Changeset 22741 in main


Ignore:
Timestamp:
03/24/21 00:14:48 (3 weeks ago)
Author:
GarthBraithwaite_STG
Message:

nm epht - put about/resources into it's own dir under html_content. Updated topics as best as could w/o input. css tweaks.

Location:
adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps
Files:
7 added
1 deleted
13 edited
2 moved

Legend:

Unmodified
Added
Removed
  • adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/nmepht-content/xml/html_content/about/AboutEPHT.xml

    r22732 r22741  
    11<?xml version="1.0" encoding="ISO-8859-1"?>
    22<HTML_CONTENT xmlns:ibis="http://www.ibisph.org">
     3
    34        <HTML_CLASS>Topic Newsroom</HTML_CLASS>
     5
    46        <OTHER_HEAD_CONTENT>
    57                <link ibis:href="css/Topic.css"
     
    911                        rel="stylesheet"
    1012                        type="text/css"/>
    11                 <!--
    12         Optional List Items Show More button:  This can be applied to other selection blocks as well. 
    13 -->
    14                 <script ibis:src="js/jquery.scrollBlockListItems.js"/>
    15                 <script>
    16                         var optionOverrides = {"maxSelectionsContainerHeight":120};
    17                         $( document ).ready(function() {
    18                         $(".Topic #moreData .Selections").scrollBlockListItems(optionOverrides);
    19                         });
    20                 </script>
    2113        </OTHER_HEAD_CONTENT>
     14
    2215        <CONTENT>
    2316                <header>
     
    2619                        <h1>New Mexico Environmental Public Health Tracking Program</h1>
    2720                </header>
     21
    2822                <section>
    2923                        <section>
     
    3933                        <section>
    4034                                <h3>Tracking in New Mexico</h3>
    41                                 <p>New Mexico Tracking activities focus on:</p>
     35                                <h4>New Mexico Tracking activities focus on:</h4>
    4236                                <ul class="Indent">
    4337                                        <li>Environmental Public Health Epidemiology, Response and Education.</li>
     
    6357                        </section>
    6458                </section>
    65                 <!--
    66                 <section class="Citation">
    67                         Deyonne Sandoval. Page content updated February 2021. Published on March 2021.
    68                 </section>
    69                 -->
    7059        </CONTENT>
    7160</HTML_CONTENT>
  • adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/nmepht-content/xml/html_content/about/ContactInformation.xml

    r22732 r22741  
    11<?xml version="1.0" encoding="ISO-8859-1"?>
     2
    23<HTML_CONTENT xmlns:ibis="http://www.ibisph.org">
     4
    35        <HTML_CLASS>Topic Newsroom</HTML_CLASS>
    46        <OTHER_HEAD_CONTENT>
     
    911                        rel="stylesheet"
    1012                        type="text/css"/>
    11                 <!--
    12         Optional List Items Show More button:  This can be applied to other selection blocks as well. 
    13 -->
    14                 <script ibis:src="js/jquery.scrollBlockListItems.js"/>
    15                 <script>
    16                         var optionOverrides = {"maxSelectionsContainerHeight":120};
    17                         $( document ).ready(function() {
    18                         $(".Topic #moreData .Selections").scrollBlockListItems(optionOverrides);
    19                         });
    20                 </script>
    2113        </OTHER_HEAD_CONTENT>
    22         -<CONTENT>
     14
     15        <CONTENT>
    2316                <header>
    2417                        <img ibis:src="view/image/resource/contactus.jpg"
     
    2619                        <h1>Contact Us</h1>
    2720                </header>
     21
    2822                <section>
    2923                        <section>
     
    3125                                <p>Thank you for your interest in the New Mexico Environmental Public Health Tracking Program and for visiting NMTracking.org.  </p>
    3226                                <h3>The New Mexico Tracking Team</h3>
    33                                 <p>Our team members include: </p>
     27                               
     28                                <h4>Our team members include: </h4>
    3429                                <ul class="Indent">
    3530                                        <li>Srikanth Paladugu, NM EPHT Principal Investigator and Environmental Health Epidemiology Bureau Chief </li>
     
    4237                                </ul>
    4338                        </section>
     39
    4440                        <section>
    4541                                <h3>Communicate with us</h3>
    4642                                <p>
    47                                         Tell us how you are using data and information from NMTracking.org.
    48                                         Reach out to us by: </p>
     43                                        Tell us how you are using data and information from NMTracking.org. </p>
     44                                <h4>Reach out to us by:</h4>
    4945                                <ul class="Indent">
    5046                                        <li>Email: <a href="mailto:doh-eheb@state.nm.us">doh-eheb@state.nm.us</a>
     
    5551                                </ul>
    5652                        </section>
     53
    5754                        <section>
    5855                                <h3>Data requests and access</h3>
     
    6057                                        <br/> Re: NM EPHT Data Access Request.</p>
    6158                                <h3>Media inquiries</h3>
    62                                 <p>For media inquiries send an email request, subject line, NM EPHT Media Inquiry, to:</p>
     59
     60                                <h4>For media inquiries send an email request, subject line, NM EPHT Media Inquiry, to:</h4>
    6361                                <ul class="Indent">
    6462                                        <li>Matt Bieber, NMDOH Communications Director <a href="mailto:Matt.Bieber@state.nm.us">Matt.Bieber@state.nm.us</a>
     
    7270                                <p>We do not host or accept unsolicited material including pitches, promotional materials, resources, weblinks or articles. </p>
    7371                        </section>
    74                         <!--
    75                         <section class="Citation">
    76                                 Deyonne Sandoval. Page content updated on February 2021. Published March 2021.
    77                         </section>
    78                         -->
    7972                </section>
    8073        </CONTENT>
  • adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/nmepht-content/xml/html_content/about/OurStory.xml

    r22740 r22741  
    11<?xml version="1.0" encoding="ISO-8859-1"?>
    22<HTML_CONTENT xmlns:ibis="http://www.ibisph.org">
     3
    34        <HTML_CLASS>Topic Newsroom</HTML_CLASS>
    45        <OTHER_HEAD_CONTENT>
     
    910                        rel="stylesheet"
    1011                        type="text/css"/>
    11                 <!--
    12         Optional List Items Show More button:  This can be applied to other selection blocks as well. 
    13 -->
    14                 <script ibis:src="js/jquery.scrollBlockListItems.js"/>
    15                 <script>
    16                         var optionOverrides = {"maxSelectionsContainerHeight":120};
    17                         $( document ).ready(function() {
    18                         $(".Topic #moreData .Selections").scrollBlockListItems(optionOverrides);
    19                         });
    20                 </script>
    2112        </OTHER_HEAD_CONTENT>
     13
    2214        <CONTENT>
    2315                <header>
     
    2618                        <h1>Our Story</h1>
    2719                </header>
     20
    2821                <section>
    2922                        <section>
     
    3528                                        This helps us better understand how the environment affects human health. As a foundation for environmental health epidemiology and education in New Mexico, we are a resource for prevention or health protection initiatives, interventions, and response situations. </p>
    3629                                <p>Due to the variety and wealth of information available from NM EPHT, our program and products often serve as an initial source of data and information for those working on environmental public health related activities or educating themselves about an environmental health topic.
    37                                         Our audiences include those from individual, family, community, school, government and scholarly domains.  </p>
     30                                        Our audiences include those from individual, family, community, school, government and scholarly domains. 
     31                                </p>
    3832                        </section>
     33
    3934                        <section>
    4035                                <h3>Meet our team</h3>
    41                                 <p>
    42                                         <span class="Bold">Stephanie Moraga-McHaley</span>
    43                                 </p>
     36
     37                                <h4>Stephanie Moraga-McHaley</h4>
    4438                                <p> At the center of our operation is Stephanie Moraga-McHaley leading this ever-evolving environmental health program that encompasses epidemiology, health promotion, informatics, and communications.
    4539                                        As Program, Manager Moraga-McHaley provides epidemiological perspective the vision for developing the NM EPHT system, overseeing our environmental public health communications platform, NMTracking.org.
     
