Changeset 24462 in main


Ignore:
Timestamp:
01/12/22 10:58:50 (11 months ago)
Author:
ChelseaLanger_NM
Message:

NM-EPHT metadata update.

Location:
adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/nmepht-content/xml/metadata
Files:
3 added
4 deleted
10 edited

Legend:

Unmodified
Added
Removed
  • adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/nmepht-content/xml/metadata/AirQualityPM2.5AnnualConcentration.xml

    r24416 r24462  
    55<citeinfo>
    66<origin>New Mexico EPHTN Project Manager</origin>
    7 <pubdate>20190801</pubdate>
    8 <title>Annual Average Ambient Concentration of Fine Particulate Matter (PM2.5) by County (where FRM PM2.5 monitors exist)</title>
     7<pubdate>20220107</pubdate>
     8<title>Annual Average Ambient Concentration of Fine Particulate Matter (PM2.5) by County</title>
    99<onlink/>
    1010</citeinfo>
    1111</citation>
    1212<descript>
    13 <abstract>The county-level daily PM2.5 dataset is created using data downloaded from the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) (http://aqsdr1.epa.gov/aqsweb/aqstmp/airdata/download_files.html).  These data were originally provided to EPA by the state of New Mexico Air Quality Program, as required under the Clean Air Act. Data are only provided for counties with monitors that pass the completeness criterion and those monitors that use a federal reference method (FRM) to monitor PM2.5.  Most PM2.5 monitors take samples every third day (some every sixth day) and a few measure every day; taking quarterly averages and then calculating an annual average addresses the comparability of these data. The air quality PM2.5 data used in calculating the indicator are tested for completeness to ensure that there are 11 samples per quarter and 4 quarters per year for each area's year.  If data for a county do not meet this completeness test, then no PM2.5 estimate is made for a county; these missing values are designated as "Insufficient Data". For counties without monitors, missing values are designated as "Data Not Available". Until year 2013, the annual National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) was 15 micrograms per cubic meter of air (ug/m3) as an arithmetic average; to attain this standard, the 3-year average of the weighted annual mean PM2.5 concentrations from a single or multiple community-oriented monitors must not exceed 15 ug/m3 (the current standard is 12 micrograms/m3 as of year 2013).  Effective December 17, 2006, the 24-hour NAAQS is 35 micrograms per cubic meter of air (ug/m3); to attain this standard, the 3-year average of the 98th percentile of 24-hour concentrations at each population-oriented monitor within an area must not exceed 35 ug/m3. The dataset contains, for each county with complete monitoring data: the year, state and county FIPS code (individually and combined), county name, county population, average annual ambient PM2.5 concentration (ug/m3). The dataset was created using guidelines provided in the CDC NCDM Recommendations. The indicator documentation is available from CDC's Environmental Public Health Tracking Network.</abstract>
    14 <purpose>This dataset contains calculated measures for air quality for use on the NM public portal. The dataset is intended for use on the NM EPHT portal for displays describing PM2.5-related air quality across NM by county with FRM PM2.5 monitors. These data are not intended for performing health assessments or otherwise being directly related or linked to health data. The data for this indicator represent highly populated counties that have PM2.5 monitors.  As a result, the data tend to reflect urban air quality and longer-term average air quality levels.  Populations in counties without FRM monitors may also be exposed to concentrations that exceed a standard. The annual PM2.5 level data help summarize long-term trends in particulate matter concentrations.  These data will give an idea of what the yearly level of PM2.5 is in an area. This indicator can be used to inform policy makers and the public about the degree of potential exposures to fine particles within New Mexico during a year and over time (trends).  The indicator measure(annual average concentration of PM2.5) can be compared to the NAAQS level of 12 ug/m3 or other health-based benchmarks to communicate the degree of public health concern to policy makers and the general public.  The measure can be affected by density and placement of monitors, and coverage will vary within the state. It does not directly reflect exposure.  Certain geographic areas, such as those near busy roads, are likely to have higher values of PM2.5 levels.  It is also important to understand that the relationship between ambient concentrations and personal exposure is uncertain, and it varies depending upon pollutant, activity patterns, and locality or microenvironments. The percentage of state population living in counties with no PM2.5 measurements must always be considered when attempting to estimate the proportion of population at risk.</purpose>
     13<abstract>The county-level daily PM2.5 dataset is created using data downloaded from the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) (http://aqsdr1.epa.gov/aqsweb/aqstmp/airdata/download_files.html). These data were originally provided to EPA by the state of New Mexico Air Quality Program, as required under the Clean Air Act. Data are only provided for counties with monitors that pass the completeness criterion and those monitors that use a federal reference method (FRM) to monitor PM2.5. Most PM2.5 monitors take samples every third day (some every sixth day) and a few measure every day; taking quarterly averages and then calculating an annual average addresses the comparability of these data. The air quality PM2.5 data used in calculating the indicator are tested for completeness to ensure that there are 11 samples per quarter and 4 quarters per year for each area's year. If data for a county do not meet this completeness test, then they are designated as having "Insufficient Data" and estimates should be interpreted with caution. For counties without monitors, missing values are designated as "No Monitor." Effective December 17, 2006, the 24-hour National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) is 35 mcg/m3; to attain this standard, the 3-year average of the 98th percentile of 24-hour concentrations at each population-oriented monitor within an area must not exceed 35 mcg/m3. The dataset contains, for each county with complete monitoring data: the year, state and county FIPS code (individually and combined), county name, county population, average annual ambient PM2.5 concentration (mcg/m3). The dataset was created using guidelines provided in the CDC NCDM Recommendations. The indicator documentation is available from CDC's Environmental Public Health Tracking Network.</abstract>
     14<purpose>This dataset contains calculated measures for air quality for use on the NM public portal. The dataset is intended for use on the NM EPHT portal for displays describing PM2.5-related air quality across NM by county with FRM PM2.5 monitors. These data are not intended for performing health assessments or otherwise being directly related or linked to health data. The data for this indicator represent highly populated counties that have PM2.5 monitors. As a result, the data tend to reflect urban air quality and longer-term average air quality levels. Populations in counties without FRM monitors may also be exposed to concentrations that exceed a standard. The annual PM2.5 level data help summarize long-term trends in particulate matter concentrations. These data will give an idea of what the annual level of PM2.5 is in an area. This indicator can be used to inform policy makers and the public about the degree of potential exposures to fine particles within New Mexico during a year and over time (trends). The indicator measure(annual average concentration of PM2.5) can be compared to the NAAQS level of 35 mcg/m3 or other health-based benchmarks to communicate the degree of public health concern to policy makers and the general public. The measure can be affected by density and placement of monitors, and coverage will vary within the state. It does not directly reflect exposure. Certain geographic areas, such as those near busy roads, are likely to have higher values of PM2.5 levels. It is also important to understand that the relationship between ambient concentrations and personal exposure is uncertain, and it varies depending upon pollutant, activity patterns, and locality or microenvironments. The percentage of state population living in counties with no PM2.5 measurements must always be considered when attempting to estimate the proportion of population at risk.</purpose>
    1515</descript>
    1616<timeperd>
     
    1919<begdate>19990101</begdate>
    2020<begtime/>
    21 <enddate>20181231</enddate>
     21<enddate>20201231</enddate>
    2222<endtime/>
    2323</rngdates>
     
    4040<theme>
    4141<themekt>Exposure Type - CDC</themekt>
    42 <themekey>Air quality; Ambient air quality; Air; Fine particulate matter; Particulate matter 2.5; PM 2.5; Environment</themekey>
     42<themekey>Air quality; Ambient air quality; Air; Fine particulate matter; Particulate matter 2.5; PM2.5; Environment</themekey>
    4343</theme>
    4444<place>
     
    4848</keywords>
    4949<accconst>None</accconst>
    50 <useconst>As general indicator of air quality over space and time, this indicator is not intended for use in performing health assessments or otherwise being directly linked (related) with health data. Acknowledgement of the EPA would be appreciated.</useconst>
     50<useconst>As a general indicator of air quality over space and time, this indicator is not intended for use in performing health assessments or otherwise being directly linked (related) with health data. Acknowledgement of the EPA would be appreciated.</useconst>
    5151<ptcontac>
    5252<cntinfo>
     
    6161<city>Santa Fe</city>
    6262<state>NM</state>
    63 <postal>87502</postal>
     63<postal>87505</postal>
    6464<country>United States Of America</country>
    6565</cntaddr>
     
    8282<dataqual>
    8383<logic>None</logic>
    84 <complete>The ambient air quality data used in calculating the indicator and measure are tested for completeness to ensure that there are eleven (11) samples per quarter and four (4) quarters per year for each area's year.  If data for a county do not achieve this completeness test, then no PM2.5 estimate is made for the county.</complete>
     84<complete>The ambient air quality data used in calculating the indicator and measure are tested for completeness to ensure that there are eleven (11) samples per quarter and four (4) quarters per year for each area's year. If data for a county do not achieve this completeness test, then the estimate should be interpreted with caution.</complete>
    8585<lineage>
    8686<procstep>
    8787<procdesc>Calculate the indicator and measure.</procdesc>
    88 <procdate>20190801</procdate>
     88<procdate>20220107</procdate>
    8989</procstep>
    9090</lineage>
     
    9292<eainfo>
    9393<overview>
    94 <eaover>Ambient air quality county indicator measure for PM2.5 for 1999 - 2014.</eaover>
     94<eaover>Ambient air quality county indicator measure for PM2.5 for 1999 - 2020.</eaover>
    9595<eadetcit>CDC Environmental Public Health Tracking Network, NCDM Recommendations Version 3.0, Air.</eadetcit>
    9696</overview>
     
    109109<city>Santa Fe</city>
    110110<state>NM</state>
    111 <postal>87502</postal>
     111<postal>87505</postal>
    112112<country>United States Of America</country>
    113113</cntaddr>
     
    126126</distinfo>
    127127<metainfo>
    128 <metd>20190801</metd>
     128<metd>20220107</metd>
    129129<metc>
    130130<cntinfo>
     
    139139<city>Santa Fe</city>
    140140<state>NM</state>
    141 <postal>87502</postal>
     141<postal>87505</postal>
    142142<country>United States Of America</country>
    143143</cntaddr>
     
