Changeset 25016 in main


Ignore:
Timestamp:
04/10/22 10:22:57 (4 months ago)
Author:
Paul Leo
Message:

NMEPHT: adding/updating metadata content files as per B. Woods

Location:
adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/nmepht-content/xml/metadata
Files:
5 added
27 edited

Legend:

Unmodified
Added
Removed
  • adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/nmepht-content/xml/metadata/AMI_HospitalizationsIncludingTexas.xml

    r24705 r25016  
    55<citeinfo>
    66<origin>New Mexico EPHTN Project Manager</origin>
    7 <pubdate>20220215</pubdate>
     7<pubdate>202204102</pubdate>
    88<title>Acute Myocardial Infarction (AMI) Hospital Admissions Including Texas Hospitalizations</title>
    99<onlink/>
     
    6161<accconst>Restricted (secure) data will only be released to external users after the New Mexico EPHT Program distributor responsible for managing data requests has contacted the New Mexico Health Systems Epidemiology Program, Epidemiology and Response Division, NM DOH and obtained approval.
    6262</accconst>
    63 <useconst>This information is provided by the Health Systems Epidemiology Program (HSEP) and the Environmental Health Epidemiology Bureau (NMEHEB) of the New Mexico Department of Health Epidemiology and Response Division (division). Efforts have been made to assure the accuracy of the data.  The division requires the following statement be included in any report using these data: "The accuracy of the original data is the responsibility of the submitting data provider and the division assumes no responsibility for any use made of or conclusions drawn from the data." (The submitting data provider refers to the hospital). For additional information on the how the data can be used, please go to http://164.64.110.239/nmac/parts/title07/07.001.0027.pdf. Authority to collect data was established in Article 14A, 24-14A-3. Health information system; creation; duties of department as part of Health Information Systems of Chapter 24, Health and Safety, of the State of New Mexico Statues,  http://public.nmcompcomm.us/nmnxtadmin/NMPublic.aspx and search for 24-14A-3. All users must read and fully comprehend metadata prior to data use.
     63<useconst>This information is provided by the Health Sysems Epidemiology Program (HSEP) and the Environmental Health Epidemiology Bureau (NMEHEB) of the New Mexico Department of Health Epidemiology and Response Division (division). Efforts have been made to assure the accuracy of the data.  The division requires the following statement be included in any report using these data: "The accuracy of the original data is the responsibility of the submitting data provider and the division assumes no responsibility for any use made of or conclusions drawn from the data." (The submitting data provider refers to the hospital). For additional information on the how the data can be used, please go to http://164.64.110.239/nmac/parts/title07/07.001.0027.pdf. Authority to collect data was established in Article 14A, 24-14A-3. Health information system; creation; duties of department as part of Health Information Systems of Chapter 24, Health and Safety, of the State of New Mexico Statues,  http://public.nmcompcomm.us/nmnxtadmin/NMPublic.aspx and search for 24-14A-3. All users must read and fully comprehend metadata prior to data use.
    6464
    6565Beginning in 2006, Texas admissions for AMI were obtained from the Texas Health Care Information Collection Center for Health Statistics. All users must read and fully comprehend metadata prior to data use.</useconst>
     
    7777<state>NM</state>
    7878<postal>87502</postal>
    79 <country>United States of America</country>
     79<country>United States Of America</country>
    8080</cntaddr>
    8181<cntvoice>18888788992</cntvoice>
     
    9191<secsys>None</secsys>
    9292<secclass>Restricted</secclass>
    93 <sechandl>Restricted data released to an external partner may not be disseminated or distributed in a manner inconsistent with New Mexico Department of Health requirements of 7.1.27 NMAC. For guidance on use, please refer to:  http://164.64.110.239/nmac/parts/title07/07.001.0027.htm .
     93<sechandl>Restricted data released to an external partner may not be disseminated or distributed in a manner inconsistent with New Mexico Departmentof Health requirements of 7.1.27 NMAC. For guidance on use, please refer to:  http://164.64.110.239/nmac/parts/title07/07.001.0027.htm .
    9494</sechandl>
    9595</secinfo>
    96 <native>SAS Server; SAS 9.4, File: hiddephtmitx0620.sas7bdat; Size: estimated at 2.2 Mb.</native>
     96<native>SASServer; SAS 9.4, File: hiddephtmitx0620.sas7bdat; Size: estimated at 2.2 Mb.</native>
    9797</idinfo>
    9898<dataqual>
     
    103103While the DOH does not systematically collect hospitalizations among New Mexico residents that occur out of state, beginning in 2006, Texas admissions for acute myocardial infarction were obtained from the Texas Health Care Information Collection Center for Health Statistics. The 2006 to 2015 Texas cross border admissions of New Mexico residents are included in this dataset.
    104104
    105 All users must read and fully comprehend metadata prior to data use. Authority to collect data was established in Article 14A, 24-14A-3. Health information system; creation; duties of department as part of Health Information Systems of Chapter 24, Health and Safety, of the State of New Mexico Statutes, http://public.nmcompcomm.us/nmnxtadmin/NMPublic.aspx and search for 24-14A-3.</complete>
     105All users must read and fully comprehend metadata prior to data use. Authority to collect data was established in Article 14A, 24-14A-3. Health information system; creation; duties of department as part of Health Information Systems of Chapter 24, Health and Safety, of the State of New Mexico Statues,http://public.nmcompcomm.us/nmnxtadmin/NMPublic.aspx and search for 24-14A-3.</complete>
    106106<lineage>
    107107<procstep>
    108108<procdesc>Created the AMI hospitalization file per the instructions found in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Recommendations for Nationally Consistent Data and Measures within the Environmental Public Health Tracking Network, version 3 (http://ephtracking.cdc.gov/docs/CDC_NCDM_v3.pdf), Indicator Template Content Area: AMI Indicator: Hospitalizations for AMI Environmental Public Health Tracking and per instructions provided in the July 25, 2016 How-to Guide, Acute Myocardial Infarction (AMI) Hospitalizations. Mapped results for the interactive data query include options for a background with a New Mexico base map or shaded relief. Both background maps are served from Thunderforest (www.thunderforest.com) and OpenStreetMap contributors (http://www.openstreetmap.org/copyright).</procdesc>
    109 <procdate>20210712</procdate>
     109<procdate>20220207</procdate>
    110110</procstep>
    111111</lineage>
     
    114114<overview>
    115115<eaover>This dataset contains the following fields: State; Admission Year; County; Age Group; Sex; Case counts are aggregated according to health outcome id by admission year, county, age group, and sex. </eaover>
    116 <eadetcit>State is the FIPS code for the patient's state of residence (NM=35). Admission Year is the year the patient was admitted (YYYY).  County is the county of the patient's residence in a 5-digit FIPS code. (e.g., 35001). Age Group is the age category of the patient at the time of discharge. There are 19 5-year age categories, where 1=0-4 years and 19=unknown. Sex is the sex of the patient (M, F and U). Monthly Hospitalizations are the actual number of hospital admissions for AMI. </eadetcit>
     116<eadetcit>State is the FIPS code for the patient's state of residence (NM=35). Admission Year is the year the patient was admitted (YYYY).  County is the county of the patient's residence in a 5-digit FIPS code. (e.g. 35001). Age Group is the age category of the patient at the time of discharge. There are 19 5-year age categories, where 1=0-4 years and 19=unknown. Sex is the sex of the patient (M, F and U). Monthly Hospitalizations are the actual number of hospital admissions for AMI. </eadetcit>
    117117</overview>
    118118</eainfo>
     
    131131<state>NM</state>
    132132<postal>87502</postal>
    133 <country>United States of America</country>
     133<country>United States Of America</country>
    134134</cntaddr>
    135135<cntvoice>18888788992</cntvoice>
     
    144144<resdesc>File: hiddephtmitx0620.sas7bdat; Size: estimated at 3.9 Mb.</resdesc>
    145145<distliab>Persons or entities given access to restricted data are liable for compliance with NMDOH-EHEB data use agreement.  Disciplinary action will be incurred for non-compliance or violation of data use agreements.</distliab>
    146 <custom>For access to unrestricted or public use data, please see:  https://nmtracking.org for New Mexico data or https://ephtracking.cdc.gov/showHome.action and https://ephtracking.cdc.gov/DataExplorer/ for national or multistate data.
     146<custom>For access to unrestricted or public use data, please see: https://nmtracking.doh.nm.gov for New Mexico data or https://ephtracking.cdc.gov/showHome.action and https://ephtracking.cdc.gov/DataExplorer/ for national or multistate data.
    147147
    148 For access to restricted or secure New Mexico data please communicate directly with us: https://nmtracking.org/about/ContactInformation.html.  Restricted (secure) data will only be released to external users after the New Mexico EPHT Program distributor responsible for management of data requests has reviewed the request. The request must include the requestor's name, affiliation, contact information, intended use of the data and whether the use of the data is intended to result in publication.  Specific data elements requested must also be included.
     148For access to restricted or secure New Mexico data please communicate directly us: https://nmtracking.doh.nm.gov/about/ContactInformation.html.  Restricted (secure) data will only be released to external users after the New Mexico EPHT Program distributor responsible for management of data requests has reviewed the request. The request must include the requestor's name, affiliation, contact information, intended use of the data and whether the use of the data is intended to result in publication.  Specific data elements requested must also be included.
    149149</custom>
    150150</distinfo>
    151151<metainfo>
    152 <metd>20210712</metd>
     152<metd>20220410</metd>
    153153<metc>
    154154<cntinfo>
  • adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/nmepht-content/xml/metadata/AMI_In-stateHospitalizations.xml

    r24705 r25016  
    55<citeinfo>
    66<origin>New Mexico EPHTN Project Manager</origin>
    7 <pubdate>20220215</pubdate>
     7<pubdate>20220410</pubdate>
    88<title>Acute Myocardial Infarction (AMI) In-state Hospitalizations</title>
    99<onlink/>
     
    1313<abstract>This dataset contains case counts of acute myocardial infarction (AMI or heart attack) (ICD-CM 410.0-410.9) inpatient in-state hospitalizations among New Mexico residents for 1999-2020. An AMI hospitalization is an admission to the hospital due to AMI as a primary (first-listed) diagnosis. These data may be stratified by year and month of admission, county of residence, age group, and/or gender.</abstract>
    1414<purpose>This dataset can be used to calculate AMI in-state hospitalization measures, including 1) the number of hospitalizations for AMI; 2) crude rate of hospitalization for AMI among persons 35 and over per 10,000 population; 3) age-specific rate of hospitalization for AMI per 10,000 population; 4) age-adjusted rate of hospitalization for AMI among persons 35 and over per 10,000 population; and 5) age-adjusted rate of hospitalization for AMI per 10,000 population (adjusted by the direct method to the 2000 US standard population).</purpose>
    15 <supplinf>Data have been de-identified to protect patient confidentiality. These data include inpatient hospitalizations of individuals who are discharged from non-federal hospitals (using their admission date). Therefore these data do not include hospitalizations from Veterans Affairs or Indian Health Service hospitals. Race and ethnicity are not reported in the dataset due to issues with the quality of the data collection process at individual hospitals. This information is derived from the New Mexico Hospital Inpatient Discharge Dataset (NMHIDD). All New Mexico general and specialty hospitals are annually required to report encounter-level hospital inpatient discharge data to the NMDOH to be included in the NMHIDD. This dataset does NOT include hospitalizations among New Mexico residents that occur out-of-state (for example in Texas). This dataset may include some transfers between New Mexico hospitals for the same individual for the same AMI event. Variations in the number of transfers or readmissions for the same AMI event may vary by geographic area and affect the calculated rate. Population data used to calculate rates are annual estimates produced by the University of New Mexico Geospatial and Population Studies (GPS) Program. They are the official estimates and projections used in New Mexico state government.</supplinf>
     15<supplinf>Data have been de-identified to protect patient confidentiality. These data include inpatient hospitalizations of individuals who are discharged from non-federal hospitals (using their admission date). Therefore, these data do not include hospitalizations from Veterans Affairs or Indian Health Service hospitals. Race and ethnicity are not reported in the dataset due to issues with the quality of the data collection process at individual hospitals. This information is derived from the New Mexico Hospital Inpatient Discharge Dataset (NMHIDD). All New Mexico general and specialty hospitals are annually required to report encounter-level hospital inpatient discharge data to the NMDOH to be included in the NMHIDD. This dataset does NOT include hospitalizations among New Mexico residents that occur out-of-state (for example in Texas). This dataset may include some transfers between New Mexico hospitals for the same individual for the same AMI event. Variations in the number of transfers or readmissions for the same AMI event may vary by geographic area and affect the calculated rate. Population data used to calculate rates are annual estimates produced by the University of New Mexico Geospatial and Population Studies (GPS) Program. They are the official estimates and projections used in New Mexico state government.</supplinf>
    1616</descript>
    1717<timeperd>
     
    101101<procstep>
    102102<procdesc>Created the AMI hospitalization file per the instructions found in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Recommendations for Nationally Consistent Data and Measures within the Environmental Public Health Tracking Network, version 2.0, August 1, 2011 (http://ephtracking.cdc.gov/docs/CDC_NCDM_v2.0_final.pdf), Indicator Template Content Area: AMI Indicator: Hospitalizations for AMI Environmental Public Health Tracking and per instructions provided in the July 13, 2012 How-to Guide, Acute Myocardial Infarction (AMI) Hospitalizations.</procdesc>
    103 <procdate>20151012</procdate>
     103<procdate>20220207</procdate>
    104104</procstep>
    105105</lineage>
     
    141141</distinfo>
    142142<metainfo>
    143 <metd>20210712</metd>
     143<metd>20220207</metd>
    144144<metc>
    145145<cntinfo>
  • adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/nmepht-content/xml/metadata/AMI_Mortality.xml

    r22293 r25016  
    55<citeinfo>
    66<origin>New Mexico EPHTN Project Manager</origin>
    7 <pubdate>20210108</pubdate>
     7<pubdate>20220225</pubdate>
    88<title>AMI Mortality</title>
    99<onlink/>
     
    1111</citation>
    1212<descript>
    13 <abstract>This dataset contains county-level records for deaths of New Mexico residents due to acute myocardial infarction (AMI or heart attack, ICD-10-CM I21-I22) that occurred between 2001 and 2016.  The dataset was generated using information from the New Mexico Bureau of Vital Records and Health Statistics (NM-VRHS) Linked Multiple Cause of Death file. The dataset supports calculation of of the AMI mortality measures among New Mexico residents.  Measures include 1) the number of deaths from AMI, 2) crude rate of death from AMI, and 3) age-adjusted rate of death from AMI (adjusted by the direct method to the 2000 US standard population.  All rates are expressed per 100,000 persons. AMI deaths and mortality are presented by county, for 2001-2019.</abstract>
     13<abstract>This dataset contains county-level records for deaths of New Mexico residents due to acute myocardial infarction (AMI or heart attack, ICD-10-CM I21-I22) that occurred between 2001 and 2020.  The dataset was generated using information from the New Mexico Bureau of Vital Records and Health Statistics (NM-VRHS) Linked Multiple Cause of Death file. The dataset supports calculation of the AMI mortality measures among New Mexico residents.  Measures include 1) the number of deaths from AMI, 2) crude rate of death from AMI, and 3) age-adjusted rate of death from AMI (adjusted by the direct method to the 2000 US standard population.  All rates are expressed per 100,000 persons. AMI deaths and mortality are presented by county, for 2001-2020.</abstract>
    1414<purpose>Dataset was created to provide data for the New Mexico Environmental Public Health Tracking Network in order to monitor spatial and temporal variation in the annual mortality due to AMI consistent with Nationally Consistent Data and Measures (NCDMs).</purpose>
    1515<supplinf>The New Mexico Linked Multiple Cause of Death data are derived from items reported on the death certificate and coded as underlying or contributing cause of death. DATA SOURCE(S): 1) Information is gathered from the Medical Certification section of NM Death Certificate; 2) Traditionally, BVRHS nosologists trained by CDC, NCHS, (based on WHO guidelines) manually assigns underlying cause of death based on NCHS linkage rules/logic; what condition gives rise to what condition. NM nosologists have not received multiple cause training; 3) Nosologist assigns a single underlying cause of death code based on the International Classification of Disease (ICD) categories, which since 1999 has been based on the Tenth Revision ICD; 4) The underlying cause of death has historically been the basis of national and NM vital statistic cause of death compilation and presentation; 5) Since about 1996 NM has partially implemented the national electronic system for automated coding of the underlying cause of death and capture of the various (multiple) conditions listed in the medical certification of death as contributory to the demise of the decedent.  The software is commonly referred to as SuperMICAR.
     
    2424<begdate>20010101</begdate>
    2525<begtime/>
    26 <enddate>20191231</enddate>
     26<enddate>20201231</enddate>
    2727<endtime/>
    2828</rngdates>
     
    8282<secsys>None</secsys>
    8383<secclass>Unclassified</secclass>
    84 <sechandl>Restricted (secure) access data refer to data presented at the county level that lack small cell suppression controls, and therefore have the potential to identify individual cases within a county according to age, sex, race/ethnicity, year of death, death manner, and diagnosis at death. Restricted (secure) data will only be released to external users after the New Mexico EPHT Program distributor AND the data steward, the New New Mexico Bureau of Vital Records and Health Statistics (NM-VRHS), has reviewed and authorized the request.  Restricted (secure) data must be requested on the standard NM-VRHS Request Form (_link_) and the signed Request Form submitted to NM-VRHS via FAX at (505) 827-1751, ATTN. Epidemiology Section.  To access documentation describing the data elements of the underlying multiple cause of death data, inquiries may be made to vrhs.data@state.nm.us. </sechandl>
     84<sechandl>Restricted (secure) access data refer to data presented at the county level that lack small cell suppression controls, and therefore have the potential to identify individual cases within a county according to age, sex, race/ethnicity, year of death, death manner, and diagnosis at death. Restricted (secure) data will only be released to external users after the New Mexico EPHT Program distributor AND the data steward, the New Mexico Bureau of Vital Records and Health Statistics (NM-VRHS), has reviewed and authorized the request.  Restricted (secure) data must be requested on the standard NM-VRHS Request Form (_link_) and the signed Request Form submitted to NM-VRHS via FAX at (505) 827-1751, ATTN. Epidemiology Section.  To access documentation describing the data elements of the underlying multiple cause of death data, inquiries may be made to vrhs.data@state.nm.us. </sechandl>
    8585</secinfo>
    8686<native>SAS Server 9.4</native>
     
    9292<procstep>
    9393<procdesc>Dataset developed per the instructions found in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Recommendations for Nationally Consistent Data and Measures (NCDMs) with the Environmental Public Health Tracking Network, version 1.3, (http://ephtracking.cdc.gov/docs/CDC_NCDM_Pt1_1.3.pdf)The dataset utilizes multiple cause coded cases of death code ICD-10 T58 (unintentional, non-fire related; unintentional, fire-related; and unknown intent). </procdesc>
    94 <procdate>20210107</procdate>
     94<procdate>20211109</procdate>
    9595</procstep>
    9696<procstep>
     
    120120rgis.unm.edu) or other servers hosted at UNM Earth Data Analysis Center.
    121121</procdesc>
    122 <procdate>20210107</procdate>
     122<procdate>20211109</procdate>
    123123</procstep></lineage>
    124124</dataqual>
     
    154154</cntinfo>
    155155</distrib>
    156 <resdesc>File: MCDeaths0116.sas7bdat</resdesc>
     156<resdesc>File: MCDeaths0119.sas7bdat</resdesc>
    157157<distliab>Persons or entities given access to restricted data are liable for compliance with the NM-VRHS data use agreement.  Disciplinary action will be incurred for non-compliance or violation of data use agreement.</distliab>
    158158<custom>For access to unrestricted or public use data, please see:  www.nmtracking.org for New Mexico data;  For access to restricted or secure New Mexico data please contact to vrhs.data@state.nm.us. </custom>
    159159</distinfo>
    160160<metainfo>
    161 <metd>20210108</metd>
     161<metd>20211109</metd>
    162162<metc>
    163163<cntinfo>
  • adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/nmepht-content/xml/metadata/Arsenic_CommunityWater.xml

    r24138 r25016  
    55<citeinfo>
    66<origin>New Mexico EPHTN Project Manager</origin>
    7 <pubdate>20210712</pubdate>
     7<pubdate>20220405</pubdate>
    88<title>Arsenic Concentration in Community Water</title>
    99<onlink/>
     
    1111</citation>
    1212<descript>
    13 <abstract>These arsenic drinking water quality sample data for New Mexico community water systems (CWS) contain the information needed to calculate Environmental Public Health Tracking (EPHT) annual drinking water quality mean and maximum concentration measures for each system or the for state by the number of CWS or the number of people served. The data are derived from New Mexico Safe Drinking Water Information System (SDWIS) database, 1999-2020. That dataset contains records for active CWS (active for the prior year at the time of extract from the state database, typically in February or March for the prior year’s sample data, e.g. March 2018 for the 2017 data). A CWS is a public water system that serves year-round residents of a community, subdivision, or mobile park that has at least 15 service connections or an average of at least 25 residents.  These CWSs are a subset of all NM public water systems (PWS).  Other water systems are not included. The number of CWS varies from year to year, by a few, typically 2-3.  There have been 610 CWS active at one time or another and in 2020 there were 566 active CWSs.
     13<abstract>These arsenic drinking water quality sample data for New Mexico community water systems (CWS) contain the information needed to calculate Environmental Public Health Tracking (EPHT) annual drinking water quality mean and maximum concentration measures for each system or the for state by the number of CWS or the number of people served. The data are derived from New Mexico Safe Drinking Water Information System (SDWIS) database, 1999-2021. That dataset contains records for active CWS (active for the prior year at the time of extract from the state database, typically in February or March for the prior year’s sample data, e.g. March 2018 for the 2017 data). A CWS is a public water system that serves year-round residents of a community, subdivision, or mobile park that has at least 15 service connections or an average of at least 25 residents.  These CWSs are a subset of all NM public water systems (PWS).  Other water systems are not included. The number of CWS varies from year to year, by a few, typically 2-3.  There have been 631 CWS active at one time or another and in 2021 there were 561 active CWSs.
    1414
    1515The New Mexico Environment Department, Drinking Water Bureau, collects and maintains the original data.</abstract>
     
    1717<supplinf>Treatment of non-detects: Sample results for arsenic with concentrations less than the detection limit have been replaced with a value equal to 0.5 the detection limit for the analytical method used. If a detection limit was not available from the SDWIS dataset or reported as zero, an estimate of the detection limit from available data and/or the analytical laboratory detection limit and/or a standard analytical method detection limit was applied.   
    1818
    19 Missing data: The current form of the NCDMs annual data table contains one annually-aggregated record for each active CWS per year for each active year (i.e., active at the time of extract from the state database in March 2021). However, this means that systems that have come online after the start date of the extraction query will have missing values up until the system became active. CWSs that have come online after the start date of the extraction query will have missing values up until the system became active. Thus, missing values may be because the water system was not yet active and current. These “missing values” are labeled as “not sampled”. Missing values may also be because the water system was not required to take a compliance sample during that particular time period. In order to mitigate the issue of “missing data” for cases when the data are in fact not missing, the carry forward procedure has been implemented. Under this procedure, if samples were not collected to test during a given year because the system (1) was not required to take a compliance sample during that particular time period or (2) received a sampling wavier from the state for reduced frequency of monitoring based on low analytical results, then the last year sampling result value was carried forward together with the year of the actual sample collection information. However, CWSs that have come online after the start date of the data extraction query will have missing values until the system became active.
     19Missing data: The current form of the NCDMs annual data table contains one annually-aggregated record for each active CWS per year for each active year (i.e., active at the time of extract from the state database in March 2022). However, this means that systems that have come online after the start date of the extraction query will have missing values up until the system became active. CWSs that have come online after the start date of the extraction query will have missing values up until the system became active. Thus, missing values may be because the water system was not yet active and current. These “missing values” are labeled as “not sampled”. Missing values may also be because the water system was not required to take a compliance sample during that particular period. In order to mitigate the issue of “missing data” for cases when the data are in fact not missing, the carry forward procedure has been implemented. Under this procedure, if samples were not collected to test during a given year because the system (1) was not required to take a compliance sample during that particular period or (2) received a sampling wavier from the state for reduced frequency of monitoring based on low analytical results, then the last year sampling result value was carried forward together with the year of the actual sample collection information. However, CWSs that have come online after the start date of the data extraction query will have missing values until the system became active.
    2020
    2121Drinking water wholesalers that have interties and sold their water to the CWS having a retail population were not included in the dataset even when SDWIS captured this information accurately and completely.  Each importing CWS was attributed with wholesalers’ applicable sampling results data. There are no other values missing for reasons beyond what the state's or EPA's monitoring framework and the structure of the EPHT NCDMs creates. The data prior to 2005 may have limited quality.</supplinf>
     
    2626<begdate>19990101</begdate>
    2727<begtime/>
    28 <enddate>20201231</enddate>
     28<enddate>20211231</enddate>
    2929<endtime/>
    3030</rngdates>
     
    9797<dataqual>
    9898<logic>None</logic>
    99 <complete>These data are complete with respect to CDC's NCDM requirements. This dataset contains only regulated community water systems, which were active at the time of the data extraction date from the state database (typically in February or March for the prior year’s sample data, e.g. March 2018 for the 2017 data). All CWS taking compliance samples from January 1, 1999-December 31, 2020 are included in the dataset. Compliance samples collected by drinking water wholesalers, that have interties with and sold to the CWS having a retail population are included within each importing CWS applicable sampling results data. Private, non-transient, and non-community water systems are not included in this dataset. Arsenic samples are taken once a year (surface sources), once every three years (groundwater sources), or once every nine years (for sources with a waiver). Some ground water systems do not have to conduct initial compliance monitoring for the 10 ppb until the end of the 2007 3-year compliance period. In general, however, starting with the January 23, 2006 effective date, if a sampling point exceeds 10 ppb, that point is sampled quarterly, and the running annual average is used to determine compliance. See Supplemental Information for treatment of non-detects.</complete>
     99<complete>These data are complete with respect to CDC's NCDM requirements. This dataset contains only regulated community water systems, which were active at the time of the data extraction date from the state database (typically in February or March for the prior year’s sample data, e.g. March 2018 for the 2017 data). All CWS taking compliance samples from January 1, 1999-December 31, 2021 are included in the dataset. Compliance samples collected by drinking water wholesalers, that have interties with and sold to the CWS having a retail population are included within each importing CWS applicable sampling results data. Private, non-transient, and non-community water systems are not included in this dataset. Arsenic samples are taken once a year (surface sources), once every three years (groundwater sources), or once every nine years (for sources with a waiver). Some ground water systems do not have to conduct initial compliance monitoring for the 10 ppb until the end of the 2007 3-year compliance period. In general, however, starting with the January 23, 2006 effective date, if a sampling point exceeds 10 ppb, that point is sampled quarterly, and the running annual average is used to determine compliance. See Supplemental Information for treatment of non-detects.</complete>
    100100<lineage>
    101101<procstep>
    102 <procdesc>This dataset was created by extracting data for non-transient community water systems serving 25 or more people or 15 service connections for at least 60 days per year, which were active for the entire year during 1999-2020 or portion therein. Sample results are limited to samples taken between January 1, 1999 and December 31, 2020.  This dataset contains information on CWS representing all 33 NM counties.  The data extracted from NMSDWIS were processed using the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Drinking Water Quality Nationally Consistent Data and Measures (NCDMs) How-To Guide within the Environmental Public Health Tracking Network, version 14.3, January 16, 2017.</procdesc>
    103 <procdate>20210712</procdate>
     102<procdesc>This dataset was created by extracting data for non-transient community water systems serving 25 or more people or 15 service connections for at least 60 days per year, which were active for the entire year during 2021 or portion therein. Sample results are limited to samples taken between January 1, 1999 and December 31, 2021.  This dataset contains information on CWS representing all 33 NM counties.  The data extracted from NMSDWIS were processed using the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Drinking Water Quality Nationally Consistent Data and Measures (NCDMs) How-To Guide within the Environmental Public Health Tracking Network, version 2, January 19, 2022.</procdesc>
     103<procdate>20220405</procdate>
    104104</procstep>
    105105<procstep>
    106106<procdesc>NM EPHT receives drinking water system data for community water systems (CWS) from the NM Environment Department Safe Drinking Water Information System (SDWIS). Data are received in MS Excel spreadsheets, with location coordinates in four different datums for business addres of the CWS: three geographic and one unknown.  Populated place locations are captured, where possible, with a matching merge with 2018 version of USGS Geographic Names Information (NAD83) by feature name.
    107107</procdesc>
    108 <procdate>20210430</procdate>
     108<procdate>20220405</procdate>
    109109</procstep>
    110110<procstep>
    111111<procdesc>NMEPHT data queried through nmtracking.org (NMTracking) result in query-specific data sets that are community water system specific or statewide.</procdesc>
    112 <procdate>20210430</procdate>
     112<procdate>20220405</procdate>
    113113</procstep>
    114114</lineage>
     
    117117<overview>
    118118<eaover>The dataset contains annual average and maximum concentrations for arsenic. The fields in the dataset are: PWSIDNumber, TimePeriod, Analyte (Arsenic), AggregationType (mean or maximum), Concentration, and ConcentrationUnits. The dataset also contains fields describing Community Water Systems (CWS) derived from an inventory file of CWS qualifying Public Water Sytems such as number of connections and approximate number of people served.</eaover>
    119 <eadetcit>Data dictionary (last revised: February 20, 2016) is available by contacting the New Mexico EPHT Program at https://nmtracking.org/ or DOH-EHEB@state.nm.us.</eadetcit>
     119<eadetcit>Data dictionary (last revised: February 19, 2022) is available by contacting the New Mexico EPHT Program at https://nmtracking.org/ or DOH-EHEB@state.nm.us.</eadetcit>
    120120</overview>
    121121</eainfo>
     
    152152</distinfo>
    153153<metainfo>
    154 <metd>20210712</metd>
     154<metd>20220405</metd>
    155155<metc>
    156156<cntinfo>
     
    166166<state>NM</state>
    167167<postal>87505</postal>
    168 <country>United States Of America</country>
     168<country>United States of America</country>
    169169</cntaddr>
    170170<cntvoice>18888788992</cntvoice>
  • adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/nmepht-content/xml/metadata/Asthma_ED_Visits.xml

    r24705 r25016  
    55<citeinfo>
    66<origin>New Mexico EPHTN Project Manager</origin>
    7 <pubdate>20220215</pubdate>
     7<pubdate>20220410</pubdate>
    88<title>Asthma Emergency Department Visits</title>
    99<onlink/>
     
    6969</keywords>
    7070<accconst>Restricted (secure) data will only be released to external users after the data steward, the Health Systems Epidemiology Program of the New Mexico Department of Health (NM DOH-HSEP), has reviewed and authorized the request. Restricted (secure) data must be requested directly from NM DOH-HSEP. Any data requests or inquiries regarding underlying data elements should be directed to NM DOH-HSEP at DOH-HealthSystemsEPI@state.nm.us.</accconst>
    71 <useconst>This information is provided by the Environmental Health Epidemiology Bureau (NMEHEB) of the New Mexico Department of Health. Efforts have been made to assure the accuracy of the data.  The NM DOH-HSEP requires the following statement be included in any report using these data: "The accuracy of the original data is the responsibility of the submitting data provider and NM DOH-HSEP assumes no responsibility for any use made of or conclusions drawn from the data." (The submitting data provider refers to the hospital). For additional information on the how the data can be used, please go to http://164.64.110.239/nmac/parts/title07/07.001.0027.htm and https://www.nmlegis.gov/sessions/12%20Regular/final/HB0018.pdf. &#13;
    72 &#13;
     71<useconst>This information is provided by the Environmental Health Epidemiology Bureau (NMEHEB) of the New Mexico Department of Health. Efforts have been made to assure the accuracy of the data.  The NM DOH-HSEP requires the following statement be included in any report using these data: "The accuracy of the original data is the responsibility of the submitting data provider and NM DOH-HSEP assumes no responsibility for any use made of or conclusions drawn from the data." (The submitting data provider refers to the hospital). For additional information on the how the data can be used, please go to http://164.64.110.239/nmac/parts/title07/07.001.0027.htm and https://www.nmlegis.gov/sessions/12%20Regular/final/HB0018.pdf.
    7372All users must read and fully comprehend metadata prior to data use.</useconst>
    7473<ptcontac>
     
    8584<state>NM</state>
    8685<postal>87502</postal>
    87 <country>United States of America</country>
     86<country>United States Of America</country>
    8887</cntaddr>
    8988<cntvoice>18888788992</cntvoice>
     