    4741                                        She earned a Master of Science and Bachelor of Science in Environmental Health and has a background in applied science health information technology.
    4842                                </p>
    49                                 <p>
    50                                         <span class="Bold">Srikanth Paladugu</span>
    51                                 </p>
     43
     44                                <h4>Srikanth Paladugu</h4>
    5245                                <p> Both our Principal Investigator for NM EPHT and the Environmental Health Epidemiology Bureau Chief, Srikanth Paladugu has experience in epidemiology, environmental health, health education and clinical management.
    5346                                        He holds a Master of Public Health Environmental Health Emphasis, Master of Business Administration, and MBBS (MD equivalent).
    5447                                </p>
    55                                 <p>
    56                                         <span class="Bold">Deyonne Sandoval</span>
    57                                 </p>
     48
     49                                <h4>Deyonne Sandoval</h4>
    5850                                <p> Leading our projects pertaining to the community health disciplines and digital media is Deyonne Sandoval, the Program Coordinator and Evaluator.
    5951                                        Her areas of specialty include program planning, health education services, evaluation, communications and website content development. Sandoval has extensive experience in community health, environmental health, behavioral health and working in the media.
    6052                                        Sandoval earned a Master of Science in Community Health (Health Education/Promotion), Bachelor of Science in Communications and is a Certified Health Education Specialist (CHES).
    6153                                </p>
    62                                 <p>
    63                                         <span class="Bold">Brian Woods</span>
    64                                 </p>
     54
     55                                <h4>Brian Woods</h4>
    6556                                <p> Leading our large epidemiological projects, Brian Woods is the program's Advanced Epidemiologist. His areas of specialty include data linkages, developing and maintaining data sets; producing epidemiological analyses data products and programming interactive data query modules on NMTracking.org.
    6657                                        His published works include research in the area of evaluation of heat vulnerability index, outcomes associated with smoke exposure, and heat related morbidity in New Mexico.
    6758                                        Woods has an interdisciplinary degree in Cultural Ecology.
    6859                                </p>
    69                                 <p>
    70                                         <span class="Bold">Kendall Frimodig</span>
    71                                 </p>
     60
     61                                <h4>Kendall Frimodig</h4>
    7262                                <p> Operating many of our epidemiological projects is Kendall Frimodig, the Environmental Health Epidemiologist.
    7363                                        His areas of specialty include geographic information systems; producing epidemiological analyses data products, and programming interactive data query modules on NMTracking.org.
     
    7565                                </p>
    7666                        </section>
     67
    7768                        <section>
    7869                                <h3>Our Plan: mission, goals and objectives</h3>
    7970                                <p>The mission of NM EPHT is to improve and expand the environmental public health surveillance capacity for the State of New Mexico and increase access to data and health education.
    80                                         We are part of a national network led and funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Our shared national goal and objectives are:  </p>
    81                                 <p>
    82                                         <span class="Bold">Goal</span>
     71                                        We are part of a national network led and funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Our shared national goal and objectives are: 
    8372                                </p>
     73
     74                                <h4>Goal</h4>
    8475                                <p>Communities improve certain health outcomes by reducing their exposure to environmental hazards.</p>
     76
    8577                                <section>
    86                                         <p>
    87                                                 <span class="Bold">Objectives</span>
    88                                         </p>
     78                                        <h4>Objectives:</h4>
    8979                                        <ul class="Indent">
    9080                                                <li>Health and environmental data are accessed and used by internal and external audiences. </li>
     
    9686                                        </ul>
    9787                                </section>
     88
    9889                                <section>
    99                                         <p>
    100                                                 <span class="Bold">Projects</span>
    101                                         </p>
    102                                         <p>In line with these objectives, during this fiscal year, NM EPHT is focusing on these areas: </p>
     90                                        <h4>Projects</h4>
     91                                        In line with these objectives, during this fiscal year, NM EPHT is focusing on these areas:
    10392                                        <ul class="Indent">
    10493                                                <li>Data Collection, Analysis, and Dissemination  </li>
     
    114103                                </section>
    115104                        </section>
     105
    116106                        <section>
    117107                                <h3>Epidemiology and Response Services</h3>
    118108                                <p> In addition to our roles with this program, each of our team members support broader Epidemiology and Response Services of the Environmental Health Epidemiology Bureau and the Epidemiology and Response Division.
    119                                         We contribute to multiple public health responses and epidemiology projects and services such as: </p>
     109                                </p>
     110
     111                                <h4>We contribute to multiple public health responses and epidemiology projects and services such as: </h4>
    120112                                <ul class="Indent">
    121113                                        <li>epidemiological investigations </li>
     
    128120                                        acute environmental exposures scenarios such as mercury spills, mass carbon monoxide poisonings; and, currently the COVID-19 pandemic.</p>
    129121                        </section>
     122
    130123                        <section>
    131124                                <h3>Work Groups and Environmental Health Collaborative Projects</h3>
    132125                                <p>Our work is collaboraitve and we serve on sevral workgroups, statewide and nationally. </p>
    133                                 <p>
    134                                         <span class="Bold">New Mexico Workgroups</span>
    135                                 </p>
     126                               
     127                               
     128                                <h4>New Mexico Workgroups</h4>
    136129                                <ul class="Indent">
    137130                                        <li>Cancer Concerns Work Group: Stephanie Moraga-McHaley, Srikanth Paladugu, Deyonne Sandoval </li>
     
    142135                                        <li>New Mexico Council on Asthma: Stephanie Moraga-McHaley, Deyonne Sandoval </li>
    143136                                </ul>
    144                                 <p>
    145                                         <span class="Bold">National CDC Tracking Work Groups</span>
    146                                 </p>
     137
     138                                <h4>National CDC Tracking Work Groups</h4>
    147139                                <ul class="Indent">
    148140                                        <li>Program Manager and Principal Investigator: Stephanie Moraga-McHaley, Srikanth Paladugu  </li>
     
    157149                                <ToDO> Note: Need the latest CW partcipation listing from Stephanie/Team </ToDO>
    158150                        </section>
     151
    159152                        <section>
    160153                                <h3>How We Operate </h3>
     
    164157                                <p>Our work is funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) National Center for Environmental Health (NCEH). New Mexico is among the 26 CDC Grantees in the EPHT Network.</p>
    165158                        </section>
    166                         <!-- Garth says we do not seem to be using now
    167                         <section class="Citation">
    168                                 Deyonne Sandoval. Page content updated February 2021. Published March 2021.
    169                         </section>
    170                         -->
    171159                </section>
    172160        </CONTENT>
  • adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/nmepht-content/xml/html_content/environment/Index.xml

    r22722 r22741  
    1414                                font-size:      1.2em;
    1515                        }
     16
     17                        .km-filter-form { margin-bottom: 0; }
    1618                </style>
    1719
  • adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/nmepht-content/xml/html_content/environment/air/FireAndSmoke.xml

    r22731 r22741  
    11<?xml version="1.0" encoding="ISO-8859-1"?>
    22<HTML_CONTENT xmlns:ibis="http://www.ibisph.org">
     3
    34        <TITLE>Fires, Smoke and Health</TITLE>
     5
    46        <HTML_CLASS>Topic Environment</HTML_CLASS>
    57        <OTHER_HEAD_CONTENT>
     
