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Timestamp:
12/28/21 12:21:50 (6 months ago)
Author:
GarthBraithwaite_STG
Message:

nm epht content - changed ibis:hash to standard href="# to use html_content processing xslt code.

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1 edited

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  • adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/nmepht-content/xml/html_content/health/cancer/CancerIncidence.xml

    r23360 r24389  
    3131                        </p>
    3232                        <p>
    33                                 About 1.7 million new cases of cancer are expected to be diagnosed during 2018 in the United States. U.S. cancer care costs were $147.3 billion in 2017. In the future, costs are likely to increase due to an aging population having more cancer, coupled with the costs of new, and often more expensive treatments which will be adopted as standards of care. The good news is that the overall cancer death rate in the U.S. fell 26% between 1991 and 2015. The National Cancer Institute (NCI) estimated that, in 2016, there were 15.5 million cancer survivors in the United States. The number of cancer survivors is expected to increase to <a ibis:hash="ref1" id="ref1.link" aria-describedby="footnote-label">20.3 million by 2026.</a>
     33                                About 1.7 million new cases of cancer are expected to be diagnosed during 2018 in the United States. U.S. cancer care costs were $147.3 billion in 2017. In the future, costs are likely to increase due to an aging population having more cancer, coupled with the costs of new, and often more expensive treatments which will be adopted as standards of care. The good news is that the overall cancer death rate in the U.S. fell 26% between 1991 and 2015. The National Cancer Institute (NCI) estimated that, in 2016, there were 15.5 million cancer survivors in the United States. The number of cancer survivors is expected to increase to <a href="#ref1" id="ref1.link" aria-describedby="footnote-label">20.3 million by 2026.</a>
    3434                        </p>
    3535                        <footer class="Footnotes"><ol>
    3636                                <li id="ref1"> <a href="https://acsjournals.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.3322/caac.21349">
    3737                                        Cancer treatment and survivorship statistics, 2016</a> Accessed 12/30/2020
    38                                 <a ibis:hash="ref1.link" aria-label="Back to content">«</a></li>
     38                                <a href="#ref1.link" aria-label="Back to content">«</a></li>
    3939                        </ol></footer>
    4040                </section>
     
    4343                        <h2>What are the Risk Factors?</h2>
    4444                        <p>
    45                                 Major risk factors for cancer include  <a ibis:hash="ref2" id="ref2.link" aria-describedby="footnote-label">tobacco use, diet, lack of exercise, and sun exposure.</a>. For example, people who smoke cigarettes are <a ibis:hash="ref3" id="ref3.link" aria-describedby="footnote-label">15 to 30 times more likely to get lung cancer or die from lung cancer</a> than people who do not smoke. Researchers have also identified genetic risks for cancer. Compared to women without a family history, <a ibis:hash="ref4" id="ref4.link" aria-describedby="footnote-label">risk of breast cancer is about 1.5 times higher for women with one affected first-degree female relative and 2-4 times higher for women with more than one first-degree relative.</a>
     45                                Major risk factors for cancer include  <a href="#ref2" id="ref2.link" aria-describedby="footnote-label">tobacco use, diet, lack of exercise, and sun exposure.</a>. For example, people who smoke cigarettes are <a href="#ref3" id="ref3.link" aria-describedby="footnote-label">15 to 30 times more likely to get lung cancer or die from lung cancer</a> than people who do not smoke. Researchers have also identified genetic risks for cancer. Compared to women without a family history, <a href="#ref4" id="ref4.link" aria-describedby="footnote-label">risk of breast cancer is about 1.5 times higher for women with one affected first-degree female relative and 2-4 times higher for women with more than one first-degree relative.</a>
    4646                        </p>
    4747                        <p>
     
    153153                                <li id="ref2">
    154154                                        Clapp RW, Howe GK, Jacobs M. Environmental and occupational causes of cancer re-visited. J Public Health Policy. 2006;27(1):61-76
    155                                 <a ibis:hash="ref2.link" aria-label="Back to content">«</a></li>
     155                                <a href="#ref2.link" aria-label="Back to content">«</a></li>
    156156                                <li id="ref3"> <a href="https://www.cdc.gov/cancer/lung/basic_info/risk_factors.htm">
    157157                                        CDC What are the risk factors for lung cancer?</a> Accessed 1/3/2020
    158                                 <a ibis:hash="ref3.link" aria-label="Back to content">«</a></li>
     158                                <a href="#ref3.link" aria-label="Back to content">«</a></li>
    159159                                <li id="ref4"> <a href="https://www.cancer.org/research/cancer-facts-statistics/breast-cancer-facts-figures.html">
    160160                                        ACS Breast Cancer Facts and Figures 2019-2020</a> Accessed 12/18/2020
    161                                 <a ibis:hash="ref4.link" aria-label="Back to content">«</a></li>
     161                                <a href="#ref4.link" aria-label="Back to content">«</a></li>
    162162                        </ol></footer> 
    163163                </section>
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