    108107<lineage>
    109108<procstep>
    110 <procdesc>Data processed according to the Emergency Department Visits for Asthma Implementation Guidance and per the instructions found in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Recommendations for Nationally Consistent Data and Measures within the Environmental Public Health Tracking Network, Content Area: Asthma, Indicator: Asthma_EDVisits_DataSubmission_How-To Guide_2017, August 1, 2017. Cases include: resident emergency department visits for asthma (classified as primary or principal diagnosis code ICD-9-CM 493XX or ICD-10-CM J45) in treated and released emergency department visit administrative data set during the years 2008-2016. Data were reported by 36 of New Mexico's acute care, non-federal hospitals' facilities. The submitted data were extensively edited. First, each hospital's data were edited for systematic problems. Then, each record was reviewed for invalid codes, missing items, and inconsistent items (e.g., sex, race/ethnicity, and diagnosis). Data were de-duplicated but transfers were not excluded. The corrections were made to the data file until all issues were resolved. The International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) and 10th Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-10-CM) Manual was used.&#13;
    111 &#13;
    112 ED data are collected from facilities yearly.  The long-term plan is for the New Mexico Department of Health (NMDOH) to collect these data through an ED electronic reporting (e-reporting) system currently being developed with the New Mexico Health Information Collaborative (NMHIC).  However, few facilities are reporting to the ED e-reporting system at this time.  Therefore, in the interim, we have been requesting that each facility submit its data directly to the NMDOH by May 31 of each year, beginning in 2017.  If a facility is already working with NMHIC, they continue to do so, but also provide data to NMDOH directly.&#13;
    113 &#13;
    114 The department is authorized to request and receive these data under the Public Health Act which grants the department authority to investigate, control and abate the cause of diseases (Section 24-1-3C).  Additional authority was enacted (NMAC 7.4.3.10) on April 30, 2009 which specifically requires that all non-federal emergency departments in the State of New Mexico must comply with NMDOH requests for ED data. The Health Information Accountability and Portability Act (HIPAA) provides that covered entities (including hospitals and their emergency departments) may disclose protected health information, without authorization, to public health authorities who are legally authorized to receive such reports for the purpose of preventing or controlling disease, injury, or disability.  This would include, for example, the reporting of a disease or injury, and conducting public health surveillance.  The NMDOH is such a public health authority.</procdesc>
    115 <procdate>20210712</procdate>
     109<procdesc>Data processed according to the Emergency Department Visits for Asthma Implementation Guidance and per the instructions found in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Recommendations for Nationally Consistent Data and Measures within the Environmental Public Health Tracking Network, Content Area: Asthma, Indicator: Asthma_EDVisits_DataSubmission_How-To Guide_2017, August 1, 2017. Cases include: resident emergency department visits for asthma (classified as primary  or principal diagnosis code ICD-9-CM 493XX or ICD-10-CM J45) in treated and released emergency department visit administrative data set during the years 2008-2016. Data were reported by 36 of New Mexico's acute care, non-federal hospitals' facilities. The submitted data were extensively edited. First, each hospital's data were edited for systematic problems. Then, each record was reviewed for invalid codes, missing items, and inconsistent items (e.g., sex, race/ethnicity, and diagnosis). Data were de-duplicated but transfers were not excluded. The corrections were made to the data file until all issues were resolved. The International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) and 10th Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-10-CM) Manual was used.
     110
     111ED data are collected from facilities yearly.  The long-term plan is for the New Mexico Department of Health (NMDOH) to collect these data through an ED electronic reporting (e-reporting) system currently being developed with the New Mexico Health Information Collaborative (NMHIC).  However, few facilities are reporting to the ED e-reporting system at this time.  Therefore, in the interim, we have been requesting that each facility submit its data directly to the NMDOH by May 31 of each year, beginning in 2017.  If a facility is already working with NMHIC, they continue to do so, but also provide data to NMDOH directly.
     112
     113The department is authorized to request and receive these data under the Public Health Act which grants the department authority to investigate, control and abate the cause of diseases (Section 24-1-3C).  Additional authority was enacted (NMAC 7.4.3.10) on April 30, 2009 which specifically requires that all non-federal emergency departments in the State of New Mexico must comply with NMDOH requests for ED data. The Health Information Accountability and Portability Act (HIPAA) provides that covered entities (including hospitals and their emergency departments) may disclose protected health information, without authorization, to public health authorities who are legally authorized to receive such reports for the purpose of preventing or controlling disease, injury , or disability.  This would include, for example, the reporting of a disease or injury, and conducting public health surveillance.  The NMDOH is such a public health authority.</procdesc>
     114<procdate>20211028</procdate>
    116115</procstep>
    117116</lineage>
     
    119118<eainfo>
    120119<overview>
    121 <eaover>This dataset contains case count of asthma (classified as primary  or principal diagnosis code ICD-9-CM 493XX or ICD-10-CM J45) ED visits among New Mexico residents for the years 2008-2020. The following variables are included: County, Year, Month, Age Group, Sex, Race and Ethnicity, Number of asthma emergency department visits.  These data are stratified by month of admission, county of residence, age group, sex, and race and ethnicity and reported for the years 2010-2016.</eaover>
     120<eaover>This dataset contains case count of asthma (classified as primary  or principal diagnosis code ICD-9-CM 493XX or ICD-10-CM J45) ED visits among New Mexico residents for the years 2008-2020. The following variables are included: County, Year, Month, Age Group, Sex, Race and Ethnicity, Number of asthma emergency department visits.</eaover>
    122121<eadetcit>This dataset includes the following fields: County (alphabetic name for the 33 counties (FIPS 001-061)); ADMISSIONYEAR: 2008-2020; ADMISSIONMONTH(mm); AGEGROUP: 1=0-4 years, 2=5-9 years, 3=10-14 years, 4=15-19 years, 5=20-24 years, 6=25-29 years, 7=30-34 years, 8=35-39 years, 9=40-44 years, 10=45-49 years, 11=50-54 years, 12=55-59 years, 13=60-64 years, 14=65-69 years, 15=70-74 years, 16=75-79 years, 17=80-84 years, 18=85+ years, 19=Unknown; SEX: M=Male, F=Female, U=Unknown; RACE:W=White, B=Black, O=Other, U=Unknown; ETHNICITY:H=Hispanic, NH=Non-Hispanic, U=Unknown; COUNT_ED: Number of asthma emergency department visits.</eadetcit>
    123122</overview>
     
    153152</distinfo>
    154153<metainfo>
    155 <metd>20210712</metd>
     154<metd>20211028</metd>
    156155<metc>
    157156<cntinfo>
     
    167166<state>NM</state>
    168167<postal>87502</postal>
    169 <country>United States of America</country>
     168<country>United States Of America</country>
    170169</cntaddr>
    171170<cntvoice>18888788992</cntvoice>
  • adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/nmepht-content/xml/metadata/Asthma_Hospitalization.xml

    r24705 r25016  
    55<citeinfo>
    66<origin>New Mexico EPHTN Project Manager</origin>
    7 <pubdate>20220215</pubdate>
     7<pubdate>20220410</pubdate>
    88<title>Asthma Hospital Admissions</title>
    99<onlink/>
     
    1515<purpose>To provide data for the New Mexico Environmental Public Health Tracking (EPHT) Network consistent with the guidance for creating the asthma inpatient hospitalization Nationally Consistent Data and Measures (NCDMs). This dataset can be used to calculate asthma hospitalization measures, including 1) the number of hospitalizations for asthma; 2) crude rate of hospitalization for asthma per 10,000 population; 3) age-specific rate of hospitalization for asthma per 10,000 population; 4) age-adjusted rate of hospitalization for asthma per 10,000 population (adjusted by the direct method to the 2000 US standard population) and 5) Average, minimum and maximum number of ED visits for asthma per month.
    1616</purpose>
    17 <supplinf>The EPHT NCDMs are based on date of admission because of the goal of relating a hospitalization event with an environmental event. These Hospital Inpatient Discharge Data (HIDD) collected by the New Mexico Department of Health (DOH) include inpatient hospitalizations of individuals who are discharged from non-federal hospitals (using their admission date). Therefore, these data do not include hospitalizations from Veterans Affairs or Indian Health Service hospitals. The DOH does not systematically collect hospitalizations among New Mexico residents that occur out-of-state. All admissions reported are by county of patient's residence and not necessarily the county where the hospitalizations occurred. These data may include some transfers between hospitals for the same individual for the same asthma event. Variations in the number of transfers or readmissions for the same asthma event may vary by geographic area and affect calculated rate. This could be of importance for the southern and south-eastern counties of NM, where residents often seek care in Texas. In these counties it is possible that this leads to artificially low numbers of admissions. Data have been de-identified to protect patient confidentiality. Population data used to calculate rates are annual estimates produced by the University of New Mexico Institute for Geospatial and Population Studies (GPS). They are the official estimates and projections used in New Mexico state government.
     17<supplinf>The EPHT NCDMs are based on date of admission because of the goal of relating a hospitalization event with an environmental event. These Hospital Inpatient Discharge Data (HIDD) collected by the New Mexico Department of Health (DOH) include inpatient hospitalizations of individuals who are discharged from non-federal hospitals (using their admission date). Therefore, these data do not include hospitalizations from Veterans Affairs or Indian Health Service hospitals. The DOH does not systematically collect hospitalizations among New Mexico residents that occur out-of-state. All admissions reported are by county of patient's residence and not necessarily the county where the hospitalizations occurred. These data may include some transfers between hospitals for the same individual for the same asthma event. Variations in the number of transfers or readmissions for the same asthma event may vary by geographic area and affect calculated rate. This could be of importance for the southern and southeastern counties of NM, where residents often seek care in Texas. In these counties it is possible that this leads to artificially low numbers of admissions. Data have been de-identified to protect patient confidentiality. Population data used to calculate rates are annual estimates produced by the University of New Mexico Institute for Geospatial and Population Studies (GPS). They are the official estimates and projections used in New Mexico state government.
    1818</supplinf>
    1919</descript>
     
    9595<secsys>None</secsys>
    9696<secclass>Restricted</secclass>
    97 <sechandl>Restricted data released to an external partner may not be disseminated or distributed in a manner inconsistent with New Mexico Department of Health requirements of 7.1.27 NMAC. For guidance on use, please refer to:  http://164.64.110.239/nmac/parts/title07/07.001.0027.htm.
     97<sechandl>Restricted data released to an external partner may not be disseminated or distributed in a manner inconsistent with New Mexico Departmentof Health requirements of 7.1.27 NMAC. For guidance on use, please refer to:  http://164.64.110.239/nmac/parts/title07/07.001.0027.htm .
    9898</sechandl>
    9999</secinfo>
    100 <native>SAS Server; SAS 9.4, File: hiddepht2020.sas7bdat; Size: estimated at 3 Gb.</native>
     100<native>SASServer; SAS 9.4, File: hiddepht2020.sas7bdat; Size: estimated at 3 Gb.</native>
    101101</idinfo>
    102102<dataqual>
    103103<logic>NA</logic>
    104 <complete>These data include inpatient hospitalizations of individuals who are discharged (using their admission data) from non-federal hospitals. Therefore, these data do not include hospitalizations from Veterans Affairs or Indian Health Service hospitals. The DOH does not systematically collect hospitalizations among New Mexico residents that occur out-of-state. Information about NM hospitals can be found at the following site,  https://dhi.health.state.nm.us/providersearch/index.php. These data are based only on primary discharge diagnosis codes (ICD-9-CM: 493.0 - 493.92 and ICD-10-CM J45). Race and ethnicity are not reported in the dataset due to issues with the quality of the data collection process at individual hospitals. The NMDOH does NOT collect hospitalizations among New Mexico residents that occur out of state. All users must read and fully comprehend metadata prior to data use. Authority to collect data was established in Article 14A, 24-14A-3. Health information system; creation; duties of department as part of Health Information Systems of Chapter 24, Health and Safety, of the State of New Mexico Statues, http://public.nmcompcomm.us/nmnxtadmin/NMPublic.aspx and search for 24-14A-3.
     104<complete>These data include inpatient hospitalizations of individuals who are discharged (using their admission data) from non-federal hospitals. Therefore, these data do not include hospitalizations from Veterans Affairs or Indian Health Service hospitals. The DOH does not systematically collect hospitalizations among New Mexico residents that occur out-of-state. Information about NM hospitals can be found at the following site,  https://dhi.health.state.nm.us/providersearch/index.php . These data are based only on primary discharge diagnosis codes (ICD-9-CM: 493.0 - 493.92 and ICD-10-CM J45). Race and ethnicity are not reported in the dataset due to issues with the quality of the data collection process at individual hospitals. The NMDOH does NOT collect hospitalizations among New Mexico residents that occur out of state. All users must read and fully comprehend metadata prior to data use. Authority to collect data was established in Article 14A, 24-14A-3. Health information system; creation; duties of department as part of Health Information Systems of Chapter 24, Health and Safety, of the State of New Mexico Statues, http://public.nmcompcomm.us/nmnxtadmin/NMPublic.aspx and search for 24-14A-3.
    105105</complete>
    106106<lineage>
     
    108108<procdesc>Created the asthma hospitalization file per the instructions found in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Recommendations for Nationally Consistent Data and Measures (NCDMs) within the National Environmental Public Health Tracking Network, version 3.0 (https://ephtracking.cdc.gov/docs/CDC_NCDM_v3.pdf) and the EPHT How-to-Guide for Data Submission, Indicator Template Content Area: Asthma Indicator: Hospitalizations for Asthma Environmental Public Health Tracking  and per instructions provided in the August 1, 2017 How-to-Guide for Data Submission, Asthma Hospitalizations. Mapped results for the interactive data query include options for a background with a New Mexico base map or shaded relief. Both background maps are served from Thunderforest (www.thunderforest.com) and OpenStreetMap contributors (http://www.openstreetmap.org/copyright).
    109109</procdesc>
    110 <procdate>20210712</procdate>
     110<procdate>20220207</procdate>
    111111</procstep></lineage>
    112112</dataqual>
     
    132132<state>NM</state>
    133133<postal>87502</postal>
    134 <country>United States of America</country>
     134<country>United States Of America</country>
    135135</cntaddr>
    136136<cntvoice>18888788992</cntvoice>
     
    150150</distinfo>
    151151<metainfo>
    152 <metd>20210712</metd>
     152<metd>20220207</metd>
    153153<metc>
    154154<cntinfo>
     
    164164<state>NM</state>
    165165<postal>87502</postal>
    166 <country>United States of America</country>
     166<country>United States Of America</country>
    167167</cntaddr>
    168168<cntvoice>18888788992</cntvoice>
  • adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/nmepht-content/xml/metadata/Asthma_Mortality.xml

    r22293 r25016  
    55<citeinfo>
    66<origin>New Mexico EPHTN Project Manager</origin>
    7 <pubdate>20210108</pubdate>
     7<pubdate>20220410</pubdate>
    88<title>Asthma Mortality</title>
    99<onlink/>
     
    1111</citation>
    1212<descript>
    13 <abstract>This dataset contains county-level records for deaths of New Mexico residents due to asthma that occurred between 2001 and 2019.  The dataset was generated using information from the New Mexico Bureau of Vital Records and Health Statistics (NM-VRHS) Linked Multiple Cause of Death file. The dataset supports calculation of of the asthma mortality measures among New Mexico residents.  Measures include 1) the number of deaths from asthma, 2) crude rate of death from asthma, and 3) age-adjusted rate of death from asthma (adjusted by the direct method to the 2000 US standard population.  All rates are expressed per 100,000 persons. Asthma deaths and mortality are presented by county, for 2001-2019.</abstract>
     13<abstract>This dataset contains county-level records for deaths of New Mexico residents due to asthma that occurred between 2001 and 2020.  The dataset was generated using information from the New Mexico Bureau of Vital Records and Health Statistics (NM-VRHS) Linked Multiple Cause of Death file. The dataset supports calculation of the asthma mortality measures among New Mexico residents.  Measures include 1) the number of deaths from asthma, 2) crude rate of death from asthma, and 3) age-adjusted rate of death from asthma (adjusted by the direct method to the 2000 US standard population.  All rates are expressed per 100,000 persons. Asthma deaths and mortality are presented by county, for 2001-2020.</abstract>
    1414<purpose>Dataset was created to provide data for the New Mexico Environmental Public Health Tracking Network in order to monitor spatial and temporal variation in the annual mortality due to asthma consistent with Nationally Consistent Data and Measures (NCDMs).</purpose>
    1515<supplinf>The New Mexico Linked Multiple Cause of Death data are derived from items reported on the death certificate and coded as underlying or contributing cause of death. DATA SOURCE(S): 1)Information is gathered from the Medical Certification section of NM Death Certificate; 2)Traditionally, BVRHS nosologists trained by CDC, NCHS, (based on WHO guidelines) manually assigns underlying cause of death based on NCHS linkage rules/logic; what condition gives rise to what condition. NM nosologists have not received multiple cause training; 3) Nosologist assigns a single underlying cause of death code based on the International Classification of Disease (ICD) categories, which since 1999 has been based on the Tenth Revision ICD; 4) The underlying cause of death has historically been the basis of national and NM vital statistic cause of death compilation and presentation; 5)Since about 1996 NM has partially implemented the national electronic system for automated coding of the underlying cause of death and capture of the various (multiple) conditions listed in the medical certification of death as contributory to the demise of the decedent.  The software is commonly referred to as SuperMICAR. AUTOMATED CAUSE OF DEATH CLASSIFICATION: 1)The national automated cause of death classification system is made up of the following components: MICAR with its enhancement called SuperMICAR, ACME and Transax; 2)MICAR (Mortality Medical Indexing Classification And Retrieval) generates the multiple cause ICD codes from literal information entered from the death certificate.   SuperMICAR is an enhancement to facilitate and simplify the data entry of information from the death certificate, with the entry screens matching the cause of death section of the standard certificate;3) ACME (Automated Classification of Medical Entities) determines an underlying cause of death; 4)Transax (Translation of Axis)  basically generates the output file which contains the ACME generated underlying cause of death and the multiple causes of death codes in two contexts: entity axis codes and record axis codes; 5) Entity axis codes reflect each condition entered on the death certificate and the location as to where that condition is reported on the certification section of the death record.  Record axis codes incorporate relationships and are the codes used for most multiple cause of death analysis; 6) New Mexico has only run the SuperMicar component since the requirement to run the other components is to have a nosologist trained in multiple cause of death on staff, which NM does not; 7) After entry of the literals into SuperMicar, NM sends the file to NCHS for the remainder of the processing and NCHS returns a Transax file to the state.  The records are sent in batches through the year and sometimes there is a lengthy wait for a batch to be processed and a Transax file returned.
    1616
    17 The New Mexico Bureau of Vital Records and Health Statistics (NM-VRHS) maintains the data for issuance and for statistical reporting.  Data are collected on all deaths occurring in-state as well as deaths of NM residents that occur out-of-state.  The death coding system is ICD-10. The following International Classification of Diseases, 10th Revision, code J45 was used to identify deaths due to asthma. </supplinf>
     17The New Mexico Bureau of Vital Records and Health Statistics (NM-VRHS) maintains the data for issuance and for statistical reporting.  Data are collected on all deaths occurring in-state as well as deaths of NM residents that occur out-of-state.  The death coding system is ICD-10. The following International Classification of Diseases, 10th Revision, code J45 was used to identify deaths due to asthma.
     18</supplinf>
    1819</descript>
    1920<timeperd>
     
    2223<begdate>20010101</begdate>
    2324<begtime/>
    24 <enddate>20191231</enddate>
     25<enddate>20201231</enddate>
    2526<endtime/>
    2627</rngdates>
     
    8384<secsys>None</secsys>
    8485<secclass>Unclassified</secclass>
    85 <sechandl>Restricted (secure) access data refer to data presented at the county level that lack small cell suppression controls, and therefore have the potential to identify individual cases within a county according to age, sex, race/ethnicity, year of death, death manner, and diagnosis at death. Restricted (secure) data will only be released to external users after the New Mexico EPHT Program distributor AND the data steward, the New New Mexico Bureau of Vital Records and Health Statistics (NM-VRHS), has reviewed and authorized the request.  Restricted (secure) data must be requested on the standard NM-VRHS Request Form (_link_) and the signed Request Form submitted to NM-VRHS via FAX at (505) 827-1751, ATTN. Epidemiology Section.  To access documentation describing the data elements of the underlying multiple cause of death data, inquiries may be made to vrhs.data@state.nm.us. </sechandl>
     86<sechandl>Restricted (secure) access data refer to data presented at the county level that lack small cell suppression controls, and therefore have the potential to identify individual cases within a county according to age, sex, race/ethnicity, year of death, death manner, and diagnosis at death. Restricted (secure) data will only be released to external users after the New Mexico EPHT Program distributor AND the data steward, the New Mexico Bureau of Vital Records and Health Statistics (NM-VRHS), has reviewed and authorized the request.  Restricted (secure) data must be requested on the standard NM-VRHS Request Form (_link_) and the signed Request Form submitted to NM-VRHS via FAX at (505) 827-1751, ATTN. Epidemiology Section.  To access documentation describing the data elements of the underlying multiple cause of death data, inquiries may be made to vrhs.data@state.nm.us. </sechandl>
    8687</secinfo>
    8788<native>SAS Server 9.4</native>
     
    9394<procstep>
    9495<procdesc>Dataset developed per the instructions found in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Recommendations for Nationally Consistent Data and Measures (NCDMs) with the Environmental Public Health Tracking Network, version 1.3, (http://ephtracking.cdc.gov/docs/CDC_NCDM_Pt1_1.3.pdf)The dataset utilizes multiple cause coded cases of death code ICD-10 T58 (unintentional, non-fire related; unintentional, fire-related; and unknown intent). </procdesc>
    95 <procdate>20210107</procdate>
     96<procdate>20211008</procdate>
    9697</procstep>
    9798<procstep>
     
    115116Please note that some data queries and displays might be available only
    116117to those with restricted-access permissions.
    117 
    118 Mapped results for the interactive data query include options for a
    119 background with an NM base map or shaded relief. Both background maps
    120 are served from the NM Resource Geographic Information System (NM RGIS,
    121 rgis.unm.edu) or other servers hosted at UNM Earth Data Analysis Center.
    122118</procdesc>
    123 <procdate>20210107</procdate>
     119<procdate>20211008</procdate>
    124120</procstep></lineage>
    125121</dataqual>
    126 <eainfo>
     122<eainfo> 
    127123<overview>
    128124<eaover>This dataset contains the following fields (defined in the detailed citation below): Asthma, Age at death, Sex, Cause of death (COD), Multiple cause of death codes 1-12, Manner, Countycode, Agepop, Age group 4, Year and Month of Death. </eaover>
    129 <eadetcit>The variable Asthma is a number, which represents asthma (ICD-10 J45) if found in the multiple cause fields (1 for first position, 2 for any other of  the 11 additional fields and 0 if not found).  The variable Agepop provides age categories used in the standard age age-adjusting groupings; ages 0, 1-4, 5-14, 15-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75-84 and 85+ years.  The variable Agegrp4 provide grouping of ages 1-14, 15-44, 45-64 and 65 and older.  Sex is coded 1 for males, 2 for females and 9 for unknown or unreported. COD, underlying cause of death, and the multiple cause of death fields are character values with length four and an implied decimal between the third and fourth position.   New Mexico counties are two digit FIPS codes in the field CountyCode. Year shows year of death 2001-2019 and month show numeric values 1-12.</eadetcit>
     125<eadetcit>The variable Asthma is a number, which represents asthma (ICD-10 J45) if found in the multiple cause fields (1 for first position, 2 for any other of  the 11 additional fields and 0 if not found).  The variable Agepop provides age categories used in the standard age age-adjusting groupings; ages 0, 1-4, 5-14, 15-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75-84 and 85+ years.  The variable Agegrp4 provide grouping of ages 1-14, 15-44, 45-64 and 65 and older.  Sex is coded 1 for males, 2 for females and 9 for unknown or unreported. COD, underlying cause of death, and the multiple cause of death fields are character values with length four and an implied decimal between the third and fourth position.   New Mexico counties are two digit FIPS codes in the field CountyCode. Year shows year of death 2001-2020 and month show numeric values 1-12.</eadetcit>
    130126</overview>
    131127</eainfo>
  • adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/nmepht-content/xml/metadata/Atrazine_CommunityWater.xml

    r24138 r25016  
    55<citeinfo>
    66<origin>New Mexico EPHTN Project Manager</origin>
    7 <pubdate>20210712</pubdate>
     7<pubdate>20220405</pubdate>
    88<title>Atrazine Concentration in Community Water</title>
    99<onlink/>
     
    1111</citation>
    1212<descript>
    13 <abstract>These atrazine drinking water quality sample data for New Mexico community water systems (CWS) contain the information needed to calculate Environmental Public Health Tracking (EPHT) annual and quarterly drinking water quality mean and maximum concentration measures for each system or the for state by the number of CWS or the number of people served. The data are derived from New Mexico Safe Drinking Water Information System (SDWIS) database, 1999-2020. That dataset contains records for active CWS (active for the prior year at the time of extract from the state database, typically in February or March for the prior year’s sample data, e.g. March 2018 for the 2017 data). A CWS is a public water system that serves year-round residents of a community, subdivision, or mobile park that has at least 15 service connections or an average of at least 25 residents.  These CWSs are a subset of all NM public water systems (PWS).  Other water systems are not included. The number of CWS varies from year to year, by a few, typically 2-3.  There have been 610 CWS active at one time or another and in 2020 there were 566 active CWSs.
     13<abstract>These atrazine drinking water quality sample data for New Mexico community water systems (CWS) contain the information needed to calculate Environmental Public Health Tracking (EPHT) annual and quarterly drinking water quality mean and maximum concentration measures for each system or the for state by the number of CWS or the number of people served. The data are derived from New Mexico Safe Drinking Water Information System (SDWIS) database, 1999-2021. That dataset contains records for active CWS (active for the prior year at the time of extract from the state database, typically in February or March for the prior year’s sample data, e.g. March 2018 for the 2017 data). A CWS is a public water system that serves year-round residents of a community, subdivision, or mobile park that has at least 15 service connections or an average of at least 25 residents.  These CWSs are a subset of all NM public water systems (PWS).  Other water systems are not included. The number of CWS varies from year to year, by a few, typically 2-3.  There have been 631 CWS active at one time or another and in 2021 there were 561 active CWSs.
    1414
    1515The New Mexico Environment Department, Drinking Water Bureau, collects and maintains the original data.</abstract>
    1616<purpose>This dataset was created as part of the Environmental Public Health Tracking Network (EPHTN) drinking water quality measures. It is intended to provide researchers, public health professionals, and the public with summary information on atrazine concentrations in community drinking water in New Mexico. The EPHT Content Workgroup Water Team identified initial contaminants of concern for the national EPHT program, identified nationally consistent data sources, and developed nationally consistent data and measures (NCDMs). This dataset can be used to calculate the nationally consistent measures for the New Mexico EPHT Program.</purpose>
    17 <supplinf>Treatment of non-detects: Sample results for atrazine with concentrations less than the detection limit (but non-zero) have been replaced with a value equal to 0.5 the detection limit for the analytical method used. If a detection limit was not available from the SDWIS dataset or reported as zero, an estimate of the detection limit from available data and/or the analytical laboratory detection limit and/or a standard analytical method detection limit was applied. Missing data: The current format of the NCDMs annual dataset contains one record for annually and quarterly aggregated data and each compliance sample taken to test for atrazine among active CWS for the years 1999-2020. If samples were not collected to test for atrazine during a given year or quarter, there would be no record in the dataset. Consequently, when records are compiled for comparisons by CWSs, it may appear that the dataset has missing data. In order to mitigate the issue of "missing data" for cases when the data are in fact not missing, the carry forward procedure has been implemented.  Under this procedure, if samples were not collected to test for atrazine during a given year or quarter because the system (1) was not required to take a compliance sample during that particular time period or (2) received a sampling waver from the state for reduced frequency of monitoring based on low analytical results, then the last year or quarter sampling result value was carried forward together with the year/quarter of the actual sample collection information. However, CWSs that have come online after the start date of the data extraction query will have missing values until the system became active.  Thus, missing values may occur because the CWS was not yet active and currently these "missing values" are labeled "not sampled".
     17<supplinf>Treatment of non-detects: Sample results for atrazine with concentrations less than the detection limit (but non-zero) have been replaced with a value equal to 0.5 the detection limit for the analytical method used. If a detection limit was not available from the SDWIS dataset or reported as zero, an estimate of the detection limit from available data and/or the analytical laboratory detection limit and/or a standard analytical method detection limit was applied. Missing data: The current format of the NCDMs annual dataset contains one record for annually and quarterly aggregated data and each compliance sample taken to test for atrazine among active CWS for the years 1999-2021. If samples were not collected to test for atrazine during a given year or quarter, there would be no record in the dataset. Consequently, when records are compiled for comparisons by CWSs, it may appear that the dataset has missing data. To mitigate the issue of "missing data" for cases when the data are in fact not missing, the carry forward procedure has been implemented.  Under this procedure, if samples were not collected to test for atrazine during a given year or quarter because the system (1) was not required to take a compliance sample during that particular period or (2) received a sampling waver from the state for reduced frequency of monitoring based on low analytical results, then the last year or quarter sampling result value was carried forward together with the year/quarter of the actual sample collection information. However, CWSs that have come online after the start date of the data extraction query will have missing values until the system became active.  Thus, missing values may occur because the CWS was not yet active and currently these "missing values" are labeled "not sampled".
    1818
    1919Drinking water wholesalers that have interties and sold their water to the CWS having a retail population were not included in the dataset even when SDWIS captured this information accurately and completely.  Each importing CWS was attributed with wholesalers' applicable sampling results data. There are no other values missing for reasons beyond what the state's or EPA's monitoring framework and the structure of the EPHT NCDMs created.</supplinf>
     
    2424<begdate>19990101</begdate>
    2525<begtime/>
    26 <enddate>20201231</enddate>
     26<enddate>20211231</enddate>
    2727<endtime/>
    2828</rngdates>
     
    7373<state>NM</state>
    7474<postal>87505</postal>
    75 <country>United States Of America</country>
     75<country>United States of America</country>
    7676</cntaddr>
    7777<cntvoice>18888788992</cntvoice>
     
    9393<dataqual>
    9494<logic>NONE</logic>
    95 <complete>These data are complete with respect to CDC's NCDM requirements. This dataset contains only regulated community water systems, which were active at the time of the data extraction date from the state SDWIS database (typically in February or March for the prior year’s sample data, e.g. March 2018 for the 2017 data). All CWSs taking compliance samples from January 1, 1999-December 31, 2020 are included in the dataset. Compliance samples collected by drinking water wholesalers that have interties with and sold to the CWS having a retail population are not included within each importing CWS applicable sampling results data, even when SDWIS captured this information accurately and completely. Each importing CWS is attributed with wholesalers' applicable sampling results data. Private, transient, and non-community water systems are not included in this dataset.  Atrazine data are typically collected, however, when the analytical results exceed the 3 mcg/L MCL a confirmatory sample would provide separate results for atrazine [analyte code #2050]). Estimates of the number of people potentially exposed may be unreliable as they are based on estimates made by the water system operator. Concentrations in drinking water cannot be directly converted to exposure, because overall water consumption and the proportion of water consumed that comes from the tap are quite variable. In systems that have more than one entry point to the distribution system, the actual atrazine level at any given house is a mixture of the levels from all contributing sources. This mix is unknown in these circumstances. In addition, atrazine in drinking water is often not the sole source of dietary atrazine intake, and may be a minor component. See Supplemental Information for treatment of non-detects.</complete>
     95<complete>These data are complete with respect to CDC's NCDM requirements. This dataset contains only regulated community water systems, which were active at the time of the data extraction date from the state SDWIS database (typically in February or March for the prior year’s sample data, e.g. March 2018 for the 2017 data). All CWSs taking compliance samples from January 1, 1999-December 31, 2021, are included in the dataset. Compliance samples collected by drinking water wholesalers that have interties with and sold to the CWS having a retail population are not included within each importing CWS applicable sampling results data, even when SDWIS captured this information accurately and completely. Each importing CWS is attributed with wholesalers' applicable sampling results data. Private, transient, and non-community water systems are not included in this dataset.  Atrazine data are typically collected, however, when the analytical results exceed the 3 mcg/L MCL a confirmatory sample would provide separate results for atrazine [analyte code #2050]). Estimates of the number of people potentially exposed may be unreliable as they are based on estimates made by the water system operator. Concentrations in drinking water cannot be directly converted to exposure, because overall water consumption and the proportion of water consumed that comes from the tap are quite variable. In systems that have more than one entry point to the distribution system, the actual atrazine level at any given house is a mixture of the levels from all contributing sources. This mix is unknown in these circumstances. In addition, atrazine in drinking water is often not the sole source of dietary atrazine intake and may be a minor component. See Supplemental Information for treatment of non-detects.</complete>
    9696<lineage>
    9797<procstep>
    98 <procdesc>This dataset was created by extracting data for non-transient community water systems in NM, which were active for the entire year 1999 through 2020 or portion therein. A CWS is a public water system that serves year-round residents of a community, subdivision, or mobile home park that has at least 15 service connections or an average of at least 25 residents. Sample results are limited to samples taken between January 1, 1999 and December 31, 2020. The dataset accommodates summary-level measures of water atrazine concentrations.  This dataset has a finite number of columns and incorporates a hierarchical data structure.  This dataset contains information on CWSs representing all 33 NM counties. The data extracted from NM SDWIS were processed using the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Drinking Water Quality Nationally Consistent Data and Measures (NCDMs) How-To Guide within the Environmental Public Health Tracking Network, version 14.3, January 16, 2017.</procdesc>
    99 <procdate>20210430</procdate>
     98<procdesc>This dataset was created by extracting data for non-transient community water systems in NM, which were active for the entire year 1999 through 2021 or portion therein. A CWS is a public water system that serves year-round residents of a community, subdivision, or mobile home park that has at least 15 service connections or an average of at least 25 residents. Sample results are limited to samples taken between January 1, 1999, and December 31, 2021. The dataset accommodates summary-level measures of water atrazine concentrations.  This dataset has a finite number of columns and incorporates a hierarchical data structure.  This dataset contains information on CWSs representing all 33 NM counties. The data extracted from NM SDWIS were processed using the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Drinking Water Quality Nationally Consistent Data and Measures (NCDMs) How-To Guide within the Environmental Public Health Tracking Network, version 2, January 19, 2022.</procdesc>
     99<procdate>20220405</procdate>
    100100</procstep>
    101101<procstep>
    102102<procdesc>NM EPHT receives drinking water system data for community water systems (CWS) from the NM Environment Department Safe Drinking Water Information System (SDWIS). Data are received in MS Excel spreadsheets, with location coordinates in four different datums for CWS business address: three geographic and one unknown.  Populated place locations are captured, where possible, with a matching merge with 2018 version of USGS Geographic Names Information (NAD83) by feature name.</procdesc>
    103 <procdate>20210430</procdate>
     103<procdate>20220405</procdate>
    104104</procstep>
    105105<procstep>
    106106<procdesc>NMEPHT data queried through nmtracking.org (NMTracking) result in query-specific data sets that are community water system specific or statewide.</procdesc>
    107 <procdate>20210430</procdate>
     107<procdate>20220405</procdate>
    108108</procstep>
    109109</lineage>
     