    151151</cntinfo>
    152152</metc>
    153 <metstdn>EPHTN Tracking Network Profile Version 1.2</metstdn>
     153<metstdn>EPHTN Tracking Network Profile Version 3.0</metstdn>
    154154<metac>None</metac>
    155155<metuc>None</metuc>
  • adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/nmepht-content/xml/metadata/AirQualityPM2.5AnnualPercentofDays.xml

    r24416 r24462  
    55<citeinfo>
    66<origin>New Mexico EPHTN Project Manager</origin>
    7 <pubdate>20190801</pubdate>
    8 <title>Annual percent of days with PM2.5 levels above the National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) by county (where monitors exist)</title>
     7<pubdate>20220110</pubdate>
     8<title>Annual Percentage of Days with PM2.5 Levels Above the National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) by County</title>
    99<onlink/>
    1010</citeinfo>
    1111</citation>
    1212<descript>
    13 <abstract>The county-level daily PM2.5 dataset is created using data downloaded from the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) (http://aqsdr1.epa.gov/aqsweb/aqstmp/airdata/download_files.html).  These data were originally provided to EPA by the state of New Mexico Air Quality Program, as required under the Clean Air Act. Data are only provided for counties with FRM (method code 8801) monitors that have annual monitoring. Most PM2.5 monitors take samples every third day (some every sixth day) and a few measure every day; summing the total number of days for each county above the National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) standard and dividing by the total number of days monitored effectively provides an estimate of the percentage of days above the NAAQS standard for a given year for each county with FRM monitoring. Effective December 17, 2006, the 24-hour NAAQS for PM2.5 is 35 micrograms per cubic meter of air (ug/m3); to attain this standard, the 3-year average of the 98th percentile of 24-hour concentrations at each population-oriented monitor within an area must not exceed 35 ug/m3. For counties without  FRM monitors, missing values are designated as "Data Not Available". The dataset contains, for each county with complete monitoring data: the year, state and county FIPS code (individually and combined), and percent of days with PM2.5 above the NAAQS. The dataset was created using guidelines provided in the CDC NCDM Recommendations (version 3.0).  The indicator documentation is available from CDC's Environmental Public Health Tracking Network.</abstract>
    14 <purpose>This dataset contains calculated measures for air quality for use on the NM public portal. The dataset is intended for use on the NM EPHT portal for displays describing PM2.5-related air quality across NM by county with PM2.5 FRM monitors. These data are not intended for performing health assessments or otherwise being directly related or linked to health data. The data for this indicator represent highly populated counties that have PM2.5 FRM monitors.  As a result, the data tend to reflect urban air quality and longer-term average air quality levels.  Populations in counties without monitors may also be exposed to concentrations that exceed a standard. The daily PM2.5 level data help summarize exceedance of short-term trends in fine particulate matter concentrations within and between counties.  These data will give an idea of what the yearly exceedance of daily PM2.5 is in an area. This indicator can be used to inform policy makers and the public about the degree of potential exposures to fine particles within New Mexico during a given year and over time (trends).  The measure (annual percentage of days above the PM2.5 NAAQS) can be compared to health-based benchmarks to communicate the degree of public health concern to policy makers and the general public.  The measure can be affected by monitor density, placement of monitors, and frequency of monitoring, and spatial and temporal coverage will vary within the state. However, this measure does not directly reflect exposure. Certain geographic areas, such as those near busy roads, are likely to have higher values of PM2.5 levels.  It is also important to understand that the relationship between ambient concentrations and personal exposure is uncertain, and it varies depending upon pollutant, activity patterns, and locality or microenvironments. The percentage of state population living in counties with no PM2.5 measurements must always be considered when attempting to estimate the proportion of population at risk.</purpose>
     13<abstract>The county-level daily PM2.5 dataset is created using data downloaded from the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) (http://aqsdr1.epa.gov/aqsweb/aqstmp/airdata/download_files.html).  These data were originally provided to EPA by the state of New Mexico Air Quality Program, as required under the Clean Air Act. Data are only provided for counties with FRM (method code 8801) monitors that have annual monitoring. Most PM2.5 monitors take samples every third day (some every sixth day) and a few measure every day; summing the total number of days for each county above the National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) standard and dividing by the total number of days monitored effectively provides an estimate of the percentage of days above the NAAQS standard for a given year for each county with FRM monitoring. Effective December 17, 2006, the 24-hour NAAQS for PM2.5 is 35 micrograms per cubic meter of air (mcg/m3); to attain this standard, the 3-year average of the 98th percentile of 24-hour concentrations at each population-oriented monitor within an area must not exceed 35 mcg/m3. For counties without  FRM monitors, missing values are designated as "No Monitor." The dataset contains, for each county with complete monitoring data: the year, state and county FIPS code (individually and combined), and percent of days with PM2.5 above the NAAQS. The dataset was created using guidelines provided in the CDC NCDM Recommendations (version 3.0).  The indicator documentation is available from CDC's Environmental Public Health Tracking Network.</abstract>
     14<purpose>This dataset contains calculated measures for air quality for use on the NM public portal. The dataset is intended for use on the NM EPHT portal for displays describing PM2.5-related air quality across NM by county with PM2.5 FRM monitors. These data are not intended for performing health assessments or otherwise being directly related or linked to health data. The data for this indicator represent highly populated counties that have PM2.5 FRM monitors.  As a result, the data tend to reflect urban air quality and longer-term average air quality levels.  Populations in counties without monitors may also be exposed to concentrations that exceed a standard. The daily PM2.5 level data help summarize exceedance of short-term trends in fine particulate matter concentrations within and between counties.  These data will give an idea of what the yearly exceedance of daily PM2.5 is in an area. This indicator can be used to inform policy makers and the public about the degree of potential exposures to fine particles within New Mexico during a given year and over time (trends). The measure (annual percentage of days above the PM2.5 NAAQS) can be compared to health-based benchmarks to communicate the degree of public health concern to policy makers and the general public. The measure can be affected by monitor density, placement of monitors, and frequency of monitoring, and spatial and temporal coverage will vary within the state. However, this measure does not directly reflect exposure. Certain geographic areas, such as those near busy roads, are likely to have higher values of PM2.5 levels.  It is also important to understand that the relationship between ambient concentrations and personal exposure is uncertain, and it varies depending upon pollutant, activity patterns, and locality or microenvironments. The percentage of state population living in counties with no PM2.5 measurements must always be considered when attempting to estimate the proportion of population at risk.</purpose>
    1515</descript>
    1616<timeperd>
     
    1919<begdate>19990101</begdate>
    2020<begtime/>
    21 <enddate>20181231</enddate>
     21<enddate>20201231</enddate>
    2222<endtime/>
    2323</rngdates>
     
    4848</keywords>
    4949<accconst>None</accconst>
    50 <useconst>As general indicator of air quality over space and time, this indicator is not intended for use in performing health assessments or otherwise being directly linked (related) with health data. Acknowledgement of the EPA would be appreciated.</useconst>
     50<useconst>As a general indicator of air quality over space and time, this indicator is not intended for use in performing health assessments or otherwise being directly linked (related) with health data. Acknowledgement of the EPA would be appreciated.</useconst>
    5151<ptcontac>
    5252<cntinfo>
     
    6161<city>Santa Fe</city>
    6262<state>NM</state>
    63 <postal>87502</postal>
     63<postal>87505</postal>
    6464<country>United States Of America</country>
    6565</cntaddr>
     
    8282<dataqual>
    8383<logic>None</logic>
    84 <complete>The air quality data used in calculating the indicator and measure are tested for completeness to ensure annual monitoring such that there sampling within the four (4) quarters for each area's year.  If data for a county do not achieve this completeness test, then no PM2.5 estimate is made for the county.</complete>
     84<complete>The air quality data used in calculating the indicator and measure are tested for completeness to ensure annual monitoring such that there sampling on at least eleven (11) days and within the four (4) quarters for each area's year. If data for a county do not achieve this completeness test, then the county will be labeled with "Insufficient Data" and estimates should be interpreted with caution.</complete>
    8585<lineage>
    8686<procstep>
    8787<procdesc>Calculate the indicator and measure.</procdesc>
    88 <procdate>20190801</procdate>
     88<procdate>20211019</procdate>
    8989</procstep>
    9090</lineage>
     
    9292<eainfo>
    9393<overview>
    94 <eaover>NM EPHT air quality county measure for PM2.5 for 1999 - 2014.</eaover>
     94<eaover>NM EPHT air quality county measure for PM2.5 for 1999 - 2020.</eaover>
    9595<eadetcit>CDC Environmental Public Health Tracking Network, NCDM Recommendations Version 3.0, Air.</eadetcit>
    9696</overview>
     
    109109<city>Santa Fe</city>
    110110<state>NM</state>
    111 <postal>87502</postal>
     111<postal>87505</postal>
    112112<country>United States Of America</country>
    113113</cntaddr>
     
    126126</distinfo>
    127127<metainfo>
    128 <metd>20190801</metd>
     128<metd>20220110</metd>
    129129<metc>
    130130<cntinfo>
     
    139139<city>Santa Fe</city>
    140140<state>NM</state>
    141 <postal>87502</postal>
     141<postal>87505</postal>
    142142<country>United States Of America</country>
    143143</cntaddr>
     
    151151</cntinfo>
    152152</metc>
    153 <metstdn>EPHTN Tracking Network Profile Version 1.2</metstdn>
     153<metstdn>EPHTN Tracking Network Profile Version 3.0</metstdn>
    154154<metac>None</metac>
    155155<metuc>None</metuc>
  • adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/nmepht-content/xml/metadata/BladderCancerIncidence.xml

    r15536 r24462  
    55<citeinfo>
    66<origin>New Mexico EPHTN Project Manager</origin>
    7 <pubdate>20180205</pubdate>
     7<pubdate>20220111</pubdate>
    88<title>Bladder Cancer Incidence</title>
    99<onlink/>
     
    1111</citation>
    1212<descript>
    13 <abstract>This dataset contains records for bladder cancer newly diagnosed among New Mexico residents between 1990 and 2015.  The dataset was generated using information from the New Mexico Tumor Registry (NMTR), the agency designated to conduct public health surveillance for cancer in New Mexico. The NMTR is a founding member of the National Cancer Institute's Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program and has continuously participated in that program since 1973. Cancer surveillance in New Mexico is conducted in accordance with standards set by the SEER Program, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the North American Association of Central Cancer Registries (NAACCR), and the American College of Surgeons. The primary source of data on cancer incidence is medical records. Casefinding involves a variety of medical facilities, including hospitals, physicians' offices, radiation facilities, freestanding surgical centers, and pathology laboratories. Hospital and central registry tumor registrars abstract data from patient medical records using uniform data items and codes as documented by NAACCR. Information on primary site and histology is coded according to the International Classification of Diseases for Oncology, Third Edition (ICD-O-3). Cancer type is defined according to SEER site recode variables, a convention that provides for standardized, consistent reporting of cancer incidence data. Assignments of census tract, NMDOH small area, and county are based on patient residence address at the time of diagnosis. </abstract>
     13<abstract>This dataset contains records for bladder cancer newly diagnosed among New Mexico residents between 1990 and 2019.  The dataset was generated using information from the New Mexico Tumor Registry (NMTR), the agency designated to conduct public health surveillance for cancer in New Mexico. The NMTR is a founding member of the National Cancer Institute's Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program and has continuously participated in that program since 1973. Cancer surveillance in New Mexico is conducted in accordance with standards set by the SEER Program, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the North American Association of Central Cancer Registries (NAACCR), and the American College of Surgeons. The primary source of data on cancer incidence is medical records. Casefinding involves a variety of medical facilities, including hospitals, physicians' offices, radiation facilities, freestanding surgical centers, and pathology laboratories. Hospital and central registry tumor registrars abstract data from patient medical records using uniform data items and codes as documented by NAACCR. Information on primary site and histology is coded according to the International Classification of Diseases for Oncology, Third Edition (ICD-O-3). Cancer type is defined according to SEER site recode variables, a convention that provides for standardized, consistent reporting of cancer incidence data. Assignments of census tract, NMDOH small area, and county are based on patient residence address at the time of diagnosis. </abstract>
    1414<purpose>This dataset can be used to calculate bladder cancer incidence measures, including case counts, crude rates, and age-adjusted rates. </purpose>
    1515<supplinf>This dataset contains information on invasive and non-invasive bladder cancers.  By SEER convention, non-invasive (in-situ) bladder cancers are recoded to invasive bladder cancers because the information needed to distinguish between non-invasive and invasive bladder cancer is not always available or reliable. Population data used to calculate incidence rates are annual estimates produced by the University of New Mexico Geospatial and Population Studies (GPS) Program and are considered the most accurate available for New Mexico. They are the official estimates and projections used in New Mexico state government. </supplinf>
     
