Changeset 25022 in main


Ignore:
Timestamp:
04/11/22 15:28:35 (4 months ago)
Author:
Maria Baron
Message:

edits, updates, fixed dead links

Location:
adopters/nj/branches/2.3/src/main/webapps/doh-shad-content/xml
Files:
5 edited

Legend:

Unmodified
Added
Removed
  • adopters/nj/branches/2.3/src/main/webapps/doh-shad-content/xml/home/html_content/ICDHelp.xml

    r16508 r25022  
    4040                <TITLE>Validity of ICD Codes</TITLE>
    4141                <CONTENT>
    42                         ICD codes are used on the death certificate primarily for surveillance
    43                         purposes. There is a strong emphasis in the U.S. Vital Events protocols
     42                        ICD codes are used on the <b>death certificate</b> primarily for surveillance
     43                        purposes. There is a strong emphasis in the <a href="https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nvss/deaths.htm">National Vital Statistics System (NVSS)</a> protocols
    4444                        on correct classification of underlying cause of death and related
    4545                        causes of death on the death certificate, and the process is
     
    5050                        completed by physicians, funeral directors, and law enforcement.)<br/><br/>
    5151
    52                         ICD codes that are used in the hospital discharge query system are the
    53                         codes that were recorded on the UB92, a standard electronic billing form
     52                        ICD codes that are used in the <b>hospital discharge</b> query system are the
     53                        codes that were recorded in the Uniform Bill-Patient Summaries (UB), a standard electronic billing form
    5454                        used across the country. The primary purpose of supplying codes to this
    5555                        form is to bill for hospital services. In general, it is believed that
    56                         the ICD codes on the UB92 do an adequate job of accurately recording the
     56                        the ICD codes on the UB do an adequate job of accurately recording the
    5757                        reason (diagnosis) for each hospital visit.<br/>
    5858                </CONTENT>
     
    6262                <TITLE>Transition From ICD-9 to ICD-10</TITLE>
    6363                <CONTENT>
    64                         The following material on this page was excerpted directly from
    65                         <a href="ftp://ftp.cdc.gov/pub/Health_Statistics/NCHS/publications/guide2/document%20for%20the%20states.pdf">
     64                        <!--The following material on this page was excerpted directly from --> See
     65                        <a href="https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/statab/Document-for-the-States.pdf">
    6666                        A Guide to State Implementation of ICD-10 for Mortality Part II: Applying
    6767                        Comparability Ratios</a>. (December 2000) National Center for Health
    68                         Statistics, pp. 6-7.<br/><br/>
     68                        Statistics, pp. 6-7.<!--br/><br/>
    6969
    7070                        <h2>ICD Revisions</h2>
    7171
    72                         Since the beginning of the century the ICD for mortality has been
     72                        Since the beginning of the [20th] century, the ICD for mortality has been
    7373                        modified about once every ten years, except for the twenty year interval
    7474                        between the last two revisions, ICD-9 and ICD-10, as shown below:<br/><br/>
     
    149149
    150150                        The introduction of a new revision of the ICD can create major
    151                         discontinuities in trend data, as shown in <a href="ftp://ftp.cdc.gov/pub/Health_Statistics/NCHS/publications/guide2/document%20for%20the%20states.pdf">Figure 1</a>. Figure 1 shows
     151                        discontinuities in trend data, as shown in <a href="https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/statab/Document-for-the-States.pdf#page=8">Figure 1</a>. Figure 1 shows
    152152                        trends in leading causes of death in the United States from 1950 to 1997
    153153                        in terms of age-adjusted death rates. The lines on the chart are not
     