    1012                        rel="stylesheet"
    1113                        type="text/css"/>
    12                 <script ibis:src="js/jquery.scrollBlockListItems.js"/>
    13                 <script>
    14                         $( document ).ready(function() {
    15                         $(".Topic #downloadsResources .Selections").scrollBlockListItems( {"maxSelectionsContainerHeight":190});
    16                         });
    17                 </script>
    1814        </OTHER_HEAD_CONTENT>
    19         -<CONTENT>
     15
     16        <CONTENT>
    2017                <header>
    2118                        <img ibis:src="view/image/environment/air/fire/bannerwildfire2.jpg"
     
    3532                <section>
    3633                        <h2>Protect Your Health on Smoky Days</h2>
    37                         <section>
    38                                 <p> The best way to protect yourself during smoky days is to avoid breathing in smoke. Even if you can't smell the smoke or if it does not smell too bad that does not mean the air quality is safe.
    39                                         Here are quick tips:
    40                                 </p>
    41                         </section>
    42                         <section>
    43                                 <ul class="Indent">
    44                                         <li>Staying indoors during smoking days is one of the best things you can do.</li>
    45                                         <li>When you don't have a monitor in your area, use the 5-3-1 Visibility Method created in New Mexico to estimate the air quality and the actions you should take based on your health circumstances and age.
    46                                                 We detail how you can use this below. </li>
    47                                         <li>Pay attention to local air quality alerts to plan your day and travel. Air quality reports are often posted on this site in the Newsroom and are also available through local news media and social media.</li>
    48                                         <li> Keep your indoor air clean by closing windows and doors.</li>
    49                                 </ul>
    50                         </section>
     34                        <p> The best way to protect yourself during smoky days is to avoid breathing in smoke. Even if you can't smell the smoke or if it does not smell too bad that does not mean the air quality is safe.
     35                                Here are quick tips:
     36                        </p>
     37                        <ul class="Indent">
     38                                <li>Staying indoors during smoking days is one of the best things you can do.</li>
     39                                <li>When you don't have a monitor in your area, use the 5-3-1 Visibility Method created in New Mexico to estimate the air quality and the actions you should take based on your health circumstances and age.
     40                                        We detail how you can use this below. </li>
     41                                <li>Pay attention to local air quality alerts to plan your day and travel. Air quality reports are often posted on this site in the Newsroom and are also available through local news media and social media.</li>
     42                                <li> Keep your indoor air clean by closing windows and doors.</li>
     43                        </ul>
    5144                </section>
    5245                <section>
     
    6053                                        It incorporates mileage and landmarks to help you determine visibility.
    6154                                        This method can also be used by event organizers, coaches, and recreational leaders to decide if practice or the game should go on or be postponed.</p>
    62                                 <section>
    63                                         <figure title="531">
    64                                                 <img ibis:src="view/image/environment/air/fire/531.2021.ds.jpg"/>
    65                                                 <figcaption> This 5-3-1 Visibility Method graphic demonstrates what you should do when visibility is down to five miles, three miles and one mile based on your age or other health factors.
     55
     56                                <figure title="531">
     57                                        <img ibis:src="view/image/environment/air/fire/531.2021.ds.jpg"/>
     58                                        <figcaption> This 5-3-1 Visibility Method graphic demonstrates what you should do when visibility is down to five miles, three miles and one mile based on your age or other health factors.
     59                                        </figcaption>
     60                                </figure>
     61                        </section>
     62
     63                        <h3>If it is smoky outside find out how far you can see by choosing landmarks to look at it. </h3>
     64                        <section>
     65                                <section class="ImageInfoBlock">
     66                                        <div>
     67                                                <p> Pick some landmarks you are familiar with.
     68                                                        Then see how well you can see those. Facing away from the sun, look for landmarks such as mountains, mesas, hills, buildings, water tanks, windmills, etc. that are about 5 miles, 3 miles and 1 mile away.
     69                                                        Use those mile ranges to help you estimate visibility.
     70                                                        If these landmarks <span class="Bold">are not easy to see </span> in the five, three, and one-mile ranges you can decide what to do based on your health conditions and age.</p>
     71                                                <p>  Where are you? NM EPHT created the 5-3-1 Buffer Tool to help you estimate the distance of landmarks by using your phone, computer or device right where you are. </p>
     72                                        </div>
     73                                        <figure title="buffermap">
     74                                                <img ibis:src="view/image/environment/air/fire/Buffermap.png"/>
     75                                                <figcaption> The 5-3-1 Buffer Tool is an on-line map to estimate the distance of landmarks that are visible from where you are standing.
    6676                                                </figcaption>
    6777                                        </figure>
    6878                                </section>
    6979                        </section>
    70                         <section>
    71                                 <h3>If it is smoky outside find out how far you can see by choosing landmarks to look at it. </h3>
    72                         </section>
    73                         <section class="ImageInfoBlock">
    74                                 <div>
    75                                         <p> Pick some landmarks you are familiar with.
    76                                                 Then see how well you can see those. Facing away from the sun, look for landmarks such as mountains, mesas, hills, buildings, water tanks, windmills, etc. that are about 5 miles, 3 miles and 1 mile away.
    77                                                 Use those mile ranges to help you estimate visibility.
    78                                                 If these landmarks <span class="Bold">are not easy to see </span> in the five, three, and one-mile ranges you can decide what to do based on your health conditions and age.</p>
    79                                         <p>  Where are you? NM EPHT created the 5-3-1 Buffer Tool to help you estimate the distance of landmarks by using your phone, computer or device right where you are. </p>
    80                                 </div>
    81                                 <figure title="buffermap">
    82                                         <img ibis:src="view/image/environment/air/fire/Buffermap.png"/>
    83                                         <figcaption> The 5-3-1 Buffer Tool is an on-line map to estimate the distance of landmarks that are visible from where you are standing.
    84                                         </figcaption>
    85                                 </figure>
    86                         </section>
     80
    8781                        <section>
    8882                                <h3>Can you see landmarks 5 miles away?</h3>
    8983                                <section class="ImageInfoBlock">
    9084                                        <div>
    91                                                 <p>
    92                                                         <span class="Bold">Young children, adults over age 65, pregnant women, and people with heart and/or lung disease, asthma or other respiratory illness:</span>
    93                                                 </p>
     85                                                <h4>Young children, adults over age 65, pregnant women, and people with heart and/or lung disease, asthma or other respiratory illness:</h4>
    9486                                                <p>If you can see less than 5 miles, the air quality is unhealthy for you and you will need to minimize outdoor activity.</p>
    9587                                                <p>You should reschedule outdoor recreational activities for a day with better air quality. </p>
    96                                                 <p>
    97                                                         <span class="Bold">Adults in Good Health: </span>
    98                                                 </p>
     88
     89                                                <h4>Adults in Good Health: </h4>
    9990                                                <p>It is okay for adults in good health to be out and about.</p>
    10091                                                <p>You should periodically check visibility especially when fires are nearby.</p>
     