    2020<begdate>19900101</begdate>
    2121<begtime/>
    22 <enddate>20141231</enddate>
     22<enddate>20191231</enddate>
    2323<endtime/>
    2424</rngdates>
     
    6363<city>Santa Fe</city>
    6464<state>NM</state>
    65 <postal>87502</postal>
     65<postal>87505</postal>
    6666<country>United States Of America</country>
    6767</cntaddr>
     
    8484<dataqual>
    8585<logic>The NMTR is a member state of the NCI SEER Program, which is considered the standard for quality among cancer registries around the world. Quality control has been an integral part of the SEER program since its inception.</logic>
    86 <complete>NMTR participates in SEER studies to evaluate the quality and completeness of the data being reported (SEER's standard for case ascertainment is 98 percent). Quality Control studies are conducted every other year, actually in even numbered calendar years. These include potentially casefinding, reabstracting/recoding, and reliability studies. The latter involve virtually all abstractors and coders in each registry coding the same 10 to 20 cases which are selected to focus on coding issues that are known to be a problem. The cases are also coded by "experts" to obtain the correct answers. In odd numbered calendar years, training is conducted for SEER registries that focuses on problems identified in the QC studies. </complete>
     86<complete>NMTR participates in SEER studies to evaluate the quality and completeness of the data being reported (SEER's standard for case ascertainment is 98 percent). Quality control studies are conducted every other year in even numbered calendar years. These include potentially casefinding, reabstracting/recoding, and reliability studies. The latter involve virtually all abstractors and coders in each registry coding the same 10 to 20 cases which are selected to focus on coding issues that are known to be a problem. The cases are also coded by "experts" to obtain the correct answers. In odd numbered calendar years, training is conducted for SEER registries that focuses on problems identified in the QC studies. </complete>
    8787<lineage>
    8888<procstep>
    89 <procdesc>The 1990-2015 bladder cancer incidence dataset disclosed in this report were extracted from the NMTR master casefile on February 8, 2018.  </procdesc>
    90 <procdate>20180205</procdate>
     89<procdesc>The 1990-2019 bladder cancer incidence dataset disclosed in this report were extracted from the NMTR master casefile on December 6, 2021.  </procdesc>
     90<procdate>20211206</procdate>
    9191</procstep>
    9292<procstep>
    93 <procdesc>NM EPHT data queries through nmtracking.org (NMTracking) result in query-specific data sets that are aggregated by geographic unit. These aggregated data are dynamically joined to boundary data sets for display in the NMTracking interactive map. Boundaries are for County, Census Tract, and Small Areas and are created using U.S. Census 2010 boundary data. The Small Areas data set consists of combined Census tracts and was developed at the NM Department of Health. New Mexico Small Areas are 108 geographic areas across the state with population size that is just large enough to calculate rates for selected health events (e.g., asthma mortality, female breast cancer incidence). Most (95%) New Mexico small-area population sizes range from 9,000 to 30,000 persons. Some counties have multiple small areas (e.g., Bernalillo County has 34 small areas within its boundaries). In other cases, whole counties (e.g., Harding, Quay, and DeBaca) are combined to create a single small area. Please, note that some data queries and displays might be available only to those with restricted-access permissions. NMTracking maps display a background with a New Mexico base map option. The background map is served from &#169; OpenStreetMap contributors (http://www.openstreetmap.org/copyright).</procdesc>
    94 <procdate>20180205</procdate>
     93<procdesc>NM EPHT data queries through nmtracking.org (NMTracking) result in query-specific data sets that are aggregated by geographic unit. These aggregated data are dynamically joined to boundary data sets for display in the NMTracking interactive map. Boundaries are for County, Census Tract, and Small Areas and are created using U.S. Census 2010 boundary data. The Small Areas data set consists of combined Census tracts and was developed at the NM Department of Health. New Mexico Small Areas are 108 geographic areas across the state with population size that is just large enough to calculate rates for selected health events (e.g., asthma mortality, female breast cancer incidence). Most (95%) New Mexico small-area population sizes range from 9,000 to 30,000 persons. Some counties have multiple small areas (e.g., Bernalillo County has 34 small areas within its boundaries). In other cases, whole counties (e.g., Harding, Quay, and DeBaca) are combined to create a single small area. Please note that some data queries and displays might be available only to those with restricted-access permissions. NMTracking maps display a background with a New Mexico base map option. The background map is served from &#169; OpenStreetMap contributors (http://www.openstreetmap.org/copyright).</procdesc>
     94<procdate>20211206</procdate>
    9595</procstep>
    9696</lineage>
     
    9898<eainfo>
    9999<overview>
    100 <eaover>The dataset disclosed in this report contains bladder cancer incidence records for New Mexico residents newly diagnosed between 1990 and 2015. The dataset includes information on sex, race/ethnicity, age at diagnosis (categorical), year of diagnosis, and census tract and county of residence at diagnosis. </eaover>
     100<eaover>The dataset disclosed in this report contains bladder cancer incidence records for New Mexico residents newly diagnosed between 1990 and 2019. The dataset includes information on sex, race/ethnicity, age at diagnosis (categorical), year of diagnosis, and census tract and county of residence at diagnosis. </eaover>
    101101<eadetcit>Data dictionary available at http:www.naaccr.org (Standards and Registry Operations / Vol II Data Standards and Dictionary).</eadetcit>
    102102</overview>
     
    115115<city>Santa Fe</city>
    116116<state>NM</state>
    117 <postal>87502</postal>
     117<postal>87505</postal>
    118118<country>United States Of America</country>
    119119</cntaddr>
     
    132132</distinfo>
    133133<metainfo>
    134 <metd>20180205</metd>
     134<metd>20211206</metd>
    135135<metc>
    136136<cntinfo>
     
    145145<city>Santa Fe</city>
    146146<state>NM</state>
    147 <postal>87502</postal>
     147<postal>87505</postal>
    148148<country>United States Of America</country>
    149149</cntaddr>
     
    157157</cntinfo>
    158158</metc>
    159 <metstdn>EPHTN Tracking Network Profile Version 1.2</metstdn>
     159<metstdn>EPHTN Tracking Network Profile Version 3.0</metstdn>
    160160<metac>None</metac>
    161161<metuc>None</metuc>
  • adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/nmepht-content/xml/metadata/Brain_OtherCNSCancerIncidence.xml

    r15536 r24462  
    55<citeinfo>
    66<origin>New Mexico EPHTN Project Manager</origin>
    7 <pubdate>20180205</pubdate>
     7<pubdate>20220111</pubdate>
    88<title>Brain and Other Nervous System Cancer Incidence</title>
    99<onlink/>
     
    1111</citation>
    1212<descript>
    13 <abstract>This dataset contains records for brain and other nervous system cancers newly diagnosed among New Mexico residents between 1990 and 2015.  The dataset was generated using information from the New Mexico Tumor Registry (NMTR), the agency designated to conduct public health surveillance for cancer in New Mexico. The NMTR is a founding member of the National Cancer Institute's Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program and has continuously participated in that program since 1973. Cancer surveillance in New Mexico is conducted in accordance with standards set by the SEER Program, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the North American Association of Central Cancer Registries (NAACCR), and the American College of Surgeons. The primary source of data on cancer incidence is medical records. Casefinding involves a variety of medical facilities, including hospitals, physicians' offices, radiation facilities, freestanding surgical centers, and pathology laboratories. Hospital and central registry tumor registrars abstract data from patient medical records using uniform data items and codes as documented by NAACCR. Information on primary site and histology is coded according to the International Classification of Diseases for Oncology, Third Edition (ICD-O-3). Cancer type is defined according to SEER site recode variables, a convention that provides for standardized, consistent reporting of cancer incidence data. Assignments of census tract, NMDOH small area, and county are based on patient residence at the time of diagnosis. </abstract>
     13<abstract>This dataset contains records for brain and other nervous system cancers newly diagnosed among New Mexico residents between 1990 and 2019.  The dataset was generated using information from the New Mexico Tumor Registry (NMTR), the agency designated to conduct public health surveillance for cancer in New Mexico. The NMTR is a founding member of the National Cancer Institute's Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program and has continuously participated in that program since 1973. Cancer surveillance in New Mexico is conducted in accordance with standards set by the SEER Program, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the North American Association of Central Cancer Registries (NAACCR), and the American College of Surgeons. The primary source of data on cancer incidence is medical records. Casefinding involves a variety of medical facilities, including hospitals, physicians' offices, radiation facilities, freestanding surgical centers, and pathology laboratories. Hospital and central registry tumor registrars abstract data from patient medical records using uniform data items and codes as documented by NAACCR. Information on primary site and histology is coded according to the International Classification of Diseases for Oncology, Third Edition (ICD-O-3). Cancer type is defined according to SEER site recode variables, a convention that provides for standardized, consistent reporting of cancer incidence data. Assignments of census tract, NMDOH small area, and county are based on patient residence at the time of diagnosis. </abstract>
    1414<purpose>This dataset can be used to calculate brain and other nervous system cancer incidence measures, including case counts, crude rates, and age-adjusted rates. </purpose>
    1515<supplinf>Population data used to calculate incidence rates are annual estimates produced by the University of New Mexico Geospatial and Population Studies (GPS) Program and are considered the most accurate available for New Mexico. They are the official estimates and projections used in New Mexico state government</supplinf>
     
    2020<begdate>19900101</begdate>
    2121<begtime/>
    22 <enddate>20141231</enddate>
     22<enddate>20191231</enddate>
    2323<endtime/>
    2424</rngdates>
     