    188188                        of state-specific ratios, cross tabulation by age and sex, and the use
    189189                        of more detailed tabulation lists than the standard ICD-10 tabulation
    190                         list of 113 Selected Causes of Death (see <a href="ftp://ftp.cdc.gov/pub/Health_Statistics/NCHS/publications/guide2/document%20for%20the%20states.pdf">Appendix I</a>). Preliminary
     190                        list of 113 Selected Causes of Death (see <a href="https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/statab/Document-for-the-States.pdf#page=29">Appendix I</a>). Preliminary
    191191                        comparability ratios for ICD-10 are shown in a companion document to
    192                         this Guide.<br/><br/>
    193                 </CONTENT>
    194                 </ibis:ExpandableContent>
    195 
    196 <h2>ICD Code Links</h2>
    197 <br/>
    198 
    199 <b>ICD-10 and ICD-10-CM</b>
    200         <ul>
    201                 <li>ICD-10 is used for Mortality data (1999-present)</li>
    202                 <li><a href="http://apps.who.int/classifications/icd10/browse/" target="_blank">ICD-10 online code look-up</a></li>
    203                 <li><a href="https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/icd/icd10.htm" target="_blank">ICD-10 information</a></li>
    204                 <li>ICD-10-CM is used for Hospitalization data (2016-present)*</li>
    205                 <li><a href="https://www.cms.gov/Medicare/Coding/ICD10/index.html" target="_blank"> ICD-10-CM diagnosis and procedure codes and transition information</a></li>
    206                 <li><a href="https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/icd/icd10cm.htm" target="_blank">ICD-10-CM information</a></li>
    207          </ul>
    208          <br/>
    209          
    210 <b>ICD-9-CM</b>
    211         <ul>
    212                 <li>ICD-9-CM was used for Hospitalization data (2008-2015)*</li>
    213                 <li><a href="https://www.cms.gov/Medicare/Coding/ICD9ProviderDiagnosticCodes/codes.html" target="_blank">ICD-9-CM diagnosis and procedure codes</a></li>
    214                 <li><a href="https://icd.codes/icd9cm" target="_blank">ICD-9-CM online code look-up</a></li>
    215                 <li><a href="https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/icd/icd9cm.htm" target="_blank">ICD-9-CM information</a></li>
    216         </ul>
    217         <br/>
    218        
    219 *ICD-10-CM was implemented nationwide on October 1, 2015.  New Jersey hospital records for October 1, 2015 through December 31, 2015 were back-coded to ICD-9-CM so the entire data year would be coded the same way.
    220 <br/><br/>
     192                        this Guide.<br/><br/-->
     193                </CONTENT>
     194                </ibis:ExpandableContent>
     195
     196                <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="2"><SHOW/>
     197                <TITLE>ICD Code Links</TITLE>
     198                <CONTENT>
     199
     200                        <b>ICD-10 and ICD-10-CM</b>
     201                                <ul>
     202                                        <li>ICD-10 is used for Mortality data (1999-present)</li>
     203                                        <li><a href="http://apps.who.int/classifications/icd10/browse/" target="_blank">ICD-10 online code look-up</a></li>
     204                                        <li><a href="https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/icd/icd10.htm" target="_blank">ICD-10 information</a></li>
     205                                        <li>ICD-10-CM is used for Hospitalization data (2016-present)*</li>
     206                                        <li><a href="https://www.cms.gov/Medicare/Coding/ICD10/index.html" target="_blank"> ICD-10-CM diagnosis and procedure codes and transition information</a></li>
     207                                        <li><a href="https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/icd/icd-10-cm.htm" target="_blank">ICD-10-CM information</a></li>
     208                                 </ul>
     209                                 <br/>
     210                                 
     211                        <b>ICD-9-CM</b>
     212                                <ul>
     213                                        <li>ICD-9-CM was used for Hospitalization data (2008-2015)*</li>
     214                                        <li><a href="https://www.cms.gov/Medicare/Coding/ICD9ProviderDiagnosticCodes/codes.html" target="_blank">ICD-9-CM diagnosis and procedure codes</a></li>
     215                                        <li><a href="https://icd.codes/icd9cm" target="_blank">ICD-9-CM online code look-up</a></li>
     216                                        <li><a href="https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/icd/icd9cm.htm" target="_blank">ICD-9-CM information</a></li>
     217                                </ul>
     218                                <br/>
     219                               
     220                        *ICD-10-CM was implemented nationwide on October 1, 2015.  New Jersey hospital records for October 1, 2015 through December 31, 2015 were back-coded to ICD-9-CM so the entire data year would be coded the same way.
     221                        <br/><br/>
     222                </CONTENT>
     223                </ibis:ExpandableContent>
    221224
    222225          <div class="Note">
  • adopters/nj/branches/2.3/src/main/webapps/doh-shad-content/xml/query/html_content/BirthQueryTechNotes.xml