    10697                                        </figure>
    10798                                </section>
     99
    108100                                <section>
    109                                         <p>
    110                                                 <span class="Bold">Decision-Making for Event, Community and Event Leaders, Coaches, and P.E. Teachers:</span>
    111                                         </p>
    112                                         <p>If your activity involves young children, adults over age 65, pregnant women, and people with heart and/or lung disease, asthma or other respiratory illness, then move your event indoors. </p>
     101                                        <h4>Decision-Making for Event, Community and Event Leaders, Coaches, and P.E. Teachers:</h4>
     102                                        If your activity involves young children, adults over age 65, pregnant women, and people with heart and/or lung disease, asthma or other respiratory illness, then move your event indoors.
    113103                                        <ul class="Indent">
    114104                                                <li>
     
    124114                                </section>
    125115                        </section>
     116
    126117                        <section>
    127118                                <h3>Can you see landmarks 3 miles away?</h3>
    128119                                <section class="ImageInfoBlock">
    129120                                        <div>
    130                                                 <p>
    131                                                         <span class="Bold">Young children, adults over age 65, pregnant women, and people with heart and/or lung disease, asthma or other respiratory illness:</span>
    132                                                 </p>
     121                                                <h4>Young children, adults over age 65, pregnant women, and people with heart and/or lung disease, asthma or other respiratory illness:</h4>
    133122                                                <p> If you can see less than 3 miles, the air quality is unhealthy for you and should stay indoors. All outdoor activities should be avoided, including running errands. </p>
    134                                                 <p>
    135                                                         <span class="Bold">Adults in Good Health: </span>
    136                                                 </p>
    137                                                 <p>Stay indoors as much as possible.</p>
     123
     124                                                <h4>Adults in Good Health: </h4>
     125                                                Stay indoors as much as possible.
    138126                                                <ul class="Indent">
    139127                                                        <li>
     
    154142                                        </figure>
    155143                                </section>
     144
    156145                                <section>
    157                                         <p>
    158                                                 <span class="Bold">Decision-Making for Event, Community and Event Leaders, Coaches, and P.E. Teachers:</span>
    159                                         </p>
     146                                        <h4>Decision-Making for Event, Community and Event Leaders, Coaches, and P.E. Teachers:</h4>
    160147                                        <p> All outdoor recreational activities, sporting events and outdoor community events should be rescheduled for a day with better air quality or moved indoors if possible. </p>
    161148                                </section>
    162149                        </section>
     150
    163151                        <section>
    164152                                <h3>Can you see landmarks less than 1 mile away?</h3>
    165153                                <section class="ImageInfoBlock">
    166154                                        <div>
    167                                                 <p>
    168                                                         <span class="Bold">All People: </span>
    169                                                 </p>
     155                                                <h4>All People: </h4>
    170156                                                <p>If you can see less than 1 mile that means the air quality is unhealthy for everyone.
    171157                                                        You should remain indoors and avoid all outdoor activities including running errands, walking, and biking.</p>
    172158                                                <p>Unless an evacuation has been issued, stay inside your home, indoor workplace, or in a safe shelter. </p>
    173                                                 <p>
    174                                                         <span class="Bold">Decision-Making for Event, Community and Event Leaders, Coaches, and P.E. Teachers:</span>
    175                                                 </p>
     159
     160                                                <h4>Decision-Making for Event, Community and Event Leaders, Coaches, and P.E. Teachers:</h4>
    176161                                                <p>Cancel or reschedule all events.
    177162                                                        Poor visibility outdoors means it could be dangerous for participants to drive to your event even if you move it indoors.
     
    185170                                </section>
    186171                        </section>
     172
    187173                        <section>
    188174                                <h3>At anytime</h3>
    189175                                <p>At any time, regardless of the visibility, if you are feeling as though you are having health effects from smoke, take precautions to avoid further exposure to smoke and consult a healthcare professional as needed. </p>
    190176                        </section>
     177
    191178                        <section>
    192179                                <h3>More Tips for Schools, Community Leaders, Event, Recreation and Sports Organizers, and Employers</h3>
     
    204191                                </ul>
    205192                        </section>
    206                         <section>
    207                                 <p>
    208                                         <span class="Bold">Communicate</span>
    209                                 </p>
     193
     194                        <section>
     195                                <h4>Communicate</h4>
    210196                                <p>As you postpone, reschedule, or cancel your event, let the community or participants know that these changes were done to protect their health.</p>
    211197                                <ul class="Indent">
     
    224210                                </ul>
    225211                        </section>
    226                         <section>
    227                                 <p>
    228                                         <span class="Bold">Educate</span>
    229                                 </p>
     212
     213                        <section>
     214                                <h4>Educate</h4>
    230215                                <p>Help educate your participants on how they can make decision during smoky days. We provide downloadable resources such as signs and flyers in the "Resources" below. </p>
    231216                                <ul class="Indent">
     
    244229                                </ul>
    245230                        </section>
     231
    246232                        <section>
    247233                                <h3>Tips for Workplaces </h3>
     
    267253                                </ul>
    268254                        </section>
     255
    269256                        <section>
    270257                                <h3>More about the 5-3-1- Visibility Method</h3>
     
    277264                        </section>
    278265                </section>
     266
    279267                <section class="SubSectionsContainer">
    280268                        <section>
     
    346334                <section>
    347335                        <h2>More ways to protect yourself on smoky days</h2>
    348                         <section>
    349                                 <p>In addition to using the 5-3-1 Visibility Method and staying indoors when it is smoky outside you can do more to protect your health on smoky days. </p>
    350                         </section>
     336                        <p>In addition to using the 5-3-1 Visibility Method and staying indoors when it is smoky outside you can do more to protect your health on smoky days. </p>
     337
    351338                        <section>
    352339                                <h3>Keep indoors clean</h3>
    353340                                <p>Staying indoors and keeping the indoor air as clean as possible is the easiest way to protect your lungs when it is smoky outside. </p>
    354                                 <p>Improve indoor air quality during a smoke event: </p>
     341
     342                                <h4>Improve indoor air quality during a smoke event: </h4>
    355343                                <ul class="Indent">
    356344                                        <li>Keep windows and doors closed.</li>
     
    363351                                                You can also make a temporary air filter with a box fan and a furnace filter. There are many online videos that demonstrate how to do this. </li>
    364352                                </ul>
    365                                 <p>Improve indoor air quality year-round:
    366                                 </p>
     353
     354                                <h4>Improve indoor air quality year-round:</h4>
    367355                                <ul class="Indent">
    368356                                        <li>Take off your shoes when coming inside your home.</li>
     
    376364                                </ul>
    377365                        </section>
     366
    378367                        <section>
    379368                                <h3>Reduce physical activity and stay hydrated</h3>
     
    381370                                <p>Stay hydrated by drinking plenty of water. Overheating can cause serious health problems. Get tips for staying cool on Heat Related Illness page. </p>
    382371                        </section>
     372
    383373                        <section>
    384374                                <h3>Choose the right mask</h3>
     
    391381                                        Wet handkerchiefs also do not filter the fine smoke particles.</p>
    392382                        </section>
     383
    393384                        <section>
    394385                                <h3>Cool your home and car safely </h3>
     