    112112<overview>
    113113<eaover>The dataset contains annual average and maximum and the mean concentration per quarter for atrazine for the years 1999-2017. The fields in the dataset are: PWSIDNumber, TimePeriod, Analyte (Atrazine), AggregationType (mean or maximum), Concentration, and ConcentrationUnits. The dataset also contains fields describing Community Water Systems (CWS) derived from an inventory file of CWS qualifying Public Water Sytems such as number of connections and approximate number of people served. </eaover>
    114 <eadetcit>Data dictionary (last revised: February 20, 2016) is available by contacting the New Mexico EPHT Program at https://nmtracking.org/ or DOH-EHEB@state.nm.us.</eadetcit>
     114<eadetcit>Data dictionary (last revised: February 19, 2022) is available by contacting the New Mexico EPHT Program at https://nmtracking.org/ or DOH-EHEB@state.nm.us.</eadetcit>
    115115</overview>
    116116</eainfo>
     
    145145</distinfo>
    146146<metainfo>
    147 <metd>20210712</metd>
     147<metd>20220405</metd>
    148148<metc>
    149149<cntinfo>
  • adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/nmepht-content/xml/metadata/COPD_ED_Visits.xml

    r24705 r25016  
    55<citeinfo>
    66<origin>New Mexico EPHTN Project Manager</origin>
    7 <pubdate>20210713</pubdate>
     7<pubdate>20220410</pubdate>
    88<title>New Mexico Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Emergency Department Visits 2010-2020</title>
    99<onlink/>
     
    8484<state>NM</state>
    8585<postal>87502</postal>
    86 <country>United States Of America</country>
     86<country>United States of America</country>
    8787</cntaddr>
    8888<cntvoice>18888788992</cntvoice>
     
    107107<lineage>
    108108<procstep>
    109 <procdesc>Data processed according to the Emergency Department Visits for COPD Implementation Guidance and per the instructions found in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Recommendations for Nationally Consistent Data and Measures within the How-to-Guide for Data Submission, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Emergency Department (ED) Visits, Environmental Public Health Tracking, July 25, 2016. Cases include: resident emergency department visits for COPD (classified as primary  or principal diagnosis code ICD-9-CM 490XX-492XX or 496XX and ICD-10-CM J40XXX-J44XXX) in treated and released emergency department visit administrative data set (including those who were admitted as inpatients from the ED)during the year 2015. Data were reported by 36 of New Mexico's acute care, non-federal hospitals' facilities. The submitted data were extensively edited. First, each hospital's data were edited for systematic problems. Then, each record was reviewed for invalid codes, missing items, and inconsistent items (e.g., sex, race/ethnicity, and diagnosis). For example, ethnicity is set to H=Hispanic when race coding shows H and race is set to U=Unknown for reported race of H.  Data were de-duplicated but transfers were not excluded. The corrections were made to the data file until all issues were resolved. The International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) Manual and 10th Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-10-CM) Manual was used.
     109<procdesc>Data processed according to the Emergency Department Visits for COPD Implementation Guidance and per the instructions found in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Recommendations for Nationally Consistent Data and Measures within the How-to-Guide for Data Submission, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Emergency Department (ED) Visits, Environmental Public Health Tracking, July 25, 2016. Cases include: resident emergency department visits for COPD (classified as primary or principal diagnosis code ICD-9-CM 490XX-492XX or 496XX and ICD-10-CM J40XXX-J44XXX) in treated and released emergency department visit administrative data set (including those who were admitted as inpatients from the ED)during the year 2015. Data were reported by 36 of New Mexico's acute care, non-federal hospitals' facilities. The submitted data were extensively edited. First, each hospital's data were edited for systematic problems. Then, each record was reviewed for invalid codes, missing items, and inconsistent items (e.g., sex, race/ethnicity, and diagnosis). For example, ethnicity is set to H=Hispanic when race coding shows H and race is set to U=Unknown for reported race of H.  Data were de-duplicated but transfers were not excluded. The corrections were made to the data file until all issues were resolved. The International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) Manual and 10th Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-10-CM) Manual was used.
    110110
    111111ED data are collected from facilities yearly.  The long-term plan is for the New Mexico Department of Health (NMDOH) to collect these data through an ED electronic reporting (e-reporting) system currently being developed with the New Mexico Health Information Collaborative (NMHIC).  However, few facilities are reporting to the ED e-reporting system at this time.  Therefore, in the interim, we have been requesting that each facility submit its data directly to the NMDOH by May 31 of each year, beginning in 2017.  If a facility is already working with NMHIC, they continue to do so, but also provide data to NMDOH directly.
    112112
    113 The department is authorized to request and receive these data under the Public Health Act which grants the department authority to investigate, control and abate the cause of diseases (Section 24-1-3C).  Additional authority was enacted (NMAC 7.4.3.10, http://164.64.110.239/nmac/parts/title07/07.004.0003.htm  ) on April 30, 2009 which specifically requires that all non-federal emergency departments in the State of New Mexico must comply with NMDOH requests for ED data. The Health Information Accountability and Portability Act (HIPAA) provides that covered entities (including hospitals and their emergency departments) may disclose protected health information, without authorization, to public health authorities who are legally authorized to receive such reports for the purpose of preventing or controlling disease, injury , or disability.  This would include, for example, the reporting of a disease or injury, and conducting public health surveillance.  The NMDOH is such a public health authority.</procdesc>
     113The department is authorized to request and receive these data under the Public Health Act which grants the department authority to investigate, control and abate the cause of diseases (Section 24-1-3C).  Additional authority was enacted (NMAC 7.4.3.10, http://164.64.110.239/nmac/parts/title07/07.004.0003.htm  ) on April 30, 2009 which specifically requires that all non-federal emergency departments in the State of New Mexico must comply with NMDOH requests for ED data. The Health Information Accountability and Portability Act (HIPAA) provides that covered entities (including hospitals and their emergency departments) may disclose protected health information, without authorization, to public health authorities who are legally authorized to receive such reports for the purpose of preventing or controlling disease, injury, or disability.  This would include, for example, the reporting of a disease or injury, and conducting public health surveillance.  The NMDOH is such a public health authority.</procdesc>
    114114<procdate>20211017</procdate>
    115115</procstep>
     
    153153<custom>For access to unrestricted or public use data, please see: https://nmtracking.org for New Mexico data or https://ephtracking.cdc.gov/showHome.action and https://ephtracking.cdc.gov/DataExplorer/ for national or multistate data. 
    154154
    155 For access to restricted or secure New Mexico data please communicate directly with us: https://nmtracking.org/about/ContactInformation.html.  Restricted (secure) data will only be released to external users after the New Mexico EPHT Program distributor responsible for management of data requests has reviewed the request. The request must include the requestor's name, affiliation, contact information, intended use of the data and whether the use of the data is intended to result in publication.  Specific data elements requested must also be included.
     155For access to restricted or secure New Mexico data please communicate directly: https://nmtracking.doh.nm.gov/about/ContactInformation.html.  Restricted (secure) data will only be released to external users after the New Mexico EPHT Program distributor responsible for management of data requests has reviewed the request. The request must include the requestor's name, affiliation, contact information, intended use of the data and whether the use of the data is intended to result in publication.  Specific data elements requested must also be included.
    156156</custom>
    157157</distinfo>
    158158<metainfo>
    159 <metd>20210713</metd>
     159<metd>20211017</metd>
    160160<metc>
    161161<cntinfo>
  • adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/nmepht-content/xml/metadata/COPD_Hospitalizations.xml

    r24705 r25016  
    1515<purpose>To provide data for the New Mexico Environmental Public Health Tracking Network (EPHT) consistent with the guidance for creating COPD Diagnosis inpatient hospital admissions for Nationally Consistent Data and Measures (NCDM), COPD_Hospitalization-DataSubmission_How-to-Guide - 2018. This dataset can be used to calculate COPD hospitalization measures, including 1) the number of hospitalizations for COPD; 2) Rate of hospitalization for COPD by age group (total, 25-44, 45-64, 65-84, and 85+) per 10,000 population; 3) Age-Adjusted rate for COPD among persons 25 and over per 10,000 population (adjusted by the direct method to the 2000 Standard US population).  Other analyses are enabled for the NMTracking portal and NMIBIS queries.
    1616</purpose>
    17 <supplinf>The EPHT nationally consistent data and measures (NCDMs) are based on date of admission because of the goal of relating a hospitalization event with an environmental event. These Hospital Inpatient Discharge Data (HIDD) collected by the New Mexico Department of Health (DOH) include inpatient hospitalizations of individuals who are discharged from non-federal hospitals (using their admission date). Therefore, these data do not include hospitalizations from Veterans Affairs or Indian Health Service hospitals. The DOH does not systematically collect hospitalizations among New Mexico residents that occur out-of-state. All admissions reported are by county of patient's residence and not necessarily the county where the hospitalizations occurred. These data may include some transfers between hospitals for the same individual for the same COPD event. Variations in the number of transfers or readmissions for the same COPD event may vary by geographic area and affect calculated rate. This could be of importance for the southern and south-eastern counties of NM, where residents often seek care in Texas. In these counties it is possible that this leads to artificially low numbers of admissions. Data have been de-identified to protect patient confidentiality. Population data used to calculate rates are annual estimates produced by the University of New Mexico Institute for Applied Research Services (IARS) Geospatial and Population Studies (GPS). They are the official estimates and projections used in New Mexico state government.</supplinf>
     17<supplinf>The EPHT nationally consistent data and measures (NCDMs) are based on date of admission because of the goal of relating a hospitalization event with an environmental event. These Hospital Inpatient Discharge Data (HIDD) collected by the New Mexico Department of Health (DOH) include inpatient hospitalizations of individuals who are discharged from non-federal hospitals (using their admission date). Therefore, these data do not include hospitalizations from Veterans Affairs or Indian Health Service hospitals. The DOH does not systematically collect hospitalizations among New Mexico residents that occur out-of-state. All admissions reported are by county of patient's residence and not necessarily the county where the hospitalizations occurred. These data may include some transfers between hospitals for the same individual for the same COPD event. Variations in the number of transfers or readmissions for the same COPD event may vary by geographic area and affect calculated rate. This could be of importance for the southern and southeastern counties of NM, where residents often seek care in Texas. In these counties it is possible that this leads to artificially low numbers of admissions. Data have been de-identified to protect patient confidentiality. Population data used to calculate rates are annual estimates produced by the University of New Mexico Institute for Applied Research Services (IARS) Geospatial and Population Studies (GPS). They are the official estimates and projections used in New Mexico state government.</supplinf>
    1818</descript>
    1919<timeperd>
     
    131131<state>NM</state>
    132132<postal>87502</postal>
    133 <country>United States Of America</country>
     133<country>United States of America</country>
    134134</cntaddr>
    135135<cntvoice>18888788992</cntvoice>
     
    146146<custom>For access to unrestricted or public use data, please see:  https://nmtracking.org for New Mexico data or https://ephtracking.cdc.gov/showHome.action and https://ephtracking.cdc.gov/DataExplorer/ for national or multistate data. 
    147147
    148 For access to restricted or secure New Mexico data please communicate directly with us: https://nmtracking.org/about/ContactInformation.html.  Restricted (secure) data will only be released to external users after the New Mexico EPHT Program distributor responsible for management of data requests has reviewed the request. The request must include the requestor's name, affiliation, contact information, intended use of the data and whether the use of the data is intended to result in publication.  Specific data elements requested must also be included.</custom>
     148For access to restricted or secure New Mexico data please communicate with us: https://nmtracking.doh.nm.gov/about/ContactInformation.html.  Restricted (secure) data will only be released to external users after the New Mexico EPHT Program distributor responsible for management of data requests has reviewed the request. The request must include the requestor's name, affiliation, contact information, intended use of the data and whether the use of the data is intended to result in publication.  Specific data elements requested must also be included.</custom>
    149149</distinfo>
    150150<metainfo>
    151 <metd>20210713</metd>
     151<metd>20211108</metd>
    152152<metc>
    153153<cntinfo>
  • adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/nmepht-content/xml/metadata/COPD_Mortality.xml

    r22293 r25016  
    55<citeinfo>
    66<origin>New Mexico EPHTN Project Manager</origin>
    7 <pubdate>20210108</pubdate>
     7<pubdate>20220410</pubdate>
    88<title>COPD Mortality</title>
    99<onlink/>
     
    1111</citation>
    1212<descript>
    13 <abstract>This dataset contains county-level records for deaths of New Mexico residents due to COPD that occurred between 2001 and 2019.  The dataset was generated using information from the New Mexico Bureau of Vital Records and Health Statistics (NM-VRHS) Linked Multiple Cause of Death file. The dataset supports calculation of of the COPD mortality measures among New Mexico residents.  Measures include 1) the number of deaths from COPD, 2) crude rate of death from COPD, and 3) age-adjusted rate of death from COPD (adjusted by the direct method to the 2000 US standard population.  All rates are expressed per 100,000 persons. COPD deaths and mortality are presented by county, for 2001-2019.</abstract>
     13<abstract>This dataset contains county-level records for deaths of New Mexico residents due to COPD that occurred between 2001 and 2020.  The dataset was generated using information from the New Mexico Bureau of Vital Records and Health Statistics (NM-VRHS) Linked Multiple Cause of Death file. The dataset supports calculation of of the COPD mortality measures among New Mexico residents.  Measures include 1) the number of deaths from COPD, 2) crude rate of death from COPD, and 3) age-adjusted rate of death from COPD (adjusted by the direct method to the 2000 US standard population.  All rates are expressed per 100,000 persons. COPD deaths and mortality are presented by county, for 2001-2020.</abstract>
    1414<purpose>Dataset was created to provide data for the New Mexico Environmental Public Health Tracking Network in order to monitor spatial and temporal variation in the annual mortality due to COPD consistent with Nationally Consistent Data and Measures (NCDMs).</purpose>
    1515<supplinf>The New Mexico Linked Multiple Cause of Death data are derived from items reported on the death certificate and coded as underlying or contributing cause of death. DATA SOURCE(S): 1) Information is gathered from the Medical Certification section of NM Death Certificate; 2 Traditionally, BVRHS nosologists trained by CDC, NCHS, (based on WHO guidelines) manually assigns underlying cause of death based on NCHS linkage rules/logic; what condition gives rise to what condition. NM nosologists have not received multiple cause training; 3) Nosologist assigns a single underlying cause of death code based on the International Classification of Disease (ICD) categories, which since 1999 has been based on the Tenth Revision ICD; 4) The underlying cause of death has historically been the basis of national and NM vital statistic cause of death compilation and presentation; 5)Since about 1996 NM has partially implemented the national electronic system for automated coding of the underlying cause of death and capture of the various (multiple) conditions listed in the medical certification of death as contributory to the demise of the decedent.  The software is commonly referred to as SuperMICAR. AUTOMATED CAUSE OF DEATH CLASSIFICATION: 1)The national automated cause of death classification system is made up of the following components: MICAR with its enhancement called SuperMICAR, ACME and Transax; 2)MICAR (Mortality Medical Indexing Classification And Retrieval) generates the multiple cause ICD codes from literal information entered from the death certificate.   SuperMICAR is an enhancement to facilitate and simplify the data entry of information from the death certificate, with the entry screens matching the cause of death section of the standard certificate;3) ACME (Automated Classification of Medical Entities) determines an underlying cause of death; 4)Transax (Translation of Axis)  basically generates the output file which contains the ACME generated underlying cause of death and the multiple causes of death codes in two contexts: entity axis codes and record axis codes; 5) Entity axis codes reflect each condition entered on the death certificate and the location as to where that condition is reported on the certification section of the death record.  Record axis codes incorporate relationships and are the codes used for most multiple cause of death analysis; 6) New Mexico has only run the SuperMicar component since the requirement to run the other components is to have a nosologist trained in multiple cause of death on staff, which NM does not; 7) After entry of the literals into SuperMicar, NM sends the file to NCHS for the remainder of the processing and NCHS returns a Transax file to the state.  The records are sent in batches through the year and sometimes there is a lengthy wait for a batch to be processed and a Transax file returned.
     
    2222<begdate>20010101</begdate>
    2323<begtime/>
    24 <enddate>20191231</enddate>
     24<enddate>20201231</enddate>
    2525<endtime/>
    2626</rngdates>
     
    7979<secsys>None</secsys>
    8080<secclass>Unclassified</secclass>
    81 <sechandl>Restricted (secure) access data refer to data presented at the county level that lack small cell suppression controls, and therefore have the potential to identify individual cases within a county according to age, sex, race/ethnicity, year of death, death manner, and diagnosis at death. Restricted (secure) data will only be released to external users after the New Mexico EPHT Program distributor AND the data steward, the New New Mexico Bureau of Vital Records and Health Statistics (NM-VRHS), has reviewed and authorized the request.  Restricted (secure) data must be requested on the standard NM-VRHS Request Form (_link_) and the signed Request Form submitted to NM-VRHS via FAX at (505) 827-1751, ATTN. Epidemiology Section.  To access documentation describing the data elements of the underlying multiple cause of death data, inquiries may be made to vrhs.data@state.nm.us. </sechandl>
     81<sechandl>Restricted (secure) access data refer to data presented at the county level that lack small cell suppression controls, and therefore have the potential to identify individual cases within a county according to age, sex, race/ethnicity, year of death, death manner, and diagnosis at death. Restricted (secure) data will only be released to external users after the New Mexico EPHT Program distributor AND the data steward, the New Mexico Bureau of Vital Records and Health Statistics (NM-VRHS), has reviewed and authorized the request.  Restricted (secure) data must be requested on the standard NM-VRHS Request Form (_link_) and the signed Request Form submitted to NM-VRHS via FAX at (505) 827-1751, ATTN. Epidemiology Section.  To access documentation describing the data elements of the underlying multiple cause of death data, inquiries may be made to vrhs.data@state.nm.us. </sechandl>
    8282</secinfo>
    8383<native>SAS Server 9.4</native>
     
    8989<procstep>
    9090<procdesc>Dataset developed per the instructions found in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Recommendations for Nationally Consistent Data and Measures (NCDMs) with the Environmental Public Health Tracking Network, version 1.3, (http://ephtracking.cdc.gov/docs/CDC_NCDM_Pt1_1.3.pdf)The dataset utilizes multiple cause coded cases of death code ICD-10 J45. </procdesc>
    91 <procdate>20210107</procdate>
     91<procdate>20211109</procdate>
    9292</procstep>
    9393<procstep>
     
    100100to those with restricted-access permissions.
    101101</procdesc>
    102 <procdate>20210108</procdate>
     102<procdate>20211109</procdate>
    103103</procstep></lineage>
    104104</dataqual>
     
    106106<overview>
    107107<eaover>This dataset contains the following fields (defined in the detailed citation below): COPD, Age at death, Sex, Cause of death (COD), Multiple cause of death codes 1-12, Manner, Countycode, Agepop, Age group 4, Year and Month of Death. </eaover>
    108 <eadetcit>The variable COPD is a number, which represents COPD (ICD-10 J45) if found in the multiple cause fields (1 for first position, 2 for any other of  the 11 additional fields and 0 if not found).  The variable Agepop provides age categories used in the standard age age-adjusting groupings; ages 0, 1-4, 5-14, 15-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75-84 and 85+ years.  The variable Agegrp4 provide grouping of ages 1-14, 15-44, 45-64 and 65 and older.  Sex is coded 1 for males, 2 for females and 9 for unknown or unreported. COD, underlying cause of death, and the multiple cause of death fields are character values with length four and an implied decimal between the third and fourth position.   New Mexico counties are two digit FIPS codes in the field CountyCode. Year shows year of death 2001-2019 and month show numeric values 1-12.</eadetcit>
     108<eadetcit>The variable COPD is a number, which represents COPD (ICD-10 J45) if found in the multiple cause fields (1 for first position, 2 for any other of the 11 additional fields and 0 if not found).  The variable Agepop provides age categories used in the standard age age-adjusting groupings; ages 0, 1-4, 5-14, 15-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75-84 and 85+ years.  The variable Agegrp4 provide grouping of ages 1-14, 15-44, 45-64 and 65 and older.  Sex is coded 1 for males, 2 for females and 9 for unknown or unreported. COD, underlying cause of death, and the multiple cause of death fields are character values with length four and an implied decimal between the third and fourth position.   New Mexico counties are two digit FIPS codes in the field CountyCode. Year shows year of death 2001-2020 and month show numeric values 1-12.</eadetcit>
    109109</overview>
    110110</eainfo>
     
    139139</distinfo>
    140140<metainfo>
    141 <metd>20210108</metd>
     141<metd>20211109</metd>
    142142<metc>
    143143<cntinfo>
  • adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/nmepht-content/xml/metadata/COPoison_Hospitalization.xml

    r24705 r25016  
    55<citeinfo>
    66<origin>New Mexico EPHTN Project Manager</origin>
    7 <pubdate>20220215</pubdate>
     7<pubdate>20220410</pubdate>
    88<title>Carbon Monoxide Poisoning Hospitalizations, 1999-2020</title>
    99<onlink/>
     
    1313<abstract>This dataset contains case counts of unintentional carbon monoxide poisonings (ICD9-CM 986, e-codes E8682, E8683, E8688, E8689, E9520, E9521, E9820, E9821 or ICD-10-CM T5801, T5804, T5811, T5814, T582X1, T582X4, T588X1, T582X4, T588X1, T588X4, T5891 or T5894 broken out by fire-related, non-fire related and unknown cause) inpatient hospitalizations among New Mexico residents for the years 1999-2020. These data are stratified by year of admission, county of residence, age group, and sex.</abstract>
    1414<purpose>To provide data for the New Mexico Environmental Public Health Tracking Network consistent with the guidance for creating the CO poisoning inpatient hospitalization Nationally Consistent Data and Measures (NCDMs).</purpose>
    15 <supplinf>Data have been de-identified to protect patient confidentiality. Unintentional CO poisoning hospitalizations are selected based on a combination of ICD-9-CM and e-codes. The New Mexico EPHT Program receives calendar year inpatient hospitalization discharge data annually from the New Mexico Health Policy Commission (NMHPC). These data are incorporated into a SAS database where the data are then organized by admission year. All admissions reported are by county of patient's residence and not necessarily the county where the hospitalizations occurred. Basic data verification procedures are completed by NMHPC on a regular basis. Additional fields are computed by NMHPC. Special note: NM residents that are hospitalized for unintentional CO poisoning out-of-state are not included in this database. This could be of importance for the southern and south-eastern counties of NM, where residents often seek care in Texas. In these counties it is possible that this leads to artificially low numbers of admissions</supplinf>
     15<supplinf>Data have been de-identified to protect patient confidentiality. Unintentional CO poisoning hospitalizations are selected based on a combination of ICD-9-CM and ICD-10-CM codes. These Hospital Inpatient Discharge Data (HIDD) collected by the New Mexico Department of Health (DOH) include inpatient hospitalizations of individuals who are discharged from non-federal hospitals (using their admission date). Therefore these data do not include hospitalizations from Veterans Affairs or Indian Health Service hospitals. These data should not include transfers between hospitals for the same individual for the same event. Transfers have been excluded. Special note: NM residents that are hospitalized for unintentional CO poisoning out-of-state are not included in this database. This could be of importance for the southern and southeastern counties of NM, where residents often seek care in Texas. In these counties it is possible that this leads to artificially low numbers of admissions</supplinf>
    1616</descript>
    1717<timeperd>
     
    9797<sechandl>Restricted (secure) data released to an external partner may not be disseminated or distributed in a manner inconsistent with New Mexico Department of Health privacy policies.</sechandl>
    9898</secinfo>
    99 <native>SAS Server; SAS 9.4 file: hiddepht2020.sas7bdat; Size: estimated at 0.6 Gb.</native>
     99<native>SASServer; SAS 9.4 file: hiddepht2020.sas7bdat; Size: estimated at 0.6 Gb.</native>
    100100</idinfo>
    101101<dataqual>
     
    105105<procstep>
    106106<procdesc>Data processed according to the Carbon Monoxide Poisoning Implementation Guidance.</procdesc>
    107 <procdate>20210926</procdate>
     107<procdate>20211108</procdate>
    108108</procstep>
    109109<procstep>
    110110<procdesc>Created the CO poisoning hospitalization file per the instructions found in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Recommendations for Nationally Consistent Data and Measures within the Environmental Public Health Tracking Network, version 2.0, August 1, 2011 and per instructions provided in the July 25, 2018 How-to Guide, Hospitalizations for Carbon Monoxide Poisoning.
    111111</procdesc>
    112 <procdate>20210926</procdate>
     112<procdate>20211108</procdate>
    113113</procstep></lineage>
    114114</dataqual>
    115115<eainfo>
    116116<overview>
    117 <eaover>This data contains the following fields: State, County, Year, Age Group, Sex, Intention, and Fire-related. The important measure is the number of unintentional non-fire-related CO-poisoning hospitalization admissions by year and county.</eaover>
     117<eaover>This data contains the following fields: State, County, Year, AgeGroup, Sex, Intention, and Fire-related. The important measure is the number of unintentional non-fire-related CO-poisoning hospitalization admissions by year and county.</eaover>
    118118<eadetcit>State is New Mexico (FIPS 35) and County is alphabetic name for the 33 counties (FIPS 001-061). Admission Year is the year the patient was admitted (YYYY). Age Group is the age category of the patient at the time of admission. There are 7 different age groupings, typically the standard million groupings are used, particularly for age-adjusted rates; 19 5-year age categories, beginning with 0-4 years. Sex is the sex of the patient (M,F,U).</eadetcit>
    119119</overview>
     
    149149</distinfo>
    150150<metainfo>
    151 <metd>20210713</metd>
     151<metd>20220410</metd>
    152152<metc>
    153153<cntinfo>
     
    163163<state>NM</state>
    164164<postal>87505</postal>
    165 <country>United States of America</country>
     165<country>United States Of America</country>
    166166</cntaddr>
    167167<cntvoice>18888788992</cntvoice>
  • adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/nmepht-content/xml/metadata/COPoisoning_ED_Visits.xml

    r24705 r25016  
    55<citeinfo>
    66<origin>New Mexico EPHTN Project Manager</origin>
    7 <pubdate>20220215</pubdate>
     7<pubdate>20210713</pubdate>
    88<title>Carbon Monoxide Poisoning Emergency Department Visits, 2008-2020</title>
    99<onlink/>
     
    4141<theme>
    4242<themekt>PH_DiseaseClassification_ICD-9-CM</themekt>
    43 <themekey>Tox eff carbon monoxide; 986, Acc poison-exhaust gas; E868.2, Acc pois-co/domestc fuel; E868.3, Acc pois-carbn monox NEC; E868.8, Acc pois-carbn monox NOS; E868.9, Poison-exhaust gas; E952.0, Undeter pois-exhaust gas; E982.0, Undetermin poison-co NEC; E982.1,</themekey>
     43<themekey>Tox eff carbon monoxide; 986, Acc poison-exhaust gas; E868.2, Acc pois-co/domestic fuel; E868.3, Acc pois-carbn monox NEC; E868.8, Acc pois-carbn monox NOS; E868.9, Poison-exhaust gas; E952.0, Undeter pois-exhaust gas; E982.0, Undetermin poison-co NEC; E982.1,</themekey>
    4444</theme>
    4545<theme>
     
    8383<state>NM</state>
    8484<postal>87502</postal>
    85 <country>United States of America</country>
     85<country>United States Of America</country>
    8686</cntaddr>
    8787<cntvoice>18888788992</cntvoice>
     
    9999<sechandl>Restricted data released to an external partner may not be disseminated or distributed.</sechandl>
    100100</secinfo>
    101 <native>SAS Server; SAS 9.4, File name: nm_ed_0820.sas7bdat</native>
     101<native>SASServer; SAS 9.4, File name: nm_ed_0820.sas7bdat</native>
    102102</idinfo>
    103103<dataqual>
    104104<logic>NONE</logic>
    105 <complete>These data include ED visits of individuals who are discharged from 36 New Mexico's acute care, non-federal hospital facilities. There are some important caveats to keep in mind when using these data:  data are submitted by individual hospital emergency departments which have varied information systems, databases, capacities to extract data and file formats that are produced; coding within the compiled dataset may not always uniform; currently, limited quality control or assurance efforts are in place.  Data submitted have been examined for internal consistency and to determine whether they have conformed to the NMDOH request guidelines.  Each facility is contacted to troubleshoot when needed. However, no chart reviews have been conducted to determine the reliability or validity of these data as reported.  The NMDOH does not take responsibility for the quality of the data.</complete>
     105<complete>These data include ED visits of individuals who are discharged from 36 New Mexico's acute care, non-federal hospitals' facilities. There are some important caveats to keep in mind when using these data:  data are submitted by individual hospital emergency departments which have varied information systems, databases, capacities to extract data and file formats that are produced; coding within the compiled dataset may not always uniform; currently, limited quality control or assurance efforts are in place.  Data submitted have been examined for internal consistency and to determine whether they have conformed to the NMDOH request guidelines.  Each facility is contacted to troubleshoot when needed. However, no chart reviews have been conducted to determine the reliability or validity of these data as reported.  The NMDOH does not take responsibility for the quality of the data.</complete>
    106106<lineage>
    107107<procstep>
    108 <procdesc>Data processed according to the Emergency Department Visits Carbon Monoxide Poisoning Implementation Guidance. Per the instructions found in the: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Recommendations for Nationally Consistent Data and Measures within the Environmental Public Health Tracking Network, Content Area: Carbon Monoxide, Indicator: ED Visits for Carbon Monoxide Poisoning, July 25, 2018. Cases include resident emergency department visits for CO poisoning, which meet the 1998 CSTE case definition for public health surveillance for a Confirmed or Probable case of acute CO poisoning in treated and released emergency department visit administrative data set. Cases with any intentional cause of carbon monoxide poisoning (E952.0, E952.1) or other intentional injury (E950.0-E979.9, E990.0-E999) anywhere in the record are excluded. Data were reported by 36 of New Mexico's acute care, non-federal hospitals' facilities. The submitted data were extensively edited. First, each hospital's data were edited for systematic problems. Then, each record was reviewed for invalid codes, missing items, and inconsistent items (e.g., sex and diagnosis). Data were de-duplicated but transfers were not excluded. The corrections were made to the data file until all issues were resolved. The International Classification of Diseases, 9th and 10th Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM and ICD-10-CM) Manual were used.&#13;
     108<procdesc>Data processed according to the Emergency Department Visits Carbon Monoxide Poisoning Implementation Guidance. Per the instructions found in the : Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Recommendations for Nationally Consistent Data and Measures within the Environmental Public Health Tracking Network, Content Area: Carbon Monoxide, Indicator: ED Visits for Carbon Monoxide Poisoning, July 25, 2018. Cases include: resident emergency department visits for CO poisoning, which meet the 1998 CSTE case definition for public health surveillance for a Confirmed or Probable case of acute CO poisoning in treated and released emergency department visit administrative data set. Cases with any intentional cause of carbon monoxide poisoning (E952.0, E952.1) or other intentional injury (E950.0-E979.9, E990.0-E999) anywhere in the record are excluded. Data were reported by 36 of New Mexico's acute care, non-federal hospitals' facilities. The submitted data were extensively edited. First, each hospital's data were edited for systematic problems. Then, each record was reviewed for invalid codes, missing items, and inconsistent items (e.g., sex and diagnosis). Data were de-duplicated but transfers were not excluded. The corrections were made to the data file until all issues were resolved. The International Classification of Diseases, 9th and 10th Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM and ICD-10-CM) Manual were used.&#13;
    109109 ED data are collected from facilities yearly.  The long-term plan is for the New Mexico Department of Health (NMDOH) to collect these data through an ED electronic reporting (e-reporting) system currently being developed with the New Mexico Health Information Collaborative (NMHIC).  However, few facilities are reporting to the ED e-reporting system at this time.  Therefore, in the interim, we have been requesting that each facility submit its data directly to the NMDOH by May 31 of each year, beginning in 2017. If a facility is already working with NMHIC, they continue to do so, but also provide data to NMDOH directly. The department is authorized to request and receive these data under the Public Health Act which grants the department authority to investigate, control and abate the cause of diseases (Section 24-1-3C).  Additional authority was enacted (NMAC 7.4.3.10) on April 30, 2009 which specifically requires that all non-federal emergency departments in the State of New Mexico must comply with NMDOH requests for ED data.&#13; 
    110110 &#13;
    111  The Health Information Accountability and Portability Act (HIPAA) provides that covered entities (including hospitals and their emergency departments) may disclose protected health information, without authorization, to public health authorities who are legally authorized to receive such reports for the purpose of preventing or controlling disease, injury, or disability.  This would include, for example, the reporting of a disease or injury, and conducting public health surveillance.  The NMDOH is such a public health authority.</procdesc>
     111 The Health Information Accountability and Portability Act (HIPAA) provides that covered entities (including hospitals and their emergency departments) may disclose protected health information, without authorization, to public health authorities who are legally authorized to receive such reports for the purpose of preventing or controlling disease, injury , or disability.  This would include, for example, the reporting of a disease or injury, and conducting public health surveillance.  The NMDOH is such a public health authority.</procdesc>
    112112<procdate>20210908</procdate>
    113113</procstep>
     