    6464<city>Santa Fe</city>
    6565<state>NM</state>
    66 <postal>87502</postal>
     66<postal>87505</postal>
    6767<country>United States Of America</country>
    6868</cntaddr>
     
    8585<dataqual>
    8686<logic>The NMTR is a member state of the NCI SEER Program, which is considered the standard for quality among cancer registries around the world. Quality control has been an integral part of the SEER program since its inception. </logic>
    87 <complete>NMTR participates in SEER studies to evaluate the quality and completeness of the data being reported (SEER's standard for case ascertainment is 98 percent). Quality Control studies are conducted every other year, actually in even numbered calendar years. These include potentially casefinding, reabstracting/recoding, and reliability studies. The latter involve virtually all abstractors and coders in each registry coding the same 10 to 20 cases which are selected to focus on coding issues that are known to be a problem. The cases are also coded by "experts" to obtain the correct answers. In odd numbered calendar years, training is conducted for SEER registries that focuses on problems identified in the QC studies. </complete>
     87<complete>NMTR participates in SEER studies to evaluate the quality and completeness of the data being reported (SEER's standard for case ascertainment is 98 percent). Quality Control studies are conducted every other year in even numbered calendar years. These include potentially casefinding, reabstracting/recoding, and reliability studies. The latter involve virtually all abstractors and coders in each registry coding the same 10 to 20 cases which are selected to focus on coding issues that are known to be a problem. The cases are also coded by "experts" to obtain the correct answers. In odd numbered calendar years, training is conducted for SEER registries that focuses on problems identified in the QC studies. </complete>
    8888<lineage>
    8989<procstep>
    90 <procdesc>The 1990-2015 brain and other nervous system cancer incidence dataset disclosed in this report was extracted from the NMTR master casefile on February 8, 2018. </procdesc>
    91 <procdate>20180205</procdate>
     90<procdesc>The 1990-2019 brain and other nervous system cancer incidence dataset disclosed in this report was extracted from the NMTR master casefile on December 6, 2021. </procdesc>
     91<procdate>20211206</procdate>
    9292</procstep>
    9393<procstep>
     
    102102&#13;
    103103NMTracking maps display a background with a New Mexico base map option. The background map is served from &#169; OpenStreetMap contributors (http://www.openstreetmap.org/copyright).</procdesc>
    104 <procdate>20180205</procdate>
     104<procdate>20211206</procdate>
    105105</procstep>
    106106</lineage>
     
    108108<eainfo>
    109109<overview>
    110 <eaover>The dataset disclosed in this report contains brain and other nervous system cancer incidence records for New Mexico residents newly diagnosed between 1990 and 2015. The dataset includes information on sex, race/ethnicity, age at diagnosis (categorical), year of diagnosis, census tract, DOH small area, and county of residence at diagnosis. </eaover>
     110<eaover>The dataset disclosed in this report contains brain and other nervous system cancer incidence records for New Mexico residents newly diagnosed between 1990 and 2019. The dataset includes information on sex, race/ethnicity, age at diagnosis (categorical), year of diagnosis, census tract, DOH small area, and county of residence at diagnosis. </eaover>
    111111<eadetcit>Data dictionary available at http:www.naaccr.org (Standards and Registry Operations / Vol II Data Standards and Dictionary) </eadetcit>
    112112</overview>
     
    125125<city>Santa Fe</city>
    126126<state>NM</state>
    127 <postal>87502</postal>
     127<postal>87505</postal>
    128128<country>United States Of America</country>
    129129</cntaddr>
     
    142142</distinfo>
    143143<metainfo>
    144 <metd>20180205</metd>
     144<metd>20220111</metd>
    145145<metc>
    146146<cntinfo>
     
    155155<city>Santa Fe</city>
    156156<state>NM</state>
    157 <postal>87502</postal>
     157<postal>87505</postal>
    158158<country>United States Of America</country>
    159159</cntaddr>
     
    167167</cntinfo>
    168168</metc>
    169 <metstdn>EPHTN Tracking Network Profile Version 1.2</metstdn>
     169<metstdn>EPHTN Tracking Network Profile Version 3.0</metstdn>
    170170<metac>None</metac>
    171171<metuc>None</metuc>
  • adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/nmepht-content/xml/metadata/EsophagusCancerIncidence.xml

    r15536 r24462  
    55<citeinfo>
    66<origin>New Mexico EPHTN Project Manager</origin>
    7 <pubdate>20180205</pubdate>
     7<pubdate>20220111</pubdate>
    88<title>Esophageal Cancer Incidence</title>
    99<onlink/>
     
    1111</citation>
    1212<descript>
    13 <abstract>This dataset contains records for esophageal cancer newly diagnosed among New Mexico residents between 1990 and 2015. The dataset was generated using information from the New Mexico Tumor Registry (NMTR), the agency designated to conduct public health surveillance for cancer in New Mexico. The NMTR is a founding member of the National Cancer Institute's Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program and has continuously participated in that program since 1973. Cancer surveillance in New Mexico is conducted in accordance with standards set by the SEER Program, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the North American Association of Central Cancer Registries (NAACCR), and the American College of Surgeons. The primary source of data on cancer incidence is medical records. Casefinding involves a variety of medical facilities, including hospitals, physicians' offices, radiation facilities, freestanding surgical centers, and pathology laboratories. Hospital and central registry tumor registrars abstract data from patient medical records using uniform data items and codes as documented by NAACCR. Information on primary site and histology is coded according to the International Classification of Diseases for Oncology, Third Edition (ICD-O-3). Cancer type is defined according to SEER site recode variables, a convention that provides for standardized, consistent reporting of cancer incidence data. Assignments of census tract, NMDOH small area, and county are based on patient residence address at the time of diagnosis. </abstract>
     13<abstract>This dataset contains records for esophageal cancer newly diagnosed among New Mexico residents between 1990 and 2019. The dataset was generated using information from the New Mexico Tumor Registry (NMTR), the agency designated to conduct public health surveillance for cancer in New Mexico. The NMTR is a founding member of the National Cancer Institute's Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program and has continuously participated in that program since 1973. Cancer surveillance in New Mexico is conducted in accordance with standards set by the SEER Program, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the North American Association of Central Cancer Registries (NAACCR), and the American College of Surgeons. The primary source of data on cancer incidence is medical records. Casefinding involves a variety of medical facilities, including hospitals, physicians' offices, radiation facilities, freestanding surgical centers, and pathology laboratories. Hospital and central registry tumor registrars abstract data from patient medical records using uniform data items and codes as documented by NAACCR. Information on primary site and histology is coded according to the International Classification of Diseases for Oncology, Third Edition (ICD-O-3). Cancer type is defined according to SEER site recode variables, a convention that provides for standardized, consistent reporting of cancer incidence data. Assignments of census tract, NMDOH small area, and county are based on patient residence address at the time of diagnosis. </abstract>
    1414<purpose>This dataset can be used to calculate esophageal cancer incidence measures, including case counts, crude rates, and age-adjusted rates. </purpose>
    1515<supplinf>This dataset contains information on invasive esophageal cancers.  Population data used to calculate incidence rates are annual estimates produced by the University of New Mexico Geospatial and Population Studies (GPS) Program and are considered the most accurate available for New Mexico. They are the official estimates and projections used in New Mexico state government. </supplinf>
     
    2020<begdate>19900101</begdate>
    2121<begtime/>
    22 <enddate>20141231</enddate>
     22<enddate>20191231</enddate>
    2323<endtime/>
    2424</rngdates>
     
    6363<city>Santa Fe</city>
    6464<state>NM</state>
    65 <postal>87502</postal>
     65<postal>87505</postal>
    6666<country>United States Of America</country>
    6767</cntaddr>
     
    8484<dataqual>
    8585<logic>The NMTR is a member state of the NCI SEER Program, which is considered the standard for quality among cancer registries around the world. Quality control has been an integral part of the SEER program since its inception.</logic>
    86 <complete>NMTR participates in SEER studies to evaluate the quality and completeness of the data being reported (SEER's standard for case ascertainment is 98 percent). Quality Control studies are conducted every other year, actually in even numbered calendar years. These include potentially casefinding, reabstracting/recoding, and reliability studies. The latter involve virtually all abstractors and coders in each registry coding the same 10 to 20 cases which are selected to focus on coding issues that are known to be a problem. The cases are also coded by "experts" to obtain the correct answers. In odd numbered calendar years, training is conducted for SEER registries that focuses on problems identified in the QC studies. </complete>
     86<complete>NMTR participates in SEER studies to evaluate the quality and completeness of the data being reported (SEER's standard for case ascertainment is 98 percent). Quality control studies are conducted every other year in even numbered calendar years. These include potentially casefinding, reabstracting/recoding, and reliability studies. The latter involve virtually all abstractors and coders in each registry coding the same 10 to 20 cases which are selected to focus on coding issues that are known to be a problem. The cases are also coded by "experts" to obtain the correct answers. In odd numbered calendar years, training is conducted for SEER registries that focuses on problems identified in the QC studies. </complete>
    8787<lineage>
    8888<procstep>
    89 <procdesc>The 1990-2015 esophageal cancer incidence dataset disclosed in this report were extracted from the NMTR master casefile on February 8, 2018.  </procdesc>
    90 <procdate>20180205</procdate>
     89<procdesc>The 1990-2019 esophageal cancer incidence dataset disclosed in this report were extracted from the NMTR master casefile on December 6, 2021.  </procdesc>
     90<procdate>20211206</procdate>
    9191</procstep>
    9292<procstep>
    9393<procdesc>NM EPHT data queries through nmtracking.org (NMTracking) result in query-specific data sets that are aggregated by geographic unit. These aggregated data are dynamically joined to boundary data sets for display in the NMTracking interactive map. Boundaries are for County, Census Tract, and Small Areas and are created using U.S. Census 2010 boundary data. The Small Areas data set consists of combined Census tracts and was developed at the NM Department of Health. New Mexico Small Areas are 108 geographic areas across the state with population size that is just large enough to calculate rates for selected health events (e.g., asthma mortality, female breast cancer incidence). Most (95%) New Mexico small-area population sizes range from 9,000 to 30,000 persons. Some counties have multiple small areas (e.g., Bernalillo County has 34 small areas within its boundaries). In other cases, whole counties (e.g., Harding, Quay, and DeBaca) are combined to create a single small area. Please, note that some data queries and displays might be available only to those with restricted-access permissions. NMTracking maps display a background with a New Mexico base map option. The background map is served from &#169; OpenStreetMap contributors (http://www.openstreetmap.org/copyright).</procdesc>
    94 <procdate>20180205</procdate>
     94<procdate>20211206</procdate>
    9595</procstep>
    9696</lineage>
     