    407398                        </section>
    408399                </section>
     400
    409401                <nav id="moreInformation"
    410402                        title="Links for more information">
     
    482474                        <ibis:TopicsMoreData topicSelectionsPath="../../../selections/environment/air/fire/"/>
    483475                </nav>
    484                 <!-- PGL - donot think being used
    485                 <section class="Citation">
    486                         Deyonne Sandoval. Page content updated February 2021, Published March 2021
    487                 </section>
    488                 -->
     476
    489477        </CONTENT>
    490478</HTML_CONTENT>
  • adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/nmepht-content/xml/html_content/health/Index.xml

    r22722 r22741  
    1515                                font-size:      1.2em;
    1616                        }
    17                 </style>
    1817
    19                 <script type="text/x-kendo-template" id="headerRowTemplate">
    20                   <a id="#=value#" href="\\#content" class="FloatRight">Top</a>
    21                   <h3 class="">#=value#</h3>
    22                 </script>
     18                        .km-filter-form { margin-bottom: 0; }
     19        </style>
     20
    2321                <script type="text/x-kendo-template" id="hrefTemplate">
    2422                   <a href="#=href#">${title}</a>
     
    3129                                {
    3230                                        data: selections
    33                                         ,group: "group"
    3431                                        ,sort:
    3532                                        {
     
    4845                                        ,ignoreCase:  true
    4946                                }
    50                                 ,headerTemplate: $('#headerRowTemplate').html()
    5147                        });
    5248                });
  • adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/nmepht-content/xml/html_content/health/breathing/Allergy.xml

    r22723 r22741  
    3333                                The severity of allergy symptoms depends on the type of pollen a person is allergic to (a person can be allergic to more than one kind of pollen); when that pollen is released; how much pollen is in the air, and; how much contact the person has with that pollen.
    3434                        </p>
     35                </section>
     36                       
     37                <section>
    3538                        <h2>Allergy Signs and Symptoms</h2>
    3639                        <p>
     
    6063
    6164                <section class="SubSectionsContainer">
    62                        
    6365                        <section class="ImageInfoBlock">
    6466                                <figure title="juniper in pollination">
     
    7072
    7173                                <div>
     74                                        <h3>Seasonal allergy health tips</h3>
    7275                                        <p>
    73                                                 <h3>Seasonal allergy health tips</h3>
     76                                                Reducing exposure to allergens such as pollen is the best
     77                                                way to lighten the symptoms for a person with seasonal
     78                                                allergies looking for relief. Tips include:
    7479                                        </p>
    75                                         <p>
    76                                                 Reducing exposure to allergens such as pollen is the best way to lighten the symptoms for a person with seasonal allergies looking for relief. Tips include:
    77                                         </p>
    78                                         <p>
    79                                                 <span class="Bold">Wash the pollen away</span> and keep it away every day.
    80                                         </p>
     80
    8181                                        <ul>
     82                                                <li>
     83                                                        <span class="Bold">Wash the pollen away</span> and keep it away every day.
     84                                                </li>
    8285                                                <li>
    8386                                                        Keep windows closed to reduce how much pollen goes into your home, car or work place.
     
    101104                                </div>
    102105                        </section>
    103 
    104                         <span class="Bold">Plan your day</span>
     106                </section>
     107
     108                <section>
     109                        <h2>More Helpful Information</h2>
     110
     111                        <h3>Plan your day</h3>
    105112                        <ul class="Indent">
    106113                                <li>
     
    121128                        </ul>
    122129
    123                         <span class="Bold">Clean your home, </span>car, and work place.
     130                        <h3>Clean your home, car, and work place.</h3>
    124131                        <ul class="Indent">
    125132                                <li>
     
    149156                        </ul>
    150157
    151                         <span class="Bold">Landscape </span>for low pollen potential.
     158                        <h3>Landscape for low pollen potential</h3>
    152159                        <ul class="Indent">
    153160                                <li>
     
    164171                                </li>   
    165172                        </ul>
    166                         <span class="Bold">Medical options</span>
    167 
     173
     174                        <h3>Medical options</h3>
    168175                        <p>
    169176                                Since New Mexico has many mild days of nice weather and great landscapes to explore, staying inside all the time may not be realistic for many. If this is the case for you; talk to your doctor about which medicines (sold over-the counter or prescription), such as nasal sprays would work for you. Your doctor may refer you to an allergist to help you find treatment options. Understanding when the high season is for the pollen you are allergic to is helpful, so you may plan your start date for treatments.
    170177                        </p>
    171                        
     178                </section>
     179
     180                <section class="SubSectionsContainer">
    172181                        <h2>New Mexico's Seasonal Pollen Periods</h2>
    173182                        <p>
    174                                         If you notice a rise in symptoms in early spring, usually in March and April, this may be due to allergies of tree pollens. In central and northern New Mexico, often those trees are Juniper and Cottonwood. Juniper is known to begin releasing pollen as early as December, peaking in March and April. Cottonwood typically begins pollinating in March and this lasts through June.
     183                                If you notice a rise in symptoms in early spring, usually in March and April, this may be due to allergies of tree pollens. In central and northern New Mexico, often those trees are Juniper and Cottonwood. Juniper is known to begin releasing pollen as early as December, peaking in March and April. Cottonwood typically begins pollinating in March and this lasts through June.
    175184                        </p>   
    176185                        <p>
     
    180189                        <section class="ImageInfoBlock">
    181190                                <div>
    182                                         <h3>
    183                                                 Pollination in the Central New Mexico/Albuquerque metro area
    184                                         </h3>
    185 
     191                                        <h3>Pollination in the Central New Mexico/Albuquerque metro area</h3>
    186192                                        <ul>                           
    187193                                                <li>
     
    213219                                                        Juniper/cedar pollen is produced from January through April and September through December.
    214220                                                </li>
    215                                                
    216221                                        </ul>
    217 
    218                                         <p>
    219                                                 Source: City of Albuquerque Air Quality Bureau
    220                                         </p>
     222                                        Source: City of Albuquerque Air Quality Bureau
    221223                                </div>
    222224
  • adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/nmepht-content/xml/html_content/health/breathing/COPD.xml

    r22715 r22741  
    2525                </header>
    2626
    27                 <section>
     27                <section class="SubSectionsContainer">
    2828                        <h2>What is COPD?</h2>
    29                 </section>
    30 
    31                 <section class="SubSectionsContainer">
    3229                        <p>
    3330                                Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a group of serious lung diseases that include emphysema and chronic bronchitis. COPD can cause coughing with, or without large amounts of mucus, wheezing, shortness of breath, chest tightness, and other symptoms. When COPD is severe, it can cause long-term disability and death. Lower respiratory diseases, which include COPD, are the 4th leading cause of death in the United States<a href="#ref1" id="ref1.link" aria-describedby="footnote-label"></a> and in New Mexico<a href="#ref2" id="ref2.link" aria-describedby="footnote-label"></a>.
     