    r18346 r25022  
    9090                                An ethnicity (Non-Hispanic, Cuban, Mexican, Puerto Rican, other Hispanic, and an unknown ethnicity category) is also recorded for each parent of each individual for whom a birth certificate is filed.   
    9191                                Race and ethnicity can be combined to make a Hispanic "race" group and this is
    92                                 <a ibis:href="home/HealthDisparities.html#strategic"> the standard way</a> the New
     92                                <!--a ibis:href="home/HealthDisparities.html#strategic"--> the standard way<!--/a--> the New
    9393                                Jersey Department of Health reports birth data.<br/><br/>
    9494                               
  • adopters/nj/branches/2.3/src/main/webapps/doh-shad-content/xml/query/html_content/DeathQueryTechNotes.xml

    r21096 r25022  
    5555
    5656                        <h2>Population</h2>
    57                                 Population estimates used to calculate mortality rates are derived from
     57                                <a href="https://www.census.gov/programs-surveys/popest.html">Population estimates</a> used to calculate mortality rates are derived from
    5858                                the most recent vintage of the mid-year estimates provided by the <a href="https://www.census.gov/en.html" target="_blank" class="Bold">U.S. Bureau of the Census</a>. 
    59                                 These estimates are based on the <a href="https://www.census.gov/programs-surveys/decennial-census/decade.2010.html" target="_blank">Decennial Census</a> and subsequent annual <a href="https://www.census.gov/programs-surveys/acs" target="_blank">American Community Surveys</a> with 31 race categories
    60                                 aggregated to the following race groups: White alone, Black alone,
     59                                These estimates are based on the <a href="https://www.census.gov/programs-surveys/decennial-census/decade.2010.html" target="_blank">Decennial Census</a> and subsequent annual counts of births, deaths, and in and out migration. Estimates are available for each state and its counties by age, race, Hispanic ethnicity, and sex categories.  Thirty-one race categories are aggregated to the following race groups: White alone, Black alone,
    6160                                American Indian/ Alaska Native alone, Asian alone, Native Hawaiian/Pacific
    62                                 Islander alone, and Two or more races.  Estimates are available for each
    63                                 state and its counties by age, race, Hispanic ethnicity, and sex categories.
     61                                Islander alone, and Two or more races. 
    6462                                Race and ethnicity can be combined to form seven race/ethnicity groups, where
    6563                                Hispanics may be of any race, the other six groups do not include
     
    112110                                therefore the expansion of the checkbox items to include deaths up to one year
    113111                                after the end of a pregnancy resulted in a sharp increase in deaths due to pregnancy,
    114                                 childbirth, and the puerperium.  For accurate maternal death rates, visit the <a href="http://nj.gov/health/fhs/maternalchild/outcomes/mortality-reviews/">Maternal Mortality Review Program website</a>.<br/>
     112                                childbirth, and the puerperium.  For accurate maternal death rates, visit the <a href="https://nj.gov/health/fhs/maternalchild/mchepi/mortality-reviews/">Maternal Mortality Review Program website</a>.<br/>
    115113                        </CONTENT>
    116114                </ibis:ExpandableContent>
     
    140138                                An ethnicity (Non-Hispanic, Mexican, Puerto Rican, Cuban, Central or South American, other Hispanic, and an unknown ethnicity category) is also recorded for each individual for whom a death certificate is filed.   
    141139                                Race and ethnicity can be combined to make a Hispanic "race" group and this is
    142                                 <a ibis:href="home/HealthDisparities.html#strategic"> the standard way</a>
     140                                <!--a ibis:href="home/HealthDisparities.html#strategic"--> the standard way<!--/a-->
    143141                                the New Jersey Department of Health reports death data.<br/><br/>
    144142                               
     
