Changeset 22731 in main


Ignore:
Timestamp:
03/19/21 10:47:43 (4 weeks ago)
Author:
Paul Leo
Message:

NMEPHT V3 Updating and Committing Fire and Smoke XML

  • removed unnecessary <br/>, if more space is desired, work with Garth for .css changes, Brent for other look and feel tweaks
  • made the html tags all lower case
  • modified xml to use new structure for related topics
  • modified xml to use new structure for listing indicator reports and query modules
  • the wildfire query is not returning any data
Location:
adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/nmepht-content/xml
Files:
4 edited

Legend:

Unmodified
Added
Removed
  • adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/nmepht-content/xml/html_content/environment/air/FireAndSmoke.xml

    r22730 r22731  
    11<?xml version="1.0" encoding="ISO-8859-1"?>
    2 
    32<HTML_CONTENT xmlns:ibis="http://www.ibisph.org">
    4 
    5 <TITLE>Fires, Smoke and Health</TITLE>
    6 
     3        <TITLE>Fires, Smoke and Health</TITLE>
    74        <HTML_CLASS>Topic Environment</HTML_CLASS>
    85        <OTHER_HEAD_CONTENT>
    9                 <link ibis:href="css/Topic.css" rel="stylesheet" type="text/css"/>
    10                 <link ibis:href="css/_SiteSpecific-Topic.css" rel="stylesheet" type="text/css"/>
    11 
     6                <link ibis:href="css/Topic.css"
     7                        rel="stylesheet"
     8                        type="text/css"/>
     9                <link ibis:href="css/_SiteSpecific-Topic.css"
     10                        rel="stylesheet"
     11                        type="text/css"/>
    1212                <script ibis:src="js/jquery.scrollBlockListItems.js"/>
    1313                <script>
    1414                        $( document ).ready(function() {
    15                                 $(".Topic #downloadsResources .Selections").scrollBlockListItems( {"maxSelectionsContainerHeight":190});
     15                        $(".Topic #downloadsResources .Selections").scrollBlockListItems( {"maxSelectionsContainerHeight":190});
    1616                        });
    1717                </script>
    1818        </OTHER_HEAD_CONTENT>
    19 
    20 
    21 -<CONTENT>
     19        -<CONTENT>
    2220                <header>
    23                         <img ibis:src="view/image/environment/air/fire/bannerwildfire2.jpg" title="bannerwildfire2.jpg"/>
     21                        <img ibis:src="view/image/environment/air/fire/bannerwildfire2.jpg"
     22                                title="bannerwildfire2.jpg"/>
    2423                        <h1>Fires, Smoke, and Health</h1>
    2524                </header>
    26                
    2725                <section>
    2826                        <h2>New Mexico Smoke From Fires and Your Health Toolkit</h2>
    29                        
    30                         <p> New Mexico's climate offers great outdoor opportunities for work and recreation throughout the year.
    31                         However, during wildfire season and prescribed burns the air quality can change rapidly, including when smoke comes from neighboring states. This means you might need to make quick decisions about being outside.
     27                        <p> New Mexico's climate offers great outdoor opportunities for work and recreation throughout the year.
     28                                However, during wildfire season and prescribed burns the air quality can change rapidly, including when smoke comes from neighboring states. This means you might need to make quick decisions about being outside.
    3229                        </p>
    33                        
    34                         <p> Do you know what to do when it becomes smoky? How does smoke affect health? This webpage serves as a toolkit to help you make those decisions.
    35                         Get health protection tips and learn how to use the 5-3-1 Visibility Method. Next, learn which health symptoms are caused by smoke.
    36                         Plus, get additional tips for staying safe and healthy on smoky days and during the COVID-19 pandemic and download the resources. </p> <TODO> Per Stephanie, need to add links in this paragraph to anchors on page</TODO>
    37                        
    38                 </section>
    39                
     30                        <p> Do you know what to do when it becomes smoky? How does smoke affect health? This webpage serves as a toolkit to help you make those decisions.
     31                                Get health protection tips and learn how to use the 5-3-1 Visibility Method. Next, learn which health symptoms are caused by smoke.