    3633                                In COPD, less air flows in and out of the airways because of one or more of the following:                             
    3734                        </p>
    38                         <section class="ImageInfoBlock">
     35                        <section class="ImageInfoBlock" style="align-items: center;">
    3936                                <figure title="Graphic of COPD effects">
    4037                                        <img ibis:src="view/image/health/breathing/copd/COPDgraphic.jpg"/>
     
    6057                                </div>
    6158                        </section>
     59                        <p>
     60                                COPD develops slowly. Symptoms often worsen over time and can limit the ability to do routine activities. Severe COPD may prevent people from doing even basic activities like walking, cooking, or taking care of themselves. COPD has no cure; doctors don't know how to reverse the damage to the airways and lungs. However, COPD is often preventable and treatable. Treatments and lifestyle changes can help affected people feel better, stay more active, and slow the progress of the disease. Early detection of COPD is key to successful treatment. Knowing the symptoms or exposures to risk factors may lead to early diagnosis of COPD.
     61                        </p>
     62                </section>
    6263
    63                         <section>
    64                                 <p>
    65                                         COPD develops slowly. Symptoms often worsen over time and can limit the ability to do routine activities. Severe COPD may prevent people from doing even basic activities like walking, cooking, or taking care of themselves. COPD has no cure; doctors don't know how to reverse the damage to the airways and lungs. However, COPD is often preventable and treatable. Treatments and lifestyle changes can help affected people feel better, stay more active, and slow the progress of the disease. Early detection of COPD is key to successful treatment. Knowing the symptoms or exposures to risk factors may lead to early diagnosis of COPD.
    66                                 </p>
    67                                 <h3>Learn about COPD causes and risk factors</h3>
    68                                 By far, the largest risk factor for COPD is smoking; Up to 75 percent of people who have COPD smoke or used to smoke<a href="#ref3" id="ref3.link" aria-describedby="footnote-label"></a>. Occupational exposures, (vapor, dust, gas or fumes) may account for about 15% of COPD but 25% of COPD among those who have never smoked<a href="#ref4" id="ref4.link" aria-describedby="footnote-label"></a>. Other environmental factors include exposure to motor vehicle exhaust and exposure to burning of biomass (e.g. cooking over wood stoves). Other factors include frequent respiratory infections in childhood and having Alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency, a rare genetic disorder<a href="#ref5" id="ref5.link" aria-describedby="footnote-label"></a>.
    69                                 As of 2014, 15.7 million Americans reported having physician-diagnosed COPD, however it is there is a common belief that COPD often goes undiagnosed. There are also large racial, ethnic, socioeconomic, and gender biases in COPD prevalence. In 2013, the following U.S. groups were more likely to report having COPD<a href="#ref6" id="ref6.link" aria-describedby="footnote-label"></a>:
    70                                 <ul class="Indent">
    71                                         <li>
    72                                                 Women
    73                                         </li>
    74                                         <li>
    75                                                 People aged 65 to 74 years and over 75 years
    76                                         </li>
    77                                         <li>
    78                                                 American Indians/Alaska Natives and multiracial non-Hispanics
    79                                         </li>
    80                                         <li>
    81                                                 People who were unemployed, retired, or unable to work
    82                                         </li>
    83                                         <li>
    84                                                 People with less than a high school education
    85                                         </li>
    86                                         <li>
    87                                                 People who were divorced, widowed, or separated
    88                                         </li>
    89                                         <li>
    90                                                 Current or former smokers
    91                                         </li>
    92                                         <li>
    93                                                 People with a history of asthma.
    94                                         </li>
    95                                 </ul>
    96                         </section>
     64                <section>
     65                        <h2>Learn about COPD causes and risk factors</h2>
     66                        By far, the largest risk factor for COPD is smoking; Up to 75 percent of people who have COPD smoke or used to smoke<a href="#ref3" id="ref3.link" aria-describedby="footnote-label"></a>. Occupational exposures, (vapor, dust, gas or fumes) may account for about 15% of COPD but 25% of COPD among those who have never smoked<a href="#ref4" id="ref4.link" aria-describedby="footnote-label"></a>. Other environmental factors include exposure to motor vehicle exhaust and exposure to burning of biomass (e.g. cooking over wood stoves). Other factors include frequent respiratory infections in childhood and having Alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency, a rare genetic disorder<a href="#ref5" id="ref5.link" aria-describedby="footnote-label"></a>.
     67                        As of 2014, 15.7 million Americans reported having physician-diagnosed COPD, however it is there is a common belief that COPD often goes undiagnosed. There are also large racial, ethnic, socioeconomic, and gender biases in COPD prevalence. In 2013, the following U.S. groups were more likely to report having COPD<a href="#ref6" id="ref6.link" aria-describedby="footnote-label"></a>:
     68                        <ul class="Indent">
     69                                <li>
     70                                        Women
     71                                </li>
     72                                <li>
     73                                        People aged 65 to 74 years and over 75 years
     74                                </li>
     75                                <li>
     76                                        American Indians/Alaska Natives and multiracial non-Hispanics
     77                                </li>
     78                                <li>
     79                                        People who were unemployed, retired, or unable to work
     80                                </li>
     81                                <li>
     82                                        People with less than a high school education
     83                                </li>
     84                                <li>
     85                                        People who were divorced, widowed, or separated
     86                                </li>
     87                                <li>
     88                                        Current or former smokers
     89                                </li>
     90                                <li>
     91                                        People with a history of asthma.
     92                                </li>
     93                        </ul>
     94                </section>
    9795
     96                <section class="SubSectionsContainer">
     97                        <h2>Tips for managing COPD</h2>
    9898                        <section class="ImageInfoBlock">
    9999                                <div>
    100                                         <h3>Tips for managing COPD</h3>
    101100                                        <ul>
    102101                                                <li>
  • adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/nmepht-content/xml/html_content/health/cardiovascular/HeartAttack.xml

    r22715 r22741  
    7979                                        You are at risk if you have certain inherited genetic factors that cannot be changed but that can be improved with lifestyle changes, such as a healthful diet and exercise and working with a doctor to manage risks with medications or cardiac rehabilitation to prevent further attacks if you have already had a heart attack. Other, modifiable risk factors are caused by chosen activities but can be improved with lifestyle changes.
    8080                                </p>
    81                                 <p>
    82                                         Examples of those at risk from inherited or non-modifiable factors include:
    83                                 </p>
     81
     82                                <h3>Examples of those at risk from inherited or non-modifiable factors include:</h3>
    8483                                <ul class="Indent">
    8584                                        <li>
     
    10099                                </ul>
    101100
    102                                 <h4>Examples of modifiable risk factors include:</h4>
     101                                <h3>Examples of modifiable risk factors include:</h3>
    103102                                <ul class="Indent">
    104103                                        <li>
     
    126125                                </p>   
    127126                        </section>
     127                </section>
    128128
     129                <section>
    129130                        <h2>Health Tips</h2>
    130131                        <section class="ImageInfoBlock">
  • adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/nmepht-content/xml/html_content/health/climate/HeatIllness.xml

    r22715 r22741  
    3838                                During periods of extreme heat and heat waves New Mexicans can be at risk for heat stress, but even if the temperatures aren't extreme, a person can be affected by heat related illness if they aren't taking the right precautions. Heat stress is heat-related illness (HRI) which can have many symptoms. HRI includes adverse health conditions ranging from heat rash and sunburn, to heat cramps, heat exhaustion, and heat stroke. If severe, any of these conditions can lead to a trip to the emergency room. If heat stroke is not treated promptly, it can lead to coma and death.
    3939                        </p>
    40                
    4140                </section>
    4241
     