    9898<eainfo>
    9999<overview>
    100 <eaover>The dataset disclosed in this report contains esophageal cancer incidence records for New Mexico residents newly diagnosed between 1990 and 2015. The dataset includes information on sex, race/ethnicity, age at diagnosis (categorical), year of diagnosis, and census tract and county of residence at diagnosis. </eaover>
     100<eaover>The dataset disclosed in this report contains esophageal cancer incidence records for New Mexico residents newly diagnosed between 1990 and 2019. The dataset includes information on sex, race/ethnicity, age at diagnosis (categorical), year of diagnosis, and census tract and county of residence at diagnosis. </eaover>
    101101<eadetcit>Data dictionary available at http:www.naaccr.org (Standards and Registry Operations / Vol II Data Standards and Dictionary).</eadetcit>
    102102</overview>
     
    115115<city>Santa Fe</city>
    116116<state>NM</state>
    117 <postal>87502</postal>
     117<postal>87505</postal>
    118118<country>United States Of America</country>
    119119</cntaddr>
     
    132132</distinfo>
    133133<metainfo>
    134 <metd>20180205</metd>
     134<metd>20220111</metd>
    135135<metc>
    136136<cntinfo>
     
    145145<city>Santa Fe</city>
    146146<state>NM</state>
    147 <postal>87502</postal>
     147<postal>87505</postal>
    148148<country>United States Of America</country>
    149149</cntaddr>
     
    157157</cntinfo>
    158158</metc>
    159 <metstdn>EPHTN Tracking Network Profile Version 1.2</metstdn>
     159<metstdn>EPHTN Tracking Network Profile Version 3.0</metstdn>
    160160<metac>None</metac>
    161161<metuc>None</metuc>
  • adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/nmepht-content/xml/metadata/FemaleBreastCancerIncidence.xml

    r15536 r24462  
    55<citeinfo>
    66<origin>New Mexico EPHTN Project Manager</origin>
    7 <pubdate>20180205</pubdate>
     7<pubdate>20220111</pubdate>
    88<title>Invasive Female Breast Cancer Incidence </title>
    99<onlink/>
     
    1111</citation>
    1212<descript>
    13 <abstract>This dataset contains records for invasive breast cancer newly diagnosed among New Mexico female residents between 1990 and 2015. The dataset was generated using information from the New Mexico Tumor Registry (NMTR), the agency designated to conduct public health surveillance for cancer in New Mexico. The NMTR is a founding member of the National Cancer Institute's Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program and has continuously participated in that program since 1973. Cancer surveillance in New Mexico is conducted in accordance with standards set by the SEER Program, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the North American Association of Central Cancer Registries (NAACCR), and the American College of Surgeons. The primary source of data on cancer incidence is medical records. Case finding involves a variety of medical facilities, including hospitals, physicians' offices, radiation facilities, freestanding surgical centers, and pathology laboratories. Hospital and central registry tumor registrars abstract data from patient medical records using uniform data items and codes as documented by NAACCR. Information on primary site and histology is coded according to the International Classification of Diseases for Oncology, Third Edition (ICD-O-3). Cancer type is defined according to SEER site recode variables, a convention that provides for standardized, consistent reporting of cancer incidence data. Assignments of census tract, NMDOH small area and county are based on patient residence at the time of diagnosis. </abstract>
     13<abstract>This dataset contains records for invasive breast cancer newly diagnosed among New Mexico female residents between 1990 and 2019. The dataset was generated using information from the New Mexico Tumor Registry (NMTR), the agency designated to conduct public health surveillance for cancer in New Mexico. The NMTR is a founding member of the National Cancer Institute's Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program and has continuously participated in that program since 1973. Cancer surveillance in New Mexico is conducted in accordance with standards set by the SEER Program, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the North American Association of Central Cancer Registries (NAACCR), and the American College of Surgeons. The primary source of data on cancer incidence is medical records. Case finding involves a variety of medical facilities, including hospitals, physicians' offices, radiation facilities, freestanding surgical centers, and pathology laboratories. Hospital and central registry tumor registrars abstract data from patient medical records using uniform data items and codes as documented by NAACCR. Information on primary site and histology is coded according to the International Classification of Diseases for Oncology, Third Edition (ICD-O-3). Cancer type is defined according to SEER site recode variables, a convention that provides for standardized, consistent reporting of cancer incidence data. Assignments of census tract, NMDOH small area and county are based on patient residence at the time of diagnosis. </abstract>
    1414<purpose>This dataset can be used to calculate invasive female breast cancer incidence measures, including case counts, crude rates, and age-adjusted rates. </purpose>
    15 <supplinf>This dataset contains information on invasive breast cancer only. It does not include information on in-situ breast cancer.  Population data used to calculate incidence rates are annual estimates produced by the University of New Mexico Geospatial and Population Studies (GPS) Program and are considered the most accurate available for New Mexico. They are the official estimates and projections used in New Mexico state government. </supplinf>
     15<supplinf>This dataset contains information on invasive breast cancer only. It does not include information on in-situ breast cancer. Population data used to calculate incidence rates are annual estimates produced by the University of New Mexico Geospatial and Population Studies (GPS) Program and are considered the most accurate available for New Mexico. They are the official estimates and projections used in New Mexico state government. </supplinf>
    1616</descript>
    1717<timeperd>
     
    2020<begdate>19900101</begdate>
    2121<begtime/>
    22 <enddate>20151231</enddate>
     22<enddate>20191231</enddate>
    2323<endtime/>
    2424</rngdates>
     
    6363<city>Santa Fe</city>
    6464<state>NM</state>
    65 <postal>87502</postal>
     65<postal>87505</postal>
    6666<country>United States Of America</country>
    6767</cntaddr>
     
    8484<dataqual>
    8585<logic>The NMTR is a member state of the NCI SEER Program, which is considered the standard for quality among cancer registries around the world. Quality control has been an integral part of the SEER program since its inception. </logic>
    86 <complete>NMTR participates in SEER studies to evaluate the quality and completeness of the data being reported (SEER's standard for case ascertainment is 98 percent). Quality Control studies are conducted every other year, actually in even numbered calendar years. These include potentially casefinding, reabstracting/recoding, and reliability studies. The latter involve virtually all abstractors and coders in each registry coding the same 10 to 20 cases which are selected to focus on coding issues that are known to be a problem. The cases are also coded by "experts" to obtain the correct answers. In odd numbered calendar years, training is conducted for SEER registries that focuses on problems identified in the QC studies. </complete>
     86<complete>NMTR participates in SEER studies to evaluate the quality and completeness of the data being reported (SEER's standard for case ascertainment is 98 percent). Quality control studies are conducted every other year in even numbered calendar years. These include potentially casefinding, reabstracting/recoding, and reliability studies. The latter involve virtually all abstractors and coders in each registry coding the same 10 to 20 cases which are selected to focus on coding issues that are known to be a problem. The cases are also coded by "experts" to obtain the correct answers. In odd numbered calendar years, training is conducted for SEER registries that focuses on problems identified in the QC studies. </complete>
    8787<lineage>
    8888<procstep>
    89 <procdesc>The 1990-2015 breast cancer incidence dataset disclosed in this report was extracted from the 2017 NMTR master casefile on February 5, 2018.</procdesc>
    90 <procdate>20180205</procdate>
     89<procdesc>The 1990-2019 breast cancer incidence dataset disclosed in this report was extracted from the NMTR master casefile on December 6, 2021.</procdesc>
     90<procdate>20211206</procdate>
    9191</procstep>
    9292<procstep>
     
    108108NMTracking maps display a background with a New Mexico base map option. The background map is served from &#169; OpenStreetMap contributors (http://www.openstreetmap.org/copyright).&#13;
    109109</procdesc>
    110 <procdate>20180205</procdate>
     110<procdate>20211206</procdate>
    111111</procstep>
    112112</lineage>
     
    114114<eainfo>
    115115<overview>
    116 <eaover>The dataset disclosed in this report contains records for female New Mexico residents newly diagnosed between 1990 and 2015 with invasive breast cancer. The dataset includes information on race/ethnicity, age at diagnosis (categorical), year of diagnosis, and census tract, NMDOH small area, and county of residence at diagnosis. </eaover>
     116<eaover>The dataset disclosed in this report contains records for female New Mexico residents newly diagnosed between 1990 and 2019 with invasive breast cancer. The dataset includes information on race/ethnicity, age at diagnosis (categorical), year of diagnosis, and census tract, NMDOH small area, and county of residence at diagnosis. </eaover>
    117117<eadetcit>Data dictionary available at http:www.naaccr.org (Standards and Registry Operations / Vol II Data Standards and Dictionary) &#13;
    118118</eadetcit>
     
    132132<city>Santa Fe</city>
    133133<state>NM</state>
    134 <postal>87502</postal>
     134<postal>87505</postal>
    135135<country>United States Of America</country>
    136136</cntaddr>
     
    150150</distinfo>
    151151<metainfo>
    152 <metd>20180205</metd>
     152<metd>20220111</metd>
    153153<metc>
    154154<cntinfo>
     
    163163<city>Santa Fe</city>
    164164<state>NM</state>
    165 <postal>87502</postal>
     165<postal>87505</postal>
    166166<country>United States Of America</country>
    167167</cntaddr>
     
    175175</cntinfo>
    176176</metc>
    177 <metstdn>EPHTN Tracking Network Profile Version 1.2</metstdn>
     177<metstdn>EPHTN Tracking Network Profile Version 3.0</metstdn>
    178178<metac>None</metac>
    179179<metuc>None</metuc>
  • adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/nmepht-content/xml/metadata/Kidney_and_RenalPelvis_CancerIncidence.xml

    r15536 r24462  
    55<citeinfo>
    66<origin>New Mexico EPHTN Project Manager</origin>
    7 <pubdate>20180205</pubdate>
     7<pubdate>20220111</pubdate>
    88<title>Kidney and Renal Pelvis Cancer Incidence</title>
    99<onlink/>
     