     32                                Plus, get additional tips for staying safe and healthy on smoky days and during the COVID-19 pandemic and download the resources. </p>
     33                        <TODO> Per Stephanie, need to add links in this paragraph to anchors on page</TODO>
     34                </section>
    4035                <section>
    41                
    4236                        <h2>Protect Your Health on Smoky Days</h2>
    43                        
    44                 <section>       
    45                         <p> The best way to protect yourself during smoky days is to avoid breathing in smoke. Even if you can't smell the smoke or if it does not smell too bad that does not mean the air quality is safe.
    46                          Here are quick tips:
    47                    </p>
    48                  </section>
    49                  
    50                  <section>
    51                    <ul class="Indent">
    52                                                 <li>Staying indoors during smoking days is one of the best things you can do.</li>
    53                                                 <li>When you don't have a monitor in your area, use the 5-3-1 Visibility Method created in New Mexico to estimate the air quality and the actions you should take based on your health circumstances and age.
    54                                                         We detail how you can use this below. </li>
    55                                                 <li>Pay attention to local air quality alerts to plan your day and travel. Air quality reports are often posted on this site in the Newsroom and are also available through local news media and social media.</li>
    56                                                 <li> Keep your indoor air clean by closing windows and doors.</li>
    57                                         </ul>
    58                 </section>
    59                 </section>
    60                
    61                 <section>
    62                
     37                        <section>
     38                                <p> The best way to protect yourself during smoky days is to avoid breathing in smoke. Even if you can't smell the smoke or if it does not smell too bad that does not mean the air quality is safe.
     39                                        Here are quick tips:
     40                                </p>
     41                        </section>
     42                        <section>
     43                                <ul class="Indent">
     44                                        <li>Staying indoors during smoking days is one of the best things you can do.</li>
     45                                        <li>When you don't have a monitor in your area, use the 5-3-1 Visibility Method created in New Mexico to estimate the air quality and the actions you should take based on your health circumstances and age.
     46                                                We detail how you can use this below. </li>
     47                                        <li>Pay attention to local air quality alerts to plan your day and travel. Air quality reports are often posted on this site in the Newsroom and are also available through local news media and social media.</li>
     48                                        <li> Keep your indoor air clean by closing windows and doors.</li>
     49                                </ul>
     50                        </section>
     51                </section>
    6352                <section>
    64                 <br></br>               
    65        
    66                 <h3>Use the 5-3-1 Visibility Method to estimate air quality </h3>
    67                 <br></br>
    68                 <p>
    69                 Using visibility is an easy way to gauge if it is okay to go outside or if is okay to stay outside especially in the absence of air quality monitors and when you do not have access to technology or air quality alerts,
    70                 such as when you are in remote areas.</p>
    71                 <p>
    72                 To help you make the decision, the New Mexico Department of Health Environmental Public Health Tracking Program and its locally based state and federal partners specializing in air quality and wildfire management, created the 5-3-1 Visibility Method.
    73                 It incorporates mileage and landmarks to help you determine visibility.
    74                 This method can also be used by event organizers, coaches, and recreational leaders to decide if practice or the game should go on or be postponed.</p>
    75                
    76                 <section>
    77                                 <figure title="531">
    78                                         <img ibis:src="view/image/environment/air/fire/531.2021.ds.jpg"/>
    79                                         <figcaption> This 5-3-1 Visibility Method graphic demonstrates what you should do when visibility is down to five miles, three miles and one mile based on your age or other health factors.
     53                        <section>
     54                                <h3>Use the 5-3-1 Visibility Method to estimate air quality </h3>
     55                                <p>
     56                                        Using visibility is an easy way to gauge if it is okay to go outside or if is okay to stay outside especially in the absence of air quality monitors and when you do not have access to technology or air quality alerts,
     57                                        such as when you are in remote areas.</p>
     58                                <p>
     59                                        To help you make the decision, the New Mexico Department of Health Environmental Public Health Tracking Program and its locally based state and federal partners specializing in air quality and wildfire management, created the 5-3-1 Visibility Method.
     60                                        It incorporates mileage and landmarks to help you determine visibility.
     61                                        This method can also be used by event organizers, coaches, and recreational leaders to decide if practice or the game should go on or be postponed.</p>
     62                                <section>
     63                                        <figure title="531">
     64                                                <img ibis:src="view/image/environment/air/fire/531.2021.ds.jpg"/>
     65                                                <figcaption> This 5-3-1 Visibility Method graphic demonstrates what you should do when visibility is down to five miles, three miles and one mile based on your age or other health factors.