    6261                                               
    6362                                                </li>                                                                           
     63                                                <li>
     64                                                        <span class="Bold">Heat exhaustion</span> appears with heavy sweating; cold, clammy skin; a fast, weak pulse; nausea or vomiting; muscle cramps; tiredness or weakness; dizziness; headache; and fainting. To treat, move to a cool place, loosen clothing, cool down with damp cloths or take a cool bath and sip water. If you are throwing up, symptoms last longer than an hour, or worsen get medical help right away.
     65                                                </li>
     66                                                <li>
     67                                                        <span class="Bold">Heat stroke</span> is the most serious HRI and happens when the body loses its ability to sweat. Body temperature will climb (103 degrees or higher), skin will be hot, red and dry or damp. Pulse will be fast and strong and a headache, nausea, dizziness and confusion and passing out can occur. It is important to recognize heat stroke in others as they may not recognize the danger that they are in because of confusion. Heat stroke is a medical emergency, so call 911 right away. Try to lower the person's body temperature with cool, wet cloths or a cool bath. Do not give them anything to drink.
     68                                                </li>
    6469                                        </ul>
    6570                                </div>
    66                                                        
    6771                        </section>
     72                </section>
    6873
    69                         <ul>
    70                                 <li>
    71                                         <span class="Bold">Heat exhaustion</span> appears with heavy sweating; cold, clammy skin; a fast, weak pulse; nausea or vomiting; muscle cramps; tiredness or weakness; dizziness; headache; and fainting. To treat, move to a cool place, loosen clothing, cool down with damp cloths or take a cool bath and sip water. If you are throwing up, symptoms last longer than an hour, or worsen get medical help right away.
    72                                 </li>
    73                                 <li>
    74                                         <span class="Bold">Heat stroke</span> is the most serious HRI and happens when the body loses its ability to sweat. Body temperature will climb (103 degrees or higher), skin will be hot, red and dry or damp. Pulse will be fast and strong and a headache, nausea, dizziness and confusion and passing out can occur. It is important to recognize heat stroke in others as they may not recognize the danger that they are in because of confusion. Heat stroke is a medical emergency, so call 911 right away. Try to lower the person's body temperature with cool, wet cloths or a cool bath. Do not give them anything to drink.
    75                                 </li>
    76                         </ul>
     74                <section>
     75                        <h2>Who is at Risk?</h2>
     76                        <p>
     77                                Anyone can be affected. People at highest risk are the elderly, the very young, people with existing chronic diseases such as heart disease, people on certain medications, and people without access to air conditioning. But even young and healthy people can get sick from the heat if they participate in strenuous physical activities without taking precautions or ignoring signs and symptoms of HRI during hot weather.
     78                        </p>
     79                        <p>
     80                                If you live in the southern part of the state it is important to be heat-aware even though you may feel that you are accustomed to the hot temperatures. Make sure children and elderly loved ones are in a cool place and are drinking plenty of water. A recent Department of Health report indicates that in southern New Mexico where high temperatures are common in the summer, there is an increased risk of visits to the emergency room for heat-related illness.
     81                        </p>
    7782
    78                         <section>
    79                                 <h2>Who is at Risk?</h2>
    80                                 <p>
    81                                         Anyone can be affected. People at highest risk are the elderly, the very young, people with existing chronic diseases such as heart disease, people on certain medications, and people without access to air conditioning. But even young and healthy people can get sick from the heat if they participate in strenuous physical activities without taking precautions or ignoring signs and symptoms of HRI during hot weather.
    82                                 </p>
    83                                 <p>
    84                                         If you live in the southern part of the state it is important to be heat-aware even though you may feel that you are accustomed to the hot temperatures. Make sure children and elderly loved ones are in a cool place and are drinking plenty of water. A recent Department of Health report indicates that in southern New Mexico where high temperatures are common in the summer, there is an increased risk of visits to the emergency room for heat-related illness.
    85                                 </p>
     83                        <h3>Children</h3>
     84                        <p>
     85                                Make sure children stay hydrated and remain indoors in a place with air conditioning on hot days. On those hot summer days when temperatures are at the highest consider going to a local public library, museum, or a community center with air-conditioning if you don't have air-conditioning in your home.
     86                        </p>
     87                        <p>
     88                                Children or animals can be seriously injured or die as temperatures rise within a few minutes of being left alone in a hot car. Do not leave your children or pets in the car while you are running errands no matter how quick you think it will be. Studies show the practice of leaving a vehicle window partially open, or cracked, has little effect on decreasing temperature inside.
     89                        </p>
    8690
    87                                 <h3>Children</h3>
    88                                 <p>
    89                                         Make sure children stay hydrated and remain indoors in a place with air conditioning on hot days. On those hot summer days when temperatures are at the highest consider going to a local public library, museum, or a community center with air-conditioning if you don't have air-conditioning in your home.
    90                                 </p>
    91                                 <p>
    92                                         Children or animals can be seriously injured or die as temperatures rise within a few minutes of being left alone in a hot car. Do not leave your children or pets in the car while you are running errands no matter how quick you think it will be. Studies show the practice of leaving a vehicle window partially open, or cracked, has little effect on decreasing temperature inside.
    93                                 </p>
     91                        <h3>Seniors</h3>
     92                        <p>
     93                                It is important that adults age 65 and older stay cool. On high-heat days recreational sports and activities should be done indoors in a cool setting such as at a local senior center. Senior centers, shopping malls and public libraries are great places to beat the heat. Check up on elderly or homebound relatives and neighbors who are living on their own during the summer months when temperatures soar. It is critical for loved ones and neighbors to check on seniors as we lose the ability to self-regulate our body temperatures as we age. If you know of someone who is homebound and without a properly functioning air conditioner, visit or call them to ask how they are doing. To find services for seniors in your community call 800-432-2080.
     94                        </p>
     95                        <p>
     96                                <h3>Outdoor Workers</h3>
     97                        </p>
     98                        <p>
     99                                Outdoor workers in agriculture, construction, and other industries are exposed to a great deal of exertional and environmental heat stress that may lead to severe illness or death. The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) recommends that employers have a plan in place to prevent heat-related illness. The plan should include hydration (drinking plenty of water), acclimatization (getting used to weather conditions), and schedules that alternate work with rest. Employers should also train workers about the hazards of working in hot environments
     100                        </p>                   
     101                </section>
    94102
    95                                 <h3>Seniors</h3>
    96                                 <p>
    97                                         It is important that adults age 65 and older stay cool. On high-heat days recreational sports and activities should be done indoors in a cool setting such as at a local senior center. Senior centers, shopping malls and public libraries are great places to beat the heat. Check up on elderly or homebound relatives and neighbors who are living on their own during the summer months when temperatures soar. It is critical for loved ones and neighbors to check on seniors as we lose the ability to self-regulate our body temperatures as we age. If you know of someone who is homebound and without a properly functioning air conditioner, visit or call them to ask how they are doing. To find services for seniors in your community call 800-432-2080.
    98                                 </p>
    99                                 <p>
    100                                         <h3>Outdoor Workers</h3>
    101                                 </p>
    102                                 <p>
    103                                         Outdoor workers in agriculture, construction, and other industries are exposed to a great deal of exertional and environmental heat stress that may lead to severe illness or death. The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) recommends that employers have a plan in place to prevent heat-related illness. The plan should include hydration (drinking plenty of water), acclimatization (getting used to weather conditions), and schedules that alternate work with rest. Employers should also train workers about the hazards of working in hot environments
    104                                 </p>                   
    105                         </section>
    106 
     103                <section class="SubSectionsContainer">
    107104                        <h2>Health Tips</h2>
    108105                        <p>
    109106                                The New Mexico Department of Health and U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention advises you to take these steps to prevent heat-related illnesses, injuries, and deaths during hot weather:
    110                         </p>                   
     107                        </p>
    111108
    112                         <section class="ImageInfoBlock">
    113                                 <div>                           
     109                        <section class="ImageInfoBlock" style="max-width: var(--max-text-width);">
     110                                <div style="margin-top: 0;">                           
    114111                                        <ul>
    115112                                                <li>
  • adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/nmepht-content/xml/html_content/health/poisonings/ChildhoodLeadPoisoning.xml

    r22715 r22741  
    169169                                        </li>
    170170                                </ul>
    171                                 <p>
    172                                         <span class="Bold">Testing for lead in private well water </span>is recommended:
    173                                 </p>
     171
     172                                <h4>Testing for lead in private well water is recommended:</h4>
    174173                                <ul>
    175174                                        <li>
     