    134134<state>NM</state>
    135135<postal>87502</postal>
    136 <country>United States of America</country>
     136<country>United States Of America</country>
    137137</cntaddr>
    138138<cntvoice>18888788992</cntvoice>
  • adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/nmepht-content/xml/metadata/CO_Exposure_Calls.xml

    r24705 r25016  
    55<citeinfo>
    66<origin>New Mexico EPHTN Project Manager</origin>
    7 <pubdate>20220215</pubdate>
     7<pubdate>20220214</pubdate>
    88<title>Carbon Monoxide Exposure Calls</title>
    99<onlink/>
     
    2323If initial call is long after exposure and a patient had related clinical effects, a definitive outcome which best describes the known "medical" outcome is selected;
    2424
    25 No effect: Patient developed no symptoms. Follow-up is required to make determination, unless the initial call occurs soon after exposure.
    26 Minor effect:  Patient exhibited minimally bothersome symptoms, e.g. drowsiness, skin, or mucous membrane manifestations. The symptoms usually resolve rapidly, and the patient returned to a state of well-being. Follow-up is required unless the call occurs long after exposure and clinical effects do not worsen. Unless the residual symptoms are long-term and of minimal clinical significance, patients are followed until symptoms resolve.
     25No effect:  Patient developed no symptoms. Follow-up is required to make determination, unless the initial call occurs soon after exposure.
     26Minor effect:  Patient exhibited minimally bothersome symptoms, i.e. drowsiness, skin, or mucous membrane manifestations. The symptoms usually resolve rapidly and the patient returned to a state of well-being. Follow-up is required unless the call occurs long after exposure and clinical effects do not worsen. Unless the residual symptoms are long-term and of minimal clinical significance, patients are followed until symptoms resolve.
    2727
    28 Moderate effect:  Patient exhibited pronounced symptoms, e.g. disorientation, prolonged or more systemic than minor symptoms. Treatment is indicated. Follow-up is required unless the initial call occurs long after exposure that clinical effects did not worsen. Unless the residual symptoms are long-term and of minimal clinical significance, patients are followed until resolved.
     28Moderate effect:  Patient exhibited pronounced symptoms, i.e. disorientation, prolonged or more systemic than minor symptoms. Treatment is indicated. Follow-up is required unless the initial call occurs long after exposure that clinical effects did not worsen. Unless the residual symptoms are long-term and of minimal clinical significance, patients are followed until resolved.
    2929
    30 Major effect: Patient exhibited life-threatening or resulted in significant disability or disfigurement symptoms, e.g. coma, cardiac or respiratory arrest. Follow-up is required unless the call occurs long after exposure and clinical effect(s) did not worsen. Unless the residual symptoms are long-term or permanent, patients are followed until symptoms have resolved or nearly resolved.
     30Major effect: Patient exhibited life-threatening or resulted in significant disability or disfigurement symptoms, i.e. coma, cardiac or respiratory arrest. Follow-up is required unless the call occurs long after exposure and clinical effect(s) did not worsen. Unless the residual symptoms are long-term or permanent, patients are followed until symptoms have resolved or nearly resolved.
    3131
    3232Death/expired: Patient dies as a result or as a complication of exposure.
     
    9898<state>NM</state>
    9999<postal>87502</postal>
    100 <country>United States of America</country>
     100<country>United States Of America</country>
    101101</cntaddr>
    102102<cntvoice>18888788992</cntvoice>
     
    114114<sechandl>Restricted data released to an external partner may not be disseminated or distributed.</sechandl>
    115115</secinfo>
    116 <native>SAS Server; SAS 9.4, File name: co_pcc.sas7bdat</native>
     116<native>SASServer; SAS 9.4, File name: co_pcc.sas7bdat</native>
    117117</idinfo>
    118118<dataqual>
     
    148148<state>NM</state>
    149149<postal>87502</postal>
    150 <country>United States of America</country>
     150<country>United States Of America</country>
    151151</cntaddr>
    152152<cntvoice>18888788992</cntvoice>
     
    178178<state>NM</state>
    179179<postal>87505</postal>
    180 <country>United States of America</country>
     180<country>United States Of America</country>
    181181</cntaddr>
    182182<cntvoice>18888788992</cntvoice>
  • adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/nmepht-content/xml/metadata/COpoisoning_Mortality.xml

    r22293 r25016  
    55<citeinfo>
    66<origin>New Mexico EPHTN Project Manager</origin>
    7 <pubdate>20210108</pubdate>
     7<pubdate>20220308</pubdate>
    88<title>Carbon Monoxide Poisoning Mortality</title>
    99<onlink/>
     
    1111</citation>
    1212<descript>
    13 <abstract>This dataset contains county-level records for deaths of New Mexico residents due to carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning (unintentional fire-related, unintentional non-fire related, and unknown intent)that occurred between 2001 and 2019.  The dataset was generated using information from the New Mexico Bureau of Vital Records and Health Statistics (NM-VRHS)Linked Multiple Cause of Death file. The dataset supports calculation of of the CO poisoning mortality measures among New Mexico residents.  Measures include 1) the number of deaths from CO poisoning, 2) crude rate of death from CO poisoning, and 3) age-adjusted rate of death from CO poisoning (adjusted by the direct method to the 2000 US standard population.  All rates are expressed per 100,000 persons. CO poisoning deaths and mortality are presented by county, for 2001-2019.</abstract>
     13<abstract>This dataset contains county-level records for deaths of New Mexico residents due to carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning (unintentional fire-related, unintentional non-fire related, and unknown intent) that occurred between 2001 and 2020.  The dataset was generated using information from the New Mexico Bureau of Vital Records and Health Statistics (NM-VRHS) Linked Multiple Cause of Death file. The dataset supports calculation of the CO poisoning mortality measures among New Mexico residents.  Measures include 1) the number of deaths from CO poisoning, 2) crude rate of death from CO poisoning, and 3) age-adjusted rate of death from CO poisoning (adjusted by the direct method to the 2000 US standard population.  All rates are expressed per 100,000 persons. CO poisoning deaths and mortality are presented by county, for 2001-2020.</abstract>
    1414<purpose>Dataset was created to provide data for the New Mexico Environmental Public Health Tracking Network in order to monitor spatial and temporal variation in the annual mortality due to CO poisoning consistent with Nationally Consistent Data and Measures (NCDMs).</purpose>
    15 <supplinf>The New Mexico Linked Multiple Cause of Death data are derived from items reported on the death certificate and coded as underlying or contributing cause of death. DATA SOURCE(S): 1)Information is gathered from the Medical Certification section of NM Death Certificate; 2)Traditionally, BVRHS nosologists trained by CDC, NCHS, (based on WHO guidelines) manually assigns underlying cause of death based on NCHS linkage rules/logic &#8211; what condition gives rise to what condition. NM nosologists have not received multiple cause training; 3) Nosologist assigns a single underlying cause of death code based on the International Classification of Disease (ICD) categories, which since 1999 has been based on the Tenth Revision ICD; 4) The underlying cause of death has historically been the basis of national and NM vital statistic cause of death compilation and presentation; 5)Since about 1996 NM has partially implemented the national electronic system for automated coding of the underlying cause of death and capture of the various (multiple) conditions listed in the medical certification of death as contributory to the demise of the decedent.  The software is commonly referred to as  SuperMICAR.  AUTOMATED CAUSE OF DEATH CLASSIFICATION: 1)The national automated cause of death classification system is made up of the following components: MICAR with its enhancement called SuperMICAR, ACME and Transax; 2)MICAR (Mortality Medical Indexing Classification And Retrieval) generates the multiple cause ICD codes from literal information entered from the death certificate.   SuperMICAR is an enhancement to facilitate and simplify the data entry of information from the death certificate, with the entry screens matching the cause of death section of the standard certificate;3) ACME (Automated Classification of Medical Entities) determines an underlying cause of death; 4)Transax (Translation of Axis)  basically generates the output file which contains the ACME generated underlying cause of death and the multiple causes of death codes in two contexts: entity axis codes and record axis codes; 5) Entity axis codes reflect each condition entered on the death certificate and the location as to where that condition is reported on the certification section of the death record.  Record axis codes incorporate relationships and are the codes used for most multiple cause of death analysis; 6) New Mexico has only run the SuperMicar component since the requirement to run the other components is to have a nosologist trained in multiple cause of death on staff, which NM does not; 7) After entry of the literals into SuperMicar, NM sends the file to NCHS for the remainder of the processing and NCHS returns a Transax file to the state.  The records are sent in batches through the year and sometimes there is a lengthy wait for a batch to be processed and a Transax file returned.
     15<supplinf>The New Mexico Linked Multiple Cause of Death data are derived from items reported on the death certificate and coded as underlying or contributing cause of death. DATA SOURCE(S): 1) Information is gathered from the Medical Certification section of NM Death Certificate; 2)Traditionally, BVRHS nosologists trained by CDC, NCHS, (based on WHO guidelines) manually assigns underlying cause of death based on NCHS linkage rules/logic &#8211; what condition gives rise to what condition. NM nosologists have not received multiple cause training; 3) Nosologist assigns a single underlying cause of death code based on the International Classification of Disease (ICD) categories, which since 1999 has been based on the Tenth Revision ICD; 4) The underlying cause of death has historically been the basis of national and NM vital statistic cause of death compilation and presentation; 5)Since about 1996 NM has partially implemented the national electronic system for automated coding of the underlying cause of death and capture of the various (multiple) conditions listed in the medical certification of death as contributory to the demise of the decedent.  The software is commonly referred to as  SuperMICAR.  AUTOMATED CAUSE OF DEATH CLASSIFICATION: 1) The national automated cause of death classification system is made up of the following components: MICAR with its enhancement called SuperMICAR, ACME and Transax; 2) MICAR (Mortality Medical Indexing Classification And Retrieval) generates the multiple cause ICD codes from literal information entered from the death certificate.   SuperMICAR is an enhancement to facilitate and simplify the data entry of information from the death certificate, with the entry screens matching the cause of death section of the standard certificate;3) ACME (Automated Classification of Medical Entities) determines an underlying cause of death; 4)Transax (Translation of Axis)  basically generates the output file which contains the ACME generated underlying cause of death and the multiple causes of death codes in two contexts: entity axis codes and record axis codes; 5) Entity axis codes reflect each condition entered on the death certificate and the location as to where that condition is reported on the certification section of the death record.  Record axis codes incorporate relationships and are the codes used for most multiple cause of death analysis; 6) New Mexico has only run the SuperMicar component since the requirement to run the other components is to have a nosologist trained in multiple cause of death on staff, which NM does not; 7) After entry of the literals into SuperMicar, NM sends the file to NCHS for the remainder of the processing and NCHS returns a Transax file to the state.  The records are sent in batches through the year and sometimes there is a lengthy wait for a batch to be processed and a Transax file returned.
    1616
    1717The New Mexico Bureau of Vital Records and Health Statistics (NM-VRHS) maintains the data for issuance and for statistical reporting.  Data are collected on all deaths occurring in-state as well as deaths of NM residents that occur out-of-state.  The death coding system is ICD-10. The following International Classification of Diseases, 10th Revision, code T58 was used to identify deaths due to CO poisoning. </supplinf>
     
    2222<begdate>20010101</begdate>
    2323<begtime/>
    24 <enddate>20191231</enddate>
     24<enddate>20201231</enddate>
    2525<endtime/>
    2626</rngdates>
     
    7979<secsys>None</secsys>
    8080<secclass>Unclassified</secclass>
    81 <sechandl>Restricted (secure) access data refer to data presented at the county level that lack small cell suppression controls, and therefore have the potential to identify individual cases within a county according to age, sex, race/ethnicity, year of death, death manner, and diagnosis at death. Restricted (secure) data will only be released to external users after the New Mexico EPHT Program distributor AND the data steward, the New New Mexico Bureau of Vital Records and Health Statistics (NM-VRHS), has reviewed and authorized the request.  Restricted (secure) data must be requested on the standard NM-VRHS Request Form (_link_) and the signed Request Form submitted to NM-VRHS via FAX at (505) 827-1751, ATTN. Epidemiology Section.  To access documentation describing the data elements of the underlying multiple cause of death data, inquiries may be made to vrhs.data@state.nm.us. </sechandl>
     81<sechandl>Restricted (secure) access data refer to data presented at the county level that lack small cell suppression controls, and therefore have the potential to identify individual cases within a county according to age, sex, race/ethnicity, year of death, death manner, and diagnosis at death. Restricted (secure) data will only be released to external users after the New Mexico EPHT Program distributor AND the data steward, the New Mexico Bureau of Vital Records and Health Statistics (NM-VRHS), has reviewed and authorized the request.  Restricted (secure) data must be requested on the standard NM-VRHS Request Form (_link_) and the signed Request Form submitted to NM-VRHS via FAX at (505) 827-1751, ATTN. Epidemiology Section.  To access documentation describing the data elements of the underlying multiple cause of death data, inquiries may be made to vrhs.data@state.nm.us. </sechandl>
    8282</secinfo>
    8383<native>SAS Server 9.4</native>
     
    8989<procstep>
    9090<procdesc>Dataset developed per the instructions found in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Recommendations for Nationally Consistent Data and Measures (NCDMs) with the Environmental Public Health Tracking Network, version 1.3, (http://ephtracking.cdc.gov/docs/CDC_NCDM_Pt1_1.3.pdf)The dataset utilizes multiple cause coded cases of death code ICD-10 T58 (unintentional, non-fire related; unintentional, fire-related; and unknown intent). </procdesc>
    91 <procdate>20210107</procdate>
     91<procdate>20211109</procdate>
    9292</procstep>
    9393<procstep>
     
    117117rgis.unm.edu) or other servers hosted at UNM Earth Data Analysis Center.
    118118</procdesc>
    119 <procdate>20210107</procdate>
     119<procdate>20211109</procdate>
    120120</procstep></lineage>
    121121</dataqual>
     
    156156</distinfo>
    157157<metainfo>
    158 <metd>20210108</metd>
     158<metd>20220308</metd>
    159159<metc>
    160160<cntinfo>
  • adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/nmepht-content/xml/metadata/DEHP_CommunityWater.xml

    r24138 r25016  
    55<citeinfo>
    66<origin>New Mexico EPHTN Project Manager</origin>
    7 <pubdate>20210712</pubdate>
     7<pubdate>20220405</pubdate>
    88<title>DEHP Concentration in Community Water</title>
    99<onlink/>
     
    1111</citation>
    1212<descript>
    13 <abstract>These DEHP (Di (2-ethylhexyl)phthalate) drinking water quality sample data for New Mexico community water systems (CWS) contain the information needed to calculate Environmental Public Health Tracking (EPHT) annual and quarterly drinking water quality mean and maximum concentration measures for each system or the for state by the number of CWS or the number of people served. The data are derived from New Mexico Safe Drinking Water Information System (SDWIS) database, 1999-2020. That dataset contains records for active CWS (active for the prior year at the time of extract from the state database, typically in February or March for the prior year’s sample data, e.g. March 2018 for the 2017 data). A CWS is a public water system that serves year-round residents of a community, subdivision, or mobile park that has at least 15 service connections or an average of at least 25 residents.  These CWSs are a subset of all NM public water systems (PWS).  Other water systems are not included. The number of CWS varies from year to year, by a few, typically 2-3.  There have been 610 CWS active at one time or another and in 2020 there were 566 active CWSs.</abstract>
     13<abstract>These DEHP (Di (2-ethylhexyl)phthalate) drinking water quality sample data for New Mexico community water systems (CWS) contain the information needed to calculate Environmental Public Health Tracking (EPHT) annual and quarterly drinking water quality mean and maximum concentration measures for each system or the for state by the number of CWS or the number of people served. The data are derived from New Mexico Safe Drinking Water Information System (SDWIS) database, 1999-2021. That dataset contains records for active CWS (active for the prior year at the time of extract from the state database, typically in February or March for the prior year’s sample data, e.g. March 2018 for the 2017 data). A CWS is a public water system that serves year-round residents of a community, subdivision, or mobile park that has at least 15 service connections or an average of at least 25 residents.  These CWSs are a subset of all NM public water systems (PWS).  Other water systems are not included. The number of CWS varies from year to year, by a few, typically 2-3.  There have been 631 CWS active at one time or another and in 2021 there were 561 active CWSs.</abstract>
    1414<purpose>This dataset was created as part of the Environmental Public Health Tracking Network (EPHTN) drinking water quality measures. It is intended to provide researchers, public health professionals, and the public with summary information on DEHP concentrations in community drinking water in New Mexico. The EPHT Content Workgroup Water Team identified initial contaminants of concern for the national EPHT program, identified nationally consistent data sources, and developed nationally consistent data and measures (NCDMs). This dataset can be used to calculate the nationally consistent measures for the New Mexico EPHT Program.</purpose>
    1515<supplinf>Treatment of non-detects: Sample results for DEHP with concentrations less than the detection limit (but non-zero) have been replaced with a value equal to 0.5 the detection limit for the analytical method used. If a detection limit was not available from the SDWIS dataset or reported as zero, an estimate of the detection limit from available data and/or the analytical laboratory detection limit and/or a standard analytical method detection limit was applied.
    1616
    17 Missing data: The current format of the NCDMs annual dataset contains one record for annually and quarterly aggregated data and each compliance sample taken to test for DEHP among active CWS for the years 1999-2020. If samples were not collected to test for DEHP during a given year or quarter, there would be no record in the dataset. Consequently, when records are compiled for comparisons by CWSs, it may appear that the dataset has missing data. In order to mitigate the issue of "missing data" for cases when the data are in fact not missing, the carry forward procedure has been implemented.  Under this procedure, if samples were not collected to test for DEHP during a given year or quarter because the system (1) was not required to take a compliance sample during that particular time period or (2) received a sampling waver from the state for reduced frequency of monitoring based on low analytical results, then the last year or quarter sampling result value was carried forward together with the year/quarter of the actual sample collection information. However, CWSs that have come online after the start date of the data extraction query will have missing values until the system became active.  Thus, missing values may occur because the CWS was not yet active and currently these "missing values" are labeled "not sampled".
     17Missing data: The current format of the NCDMs annual dataset contains one record for annually and quarterly aggregated data and each compliance sample taken to test for DEHP among active CWS for the years 1999-2021. If samples were not collected to test for DEHP during a given year or quarter, there would be no record in the dataset. Consequently, when records are compiled for comparisons by CWSs, it may appear that the dataset has missing data. In order to mitigate the issue of "missing data" for cases when the data are in fact not missing, the carry forward procedure has been implemented.  Under this procedure, if samples were not collected to test for DEHP during a given year or quarter because the system (1) was not required to take a compliance sample during that particular period or (2) received a sampling waver from the state for reduced frequency of monitoring based on low analytical results, then the last year or quarter sampling result value was carried forward together with the year/quarter of the actual sample collection information. However, CWSs that have come online after the start date of the data extraction query will have missing values until the system became active.  Thus, missing values may occur because the CWS was not yet active and currently these "missing values" are labeled "not sampled".
    1818
    1919Drinking water wholesalers that have interties and sold their water to the CWS having a retail population were not included in the dataset even when SDWIS captured this information accurately and completely.  Each importing CWS was attributed with wholesalers' applicable sampling results data. There are no other values missing for reasons beyond what the state's or EPA's monitoring framework and the structure of the EPHT NCDMs created.</supplinf>
     
    2424<begdate>19990101</begdate>
    2525<begtime/>
    26 <enddate>20201231</enddate>
     26<enddate>20211231</enddate>
    2727<endtime/>
    2828</rngdates>
     
    5959</keywords>
    6060<accconst>These data are publicly available; No permission required.</accconst>
    61 <useconst>These data may not be used to identify single problematic water systems. To identify regulatory or compliance issues with single water systems contact the NMED-DWB. The principal county served variable designates the principal county in which the CWS is located as reported by the supplier; however, community drinking water system distribution areas may extend beyond county boundaries. Use of the principal county served variable to link drinking water data to health outcomes or other data should be made only with extreme precautions, after the implications of doing so are completely understood, and with fully and explicitly stating the limitations of the linkage. These data are aggregate summary-level water DEHP concentrations in finished water. They reflect the potential for population exposure but are not true exposure estimates; therefore they should not be used directly in any epidemiologic investigations of health outcome and environmental linkages. These data may not be used to identify any individual or residence who is receiving drinking water. In addition, the data prior to 2005 may have limited quality and as such should be used with caution.
     61<useconst>These data may not be used to identify single problematic water systems. To identify regulatory or compliance issues with single water systems contact the NMED-DWB. The principal county served variable designates the principal county in which the CWS is located as reported by the supplier; however, community drinking water system distribution areas may extend beyond county boundaries. Use of the principal county served variable to link drinking water data to health outcomes or other data should be made only with extreme precautions, after the implications of doing so are completely understood, and with fully and explicitly stating the limitations of the linkage. These data are aggregate summary-level water DEHP concentrations in finished water. They reflect the potential for population exposure but are not true exposure estimates; therefore, they should not be used directly in any epidemiologic investigations of health outcome and environmental linkages. These data may not be used to identify any individual or residence who is receiving drinking water. In addition, the data prior to 2005 may have limited quality and as such should be used with caution.
    6262
    6363No responsibility is assumed by the NM Department of Health (NMDOH) related to data and materials or how these data are represented by those who access this information. All users must read and fully comprehend metadata prior to data use.</useconst>
     
    9595<dataqual>
    9696<logic>NONE</logic>
    97 <complete>These data are complete with respect to CDC's NCDM requirements. This dataset contains only regulated community water systems, which were active at the time of the data extraction date from the state SDWIS database (typically in February or March for the prior year’s sample data, e.g. March 2018 for the 2017 data). All CWSs taking compliance samples from January 1, 1999-December 31, 2020 are included in the dataset. Compliance samples collected by drinking water wholesalers that have interties with and sold to the CWS having a retail population are not included within each importing CWS applicable sampling results data, even when SDWIS captured this information accurately and completely. Each importing CWS is attributed with wholesalers' applicable sampling results data. Private, transient, and non-community water systems are not included in this dataset.  DEHP data are typically collected, however, when the analytical results exceed the 6 mcg/L MCL a confirmatory sample would provide separate results for DEHP [analyte code #2039]). Estimates of the number of people potentially exposed may be unreliable as they are based on estimates made by the water system operator. Concentrations in drinking water cannot be directly converted to exposure, because overall water consumption and the proportion of water consumed that comes from the tap are quite variable. In systems that have more than one entry point to the distribution system, the actual DEHP level at any given house is a mixture of the levels from all contributing sources. This mix is unknown in these circumstances. In addition, DEHP in drinking water is often not the sole source of dietary DEHP intake, and may be a minor component. See Supplemental Information for treatment of non-detects.</complete>
     97<complete>These data are complete with respect to CDC's NCDM requirements. This dataset contains only regulated community water systems, which were active at the time of the data extraction date from the state SDWIS database (typically in February or March for the prior year’s sample data, e.g. March 2018 for the 2017 data). All CWSs taking compliance samples from January 1, 1999-December 31, 2021 are included in the dataset. Compliance samples collected by drinking water wholesalers that have interties with and sold to the CWS having a retail population are not included within each importing CWS applicable sampling results data, even when SDWIS captured this information accurately and completely. Each importing CWS is attributed with wholesalers' applicable sampling results data. Private, transient, and non-community water systems are not included in this dataset.  DEHP data are typically collected, however, when the analytical results exceed the 6 mcg/L MCL a confirmatory sample would provide separate results for DEHP [analyte code #2039]). Estimates of the number of people potentially exposed may be unreliable as they are based on estimates made by the water system operator. Concentrations in drinking water cannot be directly converted to exposure, because overall water consumption and the proportion of water consumed that comes from the tap are quite variable. In systems that have more than one entry point to the distribution system, the actual DEHP level at any given house is a mixture of the levels from all contributing sources. This mix is unknown in these circumstances. In addition, DEHP in drinking water is often not the sole source of dietary DEHP intake and may be a minor component. See Supplemental Information for treatment of non-detects.</complete>
    9898<lineage>
    9999<procstep>
    100 <procdesc>This dataset was created by extracting data for non-transient community water systems in NM, which were active for the entire year 1999 through 2020 or portions therein. A CWS is a public water system that serves year-round residents of a community, subdivision, or mobile home park that has at least 15 service connections or at least 25 residents 60 days per year. Sample results are limited to samples taken between January 1, 1999 and December 31, 2020. The dataset accommodates summary-level measures of water DEHP concentrations.  This dataset has a finite number of columns and incorporates a hierarchical data structure.  This dataset contains information on CWSs representing all 33 NM counties. The data extracted from NM SDWIS were processed using the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Drinking Water Quality Nationally Consistent Data and Measures (NCDMs) How-To Guide within the Environmental Public Health Tracking Network,  version 14.3, January 26, 2017.</procdesc>
     100<procdesc>This dataset was created by extracting data for non-transient community water systems in NM, which were active for the entire year 1999 through 2021 or portions therein. A CWS is a public water system that serves year-round residents of a community, subdivision, or mobile home park that has at least 15 service connections or at least 25 residents 60 days per year. Sample results are limited to samples taken between January 1, 1999 and December 31, 2021. The dataset accommodates summary-level measures of water DEHP concentrations.  This dataset has a finite number of columns and incorporates a hierarchical data structure.  This dataset contains information on CWSs representing all 33 NM counties. The data extracted from NM SDWIS were processed using the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Drinking Water Quality Nationally Consistent Data and Measures (NCDMs) How-To Guide within the Environmental Public Health Tracking Network,  version 2, January 19, 2022.</procdesc>
    101101<procdate>20210430</procdate>
    102102</procstep>
    103103<procstep>
    104104<procdesc>NM EPHT receives drinking water system data for community water systems (CWS) from the NM Environment Department Safe Drinking Water Information System (SDWIS). Data are received in MS Excel spreadsheets, with location coordinates in four different datums for CWS business address: three geographic and one unknown.  Populated place locations are captured, where possible, with a matching merge with 2018 version of USGS Geographic Names Information (NAD83) by feature name.</procdesc>
    105 <procdate>20210430</procdate>
     105<procdate>20220405</procdate>
    106106</procstep>
    107107<procstep>
     
    113113<eainfo>
    114114<overview>
    115 <eaover>The dataset contains fields describing Community Water Systems (CWS) such as number of connections and approximate number of people served. The dataset contains annual average and maximum and the mean concentration per quarter for DEHP for the years 1999-2020. The fields in the dataset are: PWSIDNumber, TimePeriod, Analyte (DEHP, Di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate), AggregationType (mean or maximum), Concentration, and ConcentrationUnits.</eaover>
    116 <eadetcit>Data dictionary (last revised: February 20, 2016) is available by contacting the NM EPHT Program at http://nmtracking.org or DOH-EHEB@state.nm.us</eadetcit>
     115<eaover>The dataset contains fields describing Community Water Systems (CWS) such as number of connections and approximate number of people served. The dataset contains annual average and maximum and the mean concentration per quarter for DEHP for the years 1999-2021. The fields in the dataset are: PWSIDNumber, TimePeriod, Analyte (DEHP, Di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate), AggregationType (mean or maximum), Concentration, and ConcentrationUnits.</eaover>
     116<eadetcit>Data dictionary (last revised: February 20, 2016) is available by contacting the NM EPHT Program at https://nmtracking.doh.nm.gov or DOH-EHEB@state.nm.us</eadetcit>
    117117</overview>
    118118</eainfo>
     
    147147</distinfo>
    148148<metainfo>
    149 <metd>20210712</metd>
     149<metd>20220405</metd>
    150150<metc>
    151151<cntinfo>
     
    161161<state>NM</state>
    162162<postal>87505</postal>
    163 <country>United States Of America</country>
     163<country>United States of America</country>
    164164</cntaddr>
    165165<cntvoice>18888788992</cntvoice>
  • adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/nmepht-content/xml/metadata/HAA5CommunityWater.xml

    r24138 r25016  
    55<citeinfo>
    66<origin>New Mexico EPHTN Project Manager</origin>
    7 <pubdate>20210712</pubdate>
     7<pubdate>20220405</pubdate>
    88<title>HAA5 Concentration in Community Water </title>
    99<onlink/>
     