    1111</citation>
    1212<descript>
    13 <abstract>This dataset contains records for kidney and renal pelvis  cancer newly diagnosed among New Mexico residents between 1990 and 2015. The dataset was generated using information from the New Mexico Tumor Registry (NMTR), the agency designated to conduct public health surveillance for cancer in New Mexico. The NMTR is a founding member of the National Cancer Institute’s Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program and has continuously participated in that program since 1973. Cancer surveillance in New Mexico is conducted in accordance with standards set by the SEER Program, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the North American Association of Central Cancer Registries (NAACCR), and the American College of Surgeons. The primary source of data on cancer incidence is medical records. Casefinding involves a variety of medical facilities, including hospitals, physicians' offices, radiation facilities, freestanding surgical centers, and pathology laboratories. Hospital and central registry tumor registrars abstract data from patient medical records using uniform data items and codes as documented by NAACCR. Information on primary site and histology is coded according to the International Classification of Diseases for Oncology, Third Edition (ICD-O-3). Cancer type is defined according to SEER site recode variables, a convention that provides for standardized, consistent reporting of cancer incidence data. Assignments of census tract, NMDOH small area, and county are based on patient residence address at the time of diagnosis (see Data Quality Information section for more details on small areas).</abstract>
     13<abstract>This dataset contains records for kidney and renal pelvis  cancer newly diagnosed among New Mexico residents between 1990 and 2019. The dataset was generated using information from the New Mexico Tumor Registry (NMTR), the agency designated to conduct public health surveillance for cancer in New Mexico. The NMTR is a founding member of the National Cancer Institute’s Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program and has continuously participated in that program since 1973. Cancer surveillance in New Mexico is conducted in accordance with standards set by the SEER Program, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the North American Association of Central Cancer Registries (NAACCR), and the American College of Surgeons. The primary source of data on cancer incidence is medical records. Casefinding involves a variety of medical facilities, including hospitals, physicians' offices, radiation facilities, freestanding surgical centers, and pathology laboratories. Hospital and central registry tumor registrars abstract data from patient medical records using uniform data items and codes as documented by NAACCR. Information on primary site and histology is coded according to the International Classification of Diseases for Oncology, Third Edition (ICD-O-3). Cancer type is defined according to SEER site recode variables, a convention that provides for standardized, consistent reporting of cancer incidence data. Assignments of census tract, NMDOH small area, and county are based on patient residence address at the time of diagnosis (see Data Quality Information section for more details on small areas).</abstract>
    1414<purpose>This dataset can be used to calculate kidney and renal pelvis cancer incidence measures: case counts and age-adjusted rates.</purpose>
    1515<supplinf>This dataset contains information on invasive primary incident kidney and renal pelvis cancers. Population data used to calculate incidence rates are annual estimates produced by the University of New Mexico Geospatial and Population Studies (GPS) Program and are considered the most accurate available for New Mexico counties. They are the official estimates and projections used in New Mexico state government. </supplinf>
     
    2020<begdate>19900101</begdate>
    2121<begtime/>
    22 <enddate>20141231</enddate>
     22<enddate>20191231</enddate>
    2323<endtime/>
    2424</rngdates>
     
    6262<city>Santa Fe</city>
    6363<state>NM</state>
    64 <postal>87502</postal>
     64<postal>87505</postal>
    6565<country>United States Of America</country>
    6666</cntaddr>
     
    8383<dataqual>
    8484<logic>The NMTR is a member state of the NCI SEER Program, which is considered the standard for quality among cancer registries around the world. Quality control has been an integral part of the SEER program since its inception.</logic>
    85 <complete>NMTR participates in SEER studies to evaluate the quality and completeness of the data being reported (SEER's standard for case ascertainment is 98 percent). Quality Control studies are conducted every other year, actually in even numbered calendar years. These include potentially casefinding, reabstracting/recoding, and reliability studies. The latter involve virtually all abstractors and coders in each registry coding the same 10 to 20 cases which are selected to focus on coding issues that are known to be a problem. The cases are also coded by "experts" to obtain the correct answers. In odd numbered calendar years, training is conducted for SEER registries that focuses on problems identified in the QC studies. </complete>
     85<complete>NMTR participates in SEER studies to evaluate the quality and completeness of the data being reported (SEER's standard for case ascertainment is 98 percent). Quality control studies are conducted every other year in even numbered calendar years. These include potentially casefinding, reabstracting/recoding, and reliability studies. The latter involve virtually all abstractors and coders in each registry coding the same 10 to 20 cases which are selected to focus on coding issues that are known to be a problem. The cases are also coded by "experts" to obtain the correct answers. In odd numbered calendar years, training is conducted for SEER registries that focuses on problems identified in the QC studies. </complete>
    8686<lineage>
    8787<procstep>
    88 <procdesc>The 1990-2015 kidney and renal pelvis cancer incidence dataset disclosed in this report was extracted from the NMTR master casefile on February 8, 2018.</procdesc>
    89 <procdate>20180205</procdate>
     88<procdesc>The 1990-2019 kidney and renal pelvis cancer incidence dataset disclosed in this report was extracted from the NMTR master casefile on December 6, 2021.</procdesc>
     89<procdate>20211206</procdate>
    9090</procstep>
    9191<procstep>
    9292<procdesc>NM EPHT data queries through nmtracking.org (NMTracking) result in query-specific data sets that are aggregated by geographic unit. These aggregated data are dynamically joined to boundary data sets for display in the NMTracking interactive map. Boundaries are for County, Census Tract, and Small Areas and are created using U.S. Census 2010 boundary data. The Small Areas data set consists of combined Census tracts and was developed at the NM Department of Health. New Mexico Small Areas are 108 geographic areas across the state with population size that is just large enough to calculate rates for selected health events (e.g., asthma mortality, female breast cancer incidence). Most (95%) New Mexico small-area population sizes range from 9,000 to 30,000 persons. Some counties have multiple small areas (e.g., Bernalillo County has 34 small areas within its boundaries). In other cases, whole counties (e.g., Harding, Quay, and De Baca) are combined to create a single small area. Please, note that some data queries and displays might be available only to those with restricted-access permissions. NMTracking maps display a background with a New Mexico base map option. The background map is served from &#169; OpenStreetMap contributors (http://www.openstreetmap.org/copyright).</procdesc>
    93 <procdate>20180205</procdate>
     93<procdate>20211206</procdate>
    9494</procstep>
    9595</lineage>
     
    9797<eainfo>
    9898<overview>
    99 <eaover>The dataset disclosed in this report contains kidney and renal pelvis cancer incidence records for New Mexico residents newly diagnosed between 1990 and 2015. The dataset includes information on sex, race/ethnicity, age at diagnosis (categorical), year of diagnosis, and census tract and county of residence at diagnosis. </eaover>
     99<eaover>The dataset disclosed in this report contains kidney and renal pelvis cancer incidence records for New Mexico residents newly diagnosed between 1990 and 2019. The dataset includes information on sex, race/ethnicity, age at diagnosis (categorical), year of diagnosis, and census tract and county of residence at diagnosis. </eaover>
    100100<eadetcit>Data dictionary available at http:www.naaccr.org (Standards and Registry Operations / Vol II Data Standards and Dictionary).</eadetcit>
    101101</overview>
     
    114114<city>Santa Fe</city>
    115115<state>NM</state>
    116 <postal>87502</postal>
     116<postal>87505</postal>
    117117<country>United States Of America</country>
    118118</cntaddr>
     
    131131</distinfo>
    132132<metainfo>
    133 <metd>20180205</metd>
     133<metd>20220111</metd>
    134134<metc>
    135135<cntinfo>
     
    144144<city>Santa Fe</city>
    145145<state>NM</state>
    146 <postal>87502</postal>
     146<postal>87505</postal>
    147147<country>United States Of America</country>
    148148</cntaddr>
     
    156156</cntinfo>
    157157</metc>
    158 <metstdn>EPHTN Tracking Network Profile Version 1.2</metstdn>
     158<metstdn>EPHTN Tracking Network Profile Version 3.0</metstdn>
    159159<metac>None</metac>
    160160<metuc>None</metuc>
  • adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/nmepht-content/xml/metadata/LarynxCancerIncidence.xml

    r15536 r24462  
    55<citeinfo>
    66<origin>New Mexico EPHTN Project Manager</origin>
    7 <pubdate>20180205</pubdate>
     7<pubdate>20220111</pubdate>
    88<title>Larynx Cancer Incidence</title>
    99<onlink/>
     
    1111</citation>
    1212<descript>
    13 <abstract>This dataset contains records for larynx cancer newly diagnosed among New Mexico residents between 1990 and 2015. The dataset was generated using information from the New Mexico Tumor Registry (NMTR), the agency designated to conduct public health surveillance for cancer in New Mexico. The NMTR is a founding member of the National Cancer Institute's Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program and has continuously participated in that program since 1973. Cancer surveillance in New Mexico is conducted in accordance with standards set by the SEER Program, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the North American Association of Central Cancer Registries (NAACCR), and the American College of Surgeons. The primary source of data on cancer incidence is medical records. Casefinding involves a variety of medical facilities, including hospitals, physicians' offices, radiation facilities, freestanding surgical centers, and pathology laboratories. Hospital and central registry tumor registrars abstract data from patient medical records using uniform data items and codes as documented by NAACCR. Information on primary site and histology is coded according to the International Classification of Diseases for Oncology, Third Edition (ICD-O-3). Cancer type is defined according to SEER site recode variables, a convention that provides for standardized, consistent reporting of cancer incidence data. Assignments of census tract, NMDOH small area, and county are based on patient residence address at the time of diagnosis. </abstract>
     13<abstract>This dataset contains records for larynx cancer newly diagnosed among New Mexico residents between 1990 and 2019. The dataset was generated using information from the New Mexico Tumor Registry (NMTR), the agency designated to conduct public health surveillance for cancer in New Mexico. The NMTR is a founding member of the National Cancer Institute's Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program and has continuously participated in that program since 1973. Cancer surveillance in New Mexico is conducted in accordance with standards set by the SEER Program, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the North American Association of Central Cancer Registries (NAACCR), and the American College of Surgeons. The primary source of data on cancer incidence is medical records. Casefinding involves a variety of medical facilities, including hospitals, physicians' offices, radiation facilities, freestanding surgical centers, and pathology laboratories. Hospital and central registry tumor registrars abstract data from patient medical records using uniform data items and codes as documented by NAACCR. Information on primary site and histology is coded according to the International Classification of Diseases for Oncology, Third Edition (ICD-O-3). Cancer type is defined according to SEER site recode variables, a convention that provides for standardized, consistent reporting of cancer incidence data. Assignments of census tract, NMDOH small area, and county are based on patient residence address at the time of diagnosis. </abstract>
    1414<purpose>This dataset can be used to calculate larynx cancer incidence measures, including case counts, crude rates, and age-adjusted rates. </purpose>
    15 <supplinf>This dataset contains information on invasive larynx cancers.  Population data used to calculate incidence rates are annual estimates produced by the University of New Mexico Geospatial and Population Studies (GPS) Program and are considered the most accurate available for New Mexico. They are the official estimates and projections used in New Mexico state government. </supplinf>
     15<supplinf>This dataset contains information on invasive larynx cancers. Population data used to calculate incidence rates are annual estimates produced by the University of New Mexico Geospatial and Population Studies (GPS) Program and are considered the most accurate available for New Mexico. They are the official estimates and projections used in New Mexico state government. </supplinf>
    1616</descript>
    1717<timeperd>
     
    2020<begdate>19900101</begdate>
    2121<begtime/>
    22 <enddate>20151231</enddate>
     22<enddate>20191231</enddate>
    2323<endtime/>
    2424</rngdates>
     
    6363<city>Santa Fe</city>
    6464<state>NM</state>
    65 <postal>87502</postal>
     65<postal>87505</postal>
    6666<country>United States Of America</country>
    6767</cntaddr>
     