     66                                                </figcaption>
     67                                        </figure>
     68                                </section>
     69                        </section>
     70                        <section>
     71                                <h3>If it is smoky outside find out how far you can see by choosing landmarks to look at it. </h3>
     72                        </section>
     73                        <section class="ImageInfoBlock">
     74                                <div>
     75                                        <p> Pick some landmarks you are familiar with.
     76                                                Then see how well you can see those. Facing away from the sun, look for landmarks such as mountains, mesas, hills, buildings, water tanks, windmills, etc. that are about 5 miles, 3 miles and 1 mile away.
     77                                                Use those mile ranges to help you estimate visibility.
     78                                                If these landmarks <span class="Bold">are not easy to see </span> in the five, three, and one-mile ranges you can decide what to do based on your health conditions and age.</p>
     79                                        <p>  Where are you? NM EPHT created the 5-3-1 Buffer Tool to help you estimate the distance of landmarks by using your phone, computer or device right where you are. </p>
     80                                </div>
     81                                <figure title="buffermap">
     82                                        <img ibis:src="view/image/environment/air/fire/Buffermap.png"/>
     83                                        <figcaption> The 5-3-1 Buffer Tool is an on-line map to estimate the distance of landmarks that are visible from where you are standing.
    8084                                        </figcaption>
    8185                                </figure>
    82                 </section>
    83                 </section>
    84                 <br></br>
    85                
    86                 <section>
    87                 <h3>If it is smoky outside find out how far you can see by choosing landmarks to look at it. </h3>
    88                 </section>
    89                 <section class="ImageInfoBlock">
    90                
    91                 <div>
    92                                 <P> Pick some landmarks you are familiar with.
    93                 Then see how well you can see those. Facing away from the sun, look for landmarks such as mountains, mesas, hills, buildings, water tanks, windmills, etc. that are about 5 miles, 3 miles and 1 mile away.
    94                 Use those mile ranges to help you estimate visibility.
    95                 If these landmarks <span class="Bold">are not easy to see </span> in the five, three, and one-mile ranges you can decide what to do based on your health conditions and age.</P>
    96                
    97                 <p>  Where are you? NM EPHT created the 5-3-1 Buffer Tool to help you estimate the distance of landmarks by using your phone, computer or device right where you are. </p>
    98                
    99                 </div>
    100                                 <figure title="buffermap">
    101                                         <img ibis:src="view/image/environment/air/fire/Buffermap.png"/>
    102                                         <figcaption> The 5-3-1 Buffer Tool is an on-line map to estimate the distance of landmarks that are visible from where you are standing.
    103                                         </figcaption>
    104                        
    105                                 </figure>
    106                
    107                 </section>
    108                 <br></br>
    109                
    110                 <section>
    111                 <h3>Can you see landmarks 5 miles away?</h3>
    112                 <section class="ImageInfoBlock">
    113                 <div>
    114                 <P><span class="Bold">Young children, adults over age 65, pregnant women, and people with heart and/or lung disease, asthma or other respiratory illness:</span> </P>
    115                 <P>If you can see less than 5 miles, the air quality is unhealthy for you and you will need to minimize outdoor activity.</P>
    116                 <P>You should reschedule outdoor recreational activities for a day with better air quality. </P>
    117                 <p><span class="Bold">Adults in Good Health: </span></p>
    118                 <p>It is okay for adults in good health to be out and about.</p>
    119                 <p>You should periodically check visibility especially when fires are nearby.</p>
    120                 </div>
    121                 <figure title="Five mile visibility">
    122                                         <img ibis:src="view/image/environment/air/fire/Smokefivemile.jpg"/>
    123                                         <figcaption> This image is an example of visibility at about five miles on a smoky day. The mountains in the distance and the hill and mesa in the foreground are visible.