    155153                        <CONTENT>
    156154                                Rankable causes of death in the death query are based on <a ibis:href="query/NCHS50.htm">
    157                                 51 distinct causes of death</a> derived from the <a ibis:href="query/NCHS113.html">
     155                                52 distinct causes of death</a> derived from the <a ibis:href="query/NCHS113.html">
    158156                                NCHS List of 113 Selected Causes of Death</a>.  <br/><br/>
    159157                               
    160                                 New Jersey also uses a list of <a ibis:href="query/NCHS24.htm">27 cause groups and one residual category</a> modified from the 51 Cause List that groups causes of death that rarely occur among New Jersey residents into the residual category.  This list may also be used for ranking causes of death with the caveat that "Other than 27 Major Causes" is not eligible to be ranked.<br/><br/>
     158                                New Jersey also uses a list of <a ibis:href="query/NCHS24.htm">28 cause groups and one residual category</a> modified from the 52 Cause List that groups causes of death that rarely occur among New Jersey residents into the residual category.  This list may also be used for ranking causes of death with the caveat that "Other than 28 Major Causes" is not eligible to be ranked.<br/><br/>
    161159                               
    162160                                Leading cause of death ranking should be done based on <b>numbers of deaths</b> not rates
     
    170168                        <CONTENT>
    171169                                The presentation of death rates facilitates comparisons between political subdivisions
    172                                 with populations of different sizes or between subgroups of a population.  Crude death rates are calculated by dividing the number of deaths of the residents of an area or demographic subgroup by the resident population of that area or subgroup and are usually expression per 100,000 residents.  Deaths are limited to those that occur within a specific time period, usually a year, and the population is, in general, the mid-year estimate of the resident population of the area.<br/><br/>
     170                                with populations of different sizes or between subgroups of a population.  Crude death rates are calculated by dividing the number of deaths of the residents of an area or demographic subgroup by the resident population of that area or subgroup and are usually expressed per 100,000 residents.  Deaths are limited to those that occur within a specific time period, usually a year, and the population is, in general, the mid-year estimate of the resident population of the area.<br/><br/>
    173171
    174172                                In order to compare death experiences among various ages and races/ethnicities or between the sexes, death rates may be computed for demographic subgroups of the population.  These are referred to as age-, race/ethnicity-, or sex-specific rates and are calculated by dividing the number of deaths within a subgroup by the population in the subgroup.  Death rates from specific causes may also be calculated, with the numerator consisting of the deaths from the particular cause in an area and the denominator comprised of the population at risk of the disease or condition.  For example, the population at risk for prostate cancer is males only, so the denominator would consist of males, not the entire population.
  • adopters/nj/branches/2.3/src/main/webapps/doh-shad-content/xml/query/html_content/NCHS24.xml

    r24994 r25022  
    524524
    525525<tr>
    526 <td class="help">26</td>
     526<td class="help">27</td>
    527527<td class="help">Assault (homicide)</td>
    528528<!--td class="help">E960-E969, <strong>E979, E999</strong></td-->
     
    551551
    552552<tr>
    553 <td class="help">27</td>
     553<td class="help">28</td>
    554554<td class="help">Complications of medical and surgical care</td>
    555555<!--td class="help">E870-E879, E930-E949</td-->
  • adopters/nj/branches/2.3/src/main/webapps/doh-shad-content/xml/resources/html_content/HealthDisparities.xml