    8484<dataqual>
    8585<logic>The NMTR is a member state of the NCI SEER Program, which is considered the standard for quality among cancer registries around the world. Quality control has been an integral part of the SEER program since its inception.</logic>
    86 <complete>NMTR participates in SEER studies to evaluate the quality and completeness of the data being reported (SEER's standard for case ascertainment is 98 percent). Quality Control studies are conducted every other year, actually in even numbered calendar years. These include potentially casefinding, reabstracting/recoding, and reliability studies. The latter involve virtually all abstractors and coders in each registry coding the same 10 to 20 cases which are selected to focus on coding issues that are known to be a problem. The cases are also coded by "experts" to obtain the correct answers. In odd numbered calendar years, training is conducted for SEER registries that focuses on problems identified in the QC studies. </complete>
     86<complete>NMTR participates in SEER studies to evaluate the quality and completeness of the data being reported (SEER's standard for case ascertainment is 98 percent). Quality control studies are conducted every other year in even numbered calendar years. These include potentially casefinding, reabstracting/recoding, and reliability studies. The latter involve virtually all abstractors and coders in each registry coding the same 10 to 20 cases which are selected to focus on coding issues that are known to be a problem. The cases are also coded by "experts" to obtain the correct answers. In odd numbered calendar years, training is conducted for SEER registries that focuses on problems identified in the QC studies. </complete>
    8787<lineage>
    8888<procstep>
    89 <procdesc>The 1990-2015 larynx cancer incidence dataset disclosed in this report were extracted from the NMTR master casefile on February 5, 2018.  </procdesc>
    90 <procdate>20180205</procdate>
     89<procdesc>The 1990-2019 larynx cancer incidence dataset disclosed in this report were extracted from the NMTR master casefile on December 6, 2021.  </procdesc>
     90<procdate>20210111</procdate>
    9191</procstep>
    9292<procstep>
    9393<procdesc>NM EPHT data queries through nmtracking.org (NMTracking) result in query-specific data sets that are aggregated by geographic unit. These aggregated data are dynamically joined to boundary data sets for display in the NMTracking interactive map. Boundaries are for County, Census Tract, and Small Areas and are created using U.S. Census 2010 boundary data. The Small Areas data set consists of combined Census tracts and was developed at the NM Department of Health. New Mexico Small Areas are 108 geographic areas across the state with population size that is just large enough to calculate rates for selected health events (e.g., asthma mortality, female breast cancer incidence). Most (95%) New Mexico small-area population sizes range from 9,000 to 30,000 persons. Some counties have multiple small areas (e.g., Bernalillo County has 34 small areas within its boundaries). In other cases, whole counties (e.g., Harding, Quay, and DeBaca) are combined to create a single small area. Please, note that some data queries and displays might be available only to those with restricted-access permissions. NMTracking maps display a background with a New Mexico base map option. The background map is served from &#169; OpenStreetMap contributors (http://www.openstreetmap.org/copyright).</procdesc>
    94 <procdate>20150216</procdate>
     94<procdate>20210111</procdate>
    9595</procstep>
    9696</lineage>
     
    9898<eainfo>
    9999<overview>
    100 <eaover>The dataset disclosed in this report contains larynx cancer incidence records for New Mexico residents newly diagnosed between 1990 and 2015. The dataset includes information on sex, race/ethnicity, age at diagnosis (categorical), year of diagnosis, and census tract and county of residence at diagnosis. </eaover>
     100<eaover>The dataset disclosed in this report contains larynx cancer incidence records for New Mexico residents newly diagnosed between 1990 and 2019. The dataset includes information on sex, race/ethnicity, age at diagnosis (categorical), year of diagnosis, and census tract and county of residence at diagnosis. </eaover>
    101101<eadetcit>Data dictionary available at http:www.naaccr.org (Standards and Registry Operations / Vol II Data Standards and Dictionary).</eadetcit>
    102102</overview>
     
    115115<city>Santa Fe</city>
    116116<state>NM</state>
    117 <postal>87502</postal>
     117<postal>87505</postal>
    118118<country>United States Of America</country>
    119119</cntaddr>
     
    132132</distinfo>
    133133<metainfo>
    134 <metd>20180205</metd>
     134<metd>20220111</metd>
    135135<metc>
    136136<cntinfo>
     
    145145<city>Santa Fe</city>
    146146<state>NM</state>
    147 <postal>87502</postal>
     147<postal>87505</postal>
    148148<country>United States Of America</country>
    149149</cntaddr>
     
    157157</cntinfo>
    158158</metc>
    159 <metstdn>EPHTN Tracking Network Profile Version 1.2</metstdn>
     159<metstdn>EPHTN Tracking Network Profile Version 3.0</metstdn>
    160160<metac>None</metac>
    161161<metuc>None</metuc>
  • adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/nmepht-content/xml/metadata/LeukemiaIncidence.xml

    r15536 r24462  
    55<citeinfo>
    66<origin>New Mexico EPHTN Project Manager</origin>
    7 <pubdate>20180205</pubdate>
     7<pubdate>20220111</pubdate>
    88<title>Leukemia Incidence</title>
    99<onlink/>
     
    1111</citation>
    1212<descript>
    13 <abstract>This dataset contains records for leukemia  newly diagnosed among New Mexico residents between 1990 and 2015.  The dataset was generated using information from the New Mexico Tumor Registry (NMTR), the agency designated to conduct public health surveillance for cancer in New Mexico. The NMTR is a founding member of the National Cancer Institute's Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program and has continuously participated in that program since 1973. Cancer surveillance in New Mexico is conducted in accordance with standards set by the SEER Program, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the North American Association of Central Cancer Registries (NAACCR), and the American College of Surgeons. The primary source of data on cancer incidence is medical records. Casefinding involves a variety of medical facilities, including hospitals, physicians' offices, radiation facilities, freestanding surgical centers, and pathology laboratories. Hospital and central registry tumor registrars abstract data from patient medical records using uniform data items and codes as documented by NAACCR. Information on primary site and histology is coded according to the International Classification of Diseases for Oncology, Third Edition (ICD-O-3). Cancer type is defined according to SEER site recode variables, a convention that provides for standardized, consistent reporting of cancer incidence data. Assignments of census tract, NMDOH small area, and county are based on patient residence at the time of diagnosis. </abstract>
    14 <purpose>This dataset can be used to calculate incidence measures,  including case counts, crude rates, and age-adjusted rates, for all forms of leukemia combined and select leukemia subtypes, including acute lymphocytic leukemia, acute myeloid leukemia, and chronic lymphocytic leukemia.   </purpose>
     13<abstract>This dataset contains records for leukemia  newly diagnosed among New Mexico residents between 1990 and 2019.  The dataset was generated using information from the New Mexico Tumor Registry (NMTR), the agency designated to conduct public health surveillance for cancer in New Mexico. The NMTR is a founding member of the National Cancer Institute's Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program and has continuously participated in that program since 1973. Cancer surveillance in New Mexico is conducted in accordance with standards set by the SEER Program, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the North American Association of Central Cancer Registries (NAACCR), and the American College of Surgeons. The primary source of data on cancer incidence is medical records. Casefinding involves a variety of medical facilities, including hospitals, physicians' offices, radiation facilities, freestanding surgical centers, and pathology laboratories. Hospital and central registry tumor registrars abstract data from patient medical records using uniform data items and codes as documented by NAACCR. Information on primary site and histology is coded according to the International Classification of Diseases for Oncology, Third Edition (ICD-O-3). Cancer type is defined according to SEER site recode variables, a convention that provides for standardized, consistent reporting of cancer incidence data. Assignments of census tract, NMDOH small area, and county are based on patient residence at the time of diagnosis. </abstract>
     14<purpose>This dataset can be used to calculate incidence measures,  including case counts, crude rates, and age-adjusted rates, for all forms of leukemia combined and select leukemia subtypes, including acute lymphocytic leukemia, and chronic lymphocytic leukemia, and acute myeloid leukemia.   </purpose>
    1515<supplinf>Population data used to calculate incidence rates are annual estimates produced by the University of New Mexico Geospatial and Population Studies (GPS) Program and are considered the most accurate available for New Mexico. They are the official estimates and projections used in New Mexico state government</supplinf>
    1616</descript>
     
    2020<begdate>19900101</begdate>
    2121<begtime/>
    22 <enddate>20141231</enddate>
     22<enddate>20191231</enddate>
    2323<endtime/>
    2424</rngdates>
     
    6464<city>Santa Fe</city>
    6565<state>NM</state>
    66 <postal>87502</postal>
     66<postal>87505</postal>
    6767<country>United States Of America</country>
    6868</cntaddr>
     
    8585<dataqual>
    8686<logic>The NMTR is a member state of the NCI SEER Program, which is considered the standard for quality among cancer registries around the world. Quality control has been an integral part of the SEER program since its inception. </logic>
    87 <complete>NMTR participates in SEER studies to evaluate the quality and completeness of the data being reported (SEER's standard for case ascertainment is 98 percent). Quality Control studies are conducted every other year, actually in even numbered calendar years. These include potentially casefinding, reabstracting/recoding, and reliability studies. The latter involve virtually all abstractors and coders in each registry coding the same 10 to 20 cases which are selected to focus on coding issues that are known to be a problem. The cases are also coded by "experts" to obtain the correct answers. In odd numbered calendar years, training is conducted for SEER registries that focuses on problems identified in the QC studies. </complete>
     87<complete>NMTR participates in SEER studies to evaluate the quality and completeness of the data being reported (SEER's standard for case ascertainment is 98 percent). Quality control studies are conducted every other year in even numbered calendar years. These include potentially casefinding, reabstracting/recoding, and reliability studies. The latter involve virtually all abstractors and coders in each registry coding the same 10 to 20 cases which are selected to focus on coding issues that are known to be a problem. The cases are also coded by "experts" to obtain the correct answers. In odd numbered calendar years, training is conducted for SEER registries that focuses on problems identified in the QC studies. </complete>
    8888<lineage>
    8989<procstep>
    90 <procdesc>The 1990-2015 leukemia incidence dataset disclosed in this report was extracted from the NMTR master casefile on February 8, 2018. </procdesc>
    91 <procdate>20180205</procdate>
     90<procdesc>The 1990-2019 leukemia incidence dataset disclosed in this report was extracted from the NMTR master casefile on December 6, 2021. </procdesc>
     91<procdate>20211206</procdate>
    9292</procstep>
    9393<procstep>
    9494<procdesc>NM EPHT data queries through nmtracking.org (NMTracking) result in query-specific data sets that are aggregated by geographic unit. These aggregated data are dynamically joined to boundary data sets for display in the NMTracking interactive map. Boundaries are for County, Census Tract, and Small Areas and are created using U.S. Census 2010 boundary data. The Small Areas data set consists of combined Census tracts and was developed at the NM Department of Health. New Mexico Small Areas are 108 geographic areas across the state with population size that is just large enough to calculate rates for selected health events (e.g., asthma mortality, female breast cancer incidence). Most (95%) New Mexico small-area population sizes range from 9,000 to 30,000 persons. Some counties have multiple small areas (e.g., Bernalillo County has 34 small areas within its boundaries). In other cases, whole counties (e.g., Harding, Quay, and DeBaca) are combined to create a single small area. Please, note that some data queries and displays might be available only to those with restricted-access permissions. NMTracking maps display a background with a New Mexico base map option. The background map is served from &#169; OpenStreetMap contributors (http://www.openstreetmap.org/copyright).
    9595</procdesc>
    96 <procdate>20180205</procdate>
     96<procdate>20211206</procdate>
    9797</procstep>
    9898</lineage>
     