    124                                         </figcaption>
    125                 </figure>
    126                  </section>
    127                  <section>
    128                 <p><span class="Bold">Decision-Making for Event, Community and Event Leaders, Coaches, and P.E. Teachers:</span></p>
    129                 <p>If your activity involves young children, adults over age 65, pregnant women, and people with heart and/or lung disease, asthma or other respiratory illness, then move your event indoors. </p>
    130                
    131                 <ul class="Indent">
     86                        </section>
     87                        <section>
     88                                <h3>Can you see landmarks 5 miles away?</h3>
     89                                <section class="ImageInfoBlock">
     90                                        <div>
     91                                                <p>
     92                                                        <span class="Bold">Young children, adults over age 65, pregnant women, and people with heart and/or lung disease, asthma or other respiratory illness:</span>
     93                                                </p>
     94                                                <p>If you can see less than 5 miles, the air quality is unhealthy for you and you will need to minimize outdoor activity.</p>
     95                                                <p>You should reschedule outdoor recreational activities for a day with better air quality. </p>
     96                                                <p>
     97                                                        <span class="Bold">Adults in Good Health: </span>
     98                                                </p>
     99                                                <p>It is okay for adults in good health to be out and about.</p>
     100                                                <p>You should periodically check visibility especially when fires are nearby.</p>
     101                                        </div>
     102                                        <figure title="Five mile visibility">
     103                                                <img ibis:src="view/image/environment/air/fire/Smokefivemile.jpg"/>
     104                                                <figcaption> This image is an example of visibility at about five miles on a smoky day. The mountains in the distance and the hill and mesa in the foreground are visible.
     105                                                </figcaption>
     106                                        </figure>
     107                                </section>
     108                                <section>
     109                                        <p>
     110                                                <span class="Bold">Decision-Making for Event, Community and Event Leaders, Coaches, and P.E. Teachers:</span>
     111                                        </p>
     112                                        <p>If your activity involves young children, adults over age 65, pregnant women, and people with heart and/or lung disease, asthma or other respiratory illness, then move your event indoors. </p>
     113                                        <ul class="Indent">
    132114                                                <li>
    133115                                                        Try to keep the indoor air as clean as possible by not allowing use of air fresheners (fragrances), candles and wax melts, chemicals, cigarettes, vapor cigarettes or anything else that could compromise the air quality.
    134116                                                </li>
    135117                                                <li>
    136                                                         If it is warm, consider moving it into a place that is cooled with air conditioning (not swamp/evaporative coolers). 
     118                                                        If it is warm, consider moving it into a place that is cooled with air conditioning (not swamp/evaporative coolers).
    137119                                                </li>
    138120                                                <li>
     
    140122                                                </li>
    141123                                        </ul>
    142                         </section>     
    143                 </section>     
    144                 <br></br>
    145                 <br></br>
    146                
    147                 <section>
    148                 <h3>Can you see landmarks 3 miles away?</h3>
    149                
    150                 <section class="ImageInfoBlock">
    151                 <div>
    152                
    153                 <P><span class="Bold">Young children, adults over age 65, pregnant women, and people with heart and/or lung disease, asthma or other respiratory illness:</span> </P>
    154                
    155                 <P> If you can see less than 3 miles, the air quality is unhealthy for you and should stay indoors. All outdoor activities should be avoided, including running errands. </P>
    156                
    157                 <p><span class="Bold">Adults in Good Health: </span></p>
    158                 <P>Stay indoors as much as possible.</P>
    159                
    160                 <ul class="Indent">
    161                                                 <li>
    162                                                         Only be outside momentarily to run important errands.
    163                                                 </li>
    164                                                 <li>
    165                                                         Outdoor workers should be moved to work that does not involved being outdoors. 
    166                                                 </li>
    167                                                 <li>
    168                                                         If you are camping, hiking, fishing, or ranching, move to a safer place with better visibility and try to get to an indoor space.
    169                                                 </li>
    170                                         </ul>
    171                
    172                 </div>
    173                 <figure title="Five mile visibility">
    174                                         <img ibis:src="view/image/environment/air/fire/Smokethreemile.jpg"/>
    175                                         <figcaption> This image is an example of visibility at about three miles on a smoky day. The mountains in the distance are not very visible. You can make out the hill and mesa.
    176                                         </figcaption>
    177                
    178                                 </figure>
    179 
    180                 </section>
    181                 <section>
    182                 <p><span class="Bold">Decision-Making for Event, Community and Event Leaders, Coaches, and P.E. Teachers:</span></p>
    183                 <p> All outdoor recreational activities, sporting events and outdoor community events should be rescheduled for a day with better air quality or moved indoors if possible. </p>
    184                 </section>
    185                 </section>
    186                 <br></br>
    187                 <br></br>
    188                
    189                 <section>
    190                 <h3>Can you see landmarks less than 1 mile away?</h3>
    191                 <section class="ImageInfoBlock">
    192                 <div>
    193                 <p><span class="Bold">All People: </span></p>
    194                 <P>If you can see less than 1 mile that means the air quality is unhealthy for everyone.