    r23429 r25022  
    7575                        <br/><br/-->
    7676                       
    77                         <a href="http://nj.gov/health/chs/hnj2020/about/intro/index.shtml" class="Bold" target="_blank">Healthy New Jersey 2020</a> (HNJ2020) is the state's version of the federal <a href="https://www.healthypeople.gov/" class="Bold" target="_blank">Healthy People 2020</a> initiative, which sets national objectives for improving the health of all Americans.
     77                        <a href="https://www.nj.gov/health/chs/hnj2020/" class="Bold" target="_blank">Healthy New Jersey 2020</a> (HNJ2020) is the state's version of the federal <a href="https://www.healthypeople.gov/" class="Bold" target="_blank">Healthy People 2020</a> initiative, which sets national objectives for improving the health of all Americans.
    7878                        <br/><br/>
    7979                        HNJ2020 is used for <a href="http://www.nj.gov/health/chs/hnj2020/about/sh_assessment/index.shtml" class="Bold" target="_blank">State Health Assessment</a> (SHA) and is also the <a href="http://www.state.nj.us/health/chs/hnj2020/about/sh_improvement_plan/index.shtml" class="Bold" target="_blank">
    80                         State Health Improvement Plan</a> (SHIP).  As of April, 2018, the 2018 SHA is undergoing edits based on a public comment period in January and February.  The 2018 SHIP is in the planning stage and will focus on the SHA's six priorities for 2018-2020:
     80                        State Health Improvement Plan</a> (SHIP).  The most recent SHA was published in 2018 but HNJ2020 objectives are continually tracked on an <a href="https://www.nj.gov/health/chs/hnj2020/topics/all-objectives.shtml">online dashboard</a>.  The 2020 SHIP focused on six priority areas:
    8181                        <a href="http://nj.gov/health/chs/hnj2020/about/intro/index.shtml" target="_blank" title="Go to HNJ2020 page">
    8282                        <img ibis:src="view/image/home/HNJ2020.png" style="float:right; vertical-align:text-top; margin:0; height:100px;" title="HNJ2020" alt="HealthyNJ2020"/></a>
    8383                        <ul>
    84                                 <li>Improve access to health services</li>
    85                                 <li>Improve birth outcomes</li>
    86                                 <li>Increase childhood immunization rates</li>
    87                                 <li>Reduce heart disease and stroke</li>
    88                                 <li>Reduce obesity</li>
    89                                 <li>Improve mental health and substance abuse outcomes</li>
     84                                <li>Health equity</li>
     85                                <li>Birth outcomes</li>
     86                                <li>Mental health and substance use</li>
     87                                <li>Nutrition, physical activity, and chronic disease prevention</li>
     88                                <li>Immunization</li>
     89                                <li>Aligning state and community health improvement planning</li>
    9090                        </ul>
    9191                        <br/>
     
    9999                        All HNJ2020 objectives are being tracked as
    100100                        <a ibis:href="indicator/CatHNJ2020.html">indicators</a> within the NJSHAD system. <br/>
     101                        <br/>
     102                        Development of <a href="https://healthy.nj.gov/2030/" class="Bold">Healthy New Jersey 2030</a> (HNJ2030) has been underway since 2017 and equity is
     103                        a critical component of HNJ2030's <a href="https://healthy.nj.gov/2030/about/development/index.shtml#framework">framework</a> and <a href="https://healthy.nj.gov/2030/topics-objectives/cross-cutting-issues/">cuts across</a> all topic areas of the project.<br/>
    101104                </CONTENT>
    102105                </ibis:ExpandableContent>
     
    106109                <TITLE>Priority Areas</TITLE>
    107110                        <CONTENT>
    108                         New Jersey P.L.2004, c.137 established the <a href="http://www.njleg.state.nj.us/2004/Bills/PL04/137_.HTM" class="Bold" target="_blank">Eliminating Health Disparities Initiative</a>
     111                        New Jersey P.L.2004, c.137 established the <a href="https://lis.njleg.state.nj.us/nxt/gateway.dll/statutes/1/22026/22325" class="Bold" target="_blank">Eliminating Health Disparities Initiative</a>
    109112                        in the <a href="http://nj.gov/health/omh/index.shtml">Office of Minority and Multicultural Health</a> (OMMH)
    110113                        and set forth priority areas for OMMH to develop and implement a comprehensive, coordinated plan to reduce
     