    189188                                        </li>
    190189                                </ul>
    191                                 <span class="Bold">To reduce lead </span>in water:
     190
     191                                <h4>To reduce leadin water:</h4>
    192192                                <ul>
    193193                                        <li>
     
    203203                <section>
    204204                        <h2>Lead Poisoning Prevention Tips</h2>
    205                         <p>
    206                                 <h3>Protect yourself and your family from lead exposure by:</h3>
    207                         </p>
     205
     206                        <h3>Protect yourself and your family from lead exposure by:</h3>
    208207                        <ul>
    209208                                <li>
     
    239238                                Contact the Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention Program at NMDOH for more information (see "Downloads and Resources" below).
    240239                        </p>
     240
    241241                        <div class="NotifiableCondition">
    242242                                <h3>Notifiable Diseases or Conditions in New Mexico (N.M.A.C 7.4.3.13)</h3>
  • adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/nmepht-content/xml/selections/navigation/ResourceSelection.xml

    r20102 r22741  
    1212        </ibis:doc>
    1313
     14
    1415        <NAME>resourceMenu</NAME>
    15         <DESCRIPTION>About/Welcome page if clicked otherwise Home menu</DESCRIPTION>
    1616        <TITLE>Resources</TITLE>
    1717
     
    3838                                                        <TITLE>About Us</TITLE>
    3939                                                        <DESCRIPTION>Introduction to NM-EPHT</DESCRIPTION>
    40                                                         <LOCAL_URL>about/Introduction.html</LOCAL_URL>
     40                                                        <LOCAL_URL>about/OurStory.html</LOCAL_URL>
    4141                                                </SELECTION>
    4242                                                <SELECTION>
     
    5959                                                        <TITLE>Glossary</TITLE>
    6060                                                        <DESCRIPTION>NM EPHT Glossary of Terms, Abbreviations, and Acronyms</DESCRIPTION>
    61                                                         <LOCAL_URL>about/resources/Glossary.html</LOCAL_URL>
     61                                                        <LOCAL_URL>resources/Glossary.html</LOCAL_URL>
    6262                                                </SELECTION>
    6363                                                <SELECTION>
    6464                                                        <TITLE>FAQs</TITLE>
    6565                                                        <DESCRIPTION>Page that answers frequently-asked questions about EPHT.</DESCRIPTION>
    66                                                         <LOCAL_URL>about/resources/FAQS.html</LOCAL_URL>
     66                                                        <LOCAL_URL>resources/FAQS.html</LOCAL_URL>
    6767                                                </SELECTION>
    6868                                                <SELECTION>
    6969                                                        <TITLE>Learn How to Use NM EPHT</TITLE>
    7070                                                        <DESCRIPTION>Learn How to Use NM EPHT</DESCRIPTION>
    71                                                         <LOCAL_URL>about/resources/LearnHow.html</LOCAL_URL>
     71                                                        <LOCAL_URL>resources/LearnHow.html</LOCAL_URL>
    7272                                                </SELECTION>
    7373                                                <SELECTION>
     
    9797                                                        <TITLE>Publications</TITLE>
    9898                                                        <DESCRIPTION>Go to our library of Fact Sheets, and other library items.</DESCRIPTION>
    99                                                         <LOCAL_URL>about/resources/publications/Introduction.html</LOCAL_URL>
     99                                                        <LOCAL_URL>resources/publications/Introduction.html</LOCAL_URL>
    100100                                                </SELECTION>
    101101
  • adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/nmepht-view/css/_SiteSpecific-Topic.css

    r22721 r22741  
    121121        margin-bottom: 20px;
    122122}
    123 .Topic #content section section h3::after
    124 {
    125         content : " ";
    126         position: absolute;
    127         bottom: -8px;
    128         left: 0;
    129         height  : 5px;
    130         width   : 200px; 
    131         border-bottom: 5px solid var(--background-color-hover);
    132 }
    133123
    134124
     
    139129        position: relative;
    140130        display: flex;
    141         align-items: center;
     131/*      align-items: center; */
    142132}
    143133.Topic #content section.ImageInfoBlock figure,
     
    180170
    181171
     172.Topic #content #moreInformation  li a
     173{
     174        text-decoration: underline;
     175}
     176
     177.Topic #content h3
     178{
     179        position:                       relative;
     180        margin-top:                     calc(2 * var(--block-spacing));
     181}
     182.Topic #content h3::after
     183{
     184        content :                       " ";
     185        position:                       absolute;
     186        bottom:                         -8px;
     187        left:                           0;
     188        height:                         5px;
     189        width:                          200px; 
     190        border-bottom:          5px solid var(--background-color-hover);
     191}
     192.Topic #content #moreInformation h3
     193{
     194        margin-top:                     var(--block-spacing);
     195}
     196.Topic #content #moreInformation h3::after
     197{
     198        display: none;
     199}
     200
    182201.Topic #content #moreInformation button
    183202{
    184203    margin-top:         12px;
    185204}
     205
    186206
    187207.Topic #content #downloadsResources
     
    254274        display: block;
    255275        width: 100%;
     276        max-height: 250px;
    256277/*
    257         max-height: 250px;
    258278        object-fit: contain;
    259279
     
    286306
    287307
    288 /* topic more info overrides */
    289 .Topic #content #moreInformation  li a
    290 {
    291         text-decoration: underline;
    292 }
    293 
    294308.Topic #content .Popup li,
    295309.Topic #content .Popup li a
     
    302316        margin-top: 0.1em;
    303317}
    304 
    305 
    306 .NotifiableCondition
    307 {
    308         margin: 2rem 0;
    309         border: 1px solid red;
    310         background-color: #f8f8f8;
    311         padding: 1rem;
    312 }
    313 
    314 
    315 
    316 
    317318
    318319.Topic #content nav #moreData .Popup .Container .Content h3
     
    361362}
    362363
     364
     365.NotifiableCondition
     366{
     367        margin: 2rem 0;
     368        border: 1px solid red;
     369        background-color: #f8f8f8;
     370        padding: 1rem;
     371}
     372
    363373/*============================ End of Style Sheet ============================*/
    364374
  • adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/nmepht-view/css/_SiteSpecific-general.css

    r22684 r22741  
    3636h3
    3737{
    38         margin-top:                     10px;
     38        margin-top:                     var(--block-spacing);
    3939        margin-bottom:          10px;
    4040        font-size:                      1.1rem;
Note: See TracChangeset for help on using the changeset viewer.