6 digit codes (the sixth digit provides greater specificity for diagnosis) based on the British Pediatric Association Classification of Diseases and the ICD-9-CM. If CDC/BPA codes are present, the following were used to identify upper limb deficiencies: 755.20-755.49.</supplinf>
    1718</descript>
    1819<timeperd>
    1920<timeinfo>
    2021<rngdates>
    21 <begdate>20040101</begdate>
     22<begdate>20150101</begdate>
    2223<begtime/>
    23 <enddate>20071231</enddate>
     24<enddate>20191231</enddate>
    2425<endtime/>
    2526</rngdates>
     
    5455<theme>
    5556<themekt>ICD-9-CM</themekt>
    56 <themekey>755.20-755.29</themekey>
     57<themekey>755.2-755.4</themekey>
     58<themekey/>
     59</theme>
     60<theme>
     61<themekt>ICD-10-CM</themekt>
     62<themekey>Q71.0-Q71.9, Q72.0-Q72.9, Q73.0-Q73.8</themekey>
    5763<themekey/>
    5864</theme>
     
    7682<city>Santa Fe</city>
    7783<state>NM</state>
    78 <postal>87502</postal>
     84<postal>87505</postal>
    7985<country>United States Of America</country>
    8086</cntaddr>
     
    101107<procstep>
    102108<procdesc>Dataset developed per the instructions found in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Recommendations for Nationally Consistent Data and Measures within the Environmental Public Health Tracking Network, version 1.3, (http://ephtracking.cdc.gov/docs/CDC_NCDM_Pt1_1.3.pdf). </procdesc>
    103 <procdate>20110607</procdate>
     109<procdate>20160203</procdate>
    104110</procstep>
    105111<procstep>
     
    129135rgis.unm.edu) or other servers hosted at UNM Earth Data Analysis Center.
    130136</procdesc>
    131 <procdate>20120417</procdate>
     137<procdate>20170920</procdate>
    132138</procstep></lineage>
    133139</dataqual>
     
    156162<city>Santa Fe</city>
    157163<state>NM</state>
    158 <postal>87502</postal>
     164<postal>87505</postal>
    159165<country>United States Of America</country>
    160166</cntaddr>
     
    175181</distinfo>
    176182<metainfo>
    177 <metd>20110607</metd>
     183<metd>20210914</metd>
    178184<metc>
    179185<cntinfo>
     
    188194<city>Santa Fe</city>
    189195<state>NM</state>
    190 <postal>87502</postal>
     196<postal>87505</postal>
    191197<country>United States Of America</country>
    192198</cntaddr>
     
    200206</cntinfo>
    201207</metc>
    202 <metstdn>EPHTN Tracking Network Profile Version 1.2</metstdn>
     208<metstdn>EPHTN Tracking Network Profile Version 3.0</metstdn>
    203209<metac>None</metac>
    204210<metuc>None</metuc>
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