    1111</citation>
    1212<descript>
    13 <abstract>These total haloacetic acids or HAA5 concentrations (measured as the sum concentration of monochloroacetic acid (MCAA), dichloroacetic acid (DCAA), trichloroacetic acid (TCAA), monobromoacetic acid (MBAA) and dibromoacetic acid (DBAA) in micrograms of HAA5s per liter of water or mcg/L)  for New Mexico community water systems (CWS) contain the information needed to calculate Environmental Public Health Tracking (EPHT) annual and quarterly drinking water quality mean and maximum concentration measures for each system or the for state by the number of CWS or the number of people served. The data are derived from New Mexico Safe Drinking Water Information System (SDWIS) database, 1999-2020. That dataset contains records for active CWS (active for the prior year at the time of extract from the state database, typically in February or March for the prior year’s sample data, e.g. March 2018 for the 2017 data). A CWS is a public water system that serves year-round residents of a community, subdivision, or mobile park that has at least 15 service connections or an average of at least 25 residents.  These CWSs are a subset of all NM public water systems (PWS).  Other water systems are not included. The number of CWS varies from year to year, by a few, typically 2-3.  There have been 610 CWS active at one time or another and in 2020 there were 566 active CWSs.
     13<abstract>These total haloacetic acids or HAA5 concentrations (measured as the sum concentration of monochloroacetic acid (MCAA), dichloroacetic acid (DCAA), trichloroacetic acid (TCAA), monobromoacetic acid (MBAA) and dibromoacetic acid (DBAA) in micrograms of HAA5s per liter of water or mcg/L)  for New Mexico community water systems (CWS) contain the information needed to calculate Environmental Public Health Tracking (EPHT) annual and quarterly drinking water quality mean and maximum concentration measures for each system or the for state by the number of CWS or the number of people served. The data are derived from New Mexico Safe Drinking Water Information System (SDWIS) database, 1999-2021. That dataset contains records for active CWS (active for the prior year at the time of extract from the state database, typically in February or March for the prior year’s sample data, e.g. March 2018 for the 2017 data). A CWS is a public water system that serves year-round residents of a community, subdivision, or mobile park that has at least 15 service connections or an average of at least 25 residents.  These CWSs are a subset of all NM public water systems (PWS).  Other water systems are not included. The number of CWS varies from year to year, by a few, typically 2-3.  There have been 631 CWS active at one time or another and in 2021 there were 561 active CWSs.
    1414
    1515Note, that on December 8, 2003, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) established a drinking water standard or Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) for HAA5 of 80 micrograms per liter (80 mcg/L) or 80 parts per billion (80 ppb) to protect public health.  The initial monitoring requirements were established for HAA5 in 1998 and by 2005 the compliance monitoring framework was set for all CWSs. The New Mexico Environment Department, Drinking Water Bureau, collects and maintains the original data.</abstract>
    1616<purpose>This dataset was created as part of the Environmental Public Health Tracking Network (EPHTN) drinking water quality measures. It is intended to provide researchers, public health professionals, and the public with summary information on HAA5 concentrations in community drinking water in New Mexico. The EPHT Content Workgroup Water Team identified initial contaminants of concern for the national EPHT program, identified nationally consistent data sources, and developed nationally consistent indicators and measures. This dataset can be used to calculate the nationally consistent measures for the New Mexico EPHT Program.</purpose>
    17 <supplinf>Treatment of non-detects: Sample results for HAA5 with concentrations less than the detection limit (but non-zero) have been replaced with a value equal to 0.5 the detection limit for the analytical method used. If a detection limit was not available from the SDWIS dataset or reported as zero, an estimate of the detection limit and/or a standard analytical method detection limit was applied.  Missing data: the current format of the NCDMs annual dataset contains one record for quarterly- or annually-aggregated data and each compliance sample taken to test for HAA5 among active CWS for the years 1999-2020.  If samples were not collected to test for HAA5 during a given quarter or year, there would be no record in the dataset. Consequently, when records are compiled for comparisons by CWSs, it may appear that the dataset has missing data.  In order to mitigate the issue of “missing data” for cases when the data are in fact not missing, the carry forward procedure has been implemented. Under this procedure, if samples were not collected to test for HAA5 during a given year because the system (1) was not required to take a compliance sample during that particular time period or (2) the system failed to collect the sample from the required location and/or collect the sample during the compliance month thus resulting in a non-sampling violation or (3) received a sampling wavier from the state for reduced frequency of monitoring based on low analytical results, then the last quarter or year sampling result value was carried forward together with the year of the actual sample collection information.  However, CWSs that have come online after the start date of the extraction query will have missing values up until the system became active. Thus, missing values may be because the water system was not yet active and current. These “missing values” are labeled as “not sampled”. 
     17<supplinf>Treatment of non-detects: Sample results for HAA5 with concentrations less than the detection limit (but non-zero) have been replaced with a value equal to 0.5 the detection limit for the analytical method used. If a detection limit was not available from the SDWIS dataset or reported as zero, an estimate of the detection limit and/or a standard analytical method detection limit was applied.  Missing data: the current format of the NCDMs annual dataset contains one record for quarterly- or annually-aggregated data and each compliance sample taken to test for HAA5 among active CWS for the years 1999-2021.  If samples were not collected to test for HAA5 during a given quarter or year, there would be no record in the dataset. Consequently, when records are compiled for comparisons by CWSs, it may appear that the dataset has missing data.  In order to mitigate the issue of “missing data” for cases when the data are in fact not missing, the carry forward procedure has been implemented. Under this procedure, if samples were not collected to test for HAA5 during a given year because the system (1) was not required to take a compliance sample during that particular period or (2) the system failed to collect the sample from the required location and/or collect the sample during the compliance month thus resulting in a non-sampling violation or (3) received a sampling wavier from the state for reduced frequency of monitoring based on low analytical results, then the last quarter or year sampling result value was carried forward together with the year of the actual sample collection information.  However, CWSs that have come online after the start date of the extraction query will have missing values up until the system became active. Thus, missing values may be because the water system was not yet active and current. These “missing values” are labeled as “not sampled”. 
    1818
    1919Drinking water wholesalers that have interties and sold their water to the CWS having a retail population were not included in the dataset even when SDWIS captured this information accurately and completely.  Each importing CWS was attributed with wholesalers’ applicable sampling results data. There are no other values missing for reasons beyond what the state's or EPA's monitoring framework and the structure of the EPHT NCDMs creates. The data prior to 2005 may have limited quality. </supplinf>
     
    2424<begdate>19990101</begdate>
    2525<begtime/>
    26 <enddate>20201231</enddate>
     26<enddate>20211231</enddate>
    2727<endtime/>
    2828</rngdates>
     
    5656</place>
    5757</keywords>
    58 <accconst>These data are publically available; No permission required. </accconst>
     58<accconst>These data are publicaly available; No permission required. </accconst>
    5959<useconst>These data may not be used to identify single problematic water systems. To identify regulatory or compliance issues with single water systems contact the NMED-DWB. The principal county served variable designates the principal county in which the CWS is located as reported by the supplier; however, community drinking water system distribution areas may extend beyond county boundaries. Use of the principal county served variable to link drinking water data to health outcomes or other data should be made only with extreme precautions, after the implications of doing so are completely understood, and with fully and explicitly stating the limitations of the linkage. These data are aggregate summary measures of contaminant levels in finished water. They reflect the potential for population exposure but are not true exposure estimates; therefore they should not be used in any epidemiologic investigations of health outcome and environmental linkages. These data may not be used to identify any individual or residence who is receiving drinking water. In addition, the data prior to 2005 may have limited quality and as such should be used with caution.
    6060
     
    9393<dataqual>
    9494<logic>None</logic>
    95 <complete>These data are complete with respect to CDC's NCDM requirements. This dataset contains only regulated community water systems, which were active at the time of the data extraction date from the state database (typically in February or March for the prior year’s sample data, e.g. March 2018 for the 2017 data). All CWS taking compliance samples from January 1, 1999-December 31, 2020 are included in the dataset. Compliance samples collected by drinking water wholesalers that have interties with and sold to the CWS having a retail population are included within each importing CWS applicable sampling results data. Private, non-transient, and non-community water systems are not included in this dataset. Since 1998, under Stage I Disinfectants and Disinfection ByProduct Rule (DBPR), HAA5 monitoring framework or water sampling frequency varies among water systems depending on the water source (ground or surface water), population of residents served (less than 500, 500 or greater but less than 10,000 and 10,000 and greater), number of treatment plants and levels of HAA5 measured at location representing maximum residence time: (1) water systems using only ground water routinely sample with one water sample per treatment plant, and if serving at least 10,000 persons, then samples every quarter whereas those with smaller populations sample annually during the month with the warmest water temperature, (2) water systems using only ground water may reduce monitoring frequency to once a year at the location reflecting maximum residence time during the warmest water month of the year if serving at least 10,000 person and annual average HAA5 concentration is less than or equal to the MCL or, if the systems serves less than 10,000, then samples are collected once every three years, (3) water systems using surface water and serving fewer than 500 persons routinely sample once a year at the location reflecting maximum residence time during the warmest water month of the year, (4) water systems using surface water and serving from 500 to under 10,000 persons routinely sample once per quarter per treatment plant, (5) water systems using surface water and serving from 500 to under 10,000 persons may reduce monitoring frequency to sample once per year per treatment plant at the location reflecting maximum residence time during the warmest water month of the year, (6) water systems using surface water and serving at least 10,000 persons routinely sample four times per quarter per treatment plant and (7) water systems using surface water and serving at least 10,000 persons may reduce monitoring frequency to sample once per treatment plant per quarter per year if annual average HAA5 is half or less of the MCL. Stage I DBPR monitoring sunset September 30, 2013.
     95<complete>These data are complete with respect to CDC's NCDM requirements. This dataset contains only regulated community water systems, which were active at the time of the data extraction date from the state database (typically in February or March for the prior year’s sample data, e.g. March 2018 for the 2017 data). All CWS taking compliance samples from January 1, 1999-December 31, 2021 are included in the dataset. Compliance samples collected by drinking water wholesalers that have interties with and sold to the CWS having a retail population are included within each importing CWS applicable sampling results data. Private, non-transient, and non-community water systems are not included in this dataset. Since 1998, under Stage I Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproduct Rule (DBPR), HAA5 monitoring framework or water sampling frequency varies among water systems depending on the water source (ground or surface water), population of residents served (less than 500, 500 or greater but less than 10,000 and 10,000 and greater), number of treatment plants and levels of HAA5 measured at location representing maximum residence time: (1) water systems using only ground water routinely sample with one water sample per treatment plant, and if serving at least 10,000 persons, then samples every quarter whereas those with smaller populations sample annually during the month with the warmest water temperature, (2) water systems using only ground water may reduce monitoring frequency to once a year at the location reflecting maximum residence time during the warmest water month of the year if serving at least 10,000 person and annual average HAA5 concentration is less than or equal to the MCL or, if the systems serves less than 10,000, then samples are collected once every three years, (3) water systems using surface water and serving fewer than 500 persons routinely sample once a year at the location reflecting maximum residence time during the warmest water month of the year, (4) water systems using surface water and serving from 500 to under 10,000 persons routinely sample once per quarter per treatment plant, (5) water systems using surface water and serving from 500 to under 10,000 persons may reduce monitoring frequency to sample once per year per treatment plant at the location reflecting maximum residence time during the warmest water month of the year, (6) water systems using surface water and serving at least 10,000 persons routinely sample four times per quarter per treatment plant and (7) water systems using surface water and serving at least 10,000 persons may reduce monitoring frequency to sample once per treatment plant per quarter per year if annual average HAA5 is half or less of the MCL. Stage I DBPR monitoring sunset September 30, 2013.
    9696 
    9797Beginning October 1, 2013, all CWSs became responsible for Stage 2 DBPR Compliance monitoring. Systems were required to evaluate their distribution system and identify the locations with high HAA5. Compliance with the maximum contaminant levels was calculated for each location in the distribution system. This approach, referred to as the locational running annual average (LRAA), differs from the Stage 1 requirements, which determine compliance by calculating the running annual average of samples from all monitoring locations across the system.  Framework or water sampling frequency varies among water systems depending on the water source (ground or surface water), population of residents served (less than 500, 500 or greater but less than 10,000 and 10,000 and greater). CWS serving at least 100,000 began compliance monitoring April 1, 2012. Systems were required to take individual HAA5 samples at locations with the highest HAA5 concentrations. Total Haloacetic Acids typically continue to form in the distribution system over time so the highest concentration of these are most often found at the outermost edges of a distribution system (furthest from the water treatment facility) where the oldest water is found. Thus, this is where sampling locations for HAA5s are most appropriately located (the Maximum Retention Time or MRT Site). CWSs serving 50,000 to 99,999 began compliance monitoring on October 1, 2012. CWS serving 49,999 and fewer began monitoring on October 1, 2013.
     
    9999<lineage>
    100100<procstep>
    101 <procdesc>This dataset was created by extracting data for non-transient CWSs in NM, which were active for the entire year during 1999-2020 or portion therein. A CWS is a public water system that serves year-round residents of a community, subdivision, or mobile home park that has at least 15 service connections or an average of at least 25 residents.  Sample results are limited to samples taken between January 1, 1999 and December 31, 2017. This dataset accommodates summary-level measures of water HAA5 concentrations. This dataset contains information on CWS representing all 33 NM counties. The data extracted from NMSDWIS were processed using the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Drinking Water Quality Nationally Consistent Data and Measures (NCDMs) How-To Guide within the Environmental Public Health Tracking Network,  version 14.3, January 16, 2017. </procdesc>
    102 <procdate>20210430</procdate>
     101<procdesc>This dataset was created by extracting data for non-transient CWSs in NM, which were active for the entire year during 1999-2021 or portion therein. A CWS is a public water system that serves year-round residents of a community, subdivision, or mobile home park that has at least 15 service connections or an average of at least 25 residents.  Sample results are limited to samples taken between January 1, 1999 and December 31, 2017. This dataset accommodates summary-level measures of water HAA5 concentrations. This dataset contains information on CWS representing all 33 NM counties. The data extracted from NMSDWIS were processed using the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Drinking Water Quality Nationally Consistent Data and Measures (NCDMs) How-To Guide within the Environmental Public Health Tracking Network,  version 2, January 19, 2022. </procdesc>
     102<procdate>20220405</procdate>
    103103</procstep>
    104104<procstep>
    105105<procdesc>NM EPHT receives drinking water system data for community water systems (CWS) from the NM Environment Department Safe Drinking Water Information System (SDWIS). Data are received in MS Excel spreadsheets, with location coordinates in four different datums for CWS business address: three geographic and one unknown.  Populated place locations are captured, where possible, with a matching merge with 2018 version of USGS Geographic Names Information (NAD83) by feature name.
    106106</procdesc>
    107 <procdate>20210430</procdate>
    108107</procstep>
    109108</lineage>
     
    111110<eainfo>
    112111<overview>
    113 <eaover>The dataset contains annual average and maximum and the mean concentration per quarter for HAA5. The fields in the dataset are: PWSIDNumber, TimePeriod, Analyte (Nitrate), AggregationType (mean or maximum), Concentration, and ConcentrationUnits. The dataset also contains fields describing Community Water Systems (CWS) derived from an inventory file of CWS qualifying Public Water Sytems such as number of connections and approximate number of people served.</eaover>
    114 <eadetcit>Data dictionary (last revised: January 16, 2017) is available by contacting the NM  EPHT Program at https://nmtracking.org or DOH-EHEB@state.nm.us.</eadetcit>
     112<eaover>The dataset contains annual average and maximum and the mean concentration per quarter for HAA5. The fields in the dataset are: PWSIDNumber, TimePeriod, Analyte (Nitrate), AggregationType (mean or maximum), Concentration, and ConcentrationUnits. The dataset also contains fields describing Community Water Systems (CWS) derived from an inventory file of CWS qualifying Public Water Systems such as number of connections and approximate number of people served.</eaover>
     113<eadetcit>Data dictionary (last revised: January 19, 2022) is available by contacting the NM  EPHT Program at https://nmtracking.org or DOH-EHEB@state.nm.us.</eadetcit>
    115114</overview>
    116115</eainfo>
     
    159158<state>NM</state>
    160159<postal>87505</postal>
    161 <country>United States Of America</country>
     160<country>United States of America</country>
    162161</cntaddr>
    163162<cntvoice>18888788992</cntvoice>
  • adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/nmepht-content/xml/metadata/HeatStress_ED_Visits.xml

    r19720 r25016  
    44<citeinfo>
    55<origin>New Mexico EPHTN Project Manager</origin>
    6 <pubdate>20200110</pubdate>
    7 <title>New Mexico Heat Stress Emergency Department Visits, 2008-2018</title>
     6<pubdate>20220504</pubdate>
     7<title>New Mexico Heat Stress Emergency Department Visits, 2008-2020</title>
    88<onlink/>
    99</citeinfo>
    1010</citation>
    1111<descript>
    12 <abstract>Heat stress is defined as a constellation of explicit effects of hot weather on the body, including heat stroke and sunstroke (hyperthermia), heat syncope/collapse, heat exhaustion, heat cramps, heat fatigue, heat edema, and other/unspecified clinical effects attributed to excessive heat exposure.  This dataset contains case counts of heat stress (classified as any primary or other diagnosis code in the range of ICD-9-CM  9920-9929, cause of injury code E9000 or E9009 or ICD-10-CM T67, X30 or X32 (excluding cases with code W92)) emergency department (ED) visits among New Mexico residents for the years 2008-2018 for the months May through September. The Nationally Consistent Data and Measures (NCDM) is for the months May through September. All months have been made avaiable. ED visits include patients who are admitted to the hospital through the emergency department (inpatients) as well as outpatient. These data are stratified by county of residence, age group, sex, and when available, race and ethnicity.</abstract>
     12<abstract>Heat stress is defined as a constellation of explicit effects of hot weather on the body, including heat stroke and sunstroke (hyperthermia), heat syncope/collapse, heat exhaustion, heat cramps, heat fatigue, heat edema, and other/unspecified clinical effects attributed to excessive heat exposure.  This dataset contains case counts of heat stress (classified as any primary or other diagnosis code in the range of ICD-9-CM  9920-9929, cause of injury code E9000 or E9009 or ICD-10-CM T67, X30 or X32 (excluding cases with code W92)) emergency department (ED) visits among New Mexico residents for the years 2008-2020 for the months May through September. The Nationally Consistent Data and Measures (NCDM) is for the months May through September. All months have been made avaiable. ED visits include patients who are admitted to the hospital through the emergency department (inpatients) as well as outpatient. These data are stratified by county of residence, age group, sex, and when available, race and ethnicity.</abstract>
    1313<purpose>To provide data for the National Environmental Public Health Tracking Network consistent with the guidance for creating emergency department visits for heat stress Nationally Consistent Data and Measures (NCDM):  1) number of ED visits for heat stress; 2) crude rate of ED visits for heat stress per 100,000 population; and 3) age-adjusted rate of ED visits for heat stress per 100,000 population (adjusted by the direct method to the 2000 US standard population.</purpose>
    1414<supplinf>Data were provided by individual non-federal EDs in New Mexico. Data have been de-identified to protect patient confidentiality. Emergency department visits for heat stress are selected based on a combination of ICD-9-CM and ICD-10-CM codes. Cases with a code of man-made source of heatICD-9-CM E9001 or ICD-10-CM W92 anywhere in the record are excluded. Data have been de-identified to protect patient confidentiality.
     
    2222<begdate>20080101</begdate>
    2323<begtime/>
    24 <enddate>20182131</enddate>
     24<enddate>20202131</enddate>
    2525<endtime/>
    2626</rngdates>
     
    4747<theme>
    4848<themekt>PH_DiseaseClassification_ICD-9-CM</themekt>
    49 <themekey>Heat stroke and sunstroke; 9920, Heat syncope; 9921, Heat cramps; 9922, Heat exhaust-anhydrotic; 9923, Heat exhaust-salt deple; 9924, Heat exhaustion NOS; 9925, Heat fatigue transient; 9926, Heat edema; 9927, Heat effect NEC; 9928, Heat effect NOS; 9929, Excessive heat: weather; E9000, Excessive heat NOS; E9009,</themekey>
     49<themekey>Heat stroke and sunstroke; 9920, Heat syncope; 9921, Heat cramps; 9922, Heat exhaust-anhydrotic; 9923, Heat exhaust-salt deplete; 9924, Heat exhaustion NOS; 9925, Heat fatigue transient; 9926, Heat edema; 9927, Heat effect NEC; 9928, Heat effect NOS; 9929, Excessive heat: weather; E9000, Excessive heat NOS; E9009,</themekey>
    5050<themekt>PH_DiseaseClassification_ICD-10-CM</themekt>
    5151<themekey>Effects of heat and light; T67, Exposure to excessive natural heat; X30, Exposure to sunlight; X32, Heat stroke and sunstroke; T670, Heat syncope; T671, Heat cramps; T672, Heat exhaust-anhydrotic; T673, Heat exhaust-salt deple; T674, Heat exhaustion NOS; T675, Heat fatigue transient; T676, Heat edema; T677, Other effect of hat and light; T678, Heat effect NOS; T679, Exposure to excessive natural heat: weather; X30, Exposure to sunlight; X32
     
    102102<sechandl>Restricted data released to an external partner may not be disseminated or distributed.</sechandl>
    103103</secinfo>
    104 <native>Windows; SAS 9.4, File name: nm_ed_0818.xml File size: ~80 Mb</native>
     104<native>Windows; SAS 9.4, File name: nm_ed_0820.xml File size: ~80 Mb</native>
    105105</idinfo>
    106106<dataqual>
     
    110110<lineage>
    111111<procstep>
    112 <procdesc>Data processed according to the Emergency Department Visits for Heat Stress Implementation Guidance. Per the instructions found in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Recommendations for Nationally Consistent Data and Measures within the Environmental Public Health Tracking Network, Content Area: Heat Stress, Indicator: Emergency Department Visits for Heat Stress, July 25, 2016. Cases include: resident emergency department visits for heat stress (classified as any primary or other diagnosis code in the range of ICD-9-CM  9920-9929, or cause of injury code E9000 or E9009 or ICD-10-CM T670-T679, X30 or X32) in treated and released (including those who were admitted as inpatients) emergency department visit administrative data set during the months May through September. Cases with a code of E9001 (man-made source of heat) anywhere in the record are excluded. Data were reported by 36 of New Mexico's acute care, non-federal hospitals' facilities. The submitted data were extensively edited. First, each hospital's data were edited for systematic problems. Then, each record was reviewed for invalid codes, missing items, and inconsistent items (e.g., sex, race/ethnicity, and diagnosis). For example, ethnicity is set to H=Hispanic when race coding shows H and race is set to U=Unknown for reported race of H.  Data were de-duplicated to the time of vist, not day of visit. Transfers were not excluded. The corrections were made to the data file until all issues were resolved.
     112<procdesc>Data processed according to the Emergency Department Visits for Heat Stress Implementation Guidance. Per the instructions found in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Recommendations for Nationally Consistent Data and Measures within the Environmental Public Health Tracking Network, Content Area: Heat Stress, Indicator: Emergency Department Visits for Heat Stress, July 25, 2016. Cases include: resident emergency department visits for heat stress (classified as any primary or other diagnosis code in the range of ICD-9-CM  9920-9929, or cause of injury code E9000 or E9009 or ICD-10-CM T670-T679, X30 or X32) in treated and released (including those who were admitted as inpatients) emergency department visit administrative data set during the months May through September. Cases with a code of E9001 (man-made source of heat) anywhere in the record are excluded. Data were reported by 36 of New Mexico's acute care, non-federal hospitals' facilities. The submitted data were extensively edited. First, each hospital's data were edited for systematic problems. Then, each record was reviewed for invalid codes, missing items, and inconsistent items (e.g., sex, race/ethnicity, and diagnosis). For example, ethnicity is set to H=Hispanic when race coding shows H and race is set to U=Unknown for reported race of H.  Data were de-duplicated to the time of visit, not day of visit. Transfers were not excluded. The corrections were made to the data file until all issues were resolved.
    113113
    114114ED data are collected from facilities yearly.  The long-term plan is for the New Mexico Department of Health (NMDOH) to collect these data through an ED electronic reporting (e-reporting) system currently being developed with the New Mexico Health Information Collaborative (NMHIC).  However, few facilities are reporting to the ED e-reporting system at this time.  Therefore, in the interim, we have been requesting that each year each facility submits its data directly to the NMDOH.  If a facility is already working with NMHIC, they continue to do so, but also provide data to NMDOH directly.
     
    116116The department is authorized to request and receive these data under the Public Health Act which grants the department authority to Investigate, control and abate the cause of diseases (Section 24-1-3C).  Additional authority was enacted (NMAC 7.4.3.10) on April 30, 2009 which specifically requires that all non-federal emergency departments in the State of New Mexico must comply with NMDOH requests for ED data.
    117117
    118 The Health Information Accountability and Portability Act (HIPAA) provides that covered entities (including hospitals and their emergency departments) may disclose protected health information, without authorization, to public health authorities who are legally authorized to receive such reports for the purpose of preventing or controlling disease, injury , or disability.  This would include, for example, the reporting of a disease or injury, and conducting public health surveillance.  The NMDOH is a public health authority.
     118The Health Information Accountability and Portability Act (HIPAA) provides that covered entities (including hospitals and their emergency departments) may disclose protected health information, without authorization, to public health authorities who are legally authorized to receive such reports for the purpose of preventing or controlling disease, injury, or disability.  This would include, for example, the reporting of a disease or injury, and conducting public health surveillance.  The NMDOH is a public health authority.
    119119</procdesc>
    120 <procdate>20191121</procdate>
     120<procdate>20220405</procdate>
    121121</procstep>
    122122</lineage>
     
    145145<state>NM</state>
    146146<postal>87502</postal>
    147 <country>United States Of America</country>
     147<country>United States of America</country>
    148148</cntaddr>
    149149<cntvoice>18888788992</cntvoice>
     
    156156</cntinfo>
    157157</distrib>
    158 <resdesc>File: nm_ed_0818.xml File size: ~80 Mb</resdesc>
     158<resdesc>File: nm_ed_0820.xml File size: ~80 Mb</resdesc>
    159159<distliab>Persons or entities given access to restricted data are liable for compliance with NMDOH-EHEB data use agreement. Disciplinary action will be incurred for non-compliance or violation of data use agreements.</distliab>
    160160<custom>For access to unrestricted or public use data, please see: http://ephtracking.cdc.gov for national and multistate data or http://nmtracking.org for access to restricted or secure New Mexico specific data. For access to restricted or secure data please see Access Constraints sections for release of restricted data.</custom>
    161161</distinfo>
    162162<metainfo>
    163 <metd>20200110</metd>
     163<metd>20220405</metd>
    164164<metc>
    165165<cntinfo>
  • adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/nmepht-content/xml/metadata/HeatStress_Hospitalizations.xml

    r19720 r25016  
    44<citeinfo>
    55<origin>New Mexico EPHTN Project Manager</origin>
    6 <pubdate>20200110</pubdate>
     6<pubdate>20220405</pubdate>
    77<title>New Mexico Heat Stress Hospitalizations</title>
    88<onlink/>
     
    1010</citation>
    1111<descript>
    12 <abstract>Heat stress is defined as a constellation of explicit effects of hot weather on the body, including heat stroke and sunstroke (hyperthermia), heat syncope/collapse, heat exhaustion, heat cramps, heat fatigue, heat edema, and other/unspecified clinical effects attributed to excessive heat exposure. This dataset contains case counts of heat stress (classified as any primary or other diagnosis code in the range of ICD-9-CM 9920-9929, or cause of injury code E9000 or E9009 or ICD-10-CM T67, X30 or X32 (excluding cases with code W92)) inpatient hospitalizations among New Mexico residents for the years 1999 - 2018. The Nationally Consistent Data and Measures (NCDM) is for the months May through September. All months have been made avaiable.  These data are stratified by month of admission, county of residence, age group, and sex.</abstract>
     12<abstract>Heat stress is defined as a constellation of explicit effects of hot weather on the body, including heat stroke and sunstroke (hyperthermia), heat syncope/collapse, heat exhaustion, heat cramps, heat fatigue, heat edema, and other/unspecified clinical effects attributed to excessive heat exposure. This dataset contains case counts of heat stress (classified as any primary or other diagnosis code in the range of ICD-9-CM 9920-9929, or cause of injury code E9000 or E9009 or ICD-10-CM T67, X30 or X32 (excluding cases with code W92)) inpatient hospitalizations among New Mexico residents for the years 1999 - 2020. The Nationally Consistent Data and Measures (NCDM) is for the months May through September. All months have been made available.  These data are stratified by month of admission, county of residence, age group, and sex.</abstract>
    1313<purpose>To provide data for the National Environmental Public Health Tracking Network consistent with the guidance for creating heat stress inpatient hospitalization Nationally Consistent Data and Measures (NCDM).</purpose>
    1414<supplinf>Cases with a code of E9001 or ICD-10-CM W92 (man-made source of heat) anywhere in the record are excluded. Data have been de-identified to protect patient confidentiality.
     
    2020<begdate>19990101</begdate>
    2121<begtime/>
    22 <enddate>20181231</enddate>
     22<enddate>20201231</enddate>
    2323<endtime/>
    2424</rngdates>
     
    106106<dataqual>
    107107<logic>NONE</logic>
    108 <complete>These data include inpatient hospitalizations of individuals who are discharged from non-federal hospitals. Therefore, these data do not include hospitalizations from Veterans Affairs or Indian Health Service hospitals. Information about NM hospitals can be found at the following site: https://dhi.health.state.nm.us/providersearch/index.php. These data are based on any primary or other diagnosis code (ICD9-CM) or cause of injury codes (e-codes) or ICD-10-CMs. Hospitalizations due to transfers between hospitals are not excluded.  Race and ethnicity are not reported in the dataset due to issues with the quality of the data collection process at individual hospitals. The DOH does NOT collect hospitalizations among New Mexico residents that occur out of state.
     108<complete>These data include inpatient hospitalizations of individuals who are discharged from non-federal hospitals. Therefore, these data do not include hospitalizations from Veterans Affairs or Indian Health Service hospitals. Information about NM hospitals can be found at the following site: https://dhi.health.state.nm.us/providersearch/index.php. These data are based on any primary or other diagnosis code (ICD-9-CM) or cause of injury codes (e-codes) or ICD-10-CMs. Hospitalizations due to transfers between hospitals are not excluded.  Race and ethnicity are not reported in the dataset due to issues with the quality of the data collection process at individual hospitals. The DOH does NOT collect hospitalizations among New Mexico residents that occur out of state.
    109109</complete>
    110110<lineage>
    111111<procstep>
    112112<procdesc>Data processed according to the Heat Stress Hospitalizations Implementation Guidance and the instructions provided in the July, 2018 How-to Guide, Hospitalizations for Heat Stress.</procdesc>
    113 <procdate>20191121</procdate>
     113<procdate>20220405</procdate>
    114114</procstep>
    115115</lineage>
     
    117117<eainfo>
    118118<overview>
    119 <eaover>This dataset contains case count of heat stress hospitalizations (classified as any primary or other diagnosis code in the range of ICD-9-CM 992.0-992.9, or cause of injury code E900.0 or E900.9 or ICD-10_CM T670-T679, X30 or X32) among New Mexico residents for the years 1999-2016. The following variables are included: County, Year, Month, Age Group, Sex, Race and Ethnicity, Number of heat stress emergency department visits. These data are stratified by county of residence, age group, sex, and race and ethnicity and reported for the months May through September.
     119<eaover>This dataset contains case count of heat stress hospitalizations (classified as any primary or other diagnosis code in the range of ICD-9-CM 992.0-992.9, or cause of injury code E900.0 or E900.9 or ICD-10_CM T670-T679, X30 or X32) among New Mexico residents for the years 1999-2020. The following variables are included: County, Year, Month, Age Group, Sex, Race and Ethnicity, Number of heat stress emergency department visits. These data are stratified by county of residence, age group, sex, and race and ethnicity and reported for the months May through September.
    120120</eaover>
    121121<eadetcit>This dataset includes the following fields:  County is alphabetic name for the 33 counties (FIPS 001-061). Year: 2012; AGEGROUP: 1=0-4 years, 2=5-9 years, 3=10-14 years, 4=15-19 years, 5=20-24 years, 6=25-29 years, 7=30-34 years, 8=35-39 years, 9=40-44 years, 10=45-49 years, 11=50-54 years, 12=55-59 years, 13=60-64 years, 14=65-69 years, 15=70-74 years, 16=75-79 years, 17=80-84 years, 18=85+ years, 19=Unknown; SEX: M=Male, F=Female, U=Unknown; RACE:W=White, B=Black, O=Other, U=Unknown; ETHNICITY:H=Hispanic, NH=Non-Hispanic, U=Unknown; COUNT_ED: Number of heat stress emergency department visits.
     
    150150</cntinfo>
    151151</distrib>
    152 <resdesc>File: hiddepht2018.sas7bdat.</resdesc>
     152<resdesc>File: hiddepht2020.sas7bdat.</resdesc>
    153153<distliab>Persons or entities given access to restricted data are liable for compliance with NMDOH-EHEB data use agreement. Disciplinary action will be incurred for non-compliance or violation of data use agreements.</distliab>
    154154<custom>For access to unrestricted or public use data, please see: http://ephtracking.cdc.gov/ for national and multistate data or http://nmtracking.org. For access to restricted or secure New Mexico data please see Access Constraints sections for release of restricted data.</custom>
    155155</distinfo>
    156156<metainfo>
    157 <metd>20200110</metd>
     157<metd>20210713</metd>
    158158<metc>
    159159<cntinfo>
  • adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/nmepht-content/xml/metadata/HeatStress_Mortality.xml

    r22293 r25016  
    55<citeinfo>
    66<origin>New Mexico EPHTN Project Manager</origin>
    7 <pubdate>20210108</pubdate>
     7<pubdate>20220405</pubdate>
    88<title>Heat Stress Mortality</title>
    99<onlink/>
     
    1111</citation>
    1212<descript>
    13 <abstract>This dataset contains county-level records for deaths of New Mexico residents due to Heat stress. Heat stress is defined as a constellation of explicit effects of heat and light on the body, including heat stroke and sunstroke (hyperthermia), heat syncope/collapse, heat exhaustion, heat cramps, heat fatigue, heat edema, and other/unspecified clinical effects attributed to excessive heat exposure. This dataset contains case counts of heat stress deaths (classified as any primary or other  ICD-10 T67, X30 or X32 (excluding cases with code W92)) among New Mexico residents that occurred between 2001 and 2019.  The dataset was generated using information from the New Mexico Bureau of Vital Records and Health Statistics (NM-VRHS) Linked Multiple Cause of Death file. The dataset supports calculation of of the Heat stress mortality measures among New Mexico residents.  Measures include 1) the number of deaths from Heat stress, 2) crude rate of death from Heat stress, and 3) age-adjusted rate of death from Heat stress (adjusted by the direct method to the 2000 US standard population.  All rates are expressed per 100,000 persons.</abstract>
     13<abstract>This dataset contains county-level records for deaths of New Mexico residents due to Heat stress. Heat stress is defined as a constellation of explicit effects of heat and light on the body, including heat stroke and sunstroke (hyperthermia), heat syncope/collapse, heat exhaustion, heat cramps, heat fatigue, heat edema, and other/unspecified clinical effects attributed to excessive heat exposure. This dataset contains case counts of heat stress deaths (classified as any primary or other ICD-10 T67, X30 or X32 (excluding cases with code W92)) among New Mexico residents that occurred between 2001 and 2020.  The dataset was generated using information from the New Mexico Bureau of Vital Records and Health Statistics (NM-VRHS) Linked Multiple Cause of Death file. The dataset supports calculation of the Heat stress mortality measures among New Mexico residents.  Measures include 1) the number of deaths from Heat stress, 2) crude rate of death from Heat stress, and 3) age-adjusted rate of death from Heat stress (adjusted by the direct method to the 2000 US standard population.  All rates are expressed per 100,000 persons.</abstract>
    1414<purpose>Dataset was created to provide data for the New Mexico Environmental Public Health Tracking Network in order to monitor spatial and temporal variation in the annual mortality due to Heat stress consistent with Nationally Consistent Data and Measures (NCDMs).</purpose>
    1515<supplinf>The New Mexico Linked Multiple Cause of Death data are derived from items reported on the death certificate and coded as underlying or contributing cause of death. DATA SOURCE(S): 1) Information is gathered from the Medical Certification section of NM Death Certificate; 2) Traditionally, BVRHS nosologists trained by CDC, NCHS, (based on WHO guidelines) manually assigns underlying cause of death based on NCHS linkage rules/logic; what condition gives rise to what condition. NM nosologists have not received multiple cause training; 3) Nosologist assigns a single underlying cause of death code based on the International Classification of Disease (ICD) categories, which since 1999 has been based on the Tenth Revision ICD; 4) The underlying cause of death has historically been the basis of national and NM vital statistic cause of death compilation and presentation; 5) Since about 1996 NM has partially implemented the national electronic system for automated coding of the underlying cause of death and capture of the various (multiple) conditions listed in the medical certification of death as contributory to the demise of the decedent.  The software is commonly referred to as SuperMICAR.
     