    159162                <TITLE>Cultural Competency</TITLE>
    160163                        <CONTENT>
    161                         New Jersey is a racially, culturally, and ethnically diverse state. More than one-fifth of New Jersey residents are foreign-born and nearly one-third speak a language other than English at home and of those, only 60% feel they speak English very well.<span class="SmallerFont"><sup><a href="#ref2">2</a></sup></span>
    162                         <br/><br/>
    163                         This rich diversity presents a challenge to health professionals. Diverse populations bring different attitudes, expectations, beliefs, and communication styles to each health encounter. Health professionals must be sensitive to these complex issues if they are to be successful.<span class="SmallerFont"><sup><a href="#ref3">3</a></sup></span>
     164                        New Jersey is a racially, culturally, and ethnically diverse state. More than one-fifth of New Jersey residents are foreign-born and nearly one-third speak a language other than English at home<span class="SmallerFont"><sup><a href="#ref2">2</a></sup></span> and of those, only 60% feel they speak English very well.<span class="SmallerFont"><sup><a href="#ref3">3</a></sup></span>
     165                        <br/><br/>
     166                        This rich diversity presents a challenge to health professionals. Diverse populations bring different attitudes, expectations, beliefs, and communication styles to each health encounter. Health professionals must be sensitive to these complex issues if they are to be successful.<span class="SmallerFont"><sup><a href="#ref4">4</a></sup></span>
    164167                        <br/><br/>
    165168                        <a href="http://nj.gov/njsncc/index.shtml" target="_blank" title="Go to NJSNCC">
    166169                        <img ibis:src="view/image/home/njsncc.png" style="float:left; vertical-align:text-bottom; margin:0; margin-right:20px; height:100px;" title="NJSNCC" alt="NJSNCC"/></a>
    167                         The Office of Minority and Multicultural Health offers health professionals many cultural competency resources, including the <a href="http://nj.gov/health/ommh/documents/clas_standards.pdf">National Standards for Culturally and Linguistically Appropriate Services (CLAS) in Health and Health Care</a>, known as "CLAS Standards."  There are 15 CLAS Standards, however the first one serves as the frame and essential goal of the other fourteen:  "Provide effective, equitable, understandable, respectful, and quality care and services that are responsive to diverse cultural health beliefs and practices, preferred language, health literacy, and other communication needs."<span class="SmallerFont"><sup><a href="#ref4">4</a></sup></span>
     170                        The Office of Minority and Multicultural Health offers health professionals many cultural competency resources, including the <a href="http://nj.gov/health/ommh/documents/clas_standards.pdf">National Standards for Culturally and Linguistically Appropriate Services (CLAS) in Health and Health Care</a>, known as "CLAS Standards."  There are 15 CLAS Standards, however the first one serves as the frame and essential goal of the other fourteen:  "Provide effective, equitable, understandable, respectful, and quality care and services that are responsive to diverse cultural health beliefs and practices, preferred language, health literacy, and other communication needs."<span class="SmallerFont"><sup><a href="#ref5">5</a></sup></span>
    168171                        <br/><br/>
    169172                        The <a href="http://nj.gov/njsncc/index.shtml" class="Bold" target="_blank">New Jersey Statewide Network for Cultural Competence</a> is a broad-based network to advance culturally competent practices in New Jersey.
     
    209212                               
    210213                        <h2>NJSHAD Indicator Reports</h2>
    211                                 Most or all of the <a ibis:href="indicator/Introduction.html">NJSHAD indicator reports</a>
    212                                 in the following topic areas or cross-cutting groupings have one or more views by race/ethnicity:
    213                                 <ul>
    214                                         <li>Behavioral Risk Factor Survey (BRFS)</li>
    215                                         <li>Birth and Infant Health</li>
    216                                         <li>Cancer</li>
    217                                         <li>Child and Adolescent Health</li>
    218                                         <li>Healthy New Jersey 2020</li>
    219                                         <li>Infectious and Communicable Diseases</li>
    220                                         <li>Injury and Violence</li>
    221                                         <li>Maternal and Child Health Epidemiology (MCH Epi)</li>
    222                                         <li>Mortality and Leading Causes of Death</li>
    223                                         <li>Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Obesity</li>
    224                                 </ul>
    225                                 <br/>
     214                                Most <a ibis:href="indicator/Introduction.html">NJSHAD indicator reports</a> have one or more views by race/ethnicity except for those related to the environment, air, and water quality because those are mostly about places and systems, not individual people.
     215                                <br/><br/>
    226216                               
    227217                        <h2>NJSHAD Custom Data Queries</h2>
    228                                 Datasets in the <a ibis:href="query/Introduction.html">NJSHAD query system</a>
    229                                 that have race and/or ethnicity among the variable choices are:
    230                                 <ul>
    231                                         <li>Births</li>
    232                                         <li>Deaths</li>
    233                                         <li>Infant Deaths and Fetal Deaths</li>
    234                                         <li>Inpatient Hospital Discharges and Emergency Department Visits</li>
    235                                         <li>HIV New Diagnoses, Persons Living with HIV/AIDS, and Deaths</li>
    236                                         <li>STD Incidence</li>
    237                                         <li>Behavioral Risk Factor Survey: includes data related to arthritis, asthma, cardiovascular health, cancer screening, diabetes, diet and exercise, health care access and coverage, immunizations, overweight and obesity, substance use, and more</li>
    238                                         <li>Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System: includes data for before,      during, and after pregnancy, as well as infant health issues like breastfeeding and safe sleep</li>
    239                                 </ul>
    240                                 <br/>
     218                                All datasets in the <a ibis:href="query/Introduction.html">NJSHAD query system</a> have race and/or ethnicity among the variable choices except Communicable Disease Cases and School Immunization Status.
     219                                <br/><br/>
    241220
    242221                                <h2>Other Data Sources</h2>
     