    100100<eainfo>
    101101<overview>
    102 <eaover>The dataset disclosed in this report contains leukemia incidence records for New Mexico residents newly diagnosed between 1990 and 2015. The dataset includes information on sex, race/ethnicity, age at diagnosis (categorical), year of diagnosis, leukemia subtype, and census tract, NMDOH small area, and county of residence at diagnosis. </eaover>
     102<eaover>The dataset disclosed in this report contains leukemia incidence records for New Mexico residents newly diagnosed between 1990 and 2019. The dataset includes information on sex, race/ethnicity, age at diagnosis (categorical), year of diagnosis, leukemia subtype, and census tract, NMDOH small area, and county of residence at diagnosis. </eaover>
    103103<eadetcit>Data dictionary available at http:www.naaccr.org (Standards and Registry Operations / Vol II Data Standards and Dictionary) </eadetcit>
    104104</overview>
     
    117117<city>Santa Fe</city>
    118118<state>NM</state>
    119 <postal>87502</postal>
     119<postal>87505</postal>
    120120<country>United States Of America</country>
    121121</cntaddr>
     
    134134</distinfo>
    135135<metainfo>
    136 <metd>20180205</metd>
     136<metd>20220111</metd>
    137137<metc>
    138138<cntinfo>
     
    147147<city>Santa Fe</city>
    148148<state>NM</state>
    149 <postal>87502</postal>
     149<postal>87505</postal>
    150150<country>United States Of America</country>
    151151</cntaddr>
     
    159159</cntinfo>
    160160</metc>
    161 <metstdn>EPHTN Tracking Network Profile Version 1.2</metstdn>
     161<metstdn>EPHTN Tracking Network Profile Version 3.0</metstdn>
    162162<metac>None</metac>
    163163<metuc>None</metuc>
  • adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/nmepht-content/xml/metadata/Liver_and_BileDuct_CancerIncidence.xml

    r15536 r24462  
    55<citeinfo>
    66<origin>New Mexico EPHTN Project Manager</origin>
    7 <pubdate>20180205</pubdate>
     7<pubdate>20220111</pubdate>
    88<title>Liver and Bile Duct Cancer Incidence</title>
    99<onlink/>
     
    1111</citation>
    1212<descript>
    13 <abstract>This dataset contains records for liver and bile duct cancer newly diagnosed among New Mexico residents between 1990 and 2015. The dataset was generated using information from the New Mexico Tumor Registry (NMTR), the agency designated to conduct public health surveillance for cancer in New Mexico. The NMTR is a founding member of the National Cancer Institute’s Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program and has continuously participated in that program since 1973. Cancer surveillance in New Mexico is conducted in accordance with standards set by the SEER Program, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the North American Association of Central Cancer Registries (NAACCR), and the American College of Surgeons. The primary source of data on cancer incidence is medical records. Casefinding involves a variety of medical facilities, including hospitals, physicians' offices, radiation facilities, freestanding surgical centers, and pathology laboratories. Hospital and central registry tumor registrars abstract data from patient medical records using uniform data items and codes as documented by NAACCR. Information on primary site and histology is coded according to the International Classification of Diseases for Oncology, Third Edition (ICD-O-3). Cancer type is defined according to SEER site recode variables, a convention that provides for standardized, consistent reporting of cancer incidence data. Assignments of census tract, NMDOH small area, and county are based on patient residence address at the time of diagnosis (see Data Quality Information section for more details on small areas).</abstract>
     13<abstract>This dataset contains records for liver and bile duct cancer newly diagnosed among New Mexico residents between 1990 and 2019. The dataset was generated using information from the New Mexico Tumor Registry (NMTR), the agency designated to conduct public health surveillance for cancer in New Mexico. The NMTR is a founding member of the National Cancer Institute’s Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program and has continuously participated in that program since 1973. Cancer surveillance in New Mexico is conducted in accordance with standards set by the SEER Program, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the North American Association of Central Cancer Registries (NAACCR), and the American College of Surgeons. The primary source of data on cancer incidence is medical records. Casefinding involves a variety of medical facilities, including hospitals, physicians' offices, radiation facilities, freestanding surgical centers, and pathology laboratories. Hospital and central registry tumor registrars abstract data from patient medical records using uniform data items and codes as documented by NAACCR. Information on primary site and histology is coded according to the International Classification of Diseases for Oncology, Third Edition (ICD-O-3). Cancer type is defined according to SEER site recode variables, a convention that provides for standardized, consistent reporting of cancer incidence data. Assignments of census tract, NMDOH small area, and county are based on patient residence address at the time of diagnosis (see Data Quality Information section for more details on small areas).</abstract>
    1414<purpose>This dataset can be used to calculate liver and bile duct cancer incidence measures: case counts and age-adjusted rates. </purpose>
    1515<supplinf>This dataset contains information on invasive liver and bile duct cancers.  Population data used to calculate incidence rates are annual estimates produced by the University of New Mexico Geospatial and Population Studies (GPS) Program and are considered the most accurate available for New Mexico counties. They are the official estimates and projections used in New Mexico state government. </supplinf>
     
    2020<begdate>19900101</begdate>
    2121<begtime/>
    22 <enddate>20141231</enddate>
     22<enddate>20191231</enddate>
    2323<endtime/>
    2424</rngdates>
     
    6262<city>Santa Fe</city>
    6363<state>NM</state>
    64 <postal>87502</postal>
     64<postal>87505</postal>
    6565<country>United States Of America</country>
    6666</cntaddr>
     
    8383<dataqual>
    8484<logic>The NMTR is a member state of the NCI SEER Program, which is considered the standard for quality among cancer registries around the world. Quality control has been an integral part of the SEER program since its inception.</logic>
    85 <complete>NMTR participates in SEER studies to evaluate the quality and completeness of the data being reported (SEER's standard for case ascertainment is 98 percent). Quality Control studies are conducted every other year, actually in even numbered calendar years. These include potentially casefinding, reabstracting/recoding, and reliability studies. The latter involve virtually all abstractors and coders in each registry coding the same 10 to 20 cases which are selected to focus on coding issues that are known to be a problem. The cases are also coded by "experts" to obtain the correct answers. In odd numbered calendar years, training is conducted for SEER registries that focuses on problems identified in the QC studies.</complete>
     85<complete>NMTR participates in SEER studies to evaluate the quality and completeness of the data being reported (SEER's standard for case ascertainment is 98 percent). Quality control studies are conducted every other year in even numbered calendar years. These include potentially casefinding, reabstracting/recoding, and reliability studies. The latter involve virtually all abstractors and coders in each registry coding the same 10 to 20 cases which are selected to focus on coding issues that are known to be a problem. The cases are also coded by "experts" to obtain the correct answers. In odd numbered calendar years, training is conducted for SEER registries that focuses on problems identified in the QC studies.</complete>
    8686<lineage>
    8787<procstep>
    88 <procdesc>The 1990-2015 liver cancer incidence dataset disclosed in this report was extracted from the NMTR master casefile on February 8, 2018.</procdesc>
    89 <procdate>20180205</procdate>
     88<procdesc>The 1990-2019 liver cancer incidence dataset disclosed in this report was extracted from the NMTR master casefile on December 6, 2021.</procdesc>
     89<procdate>20211206</procdate>
    9090</procstep>
    9191<procstep>
    9292<procdesc>NM EPHT data queries through nmtracking.org (NMTracking) result in query-specific data sets that are aggregated by geographic unit. These aggregated data are dynamically joined to boundary data sets for display in the NMTracking interactive map. Boundaries are for County, Census Tract, and Small Areas and are created using U.S. Census 2010 boundary data. The Small Areas data set consists of combined Census tracts and was developed at the NM Department of Health. New Mexico Small Areas are 108 geographic areas across the state with population size that is just large enough to calculate rates for selected health events (e.g., asthma mortality, female breast cancer incidence). Most (95%) New Mexico small-area population sizes range from 9,000 to 30,000 persons. Some counties have multiple small areas (e.g., Bernalillo County has 34 small areas within its boundaries). In other cases, whole counties (e.g., Harding, Quay, and DeBaca) are combined to create a single small area. Please, note that some data queries and displays might be available only to those with restricted-access permissions. NMTracking maps display a background with a New Mexico base map option. The background map is served from &#169; OpenStreetMap contributors (http://www.openstreetmap.org/copyright).</procdesc>
    93 <procdate>20180205</procdate>
     93<procdate>20211206</procdate>
    9494</procstep>
    9595</lineage>
     
    9797<eainfo>
    9898<overview>
    99 <eaover>: The dataset disclosed in this report contains liver cancer incidence records for New Mexico residents newly diagnosed between 1990 and 2015. The dataset includes information on sex, race/ethnicity, age at diagnosis (categorical), year of diagnosis, and census tract and county of residence at diagnosis. </eaover>
     99<eaover>: The dataset disclosed in this report contains liver cancer incidence records for New Mexico residents newly diagnosed between 1990 and 2019. The dataset includes information on sex, race/ethnicity, age at diagnosis (categorical), year of diagnosis, and census tract and county of residence at diagnosis. </eaover>
    100100<eadetcit>Data dictionary available at http:www.naaccr.org (Standards and Registry Operations /Volume II Data Standards and Dictionary).</eadetcit>
    101101</overview>
     
    114114<city>Santa Fe</city>
    115115<state>NM</state>
    116 <postal>87502</postal>
     116<postal>87505</postal>
    117117<country>United States Of America</country>
    118118</cntaddr>
     
    131131</distinfo>
    132132<metainfo>
    133 <metd>20180205</metd>
     133<metd>20220111</metd>
    134134<metc>
    135135<cntinfo>
     
    144144<city>Santa Fe</city>
    145145<state>NM</state>
    146 <postal>87502</postal>
     146<postal>87505</postal>
    147147<country>United States Of America</country>
    148148</cntaddr>
     
    156156</cntinfo>
    157157</metc>
    158 <metstdn>EPHTN Tracking Network Profile Version 1.2</metstdn>
     158<metstdn>EPHTN Tracking Network Profile Version 3.0</metstdn>
    159159<metac>None</metac>
    160160<metuc>None</metuc>
Note: See TracChangeset for help on using the changeset viewer.