    2424<begdate>20010101</begdate>
    2525<begtime/>
    26 <enddate>20191231</enddate>
     26<enddate>20201231</enddate>
    2727<endtime/>
    2828</rngdates>
     
    4949<theme>
    5050<themekt>ICD-10 T67, X30 and X32</themekt>
    51 <themekey>Effects of heat and light; T67, Exposure to excessive natural heat; X30, Exposure to sunlight; X32, Heat stroke and sunstroke; T670, Heat syncope; T671, Heat cramps; T672, Heat exhaust-anhydrotic; T673, Heat exhaust-salt deple; T674, Heat exhaustion NOS; T675, Heat fatigue transient; T676, Heat edema; T677, Other effect of hat and light; T678, Heat effect NOS; T679, Exposure to excessive natural heat: weather; X30, Exposure to sunlight; X32
     51<themekey>Effects of heat and light; T67, Exposure to excessive natural heat; X30, Exposure to sunlight; X32
    5252</themekey>
    5353</theme>
     
    9191<secsys>None</secsys>
    9292<secclass>Unclassified</secclass>
    93 <sechandl>Restricted (secure) access data refer to data presented at the county level that lack small cell suppression controls, and therefore have the potential to identify individual cases within a county according to age, sex, race/ethnicity, year of death, death manner, and diagnosis at death. Restricted (secure) data will only be released to external users after the New Mexico EPHT Program distributor AND the data steward, the New New Mexico Bureau of Vital Records and Health Statistics (NM-VRHS), has reviewed and authorized the request.  Restricted (secure) data must be requested on the standard NM-VRHS Request Form (_link_) and the signed Request Form submitted to NM-VRHS via FAX at (505) 827-1751, ATTN. Epidemiology Section.  To access documentation describing the data elements of the underlying multiple cause of death data, inquiries may be made to vrhs.data@state.nm.us. </sechandl>
     93<sechandl>Restricted (secure) access data refer to data presented at the county level that lack small cell suppression controls, and therefore have the potential to identify individual cases within a county according to age, sex, race/ethnicity, year of death, death manner, and diagnosis at death. Restricted (secure) data will only be released to external users after the New Mexico EPHT Program distributor AND the data steward, the New Mexico Bureau of Vital Records and Health Statistics (NM-VRHS), has reviewed and authorized the request.  Restricted (secure) data must be requested on the standard NM-VRHS Request Form (_link_) and the signed Request Form submitted to NM-VRHS via FAX at (505) 827-1751, ATTN. Epidemiology Section.  To access documentation describing the data elements of the underlying multiple cause of death data, inquiries may be made to vrhs.data@state.nm.us. </sechandl>
    9494</secinfo>
    9595<native>SAS Server 9.4</native>
     
    101101<procstep>
    102102<procdesc>Dataset developed per the instructions found in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Recommendations for Nationally Consistent Data and Measures (NCDMs) with the Environmental Public Health Tracking Network, version 1.3, (http://ephtracking.cdc.gov/docs/CDC_NCDM_Pt1_1.3.pdf)The dataset utilizes multiple cause coded cases of death code ICD-10 T58 (unintentional, non-fire related; unintentional, fire-related; and unknown intent). </procdesc>
    103 <procdate>20210107</procdate>
     103<procdate>20220405</procdate>
    104104</procstep>
    105105<procstep>
     
    129129rgis.unm.edu) or other servers hosted at UNM Earth Data Analysis Center.
    130130</procdesc>
    131 <procdate>20210107</procdate>
     131<procdate>20220405</procdate>
    132132</procstep></lineage>
    133133</dataqual>
    134134<eainfo>
    135135<overview>
    136 <eaover>This dataset contains the following fields (defined in the detailed citation below): case count of heat stress deaths (classified as anyunderlying or other contributing diagnosis code in the range of ICD-10 T670-T679, X30 or X32) among New Mexico residents for the years 2001-2019; County, Year, Month, Age Group, Sex, Race and Ethnicity. These data are stratified by county of residence, age group and sex. The Nationally Consistent Data and Measures (NCDM) is for the months May through September. All months have been made avaiable.
     136<eaover>This dataset contains the following fields (defined in the detailed citation below): case count of heat stress deaths (classified as any underlying or other contributing diagnosis code in the range of ICD-10 T670-T679, X30 or X32) among New Mexico residents for the years 2001-2020; County, Year, Month, Age Group, Sex, Race and Ethnicity. These data are stratified by county of residence, age group and sex. The Nationally Consistent Data and Measures (NCDM) is for the months May through September. All months have been made available.
    137137</eaover>
    138 <eadetcit>The variable Heats is a number, which represents Heat stress (ICD-10 T670-T679, X30 or X32) if found in the multiple cause fields (1 for first position, 2 for any other of  the 11 additional fields and 0 if not found).  The variable Agepop provides age categories used in the standard age age-adjusting groupings; ages 0, 1-4, 5-14, 15-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75-84 and 85+ years.  The variable Agegrp4 provide grouping of ages 1-14, 15-44, 45-64 and 65 and older.  Sex is coded 1 for males, 2 for females and 9 for unknown or unreported. COD, underlying cause of death, and the multiple cause of death fields are character values with length four and an implied decimal between the third and fourth position.   New Mexico counties are two digit FIPS codes in the field CountyCode. Year shows year of death 2001-2019 and month show numeric values 1-12.
     138<eadetcit>The variable Heats is a number, which represents Heat stress (ICD-10 T670-T679, X30 or X32) if found in the multiple cause fields (1 for first position, 2 for any other of  the 11 additional fields and 0 if not found).  The variable Agepop provides age categories used in the standard age age-adjusting groupings; ages 0, 1-4, 5-14, 15-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75-84 and 85+ years.  The variable Agegrp4 provide grouping of ages 1-14, 15-44, 45-64 and 65 and older.  Sex is coded 1 for males, 2 for females and 9 for unknown or unreported. COD, underlying cause of death, and the multiple cause of death fields are character values with length four and an implied decimal between the third and fourth position.   New Mexico counties are two digit FIPS codes in the field CountyCode. Year shows year of death 2001-2020 and month show numeric values 1-12.
    139139
    140140For detailed entity and attributes, see data dictionary document 'NCDM Data Dictionaries'.  http://ephtracking.cdc.gov/showLibrary.action.
     
    167167</cntinfo>
    168168</distrib>
    169 <resdesc>File: MCDeaths0118.sas7bdat</resdesc>
     169<resdesc>File: MCDeaths0120.sas7bdat</resdesc>
    170170<distliab>Persons or entities given access to restricted data are liable for compliance with the NM-VRHS data use agreement.  Disciplinary action will be incurred for non-compliance or violation of data use agreement.</distliab>
    171171<custom>For access to unrestricted or public use data, please see:  www.nmtracking.org for New Mexico data;  For access to restricted or secure New Mexico data please contact to vrhs.data@state.nm.us. </custom>
    172172</distinfo>
    173173<metainfo>
    174 <metd>20200110</metd>
     174<metd>20220405</metd>
    175175<metc>
    176176<cntinfo>
  • adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/nmepht-content/xml/metadata/Nitrate_CommunityWater.xml

    r24138 r25016  
    55<citeinfo>
    66<origin>New Mexico EPHTN Project Manager</origin>
    7 <pubdate>20210713</pubdate>
     7<pubdate>20220405</pubdate>
    88<title>Nitrate Concentration in Community Water</title>
    99<onlink/>
     
    1111</citation>
    1212<descript>
    13 <abstract>These nitrate drinking water quality sample data (typically, combined nitrate plus nitrite as nitrogen data) for New Mexico community water systems (CWS) contain the information needed to calculate Environmental Public Health Tracking (EPHT) annual and quarterly drinking water quality mean and maximum concentration measures for each system or the for state by the number of CWS or the number of people served. The data are derived from New Mexico Safe Drinking Water Information System (SDWIS) database, 1999-2020. That dataset contains records for active CWS (active for the prior year at the time of extract from the state database, typically in February or March for the prior year’s sample data, e.g. March 2018 for the 2017 data). A CWS is a public water system that serves year-round residents of a community, subdivision, or mobile park that has at least 15 service connections or an average of at least 25 residents.  These CWSs are a subset of all NM public water systems (PWS).  Other water systems are not included. The number of CWS varies from year to year, by a few, typically 2-3.  There have been 610 CWS active at one time or another and in 2020 there were 566 active CWSs.
     13<abstract>These nitrate drinking water quality sample data (typically, combined nitrate plus nitrite as nitrogen data) for New Mexico community water systems (CWS) contain the information needed to calculate Environmental Public Health Tracking (EPHT) annual and quarterly drinking water quality mean and maximum concentration measures for each system or the for state by the number of CWS or the number of people served. The data are derived from New Mexico Safe Drinking Water Information System (SDWIS) database, 1999-2021. That dataset contains records for active CWS (active for the prior year at the time of extract from the state database, typically in February or March for the prior year’s sample data, e.g. March 2018 for the 2017 data). A CWS is a public water system that serves year-round residents of a community, subdivision, or mobile park that has at least 15 service connections or an average of at least 25 residents.  These CWSs are a subset of all NM public water systems (PWS).  Other water systems are not included. The number of CWS varies from year to year, by a few, typically 2-3.  There have been 631 CWS active at one time or another and in 2021 there were 561 active CWSs.
    1414
    1515The New Mexico Environment Department, Drinking Water Bureau, collects and maintains the original data.
    1616</abstract>
    1717<purpose>This dataset was created as part of the Environmental Public Health Tracking Network (EPHTN) drinking water quality measures. It is intended to provide researchers, public health professionals, and the public with summary information on nitrate concentrations in community drinking water in New Mexico. The EPHT Content Workgroup Water Team identified initial contaminants of concern for the national EPHT program, identified nationally consistent data sources, and developed nationally consistent data and measures (NCDMs). This dataset can be used to calculate the nationally consistent measures for the New Mexico EPHT Program.</purpose>
    18 <supplinf>Treatment of non-detects: Sample results for nitrate with concentrations less than the detection limit (but non-zero) have been replaced with a value equal to 0.5 the detection limit for the analytical method used. If a detection limit was not available from the SDWIS dataset or reported as zero, an estimate of the detection limit from available data and/or the analytical laboratory detection limit and/or a standard analytical method detection limit was applied. Missing data: The current format of the NCDMs annual dataset contains one record for annually and quarterly aggregated data and each compliance sample taken to test for nitrate among active CWS for the years 1999-2020. If samples were not collected to test for nitrate during a given year or quarter, there would be no record in the dataset. Consequently, when records are compiled for comparisons by CWSs, it may appear that the dataset has missing data. In order to mitigate the issue of "missing data" for cases when the data are in fact not missing, the carry forward procedure has been implemented.  Under this procedure, if samples were not collected to test for nitrate during a given year or quarter because the system (1) was not required to take a compliance sample during that particular time period or (2) received a sampling waver from the state for reduced frequency of monitoring based on low analytical results, then the last year or quarter sampling result value was carried forward together with the year/quarter of the actual sample collection information. However, CWSs that have come online after the start date of the data extraction query will have missing values until the system became active.  Thus, missing values may occur because the CWS was not yet active and currently these "missing values" are labeled "not sampled".
     18<supplinf>Treatment of non-detects: Sample results for nitrate with concentrations less than the detection limit (but non-zero) have been replaced with a value equal to 0.5 the detection limit for the analytical method used. If a detection limit was not available from the SDWIS dataset or reported as zero, an estimate of the detection limit from available data and/or the analytical laboratory detection limit and/or a standard analytical method detection limit was applied. Missing data: The current format of the NCDMs annual dataset contains one record for annually and quarterly aggregated data and each compliance sample taken to test for nitrate among active CWS for the years 1999-2021. If samples were not collected to test for nitrate during a given year or quarter, there would be no record in the dataset. Consequently, when records are compiled for comparisons by CWSs, it may appear that the dataset has missing data. In order to mitigate the issue of "missing data" for cases when the data are in fact not missing, the carry forward procedure has been implemented.  Under this procedure, if samples were not collected to test for nitrate during a given year or quarter because the system (1) was not required to take a compliance sample during that particular period or (2) received a sampling waver from the state for reduced frequency of monitoring based on low analytical results, then the last year or quarter sampling result value was carried forward together with the year/quarter of the actual sample collection information. However, CWSs that have come online after the start date of the data extraction query will have missing values until the system became active.  Thus, missing values may occur because the CWS was not yet active and currently these "missing values" are labeled "not sampled".
    1919
    2020Drinking water wholesalers that have interties and sold their water to the CWS having a retail population were not included in the dataset even when SDWIS captured this information accurately and completely.  Each importing CWS was attributed with wholesalers' applicable sampling results data. There are no other values missing for reasons beyond what the state's or EPA's monitoring framework and the structure of the EPHT NCDMs created.
     
    2626<begdate>19990101</begdate>
    2727<begtime/>
    28 <enddate>20201231</enddate>
     28<enddate>20211231</enddate>
    2929<endtime/>
    3030</rngdates>
     
    9797<dataqual>
    9898<logic>NONE</logic>
    99 <complete>These data are complete with respect to CDC's NCDM requirements. This dataset contains only regulated community water systems, which were active at the time of the data extraction date from the state SDWIS database (typically in February or March for the prior year’s sample data, e.g. March 2018 for the 2017 data). All CWSs taking compliance samples from January 1, 1999-December 31, 2020 are included in the dataset. Compliance samples collected by drinking water wholesalers that have interties with and sold to the CWS having a retail population are not included within each importing CWS applicable sampling results data, even when SDWIS captured this information accurately and completely. Each importing CWS is attributed with wholesalers' applicable sampling results data. Private, transient, and non-community water systems are not included in this dataset.  Nitrate data (combined nitrate plus nitrite as nitrogen data [analyte code #1038] are typically collected, however, when the analytical results exceed the 10 mg/L MCL a confirmatory sample would provide separate results for nitrite [analyte code #1041] and the nitrate [analyte code #1040]).
     99<complete>These data are complete with respect to CDC's NCDM requirements. This dataset contains only regulated community water systems, which were active at the time of the data extraction date from the state SDWIS database (typically in February or March for the prior year’s sample data, e.g. March 2018 for the 2017 data). All CWSs taking compliance samples from January 1, 1999-December 31, 2021 are included in the dataset. Compliance samples collected by drinking water wholesalers that have interties with and sold to the CWS having a retail population are not included within each importing CWS applicable sampling results data, even when SDWIS captured this information accurately and completely. Each importing CWS is attributed with wholesalers' applicable sampling results data. Private, transient, and non-community water systems are not included in this dataset.  Nitrate data (combined nitrate plus nitrite as nitrogen data [analyte code #1038] are typically collected, however, when the analytical results exceed the 10 mg/L MCL a confirmatory sample would provide separate results for nitrite [analyte code #1041] and the nitrate [analyte code #1040]).
    100100
    101 Estimates of the number of people potentially exposed may be unreliable as they are based on estimates made by the water system operator. Concentrations in drinking water cannot be directly converted to exposure, because overall water consumption and the proportion of water consumed that comes from the tap are quite variable. In systems that have more than one entry point to the distribution system, the actual nitrate level at any given house is a mixture of the levels from all contributing sources. This mix is unknown in these circumstances. In addition, nitrate in drinking water is often not the sole source of dietary nitrate/nitrite intake, and may be a minor component. See Supplemental Information for treatment of non-detects.</complete>
     101Estimates of the number of people potentially exposed may be unreliable as they are based on estimates made by the water system operator. Concentrations in drinking water cannot be directly converted to exposure, because overall water consumption and the proportion of water consumed that comes from the tap are quite variable. In systems that have more than one entry point to the distribution system, the actual nitrate level at any given house is a mixture of the levels from all contributing sources. This mix is unknown in these circumstances. In addition, nitrate in drinking water is often not the sole source of dietary nitrate/nitrite intake and may be a minor component. See Supplemental Information for treatment of non-detects.</complete>
    102102<lineage>
    103103<procstep>
    104 <procdesc>This dataset was created by extracting data for non-transient community water systems in NM, which were active for the entire year 1999 through 2020 or portion therein. A CWS is a public water system that serves year-round residents of a community, subdivision, or mobile home park that has at least 15 service connections or an average of at least 25 residents. Sample results are limited to samples taken between January 1, 1999 and December 31, 2020. The dataset accommodates summary-level measures of water nitrate concentrations.  This dataset has a finite number of columns and incorporates a hierarchical data structure.  This dataset contains information on CWSs representing all 33 NM counties. The data extracted from NM SDWIS were processed using the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Drinking Water Quality Nationally Consistent Data and Measures (NCDMs) How-To Guide within the Environmental Public Health Tracking Network, version 14.3, January 16, 2017.</procdesc>
     104<procdesc>This dataset was created by extracting data for non-transient community water systems in NM, which were active for the entire year 1999 through 2021 or portion therein. A CWS is a public water system that serves year-round residents of a community, subdivision, or mobile home park that has at least 15 service connections or an average of at least 25 residents. Sample results are limited to samples taken between January 1, 1999 and December 31, 2021. The dataset accommodates summary-level measures of water nitrate concentrations.  This dataset has a finite number of columns and incorporates a hierarchical data structure.  This dataset contains information on CWSs representing all 33 NM counties. The data extracted from NM SDWIS were processed using the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Drinking Water Quality Nationally Consistent Data and Measures (NCDMs) How-To Guide within the Environmental Public Health Tracking Network, version 2, January 19, 2022.</procdesc>
    105105<procdate>20210430</procdate>
    106106</procstep>
     
    108108<procdesc>NM EPHT receives drinking water system data for community water systems (CWS) from the NM Environment Department Safe Drinking Water Information System (SDWIS). Data are received in MS Excel spreadsheets, with location coordinates in four different datums for CWS business address: three geographic and one unknown.  Populated place locations are captured, where possible, with a matching merge with 2018 version of USGS Geographic Names Information (NAD83) by feature name.
    109109</procdesc>
    110 <procdate>20210430</procdate>
     110<procdate>20220405</procdate>
    111111</procstep>
    112112<procstep>
    113113<procdesc>NMEPHT data queried through nmtracking.org (NMTracking) result in query-specific data sets that are community water system specific or statewide.</procdesc>
    114 <procdate>20210430</procdate>
    115114</procstep>
    116115</lineage>
     
    118117<eainfo>
    119118<overview>
    120 <eaover>The dataset contains annual average and maximum and the mean concentration per year or quarter for nitrate (combined nitrate plus nitrite as nitrogen) for the years 1999-2020. The fields in the dataset are: PWSIDNumber, TimePeriod, Analyte (Nitrate), AggregationType (mean or maximum), Concentration, and ConcentrationUnits. The dataset also contains fields describing Community Water Systems (CWS) derived from an inventory file of CWS qualifying Public Water Sytems such as number of connections and approximate number of people served.</eaover>
    121 <eadetcit>Data dictionary (last revised: January 16, 2017) is available by contacting the NM EPHT Program at http://nmtracking.org or DOH-EHEB@state.nm.us.</eadetcit>
     119<eaover>The dataset contains annual average and maximum and the mean concentration per year or quarter for nitrate (combined nitrate plus nitrite as nitrogen) for the years 1999-2021. The fields in the dataset are: PWSIDNumber, TimePeriod, Analyte (Nitrate), AggregationType (mean or maximum), Concentration, and ConcentrationUnits. The dataset also contains fields describing Community Water Systems (CWS) derived from an inventory file of CWS qualifying Public Water Systems such as number of connections and approximate number of people served.</eaover>
     120<eadetcit>Data dictionary (last revised: January 19, 2022) is available by contacting the NM EPHT Program at http://nmtracking.org or DOH-EHEB@state.nm.us.</eadetcit>
    122121</overview>
    123122</eainfo>
     
    152151</distinfo>
    153152<metainfo>
    154 <metd>20210713</metd>
     153<metd>20220405</metd>
    155154<metc>
    156155<cntinfo>
     
    166165<state>NM</state>
    167166<postal>87505</postal>
    168 <country>United States Of America</country>
     167<country>United States of America</country>
    169168</cntaddr>
    170169<cntvoice>18888788992</cntvoice>
  • adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/nmepht-content/xml/metadata/PCE_CommunityWater.xml

    r24138 r25016  
    55<citeinfo>
    66<origin>New Mexico EPHTN Project Manager</origin>
    7 <pubdate>20210712</pubdate>
     7<pubdate>2022044</pubdate>
    88<title>PCE Concentration in Community Water</title>
    99<onlink/>
     
    1111</citation>
    1212<descript>
    13 <abstract>These PCE (Tetrachloroethylene) drinking water quality sample data (typically, combined nitrate plus nitrite as nitrogen data) for New Mexico community water systems (CWS) contain the information needed to calculate Environmental Public Health Tracking (EPHT) annual drinking water quality mean and maximum concentration measures for each system or the for state by the number of CWS or the number of people served. The data are derived from New Mexico Safe Drinking Water Information System (SDWIS) database, 1999-2020. That dataset contains records for active CWS (active for the prior year at the time of extract from the state database, typically in February or March for the prior year’s sample data, e.g. March 2018 for the 2017 data). A CWS is a public water system that serves year-round residents of a community, subdivision, or mobile park that has at least 15 service connections or an average of at least 25 residents.  These CWSs are a subset of all NM public water systems (PWS).  Other water systems are not included. The number of CWS varies from year to year, by a few, typically 2-3.  There have been 610 CWS active at one time or another and in 2020 there were 566 active CWSs.
     13<abstract>These PCE (Tetrachloroethylene) drinking water quality sample data (typically, combined nitrate plus nitrite as nitrogen data) for New Mexico community water systems (CWS) contain the information needed to calculate Environmental Public Health Tracking (EPHT) annual drinking water quality mean and maximum concentration measures for each system or the for state by the number of CWS or the number of people served. The data are derived from New Mexico Safe Drinking Water Information System (SDWIS) database, 1999-2021. That dataset contains records for active CWS (active for the prior year at the time of extract from the state database, typically in February or March for the prior year’s sample data, e.g. March 2018 for the 2017 data). A CWS is a public water system that serves year-round residents of a community, subdivision, or mobile park that has at least 15 service connections or an average of at least 25 residents.  These CWSs are a subset of all NM public water systems (PWS).  Other water systems are not included. The number of CWS varies from year to year, by a few, typically 2-3.  There have been 610 CWS active at one time or another and in 2021 there were 561 active CWSs.
    1414
    1515The New Mexico Environment Department, Drinking Water Bureau, collects and maintains the original data.
    1616</abstract>
    1717<purpose>This dataset was created as part of the Environmental Public Health Tracking Network (EPHTN) drinking water quality measures. It is intended to provide researchers, public health professionals, and the public with summary information on PCE concentrations in community drinking water in New Mexico. The EPHT Content Workgroup Water Team identified initial contaminants of concern for the national EPHT program, identified nationally consistent data sources, and developed nationally consistent data and measures (NCDMs). This dataset can be used to calculate the nationally consistent measures for the New Mexico EPHT Program.</purpose>
    18 <supplinf>Treatment of non-detects: Sample results for PCE with concentrations less than the detection limit (but non-zero) have been replaced with a value equal to 0.5 the detection limit for the analytical method used. If a detection limit was not available from the SDWIS dataset or reported as zero, an estimate of the detection limit from available data and/or the analytical laboratory detection limit and/or a standard analytical method detection limit was applied. Missing data: The current format of the NCDMs annual dataset contains one record for annually and quarterly aggregated data and each compliance sample taken to test for PCE among active CWS for the years 1999-2012. If samples were not collected to test for PCE during a given year or quarter, there would be no record in the dataset. Consequently, when records are compiled for comparisons by CWSs, it may appear that the dataset has missing data. In order to mitigate the issue of "missing data" for cases when the data are in fact not missing, the carry forward procedure has been implemented.  Under this procedure, if samples were not collected to test for PCE during a given year or quarter because the system (1) was not required to take a compliance sample during that particular time period or (2) received a sampling waver from the state for reduced frequency of monitoring based on low analytical results, then the last year or quarter sampling result value was carried forward together with the year/quarter of the actual sample collection information. However, CWSs that have come online after the start date of the data extraction query will have missing values until the system became active.  Thus, missing values may occur because the CWS was not yet active and currently these "missing values" are labeled "not sampled".
     18<supplinf>Treatment of non-detects: Sample results for PCE with concentrations less than the detection limit (but non-zero) have been replaced with a value equal to 0.5 the detection limit for the analytical method used. If a detection limit was not available from the SDWIS dataset or reported as zero, an estimate of the detection limit from available data and/or the analytical laboratory detection limit and/or a standard analytical method detection limit was applied. Missing data: The current format of the NCDMs annual dataset contains one record for annually and quarterly aggregated data and each compliance sample taken to test for PCE among active CWS for the years 1999-2021. If samples were not collected to test for PCE during a given year or quarter, there would be no record in the dataset. Consequently, when records are compiled for comparisons by CWSs, it may appear that the dataset has missing data. In order to mitigate the issue of "missing data" for cases when the data are in fact not missing, the carry forward procedure has been implemented.  Under this procedure, if samples were not collected to test for PCE during a given year or quarter because the system (1) was not required to take a compliance sample during that particular period or (2) received a sampling waver from the state for reduced frequency of monitoring based on low analytical results, then the last year or quarter sampling result value was carried forward together with the year/quarter of the actual sample collection information. However, CWSs that have come online after the start date of the data extraction query will have missing values until the system became active.  Thus, missing values may occur because the CWS was not yet active and currently these "missing values" are labeled "not sampled".
    1919
    20 Drinking water wholesalers that have interties and sold their water to the CWS having a retail population were not included in the dataset even when SDWIS captured this information accurately and completely.  Each importing CWS was attributed with wholesalers' applicable sampling results data. There are no other values missing for reasons beyond what the state's or EPA's monitoring framework and the structure of the EPHT NCDMs created.</supplinf>
     20Drinking water wholesalers that have interties and sold their water to the CWS having a retail population were not included in the dataset even when SDWIS captured this information accurately and completely. Each importing CWS was attributed with wholesalers' applicable sampling results data. There are no other values missing for reasons beyond what the state's or EPA's monitoring framework and the structure of the EPHT NCDMs created.</supplinf>
    2121</descript>
    2222<timeperd>
     
    2525<begdate>19990101</begdate>
    2626<begtime/>
    27 <enddate>20201231</enddate>
     27<enddate>20211231</enddate>
    2828<endtime/>
    2929</rngdates>
     
    9696<dataqual>
    9797<logic>NONE</logic>
    98 <complete>These data are complete with respect to CDC's NCDM requirements. This dataset contains only regulated community water systems, which were active at the time of the data extraction date from the state SDWIS database (typically in February or March for the prior year’s sample data, e.g. March 2018 for the 2017 data). All CWSs taking compliance samples from January 1, 1999-December 31, 2020 are included in the dataset. Compliance samples collected by drinking water wholesalers that have interties with and sold to the CWS having a retail population are not included within each importing CWS applicable sampling results data, even when SDWIS captured this information accurately and completely. Each importing CWS is attributed with wholesalers' applicable sampling results data. Private, transient, and non-community water systems are not included in this dataset.  PCE data are typically collected, however, when the analytical results exceed the 5 mcg/L MCL a confirmatory sample would provide separate results for PCE [analyte code #2987]). Estimates of the number of people potentially exposed may be unreliable as they are based on estimates made by the water system operator. Concentrations in drinking water cannot be directly converted to exposure, because overall water consumption and the proportion of water consumed that comes from the tap are quite variable. In systems that have more than one entry point to the distribution system, the actual PCE level at any given house is a mixture of the levels from all contributing sources. This mix is unknown in these circumstances. In addition, PCE in drinking water is often not the sole source of dietary PCE intake, and may be a minor component. See Supplemental Information for treatment of non-detects.</complete>
     98<complete>These data are complete with respect to CDC's NCDM requirements. This dataset contains only regulated community water systems, which were active at the time of the data extraction date from the state SDWIS database (typically in February or March for the prior year’s sample data, e.g. March 2018 for the 2017 data). All CWSs taking compliance samples from January 1, 1999-December 31, 2021 are included in the dataset. Compliance samples collected by drinking water wholesalers that have interties with and sold to the CWS having a retail population are not included within each importing CWS applicable sampling results data, even when SDWIS captured this information accurately and completely. Each importing CWS is attributed with wholesalers' applicable sampling results data. Private, transient, and non-community water systems are not included in this dataset.  PCE data are typically collected, however, when the analytical results exceed the 5 mcg/L MCL a confirmatory sample would provide separate results for PCE [analyte code #2987]). Estimates of the number of people potentially exposed may be unreliable as they are based on estimates made by the water system operator. Concentrations in drinking water cannot be directly converted to exposure, because overall water consumption and the proportion of water consumed that comes from the tap are quite variable. In systems that have more than one entry point to the distribution system, the actual PCE level at any given house is a mixture of the levels from all contributing sources. This mix is unknown in these circumstances. In addition, PCE in drinking water is often not the sole source of dietary PCE intake, and may be a minor component. See Supplemental Information for treatment of non-detects.
     99
     100Estimates of the number of people potentially exposed may be unreliable as they are based on estimates made by the water system operator. Concentrations in drinking water cannot be directly converted to exposure, because overall water consumption and the proportion of water consumed that comes from the tap are quite variable. In systems that have more than one entry point to the distribution system, the actual nitrate level at any given house is a mixture of the levels from all contributing sources. This mix is unknown in these circumstances.</complete>
    99101<lineage>
    100102<procstep>
    101 <procdesc>This dataset was created by extracting data for non-transient community water systems in NM, which were active for the entire year 1999 through 2015 or portion therein. A CWS is a public water system that serves year-round residents of a community, subdivision, or mobile home park that has at least 15 service connections or an average of at least 25 residents. Sample results are limited to samples taken between January 1, 1999 and December 31, 2020. The dataset accommodates summary-level measures of water PCE concentrations.  This dataset has a finite number of columns and incorporates a hierarchical data structure.  This dataset contains information on CWSs representing all 33 NM counties. The data extracted from NM SDWIS were processed using the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Drinking Water Quality Nationally Consistent Data and Measures (NCDMs) How-To Guide within the Environmental Public Health Tracking Network, version 14.3, January 26, 2017.
     103<procdesc>This dataset was created by extracting data for non-transient community water systems in NM, which were active for the entire year 1999 through 2021 or portion therein. A CWS is a public water system that serves year-round residents of a community, subdivision, or mobile home park that has at least 15 service connections or an average of at least 25 residents. Sample results are limited to samples taken between January 1, 1999 and December 31, 2021. The dataset accommodates summary-level measures of water PCE concentrations.  This dataset has a finite number of columns and incorporates a hierarchical data structure.  This dataset contains information on CWSs representing all 33 NM counties. The data extracted from NM SDWIS were processed using the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Drinking Water Quality Nationally Consistent Data and Measures (NCDMs) How-To Guide within the Environmental Public Health Tracking Network, version 2, January 19, 2022.
    102104</procdesc>
    103 <procdate>20210430</procdate>
     105<procdate>20220404</procdate>
    104106</procstep>
    105107<procstep>
    106108<procdesc>NM EPHT receives drinking water system data for community water systems (CWS) from the NM Environment Department Safe Drinking Water Information System (SDWIS). Data are received in MS Excel spreadsheets, with location coordinates in four different datums for CWS business address: three geographic and one unknown.  Populated place locations are captured, where possible, with a matching merge with 2018 version of USGS Geographic Names Information (NAD83) by feature name.
    107109</procdesc>
    108 <procdate>20210430</procdate>
     110<procdate>20220404</procdate>
    109111</procstep>
    110112<procstep>
    111113<procdesc>NMEPHT data queried through nmtracking.org (NMTracking) result in query-specific data sets that are community water system specific or statewide.</procdesc>
    112 <procdate>20210430</procdate>
     114<procdate>20220404</procdate>
    113115</procstep>
    114116</lineage>
     