    247226                                        <li><a href="http://www.nj.gov/health/fhs/chronic/diabetes/" target="_blank">Diabetes</a></li>
    248227                                        <!--li><a href="http://www.nj.gov/health/hivstdtb/hiv-aids/statmap.shtml" target="_blank">HIV/AIDS</a></li-->
    249                                         <li><a href="http://www.nj.gov/health/fhs/maternalchild/outcomes/mortality-reviews/" target="_blank">Maternal Mortality</a></li>
     228                                        <li><a href="https://www.nj.gov/health/fhs/maternalchild/mchepi/mortality-reviews/" target="_blank">Maternal Mortality</a></li>
    250229                                        <li><a href="https://www.state.nj.us/humanservices/dmhas/publications/surveys/" target="_blank">Middle School Risk and Protective Factor Surveys</a></li>
    251                                         <li><a href="http://lwd.state.nj.us/labor/lpa/dmograph/est/est_index.html" target="_blank">Population Demographics</a></li>
     230                                        <li><a href="https://www.nj.gov/labor/lpa/dmograph/est/est_index.html" target="_blank">Population Demographics</a></li>
    252231                                        <li><a href="http://www.nj.gov/health/fhs/maternalchild/outcomes/prams/" target="_blank">Pregnancy Risk Assessment</a></li>
    253232                                        <!--li><a href="http://www.nj.gov/health/hivstdtb/stds/stats.shtml" target="_blank">Sexually Transmitted Disease</a> (STD)</li-->
     
    293272                                        <a name="ref1"></a>1. US Department of Health and Human Services. The Secretary's Advisory Committee on National Health Promotion and Disease Prevention Objectives for 2020. <a href="http://www.healthypeople.gov/sites/default/files/PhaseI_0.pdf">Phase I report: Recommendations for the framework and format of Healthy People 2020</a>. Section IV: Advisory Committee findings and recommendations. Page 28. 10/28/08
    294273                                        <br/>
    295                                         <a name="ref2"></a>2. US Census Bureau, 2016 American Community Survey 1-Year Estimates, retrieved from <a href="https://factfinder.census.gov/faces/nav/jsf/pages/index.xhtml">American Fact Finder</a> on 4/12/18.
    296                                         <br/>
    297                                         <a name="ref3"></a>3. NJDOH Office of Minority and Multicultural Health, <a href="http://nj.gov/health/ommh/resources/">Cultural Competency Resources</a> webpage. 4/12/18.
    298                                         <br/>
    299                                         <a name="ref4"></a>4. NJDOH Office of Minority and Multicultural Health, <a href="http://nj.gov/health/ommh/documents/clas_policy_practice.pdf">Cultural Competence CLAS Policy and Practice</a> circular. 1/1/17.
     274                                        <a name="ref2"></a>2. US Census Bureau, Quick Facts, retrieved from <a href="https://www.census.gov/quickfacts/fact/table/NJ/PST045221">New Jersey Quick Facts</a> on 4/11/22.
     275                                        <br/>
     276                                        <a name="ref3"></a>3. US Census Bureau, American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates for 2016-2020, retrieved from <a href="https://data.census.gov/cedsci/">Table S1601</a> on 4/11/22.
     277                                        <br/>
     278                                        <a name="ref4"></a>4. NJDOH Office of Minority and Multicultural Health, <a href="http://nj.gov/health/ommh/resources/">Cultural Competency Resources</a> webpage. 4/12/18.
     279                                        <br/>
     280                                        <a name="ref5"></a>5. NJDOH Office of Minority and Multicultural Health, <a href="http://nj.gov/health/ommh/documents/clas_policy_practice.pdf">Cultural Competence CLAS Policy and Practice</a> circular. 1/1/17.
    300281                                        <br/>
    301282                                </div>
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