    116118<eainfo>
    117119<overview>
    118 <eaover>The dataset contains annual average and maximum and the mean concentration per quarter for PCE for the years 1999-2020. The fields in the dataset are: PWSIDNumber, TimePeriod, Analyte (PCE, Tetrachloroethylene), AggregationType (mean or maximum), Concentration, and ConcentrationUnits. The dataset also contains fields describing Community Water Systems (CWS) derived from an inventory file of CWS qualifying Public Water Sytems such as number of connections and approximate number of people served.
     120<eaover>The dataset contains annual average and maximum and the mean concentration per quarter for PCE for the years 1999-2021. The fields in the dataset are: PWSIDNumber, TimePeriod, Analyte (PCE, Tetrachloroethylene), AggregationType (mean or maximum), Concentration, and ConcentrationUnits. The dataset also contains fields describing Community Water Systems (CWS) derived from an inventory file of CWS qualifying Public Water Sytems such as number of connections and approximate number of people served.
    119121</eaover>
    120 <eadetcit>Data dictionary (last revised: January 16, 2017) is available by contacting the NM EPHT Program at http://nmtracking.org or DOH-EHEB@state.nm.us</eadetcit>
     122<eadetcit>Data dictionary (last revised: January 19, 2022) is available by contacting the NM EPHT Program at http://nmtracking.org or DOH-EHEB@state.nm.us</eadetcit>
    121123</overview>
    122124</eainfo>
     
    151153</distinfo>
    152154<metainfo>
    153 <metd>20210712</metd>
     155<metd>20220404</metd>
    154156<metc>
    155157<cntinfo>
     
    165167<state>NM</state>
    166168<postal>87505</postal>
    167 <country>United States Of America</country>
     169<country>United States of America</country>
    168170</cntaddr>
    169171<cntvoice>18888788992</cntvoice>
  • adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/nmepht-content/xml/metadata/RadiumCommunityWater.xml

    r24138 r25016  
    55<citeinfo>
    66<origin>New Mexico EPHTN Project Manager</origin>
    7 <pubdate>20210712</pubdate>
     7<pubdate>2022044</pubdate>
    88<title>Radium Concentration in Community Water </title>
    99<onlink/>
     
    1111</citation>
    1212<descript>
    13 <abstract>These radium (combined radium-226 and -228) for New Mexico community water systems (CWS) contain the information needed to calculate Environmental Public Health Tracking (EPHT) annual and quarterly drinking water quality mean and maximum concentration measures for each system or the for state by the number of CWS or the number of people served. The data are derived from New Mexico Safe Drinking Water Information System (SDWIS) database, 2003-2020. That dataset contains records for active CWS (active for the prior year at the time of extract from the state database, typically in February or March for the prior year’s sample data, e.g. March 2018 for the 2017 data). A CWS is a public water system that serves year-round residents of a community, subdivision, or mobile park that has at least 15 service connections or an average of at least 25 residents.  These CWSs are a subset of all NM public water systems (PWS).  Other water systems are not included. The number of CWS varies from year to year, by a few, typically 2-3.  There have been 610 CWS active at one time or another and in 2020 there were 566 active CWSs.
     13<abstract>These radium (combined radium-226 and -228) for New Mexico community water systems (CWS) contain the information needed to calculate Environmental Public Health Tracking (EPHT) annual and quarterly drinking water quality mean and maximum concentration measures for each system or the for state by the number of CWS or the number of people served. The data are derived from New Mexico Safe Drinking Water Information System (SDWIS) database, 2003-2021. That dataset contains records for active CWS (active for the prior year at the time of extract from the state database, typically in February or March for the prior year’s sample data, e.g. March 2018 for the 2017 data). A CWS is a public water system that serves year-round residents of a community, subdivision, or mobile park that has at least 15 service connections or an average of at least 25 residents.  These CWSs are a subset of all NM public water systems (PWS).  Other water systems are not included. The number of CWS varies from year to year, by a few, typically 2-3.  There have been 610 CWS active at one time or another and in 2021 there were 561 active CWSs.
    1414
    1515Note, that on December 8, 2003, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) established a drinking water standard or Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) for radium (i.e., combined radium-226 and -228) of 5 picocuries per liter (5 pCi/L) to protect public health.  The initial monitoring requirements were established for radium in 2003 and by 2007 the compliance monitoring framework was set for all CWSs. 
     
    1717<purpose>This dataset was created as part of the Environmental Public Health Tracking Network (EPHTN) drinking water quality measures. It is intended to provide researchers, public health professionals, and the public with summary information on radium concentrations in community drinking water in New Mexico. The EPHT Content Workgroup Water Team identified initial contaminants of concern for the national EPHT program, identified nationally consistent data sources, and developed nationally consistent indicators and measures. This dataset can be used to calculate the nationally consistent measures for the New Mexico EPHT Program.
    1818</purpose>
    19 <supplinf>Treatment of non-detects: Sample results for radium (i.e., combined radium-226 and -228) with concentrations less than the detection limit (but non-zero) have been replaced with a value equal to 1.0 the detection limit for the analytical method used. If a detection limit was not available from the SDWIS dataset or reported as zero, an estimate of the detection limit and/or a standard analytical method detection limit was applied.  Missing data: The current format of the NCDMs annual dataset contains one record for annually-aggregated data and each compliance sample taken to test for radium among active CWS for the years 2003-2013. If samples were not collected to test for radium during a given year, there would be no record in the dataset. Consequently, when records are compiled for comparisons by CWSs, it may appear that the dataset has missing data.  In order to mitigate the issue of missing data for cases when the data are in fact not missing, the carry forward procedure has been implemented. Under this procedure, if samples were not collected to test for radium during a given year because the system (1) was not required to take a compliance sample during that particular time period or (2) was under reduced monitoring from the state based on low analytical results, then the last year sampling result value was carried forward together with the year of the actual sample collection information.  However, CWSs that have come online after the start date of the extraction query will have missing values up until the system became active. Thus, missing values may be because the water system was not yet active. These missing values are labelled as not sampled.
     19<supplinf>Treatment of non-detects: Sample results for radium (i.e., combined radium-226 and -228) with concentrations less than the detection limit (but non-zero) have been replaced with a value equal to 1.0 the detection limit for the analytical method used. If a detection limit was not available from the SDWIS dataset or reported as zero, an estimate of the detection limit and/or a standard analytical method detection limit was applied.  Missing data: The current format of the NCDMs annual dataset contains one record for annually-aggregated data and each compliance sample taken to test for radium among active CWS for the years 2003-2013. If samples were not collected to test for radium during a given year, there would be no record in the dataset. Consequently, when records are compiled for comparisons by CWSs, it may appear that the dataset has missing data.  In order to mitigate the issue of missing data for cases when the data are in fact not missing, the carry forward procedure has been implemented. Under this procedure, if samples were not collected to test for radium during a given year because the system (1) was not required to take a compliance sample during that particular period or (2) was under reduced monitoring from the state based on low analytical results, then the last year sampling result value was carried forward together with the year of the actual sample collection information.  However, CWSs that have come online after the start date of the extraction query will have missing values up until the system became active. Thus, missing values may be because the water system was not yet active. These missing values are labelled as not sampled.
    2020
    2121Drinking water wholesalers that have interties and sold their water to the CWS having a retail population were not included in the dataset even when SDWIS captured this information accurately and completely. Each importing CWS was attributed with wholesalers' applicable sampling results data. There are no other values missing for reasons beyond what the state's or EPA's monitoring framework and the structure of the EPHT NCDMs creates. The data prior to 2008 may have limited quality.
     
    2727<begdate>19990101</begdate>
    2828<begtime/>
    29 <enddate>20201231</enddate>
     29<enddate>20211231</enddate>
    3030<endtime/>
    3131</rngdates>
     
    9393<sechandl>None</sechandl>
    9494</secinfo>
    95 <native>SAS 9.4, water_pws_ann.sas7bdat </native>
     95<native>SAS 9.4, water_pws_ann.sas7bdat</native>
    9696</idinfo>
    9797<dataqual>
    9898<logic>None</logic>
    99 <complete>These data are complete with respect to CDC NCDMs requirements. This dataset contains only regulated community water systems, which were active the time of the data extraction date from the state SDWIS database (typically in February or March for the prior year’s sample data, e.g. March 2018 for the 2017 data). All CWSs taking compliance samples from January 1, 1999-December 31, 2020 are included in the dataset. Note redium samples were only required beginning in 2003, see abstract. Compliance samples collected by drinking water wholesalers that have interties with and sold to the CWS having a retail population are included within each importing CWS applicable sampling results data. Private, non-transient, and non-community water systems are not included in this dataset. Since December 31, 2007, radium (i.e., combined radium-226 and -228) monitoring framework or water sampling frequency varies among water systems depending on the levels of radium measured at the entry point to the distribution system consistently and reliably: (1) water systems consistently exceeding the radium (i.e., combined radium-226 and -228) MCL of 5 pCi/L are required to collect four quarterly samples every year, (2) water systems with radium levels greater than 0.5 MCL but below or equal to MCL collect one sample every 3 years, (3) water systems with water radium concentration above or equal to detection level but below or equal to 0.5 MCL take one water sample every 6 years, and finally, (4) water systems with radium levels below detection level are required to collect one compliance monitoring sample every 9th year.
     99<complete>These data are complete with respect to CDC NCDMs requirements. This dataset contains only regulated community water systems, which were active the time of the data extraction date from the state SDWIS database (typically in February or March for the prior year’s sample data, e.g. March 2018 for the 2017 data). All CWSs taking compliance samples from January 1, 1999-December 31, 2021 are included in the dataset. Note redium samples were only required beginning in 2003, see abstract. Compliance samples collected by drinking water wholesalers that have interties with and sold to the CWS having a retail population are included within each importing CWS applicable sampling results data. Private, non-transient, and non-community water systems are not included in this dataset. Since December 31, 2007, radium (i.e., combined radium-226 and -228) monitoring framework or water sampling frequency varies among water systems depending on the levels of radium measured at the entry point to the distribution system consistently and reliably: (1) water systems consistently exceeding the radium (i.e., combined radium-226 and -228) MCL of 5 pCi/L are required to collect four quarterly samples every year, (2) water systems with radium levels greater than 0.5 MCL but below or equal to MCL collect one sample every 3 years, (3) water systems with water radium concentration above or equal to detection level but below or equal to 0.5 MCL take one water sample every 6 years, and finally, (4) water systems with radium levels below detection level are required to collect one compliance monitoring sample every 9th year.
    100100
    101101Estimates of the number of people potentially exposed may be unreliable as they are based on estimates made by the water system operator. Concentrations in drinking water cannot be directly converted to exposure, because overall water consumption and the proportion of water consumed that comes from the tap are quite variable. In systems that have more than one entry point to the distribution system, the actual nitrate level at any given house is a mixture of the levels from all contributing sources. This mix is unknown in these circumstances.</complete>
    102102<lineage>
    103103<procstep>
    104 <procdesc>This dataset was created by extracting data for non-transient CWSs in NM, which were active for the entire year during 1999-2020 or portion therein. A CWS is a public water system that serves year-round residents of a community, subdivision, or mobile home park that has at least 15 service connections or an average of at least 25 residents.  Sample results are limited to samples taken between January 1, 1999 and December 31, 2020. This dataset accommodates summary-level measures of water radium concentrations. This dataset contains information on CWS representing all 33 NM counties. The data extracted from NM SDWIS were processed using the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Drinking Water Quality Nationally Consistent Data and Measures (NCDMs) How-To Guide within the Environmental Public Health Tracking Network, version 14.3, January 16, 2017.</procdesc>
    105 <procdate>20210430</procdate>
     104<procdesc>This dataset was created by extracting data for non-transient CWSs in NM, which were active for the entire year during 1999-2021 or portion therein. A CWS is a public water system that serves year-round residents of a community, subdivision, or mobile home park that has at least 15 service connections or an average of at least 25 residents. Sample results are limited to samples taken between January 1, 1999 and December 31, 2021. This dataset accommodates summary-level measures of water radium concentrations. This dataset contains information on CWS representing all 33 NM counties. The data extracted from NM SDWIS were processed using the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Drinking Water Quality Nationally Consistent Data and Measures (NCDMs) How-To Guide within the Environmental Public Health Tracking Network, version 2, January 19, 2022.</procdesc>
     105<procdate>20220404</procdate>
    106106</procstep>
    107107<procstep>
    108108<procdesc>NM EPHT receives drinking water system data for community water systems (CWS) from the NM Environment Department Safe Drinking Water Information System (SDWIS). Data are received in MS Excel spreadsheets, with location coordinates in four different datums for CWS business address: three geographic and one unknown.  Populated place locations are captured, where possible, with a matching merge with 2018 version of USGS Geographic Names Information (NAD83) by feature name.
    109109</procdesc>
    110 <procdate>20210430</procdate>
     110<procdate>20220404</procdate>
    111111</procstep>
    112112<procstep>
    113113<procdesc>NMEPHT data queried through nmtracking.org (NMTracking) result in query-specific data sets that are community water system specific or statewide.</procdesc>
    114 <procdate>20180330</procdate>
     114<procdate>20220404</procdate>
    115115</procstep>
    116116</lineage>
     
    120120<eaover>The dataset contains annual average and maximum concentrations for radium (i.e., combined radium-226 and -228). The fields in the dataset are: PWSIDNumber, TimePeriod, Analyte (Nitrate), AggregationType (mean or maximum), Concentration, and ConcentrationUnits. The dataset also contains fields describing Community Water Systems (CWS) derived from an inventory file of CWS qualifying Public Water Sytems such as number of connections and approximate number of people served.
    121121</eaover>
    122 <eadetcit>Data dictionary (last revised: January 16, 2017) is available by contacting the NM  EPHT Program at https://nmtracking.org </eadetcit>
     122<eadetcit>Data dictionary (last revised: January 19, 2022) is available by contacting the NM  EPHT Program at https://nmtracking.org </eadetcit>
    123123</overview>
    124124</eainfo>
     
    137137<state>NM</state>
    138138<postal>87505</postal>
    139 <country>United States Of America</country>
     139<country>United States of America</country>
    140140</cntaddr>
    141141<cntvoice>18888788992</cntvoice>
     
    153153</distinfo>
    154154<metainfo>
    155 <metd>20210712</metd>
     155<metd>20220404</metd>
    156156<metc>
    157157<cntinfo>
     
    180180<metstdn>EPHTN Tracking Network Profile Version 3</metstdn>
    181181<metac>None</metac>
    182 <metuc>None</metuc>
     182<metuc>This information is provided by the Environmental Health Epidemiology Bureau (EHEB) of the New Mexico Department of Health. All users must read and fully comprehend metadata prior to data use.</metuc>
    183183</metainfo>
    184184</metadata>
  • adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/nmepht-content/xml/metadata/TCE_CommunityWater.xml

    r24138 r25016  
    55<citeinfo>
    66<origin>New Mexico EPHTN Project Manager</origin>
    7 <pubdate>20210712</pubdate>
     7<pubdate>2022044</pubdate>
    88<title>TCE Concentration in Community Water</title>
    99<onlink/>
     
    1111</citation>
    1212<descript>
    13 <abstract>These TCE  (Trichloroethylene) drinking water quality sample data  for New Mexico community water systems (CWS) contain the information needed to calculate Environmental Public Health Tracking (EPHT) annual and quarterly drinking water quality mean and maximum concentration measures for each system or the for state by the number of CWS or the number of people served. The data are derived from New Mexico Safe Drinking Water Information System (SDWIS) database, 1999-2020. That dataset contains records for active CWS (active for the prior year at the time of extract from the state database, typically in February or March for the prior year’s sample data, e.g. March 2018 for the 2017 data). A CWS is a public water system that serves year-round residents of a community, subdivision, or mobile park that has at least 15 service connections or an average of at least 25 residents.  These CWSs are a subset of all NM public water systems (PWS).  Other water systems are not included. The number of CWS varies from year to year, by a few, typically 2-3.  There have been 610 CWS active at one time or another and in 2020 there were 566 active CWSs.
     13<abstract>These TCE  (Trichloroethylene) drinking water quality sample data  for New Mexico community water systems (CWS) contain the information needed to calculate Environmental Public Health Tracking (EPHT) annual and quarterly drinking water quality mean and maximum concentration measures for each system or the for state by the number of CWS or the number of people served. The data are derived from New Mexico Safe Drinking Water Information System (SDWIS) database, 1999-2021. That dataset contains records for active CWS (active for the prior year at the time of extract from the state database, typically in February or March for the prior year’s sample data, e.g. March 2018 for the 2017 data). A CWS is a public water system that serves year-round residents of a community, subdivision, or mobile park that has at least 15 service connections or an average of at least 25 residents.  These CWSs are a subset of all NM public water systems (PWS).  Other water systems are not included. The number of CWS varies from year to year, by a few, typically 2-3.  There have been 610 CWS active at one time or another and in 2021 there were 561 active CWSs.
    1414
    1515The New Mexico Environment Department, Drinking Water Bureau, collects and maintains the original data.
    1616</abstract>
    1717<purpose>This dataset was created as part of the Environmental Public Health Tracking Network (EPHTN) drinking water quality measures. It is intended to provide researchers, public health professionals, and the public with summary information on TCE concentrations in community drinking water in New Mexico. The EPHT Content Workgroup Water Team identified initial contaminants of concern for the national EPHT program, identified nationally consistent data sources, and developed nationally consistent data and measures (NCDMs). This dataset can be used to calculate the nationally consistent measures for the New Mexico EPHT Program.</purpose>
    18 <supplinf>Treatment of non-detects: Sample results for TCE with concentrations less than the detection limit (but non-zero) have been replaced with a value equal to 0.5 the detection limit for the analytical method used. If a detection limit was not available from the SDWIS dataset or reported as zero, an estimate of the detection limit from available data and/or the analytical laboratory detection limit and/or a standard analytical method detection limit was applied. Missing data: The current format of the NCDMs annual dataset contains one record for annually and quarterly aggregated data and each compliance sample taken to test for TCE among active CWS for the years 1999-2020. If samples were not collected to test for TCE during a given year or quarter, there would be no record in the dataset. Consequently, when records are compiled for comparisons by CWSs, it may appear that the dataset has missing data. In order to mitigate the issue of "missing data" for cases when the data are in fact not missing, the carry forward procedure has been implemented.  Under this procedure, if samples were not collected to test for TCE during a given year or quarter because the system (1) was not required to take a compliance sample during that particular time period or (2) received a sampling waver from the state for reduced frequency of monitoring based on low analytical results, then the last year or quarter sampling result value was carried forward together with the year/quarter of the actual sample collection information. However, CWSs that have come online after the start date of the data extraction query will have missing values until the system became active.  Thus, missing values may occur because the CWS was not yet active and currently these "missing values" are labeled "not sampled".
     18<supplinf>Treatment of non-detects: Sample results for TCE with concentrations less than the detection limit (but non-zero) have been replaced with a value equal to 0.5 the detection limit for the analytical method used. If a detection limit was not available from the SDWIS dataset or reported as zero, an estimate of the detection limit from available data and/or the analytical laboratory detection limit and/or a standard analytical method detection limit was applied. Missing data: The current format of the NCDMs annual dataset contains one record for annually and quarterly aggregated data and each compliance sample taken to test for TCE among active CWS for the years 1999-2021. If samples were not collected to test for TCE during a given year or quarter, there would be no record in the dataset. Consequently, when records are compiled for comparisons by CWSs, it may appear that the dataset has missing data. In order to mitigate the issue of "missing data" for cases when the data are in fact not missing, the carry forward procedure has been implemented.  Under this procedure, if samples were not collected to test for TCE during a given year or quarter because the system (1) was not required to take a compliance sample during that particular period or (2) received a sampling waver from the state for reduced frequency of monitoring based on low analytical results, then the last year or quarter sampling result value was carried forward together with the year/quarter of the actual sample collection information. However, CWSs that have come online after the start date of the data extraction query will have missing values until the system became active.  Thus, missing values may occur because the CWS was not yet active and currently these "missing values" are labeled "not sampled".
    1919
    20 Drinking water wholesalers that have interties and sold their water to the CWS having a retail population were not included in the dataset even when SDWIS captured this information accurately and completely.  Each importing CWS was attributed with wholesalers' applicable sampling results data. There are no other values missing for reasons beyond what the state's or EPA's monitoring framework and the structure of the EPHT NCDMs created.</supplinf>
     20Drinking water wholesalers that have interties and sold their water to the CWS having a retail population were not included in the dataset even when SDWIS captured this information accurately and completely. Each importing CWS was attributed with wholesalers' applicable sampling results data. There are no other values missing for reasons beyond what the state's or EPA's monitoring framework and the structure of the EPHT NCDMs created.</supplinf>
    2121</descript>
    2222<timeperd>
     
    2525<begdate>19990101</begdate>
    2626<begtime/>
    27 <enddate>20201231</enddate>
     27<enddate>20211231</enddate>
    2828<endtime/>
    2929</rngdates>
     
    4646<theme>
    4747<themekt>NONE</themekt>
    48 <themekey>TCE; Trichloroethylene; 2984; Environmental hazard; Environment; Water quality; Public water system; PWS; Community water system; CWS; ground water; State drinking water data set; National drinking water data set; Safe drinking water act; SDWA; safe drinking water information system; SDWIS; MCL; MCL violations; Maximum Contaminant Level;</themekey>
     48<themekey>TCE; Trichloroethylene; 2984; Environmental hazard; Environment; Water quality; Public water system; PWS; Community water system; CWS; ground water; State drinking water data set; National drinking water data set; Safe drinking water act; SDWA; safe drinking water information system; SDWIS; MCL; MCL violations; Maximum Contaminant Level</themekey>
    4949<themekey></themekey>
    5050<themekey></themekey>
     
    9696<dataqual>
    9797<logic>NONE</logic>
    98 <complete>These data are complete with respect to CDC's NCDM requirements. This dataset contains only regulated community water systems, which were active at the time of the data extraction date from the state SDWIS database (typically in February or March for the prior year’s sample data, e.g. March 2018 for the 2020 data). All CWSs taking compliance samples from January 1, 1999-December 31, 2020 are included in the dataset. Compliance samples collected by drinking water wholesalers that have interties with and sold to the CWS having a retail population are not included within each importing CWS applicable sampling results data, even when SDWIS captured this information accurately and completely. Each importing CWS is attributed with wholesalers' applicable sampling results data. Private, transient, and non-community water systems are not included in this dataset.  TCE data are typically collected, however, when the analytical results exceed the 5 mcg/L MCL a confirmatory sample would provide separate results for TCE [analyte code #2984]). Estimates of the number of people potentially exposed may be unreliable as they are based on estimates made by the water system operator. Concentrations in drinking water cannot be directly converted to exposure, because overall water consumption and the proportion of water consumed that comes from the tap are quite variable. In systems that have more than one entry point to the distribution system, the actual TCE level at any given house is a mixture of the levels from all contributing sources. This mix is unknown in these circumstances. In addition, TCE in drinking water is often not the sole source of dietary TCE intake, and may be a minor component. See Supplemental Information for treatment of non-detects.</complete>
     98<complete>These data are complete with respect to CDC's NCDM requirements. This dataset contains only regulated community water systems, which were active at the time of the data extraction date from the state SDWIS database (typically in February or March for the prior year’s sample data, e.g. March 2018 for the 2017 data). All CWSs taking compliance samples from January 1, 1999-December 31, 2021 are included in the dataset. Compliance samples collected by drinking water wholesalers that have interties with and sold to the CWS having a retail population are not included within each importing CWS applicable sampling results data, even when SDWIS captured this information accurately and completely. Each importing CWS is attributed with wholesalers' applicable sampling results data. Private, transient, and non-community water systems are not included in this dataset.  TCE data are typically collected, however, when the analytical results exceed the 5 mcg/L MCL a confirmatory sample would provide separate results for TCE [analyte code #2984]). Estimates of the number of people potentially exposed may be unreliable as they are based on estimates made by the water system operator. Concentrations in drinking water cannot be directly converted to exposure, because overall water consumption and the proportion of water consumed that comes from the tap are quite variable. In systems that have more than one entry point to the distribution system, the actual TCE level at any given house is a mixture of the levels from all contributing sources. This mix is unknown in these circumstances. In addition, TCE in drinking water is often not the sole source of dietary TCE intake, and may be a minor component. See Supplemental Information for treatment of non-detects.
     99
     100Estimates of the number of people potentially exposed may be unreliable as they are based on estimates made by the water system operator. Concentrations in drinking water cannot be directly converted to exposure, because overall water consumption and the proportion of water consumed that comes from the tap are quite variable. In systems that have more than one entry point to the distribution system, the actual nitrate level at any given house is a mixture of the levels from all contributing sources. This mix is unknown in these circumstances.</complete>
    99101<lineage>
    100102<procstep>
    101 <procdesc>This dataset was created by extracting data for non-transient community water systems in NM, which were active for the entire year 1999 through 2020 or portion therein. A CWS is a public water system that serves year-round residents of a community, subdivision, or mobile home park that has at least 15 service connections or an average of at least 25 residents. Sample results are limited to samples taken between January 1, 1999 and December 31, 2020. The dataset accommodates summary-level measures of water TCE concentrations.  This dataset has a finite number of columns and incorporates a hierarchical data structure.  This dataset contains information on CWSs representing all 33 NM counties. The data extracted from NM SDWIS were processed using the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Drinking Water Quality Nationally Consistent Data and Measures (NCDMs) How-To Guide within the Environmental Public Health Tracking Network, version 14.3, January 16, 2017.</procdesc>
    102 <procdate>20210430</procdate>
     103<procdesc>This dataset was created by extracting data for non-transient community water systems in NM, which were active for the entire year 1999 through 2021 or portion therein. A CWS is a public water system that serves year-round residents of a community, subdivision, or mobile home park that has at least 15 service connections or an average of at least 25 residents. Sample results are limited to samples taken between January 1, 1999 and December 31, 2021. The dataset accommodates summary-level measures of water TCE concentrations.  This dataset has a finite number of columns and incorporates a hierarchical data structure.  This dataset contains information on CWSs representing all 33 NM counties. The data extracted from NM SDWIS were processed using the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Drinking Water Quality Nationally Consistent Data and Measures (NCDMs) How-To Guide within the Environmental Public Health Tracking Network, version 2, January 19, 2022.</procdesc>
     104<procdate>20220404</procdate>
    103105</procstep>
    104106<procstep>
     
    108110<procstep>
    109111<procdesc>NMEPHT data queried through nmtracking.org (NMTracking) result in query-specific data sets that are community water system specific or statewide.</procdesc>
    110 <procdate>20210430</procdate>
     112<procdate>20220404</procdate>
    111113</procstep>
    112114</lineage>
     
    114116<eainfo>
    115117<overview>
    116 <eaover>The dataset contains annual average and maximum and the mean concentration per quarter for TCE for the years 1999-2017. The fields in the dataset are: PWSIDNumber, TimePeriod, Analyte (TCE, Trichloroethylene), AggregationType (mean or maximum), Concentration, and ConcentrationUnits. The dataset also contains fields describing Community Water Systems (CWS) such as number of connections and approximate number of people served. </eaover>
    117 <eadetcit>Data dictionary (last revised: February 20, 2016) is available by contacting the NM EPHT Program at http://nmtracking.org or DOH-EHEB@state.nm.us</eadetcit>
     118<eaover>The dataset contains annual average and maximum and the mean concentration per quarter for TCE for the years 1999-2021. The fields in the dataset are: PWSIDNumber, TimePeriod, Analyte (TCE, Trichloroethylene), AggregationType (mean or maximum), Concentration, and ConcentrationUnits. The dataset also contains fields describing Community Water Systems (CWS) such as number of connections and approximate number of people served. </eaover>
     119<eadetcit>Data dictionary (last revised: January 19, 2022) is available by contacting the NM EPHT Program at http://nmtracking.org or DOH-EHEB@state.nm.us</eadetcit>
    118120</overview>
    119121</eainfo>
     
    132134<state>NM</state>
    133135<postal>87505</postal>
    134 <country>United States Of America</country>
     136<country>United States of America</country>
    135137</cntaddr>
    136138<cntvoice>18888788992</cntvoice>
     
    148150</distinfo>
    149151<metainfo>
    150 <metd>20210712</metd>
     152<metd>20220404</metd>
    151153<metc>
    152154<cntinfo>
  • adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/nmepht-content/xml/metadata/TTHMCommunityWater.xml

    r24138 r25016  
    55<citeinfo>
    66<origin>New Mexico EPHTN Project Manager</origin>
    7 <pubdate>20210712</pubdate>
     7<pubdate>20220405</pubdate>
    88<title>TTHM Concentration in Community Water </title>
    99<onlink/>
     
    1111</citation>
    1212<descript>
    13 <abstract>These total trihalomethanes (TTHM) concentrations (measured as the sum concentration of chloroform, bromodichloromethane, dibromochloromethane, and bromoform in micrograms of TTHMs per liter of water or mcg/L) drinking water quality sample data for New Mexico community water systems (CWS) contain the information needed to calculate Environmental Public Health Tracking (EPHT) annual and quarterly drinking water quality mean and maximum concentration measures for each system or the for state by the number of CWS or the number of people served. The data are derived from New Mexico Safe Drinking Water Information System (SDWIS) database, 1999-2020. That dataset contains records for active CWS (active for the prior year at the time of extract from the state database, typically in February or March for the prior year’s sample data, e.g. March 2018 for the 2017 data). A CWS is a public water system that serves year-round residents of a community, subdivision, or mobile park that has at least 15 service connections or an average of at least 25 residents.  These CWSs are a subset of all NM public water systems (PWS).  Other water systems are not included. The number of CWS varies from year to year, by a few, typically 2-3.  There have been 610 CWS active at one time or another and in 2020 there were 566 active CWSs.
     13<abstract>These total trihalomethanes (TTHM) concentrations (measured as the sum concentration of chloroform, bromodichloromethane, dibromochloromethane, and bromoform in micrograms of TTHMs per liter of water or mcg/L) drinking water quality sample data for New Mexico community water systems (CWS) contain the information needed to calculate Environmental Public Health Tracking (EPHT) annual and quarterly drinking water quality mean and maximum concentration measures for each system or the for state by the number of CWS or the number of people served. The data are derived from New Mexico Safe Drinking Water Information System (SDWIS) database, 1999-2020. That dataset contains records for active CWS (active for the prior year at the time of extract from the state database, typically in February or March for the prior year’s sample data, e.g. March 2018 for the 2017 data). A CWS is a public water system that serves year-round residents of a community, subdivision, or mobile park that has at least 15 service connections or an average of at least 25 residents.  These CWSs are a subset of all NM public water systems (PWS).  Other water systems are not included. The number of CWS varies from year to year, by a few, typically 2-3.  There have been 631 CWS active at one time or another and in 2021 there were 561 active CWSs.
    1414
    1515The New Mexico Environment Department, Drinking Water Bureau, collects and maintains the original data.
     
    1818</abstract>
    1919<purpose>This dataset was created as part of the Environmental Public Health Tracking Network (EPHTN) drinking water quality measures. It is intended to provide researchers, public health professionals, and the public with summary information on TTHM concentrations in community drinking water in New Mexico. The EPHT Content Workgroup Water Team identified initial contaminants of concern for the national EPHT program, identified nationally consistent data sources, and developed nationally consistent indicators and measures. This dataset can be used to calculate the nationally consistent measures for the New Mexico EPHT Program.</purpose>
    20 <supplinf>Treatment of non-detects: Sample results for TTHM with concentrations less than the detection limit (but non-zero) have been replaced with a value equal to 0.5 the detection limit for the analytical method used. If a detection limit was not available from the SDWIS dataset or reported as zero, an estimate of the detection limit and/or a standard analytical method detection limit was applied.  Missing data: the current format of the NCDMs annual dataset contains one record for quarterly- or annually-aggregated data and each compliance sample taken to test for TTHM among active CWS for the years 1999-2020.  If samples were not collected to test for TTHM during a given quarter or year, there would be no record in the dataset. Consequently, when records are compiled for comparisons by CWSs, it may appear that the dataset has missing data.  In order to mitigate the issue of “missing data” for cases when the data are in fact not missing, the carry forward procedure has been implemented. Under this procedure, if samples were not collected to test for TTHM during a given year because the system (1) was not required to take a compliance sample during that particular time period or (2) the system failed to collect the sample from the required location and/or collect the sample during the compliance month thus resulting in a non-sampling violation or (3) received a sampling wavier from the state for reduced frequency of monitoring based on low analytical results, then the last quarter or year sampling result value was carried forward together with the year of the actual sample collection information.  However, CWSs that have come online after the start date of the extraction query will have missing values up until the system became active. Thus, missing values may be because the water system was not yet active and current. These “missing values” are labeled as “not sampled”. 
     20<supplinf>Treatment of non-detects: Sample results for TTHM with concentrations less than the detection limit (but non-zero) have been replaced with a value equal to 0.5 the detection limit for the analytical method used. If a detection limit was not available from the SDWIS dataset or reported as zero, an estimate of the detection limit and/or a standard analytical method detection limit was applied.  Missing data: the current format of the NCDMs annual dataset contains one record for quarterly- or annually-aggregated data and each compliance sample taken to test for TTHM among active CWS for the years 1999-2021.  If samples were not collected to test for TTHM during a given quarter or year, there would be no record in the dataset. Consequently, when records are compiled for comparisons by CWSs, it may appear that the dataset has missing data.  In order to mitigate the issue of “missing data” for cases when the data are in fact not missing, the carry forward procedure has been implemented. Under this procedure, if samples were not collected to test for TTHM during a given year because the system (1) was not required to take a compliance sample during that particular period or (2) the system failed to collect the sample from the required location and/or collect the sample during the compliance month thus resulting in a non-sampling violation or (3) received a sampling wavier from the state for reduced frequency of monitoring based on low analytical results, then the last quarter or year sampling result value was carried forward together with the year of the actual sample collection information.  However, CWSs that have come online after the start date of the extraction query will have missing values up until the system became active. Thus, missing values may be because the water system was not yet active and current. These “missing values” are labeled as “not sampled”. 
    2121
    2222Drinking water wholesalers that have interties and sold their water to the CWS having a retail population were not included in the dataset even when SDWIS captured this information accurately and completely.  Each importing CWS was attributed with wholesalers’ applicable sampling results data. There are no other values missing for reasons beyond what the state's or EPA's monitoring framework and the structure of the EPHT NCDMs creates. The data prior to 2005 may have limited quality.
     
    2828<begdate>19990101</begdate>
    2929<begtime/>
    30 <enddate>20201231</enddate>
     30<enddate>20211231</enddate>
    3131<endtime/>
    3232</rngdates>
     
    6060</place>
    6161</keywords>
    62 <accconst>These data are publically available; No permission required. </accconst>
     62<accconst>These data are publicaly available; No permission required. </accconst>
    6363<useconst>These data may not be used to identify single problematic water systems. To identify regulatory or compliance issues with single water systems contact the NMED-DWB. The principal county served variable designates the principal county in which the CWS is located as reported by the supplier; however, community drinking water system distribution areas may extend beyond county boundaries. Use of the principal county served variable to link drinking water data to health outcomes or other data should be made only with extreme precautions, after the implications of doing so are completely understood, and with fully and explicitly stating the limitations of the linkage. These data are aggregate summary measures of contaminant levels in finished water. They reflect the potential for population exposure but are not true exposure estimates; therefore they should not be used in any epidemiologic investigations of health outcome and environmental linkages. These data may not be used to identify any individual or residence who is receiving drinking water. In addition, the data prior to 2005 may have limited quality and as such should be used with caution.
    6464
     
    9797<dataqual>
    9898<logic>None</logic>
    99 <complete>These data are complete with respect to CDC's NCDM requirements. This dataset contains only regulated community water systems, which were active at the time of the data extraction date from the state database (i.e., in March, 2021). All CWS taking compliance samples from January 1, 1999-December 31, 2020 are included in the dataset. Compliance samples collected by drinking water wholesalers that have interties with and sold to the CWS having a retail population are included within each importing CWS applicable sampling results data. Private, non-transient, and non-community water systems are not included in this dataset. Since 1998, under Stage I Disinfectants and Disinfection ByProduct Rule (DBPR), TTHM monitoring framework or water sampling frequency varies among water systems depending on the water source (ground or surface water), population of residents served (less than 500, 500 or greater but less than 10,000 and 10,000 and greater), number of treatment plants and levels of TTHM measured at location representing maximum residence time: (1) water systems using only ground water routinely sample with one water sample per treatment plant, and if serving at least 10,000 persons, then samples every quarter whereas those with smaller populations sample annually during the month with the warmest water temperature, (2) water systems using only ground water may reduce monitoring frequency to once a year at the location reflecting maximum residence time during the warmest water month of the year if serving at least 10,000 person and annual average TTHM concentration is less than or equal to the MCL or, if the systems serves less than 10,000, then samples are collected once every three years, (3) water systems using surface water and serving fewer than 500 persons routinely sample once a year at the location reflecting maximum residence time during the warmest water month of the year, (4) water systems using surface water and serving from 500 to under 10,000 persons routinely sample once per quarter per treatment plant, (5) water systems using surface water and serving from 500 to under 10,000 persons may reduce monitoring frequency to sample once per year per treatment plant at the location reflecting maximum residence time during the warmest water month of the year, (6) water systems using surface water and serving at least 10,000 persons routinely sample four times per quarter per treatment plant and (7) water systems using surface water and serving at least 10,000 persons may reduce monitoring frequency to sample once per treatment plant per quarter per year if annual average TTHM is half or less of the MCL. Stage I DBPR monitoring sunset September 30, 2013.
     99<complete>These data are complete with respect to CDC's NCDM requirements. This dataset contains only regulated community water systems, which were active at the time of the data extraction date from the state database (i.e., in March, 2021). All CWS taking compliance samples from January 1, 1999-December 31, 2021 are included in the dataset. Compliance samples collected by drinking water wholesalers that have interties with and sold to the CWS having a retail population are included within each importing CWS applicable sampling results data. Private, non-transient, and non-community water systems are not included in this dataset. Since 1998, under Stage I Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproduct Rule (DBPR), TTHM monitoring framework or water sampling frequency varies among water systems depending on the water source (ground or surface water), population of residents served (less than 500, 500 or greater but less than 10,000 and 10,000 and greater), number of treatment plants and levels of TTHM measured at location representing maximum residence time: (1) water systems using only ground water routinely sample with one water sample per treatment plant, and if serving at least 10,000 persons, then samples every quarter whereas those with smaller populations sample annually during the month with the warmest water temperature, (2) water systems using only ground water may reduce monitoring frequency to once a year at the location reflecting maximum residence time during the warmest water month of the year if serving at least 10,000 person and annual average TTHM concentration is less than or equal to the MCL or, if the systems serves less than 10,000, then samples are collected once every three years, (3) water systems using surface water and serving fewer than 500 persons routinely sample once a year at the location reflecting maximum residence time during the warmest water month of the year, (4) water systems using surface water and serving from 500 to under 10,000 persons routinely sample once per quarter per treatment plant, (5) water systems using surface water and serving from 500 to under 10,000 persons may reduce monitoring frequency to sample once per year per treatment plant at the location reflecting maximum residence time during the warmest water month of the year, (6) water systems using surface water and serving at least 10,000 persons routinely sample four times per quarter per treatment plant and (7) water systems using surface water and serving at least 10,000 persons may reduce monitoring frequency to sample once per treatment plant per quarter per year if annual average TTHM is half or less of the MCL. Stage I DBPR monitoring sunset September 30, 2013.
    100100 
    101101Beginning October 1, 2013, all CWSs became responsible for Stage 2 DBPR Compliance monitoring. Systems were required to evaluate their distribution system and identify the locations with high TTHM. Compliance with the maximum contaminant levels was calculated for each location in the distribution system. This approach, referred to as the locational running annual average (LRAA), differs from the Stage 1 requirements, which determine compliance by calculating the running annual average of samples from all monitoring locations across the system.  Framework or water sampling frequency varies among water systems depending on the water source (ground or surface water), population of residents served (less than 500, 500 or greater but less than 10,000 and 10,000 and greater). CWS serving at least 100,000 began compliance monitoring April 1, 2012. Systems were required to take individual TTHM samples at locations with the highest TTHM concentrations. Trihalomethanes typically continue to form in the distribution system over time so the highest concentration of these are most often found at the outermost edges of a distribution system (furthest from the water treatment facility) where the oldest water is found. Thus, this is where sampling locations for TTHMs are most appropriately located (the Maximum Retention Time or MRT Site). CWSs serving 50,000 to 99,999 began compliance monitoring on October 1, 2012. CWS serving 49,999 and fewer began monitoring on October 1, 2013
     
    103103<lineage>
    104104<procstep>
    105 <procdesc>This dataset was created by extracting data for non-transient CWSs in NM, which were active for the entire year during 1999-2020 or portion therein. A CWS is a public water system that serves year-round residents of a community, subdivision, or mobile home park that has at least 15 service connections or an average of at least 25 residents.  Sample results are limited to samples taken between January 1, 1999 and December 31, 2020. This dataset accommodates summary-level measures of water TTHM concentrations. This dataset contains information on CWS representing all 33 NM counties. The data extracted from NMSDWIS were processed using the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Drinking Water Quality Nationally Consistent Data and Measures (NCDMs) How-To Guide within the Environmental Public Health Tracking Network, version 14.3, January 16, 2017.</procdesc>
    106 <procdate>20210430</procdate>
     105<procdesc>This dataset was created by extracting data for non-transient CWSs in NM, which were active for the entire year during 1999-2021 or portion therein. A CWS is a public water system that serves year-round residents of a community, subdivision, or mobile home park that has at least 15 service connections or an average of at least 25 residents.  Sample results are limited to samples taken between January 1, 1999 and December 31, 2021. This dataset accommodates summary-level measures of water TTHM concentrations. This dataset contains information on CWS representing all 33 NM counties. The data extracted from NMSDWIS were processed using the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Drinking Water Quality Nationally Consistent Data and Measures (NCDMs) How-To Guide within the Environmental Public Health Tracking Network, version 2, January 19, 2022.</procdesc>
     106<procdate>20220405</procdate>
    107107</procstep>
    108108<procstep>
    109109<procdesc>NM EPHT receives drinking water system data for community water systems (CWS) from the NM Environment Department Safe Drinking Water Information System (SDWIS). Data are received in MS Excel spreadsheets, with location coordinates in four different datums for CWS business address: three geographic and one unknown.  Populated place locations are captured, where possible, with a matching merge with 2018 version of USGS Geographic Names Information (NAD83) by feature name.</procdesc>
    110 <procdate>20210430</procdate>
    111110</procstep>
    112111<procstep>
    113112<procdesc>NMEPHT data queried through nmtracking.org (NMTracking) result in query-specific data sets that are community water system specific or statewide.</procdesc>
    114 <procdate>20210430</procdate>
    115113</procstep>
    116114</lineage>
     
    118116<eainfo>
    119117<overview>
    120 <eaover>The dataset contains quarterly average and annual average and maximum concentrations for TTHM. The fields in the dataset are: PWSIDNumber, TimePeriod, Analyte (Nitrate), AggregationType (mean or maximum), Concentration, and ConcentrationUnits. The dataset also contains fields describing Community Water Systems (CWS) derived from an inventory file of CWS qualifying Public Water Sytems such as number of connections and approximate number of people served.
     118<eaover>The dataset contains quarterly average and annual average and maximum concentrations for TTHM. The fields in the dataset are: PWSIDNumber, TimePeriod, Analyte (Nitrate), AggregationType (mean or maximum), Concentration, and ConcentrationUnits. The dataset also contains fields describing Community Water Systems (CWS) derived from an inventory file of CWS qualifying Public Water Systems such as number of connections and approximate number of people served.
    121119</eaover>
    122 <eadetcit>Data dictionary (last revised: January 16, 2016) is available by contacting the NM EPHT Program at http://nmtracking.org or DOH-EHEB@state.nm.us.</eadetcit>
     120<eadetcit>Data dictionary (last revised: January 19, 2022) is available by contacting the NM EPHT Program at http://nmtracking.org or DOH-EHEB@state.nm.us.</eadetcit>
    123121</overview>
    124122</eainfo>
     
    137135<state>NM</state>
    138136<postal>87505</postal>
    139 <country>United States Of America</country>
     137<country>United States of America</country>
    140138</cntaddr>
    141139<cntvoice>18888788992</cntvoice>
     
    153151</distinfo>
    154152<metainfo>
    155 <metd>20210430</metd>
     153<metd>20220405</metd>
    156154<metc>
    157155<cntinfo>
  • adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/nmepht-content/xml/metadata/Temperature.xml

    r13462 r25016  
    44<citation>
    55<citeinfo>
    6 <origin>New Mexico EPHTN Project Manager</origin>
    7 <pubdate>20170323</pubdate>
    8 <title>Extreme Heat Events by County</title>
     6<origin>New Mexico EPHTN</origin>
     7<pubdate>20220308</pubdate>
     8<title>Temperatures, Ground Monitored</title>
    99<onlink/>
    1010</citeinfo>
    1111</citation>
    1212<description>
    13 <abstract>This dataset contains the number of days above various temperature thresholds for each year (1981-2016) and each New Mexico county. The dataset was created using guidelines provided in the CDC NCDM Recommendations for heat exposure. The NCDM documentation is available from CDC's Environmental Public Health Tracking Network. These county-level estimates were created using gridded climate data downloaded from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) North American Land Data Assimilation System (NLDAS-2) dataset. NLDAS-2 provides a gridded climate dataset that includes estimated hourly temperature and absolute humidity at 2 meters above ground level for the entire United States at 1/8th degree spatial resolution (approximately a 14x14 km grid). Using these data, we calculated both daily maximum temperature and daily maximum heat index for all New Mexico grid cells.  Next, we identified extreme heat days using both absolute temperature thresholds (i.e. days when temperatures reached 90°F, 95°F, 100°F, or 105°F) and relative temperature thresholds (i.e. days when temperatures reached the local 90th, 95th, or 98th May-September 1981-2010 temperature percentiles). We converted grid-level data to county-level estimates to facilitate linkage with populations and health outcomes.</abstract>
    14 <purpose>This dataset contains calculated measures of cumulative annual heat exposure across NM by county. This does not provide complete information on actual exposure to dangerous temperatures in any given region or for any given person. These data are not intended for performing health assessments or otherwise being directly related or linked to health data.</purpose>
    15 <methods>These county-level estimates of heat exposure were created using gridded climate data downloaded from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) North American Land Data Assimilation System (NLDAS-2) dataset. To do this, we first averaged the NLDAS-2 grid within each 2010 US Census tract in New Mexico.  We then used 2010 Census tract populations to compute a population-weighted average temperature for each county, which was intended to be more representative of population exposure than a simple areal average would have been. Temperature and heat index percentiles were calculated using May-September temperatures from 1981-2010, though the number of days exceeding those percentiles in a given year were summed over all months. The NLDAS-2 forcing dataset provides absolute humidity and dry bulb temperature. Relative humidity was calculated from absolute humidity, dry bulb temperature, and elevation-adjusted atmospheric pressure after Bolton (1980) [The computation of equivalent potential temperature. Monthly Weather Review 108:1046-1053] and elevations for each NLDAS-2 grid cell. Heat index was then calculated using the NOAA standard heat index equation (http://www.wpc.ncep.noaa.gov/html/heatindex_equation.shtml), including all appropriate adjustments.</methods>
     13<abstract>This dataset contains the daily summaries of temperature for each year 1940-2021 for each New Mexico station local (393 total), Placename, small area (where monitors are available), county, NWS Climate Division and EPA Eco-Region. The dataset was created using National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration National Centers for Environmental Information data, https://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/cdo-web/datatools. Data downloads include daily temperature maximum, minimum, average. Additionally, the data include data quality flags, date and time of observation and moisture measures of precipitation and evaporation. Because space and speed of processing for queries is important, the original data gets parsed into temperatures and precipitation files and, while utilized in processing, the flags and time of observation are not kept in the analysis files. Further, because most records with precipitation do not include temperature measures those measures are also parsed into separate files for query (see Precipitation.xml metadata). Using these data, we calculate both daily maximum and maximum temperatures for all of New Mexico and substate geographies. Our queries can identify and display histories, comparisons and extreme heat days using both absolute temperature thresholds (i.e. days when temperatures reached 90°F, 95°F, 100°F, or 105°F) and user specified temperature thresholds. We also use the data to facilitate linkage with populations and health outcomes.
     14</abstract>
     15<purpose>This dataset contains measures of temperatures that may be summarized at the day, month and annual levels and enable comparisons over time and/or geography for minimum, maximum, minimum and maximum or threshold temperatures. This does not provide complete information on actual exposure to dangerous temperatures in any given region or for any given person.
     16</purpose>
     17<methods>The various geographic-level measures of heat exposure were created using National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration National Centers for Environmental Information data, https://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/cdo-web/datatools data. To do this, we first take the minimum and/or maximum temperature within each area in New Mexico.</methods>
    1618</description>
    1719<timeperd>
    1820<timeinfo>
    1921<rngdates>
    20 <begdate>19810101</begdate>
    21 <enddate>20161231</enddate>
     22<begdate>19400101</begdate>
     23<enddate>20211231</enddate>
    2224</rngdates>
    2325</timeinfo>
     
    3840<theme>
    3941<themekt>Exposure Type - CDC</themekt>
    40 <themekey>Temperature; Heat; Climate; Climate change; Environment</themekey>
     42<themekey>Temperature; Heat; Climate; Climate change; Environment; Weather</themekey>
    4143</theme>
    4244<place>
    43 <placekt>FIPS 6-4 (County)</placekt>
     45<placekt>local (Station Location)</placekt>
     46<placekey>NM, New Mexico, 393</placekey>
     47<placekt>GeoSarea (NM Small Areas)</placekt>
     48<placekey>NM, New Mexico, 109</placekey>
     49<placekt>Placename (NM Place Names; Town, City)</placekt>
     50<placekey>NM, New Mexico, 70</placekey>
     51<placekt>FIPS (County)</placekt>
    4452<placekey>NM, New Mexico, 35</placekey>
     53<placekt>CDiv (NWS Climate Division)</placekt>
     54<placekey>NM, New Mexico, 8</placekey>
     55<placekt>ecoregion (EP Eco-Region)</placekt>
     56<placekey>NM, New Mexico, 7</placekey>
    4557</place>
    4658</keywords>
    4759<accconst>None</accconst>
    48 <useconst>As general indicators of heat exposure over space and time, these indicators are not intended for use in performing health assessments or otherwise being directly linked (related) with health data. Data users should acknowledge the original data source (NASA NLDAS-2).</useconst>
     60<useconst>As general indicators of heat exposure over space and time. Data users should acknowledge the original data source (NOAA NCEI).</useconst>
    4961<ptcontac>
    5062<cntinfo>
     
    8698</procstep>
    8799<procstep>
    88 <procdesc>NM EPHT data queries through nmtracking.org (NMTracking) result in query-specific data sets that are aggregated by geographic unit. These aggregated data are dynamically joined to boundary data sets for display in the NMTracking interactive map. Boundaries are for County and 2010 U.S. Census Tract. Mapped results for the interactive data query include options for a background with an NM base map or shaded relief. Both background maps are served from the NM Resource Geographic Information System or other servers hosted at UNM Earth Data Analysis Center.
     100<procdesc>NM EPHT data queries through nmtracking.org (NMTracking) result in query-specific data sets that maybe aggregated by geographic unit.
    89101</procdesc>
    90 <procdate>20170201</procdate>
     102<procdate>20220308</procdate>
    91103</procstep>
    92104</lineage>
     
    94106<eainfo>
    95107<overview>
    96 <eaover>NM EPHT heat exposure county indicators for temperature and heat index, 1981-2016.</eaover>
    97 <eadetcit>CDC Environmental Public Health Tracking Network, NCDM Recommendations, Temperature.</eadetcit>
     108<eaover>NM EPHT heat exposure county indicators for temperature and heat index, 1941-2021.</eaover>
     109<eadetcit>Temperature.</eadetcit>
    98110</overview>
    99111</eainfo>
     
    126138</distinfo>
    127139<metainfo>
    128 <metd>20170201</metd>
     140<metd>20220308</metd>
    129141<metc>
    130142<cntinfo>
  • adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/nmepht-content/xml/metadata/UraniumCommunityWater.xml

    r24138 r25016  
    55<citeinfo>
    66<origin>New Mexico EPHTN Project Manager</origin>
    7 <pubdate>20210712</pubdate>
     7<pubdate>20220405</pubdate>
    88<title>Uranium Concentration in Community Water </title>
    99<onlink/>
     
    1111</citation>
    1212<descript>
    13 <abstract>These uranium drinking water quality sample data for New Mexico community water systems (CWS) contain the information needed to calculate Environmental Public Health Tracking (EPHT) annual drinking water quality mean and maximum concentration measures for each system or the for state by the number of CWS or the number of people served. The data are derived from New Mexico Safe Drinking Water Information System (SDWIS) database, 2003-2020. That dataset contains records for active CWS (active for the prior year at the time of extract from the state database, typically in February or March for the prior year’s sample data, e.g. March 2018 for the 2017 data). A CWS is a public water system that serves year-round residents of a community, subdivision, or mobile park that has at least 15 service connections or an average of at least 25 residents.  These CWSs are a subset of all NM public water systems (PWS).  Other water systems are not included. The number of CWS varies from year to year, by a few, typically 2-3.  There have been 610 CWS active at one time or another and in 2020 there were 566 active CWSs.
     13<abstract>These uranium drinking water quality sample data for New Mexico community water systems (CWS) contain the information needed to calculate Environmental Public Health Tracking (EPHT) annual drinking water quality mean and maximum concentration measures for each system or the for state by the number of CWS or the number of people served. The data are derived from New Mexico Safe Drinking Water Information System (SDWIS) database, 2003-2021. That dataset contains records for active CWS (active for the prior year at the time of extract from the state database, typically in February or March for the prior year’s sample data, e.g. March 2018 for the 2017 data). A CWS is a public water system that serves year-round residents of a community, subdivision, or mobile park that has at least 15 service connections or an average of at least 25 residents.  These CWSs are a subset of all NM public water systems (PWS).  Other water systems are not included. The number of CWS varies from year to year, by a few, typically 2-3.  There have been 631 CWS active at one time or another and in 2021 there were 561 active CWSs.
    1414
    1515The New Mexico Environment Department, Drinking Water Bureau, collects and maintains the original data.
     
    1717Note, that on December 8, 2003, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) established a drinking water standard or Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) for uranium of 30 micrograms per liter (30 mcg/L) or 30 parts per billion (30 ppb) to protect public health.  The initial monitoring requirements were established for uranium in 2003 and by 2007 the compliance monitoring framework was set for all CWSs.  </abstract>
    1818<purpose>This dataset was created as part of the Environmental Public Health Tracking Network (EPHTN) drinking water quality measures. It is intended to provide researchers, public health professionals, and the public with summary information on uranium concentrations in community drinking water in New Mexico. The EPHT Content Workgroup Water Team identified initial contaminants of concern for the national EPHT program, identified nationally consistent data sources, and developed nationally consistent indicators and measures. This dataset can be used to calculate the nationally consistent measures for the New Mexico EPHT Program. </purpose>
    19 <supplinf>Treatment of non-detects: Sample results for uranium with concentrations less than the detection limit (but non-zero) have been replaced with a value equal to 0.5 the detection limit for the analytical method used. If a detection limit was not available from the SDWIS dataset or reported as zero, an estimate of the detection limit and/or a standard analytical method detection limit was applied.  Missing data: The current format of the NCDMs annual dataset contains one record for annually-aggregated data and each compliance sample taken to test for uranium among active CWS for the years 1999-2020. If samples were not collected to test for uranium during a given year, there would be no record in the dataset. Consequently, when records are compiled for comparisons by CWSs, it may appear that the dataset has missing data.  In order to mitigate the issue of “missing data” for cases when the data are in fact not missing, the carry forward procedure has been implemented. Under this procedure, if samples were not collected to test for uranium during a given year because the system (1) was not required to take a compliance sample during that particular time period or (2) received a sampling wavier from the state for reduced frequency of monitoring based on low analytical results, then the last year sampling result value was carried forward together with the year of the actual sample collection information.  However, CWSs that have come online after the start date of the extraction query will have missing values up until the system became active. Thus, missing values may be because the water system was not yet active and current. These “missing values” are labeled as “not sampled”. 
     19<supplinf>Treatment of non-detects: Sample results for uranium with concentrations less than the detection limit (but non-zero) have been replaced with a value equal to 0.5 the detection limit for the analytical method used. If a detection limit was not available from the SDWIS dataset or reported as zero, an estimate of the detection limit and/or a standard analytical method detection limit was applied.  Missing data: The current format of the NCDMs annual dataset contains one record for annually-aggregated data and each compliance sample taken to test for uranium among active CWS for the years 1999-2021. If samples were not collected to test for uranium during a given year, there would be no record in the dataset. Consequently, when records are compiled for comparisons by CWSs, it may appear that the dataset has missing data.  In order to mitigate the issue of “missing data” for cases when the data are in fact not missing, the carry forward procedure has been implemented. Under this procedure, if samples were not collected to test for uranium during a given year because the system (1) was not required to take a compliance sample during that particular period or (2) received a sampling wavier from the state for reduced frequency of monitoring based on low analytical results, then the last year sampling result value was carried forward together with the year of the actual sample collection information.  However, CWSs that have come online after the start date of the extraction query will have missing values up until the system became active. Thus, missing values may be because the water system was not yet active and current. These “missing values” are labeled as “not sampled”. 
    2020
    2121Drinking water wholesalers that have interties and sold their water to the CWS having a retail population were not included in the dataset even when SDWIS captured this information accurately and completely.  Each importing CWS was attributed with wholesalers’ applicable sampling results data. There are no other values missing for reasons beyond what the state's or EPA's monitoring framework and the structure of the EPHT NCDMs creates. The data prior to 2008 may have limited quality. </supplinf>
     
    2626<begdate>19990101</begdate>
    2727<begtime/>
    28 <enddate>20201231</enddate>
     28<enddate>20211231</enddate>
    2929<endtime/>
    3030</rngdates>
     
    9595<dataqual>
    9696<logic>None</logic>
    97 <complete>These data are complete with respect to CDC's NCDM requirements. This dataset contains only regulated community water systems, which were active at the time of the data extraction date from the state database (typically in February or March for the prior year’s sample data, e.g. March 2018 for the 2017 data). All CWS taking compliance samples from January 1, 1999-December 31, 2020 are included in the dataset. Compliance samples collected by drinking water wholesalers that have interties with and sold to the CWS having a retail population are included within each importing CWS applicable sampling results data. Private, non-transient, and non-community water systems are not included in this dataset. Since 2007, uranium monitoring framework or water sampling frequency varies among water systems depending on the levels of uranium measured at the entry point to the distribution system consistently and reliably: (1) water systems consistently exceeding the uranium MCL of 30 mcg/L are required to collect four quarterly samples every year, (2) water systems with uranium levels greater than 0.5 MCL but if below or equal to MCL collect one sample every 3 years, (3) water systems with water uranium concentration above or equal to detection level but below or equal to 0.5 MCL take one water sample every 6 years, and finally, (4) water systems with uranium levels &lt;detection level are required to collect one compliance monitoring sample every 9th year.
     97<complete>These data are complete with respect to CDC's NCDM requirements. This dataset contains only regulated community water systems, which were active at the time of the data extraction date from the state database (typically in February or March for the prior year’s sample data, e.g. March 2018 for the 2017 data). All CWS taking compliance samples from January 1, 1999-December 31, 2021 are included in the dataset. Compliance samples collected by drinking water wholesalers that have interties with and sold to the CWS having a retail population are included within each importing CWS applicable sampling results data. Private, non-transient, and non-community water systems are not included in this dataset. Since 2007, uranium monitoring framework or water sampling frequency varies among water systems depending on the levels of uranium measured at the entry point to the distribution system consistently and reliably: (1) water systems consistently exceeding the uranium MCL of 30 mcg/L are required to collect four quarterly samples every year, (2) water systems with uranium levels greater than 0.5 MCL but if below or equal to MCL collect one sample every 3 years, (3) water systems with water uranium concentration above or equal to detection level but below or equal to 0.5 MCL take one water sample every 6 years, and finally, (4) water systems with uranium levels less than detection level are required to collect one compliance monitoring sample every 9th year.
    9898
    9999Estimates of the number of people potentially exposed may be unreliable as they are based on estimates made by the water system operator. Concentrations in drinking water cannot be directly converted to exposure, because overall water consumption and the proportion of water consumed that comes from the tap are quite variable.
     
    101101<lineage>
    102102<procstep>
    103 <procdesc>This dataset was created by extracting data for non-transient CWSs in NM, which were active for the entire year during 1999-2020 or portion therein. A CWS is a public water system that serves year-round residents of a community, subdivision, or mobile home park that has at least 15 service connections or an average of at least 25 residents.  Sample results are limited to samples taken between January 1, 1999 and December 31, 2020. This dataset accommodates summary-level measures of water uranium concentrations. This dataset contains information on CWS representing all 33 NM counties. The data extracted from NMSDWIS were processed using the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Drinking Water Quality Nationally Consistent Data and Measures (NCDMs) How-To Guide within the Environmental Public Health Tracking Network, version 14.3, January 16, 2017.</procdesc>
    104 <procdate>20210430</procdate>
     103<procdesc>This dataset was created by extracting data for non-transient CWSs in NM, which were active for the entire year during 1999-2021 or portion therein. A CWS is a public water system that serves year-round residents of a community, subdivision, or mobile home park that has at least 15 service connections or an average of at least 25 residents.  Sample results are limited to samples taken between January 1, 1999 and December 31, 2021. This dataset accommodates summary-level measures of water uranium concentrations. This dataset contains information on CWS representing all 33 NM counties. The data extracted from NMSDWIS were processed using the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Drinking Water Quality Nationally Consistent Data and Measures (NCDMs) How-To Guide within the Environmental Public Health Tracking Network, version 2, January 19, 2022.</procdesc>
     104<procdate>20220405</procdate>
    105105</procstep>
    106106<procstep>
    107107<procdesc>NM EPHT receives drinking water system data for community water systems (CWS) from the NM Environment Department Safe Drinking Water Information System (SDWIS). Data are received in MS Excel spreadsheets, with location coordinates in four different datums for CWS business address: three geographic and one unknown.  Populated place locations are captured, where possible, with a matching merge with 2018 version of USGS Geographic Names Information (NAD83) by feature name.
    108108</procdesc>
    109 <procdate>20210430</procdate>
     109<procdate>20220405</procdate>
    110110</procstep>
    111111<procstep>
    112112<procdesc>NMEPHT data queried through nmtracking.org (NMTracking) result in query-specific data sets that are community water system specific or statewide.</procdesc>
    113 <procdate>20210430</procdate>
     113<procdate>20220405</procdate>
    114114</procstep>
    115115</lineage>
     
    117117<eainfo>
    118118<overview>
    119 <eaover>The dataset contains annual average and maximum and the mean concentration per year for uranium for the years 1999-2020. The fields in the dataset are: PWSIDNumber, TimePeriod, Analyte (Nitrate), AggregationType (mean or maximum), Concentration, and ConcentrationUnits. The dataset also contains fields describing Community Water Systems (CWS) derived from an inventory file of CWS qualifying Public Water Sytems such as number of connections and approximate number of people served.</eaover>
    120 <eadetcit>Data dictionary (last revised: February 20, 2016) is available by contacting the NM EPHT Program at http://nmtracking.org or DOH-EHEB@state.nm.us.</eadetcit>
     119<eaover>The dataset contains annual average and maximum and the mean concentration per year for uranium for the years 1999-2021. The fields in the dataset are: PWSIDNumber, TimePeriod, Analyte (Nitrate), AggregationType (mean or maximum), Concentration, and ConcentrationUnits. The dataset also contains fields describing Community Water Systems (CWS) derived from an inventory file of CWS qualifying Public Water Sytems such as number of connections and approximate number of people served.</eaover>
     120<eadetcit>Data dictionary (last revised: February 19, 2022) is available by contacting the NM EPHT Program at https://nmtracking.doh.nm.gov or DOH-EHEB@state.nm.us.</eadetcit>
    121121</overview>
    122122</eainfo>
     
    135135<state>NM</state>
    136136<postal>87505</postal>
    137 <country>United States Of America</country>
     137<country>United States of America</country>
    138138</cntaddr>
    139139<cntvoice>18888788992</cntvoice>
     
    151151</distinfo>
    152152<metainfo>
    153 <metd>20210712</metd>
     153<metd>20220405</metd>
    154154<metc>
    155155<cntinfo>
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