    195                 You should remain indoors and avoid all outdoor activities including running errands, walking, and biking.</P>
    196                 <P>Unless an evacuation has been issued, stay inside your home, indoor workplace, or in a safe shelter. </P>
    197                 <p><span class="Bold">Decision-Making for Event, Community and Event Leaders, Coaches, and P.E. Teachers:</span></p>
    198                 <P>Cancel or reschedule all events.
    199                 Poor visibility outdoors means it could be dangerous for participants to drive to your event even if you move it indoors.
    200                 Being outdoors including briefly walking outside could be unhealthy during this time. </P>
    201                 </div>
    202                 <figure title="Five mile visibility">
    203                                         <img ibis:src="view/image/environment/air/fire/Smokeonemile.jpg"/>
    204                                         <figcaption> This image is an example of visibility at one mile and less. The mountains in the distance and hill are not visible. The nearest large landmark can barely be outlined.
    205                                         </figcaption>
    206                
    207                 </figure>
    208                 </section>
    209                 </section>
    210                 <br></br>
    211                
     124                                </section>
     125                        </section>
     126                        <section>
     127                                <h3>Can you see landmarks 3 miles away?</h3>
     128                                <section class="ImageInfoBlock">
     129                                        <div>
     130                                                <p>
     131                                                        <span class="Bold">Young children, adults over age 65, pregnant women, and people with heart and/or lung disease, asthma or other respiratory illness:</span>
     132                                                </p>
     133                                                <p> If you can see less than 3 miles, the air quality is unhealthy for you and should stay indoors. All outdoor activities should be avoided, including running errands. </p>
     134                                                <p>
     135                                                        <span class="Bold">Adults in Good Health: </span>
     136                                                </p>
     137                                                <p>Stay indoors as much as possible.</p>
     138                                                <ul class="Indent">
     139                                                        <li>
     140                                                                Only be outside momentarily to run important errands.
     141                                                        </li>
     142                                                        <li>
     143                                                                Outdoor workers should be moved to work that does not involved being outdoors.
     144                                                        </li>
     145                                                        <li>
     146                                                                If you are camping, hiking, fishing, or ranching, move to a safer place with better visibility and try to get to an indoor space.
     147                                                        </li>
     148                                                </ul>
     149                                        </div>
     150                                        <figure title="Five mile visibility">
     151                                                <img ibis:src="view/image/environment/air/fire/Smokethreemile.jpg"/>
     152                                                <figcaption> This image is an example of visibility at about three miles on a smoky day. The mountains in the distance are not very visible. You can make out the hill and mesa.
     153                                                </figcaption>
     154                                        </figure>
     155                                </section>
     156                                <section>
     157                                        <p>
     158                                                <span class="Bold">Decision-Making for Event, Community and Event Leaders, Coaches, and P.E. Teachers:</span>
     159                                        </p>
     160                                        <p> All outdoor recreational activities, sporting events and outdoor community events should be rescheduled for a day with better air quality or moved indoors if possible. </p>
     161                                </section>
     162                        </section>
     163                        <section>
     164                                <h3>Can you see landmarks less than 1 mile away?</h3>
     165                                <section class="ImageInfoBlock">
     166                                        <div>
     167                                                <p>
     168                                                        <span class="Bold">All People: </span>
     169                                                </p>
     170                                                <p>If you can see less than 1 mile that means the air quality is unhealthy for everyone.
     171                                                        You should remain indoors and avoid all outdoor activities including running errands, walking, and biking.</p>
     172                                                <p>Unless an evacuation has been issued, stay inside your home, indoor workplace, or in a safe shelter. </p>
     173                                                <p>
     174                                                        <span class="Bold">Decision-Making for Event, Community and Event Leaders, Coaches, and P.E. Teachers:</span>
     175                                                </p>
     176                                                <p>Cancel or reschedule all events.
     177                                                        Poor visibility outdoors means it could be dangerous for participants to drive to your event even if you move it indoors.
     178                                                        Being outdoors including briefly walking outside could be unhealthy during this time. </p>
     179                                        </div>
     180                                        <figure title="Five mile visibility">
     181                                                <img ibis:src="view/image/environment/air/fire/Smokeonemile.jpg"/>
     182                                                <figcaption> This image is an example of visibility at one mile and less. The mountains in the distance and hill are not visible. The nearest large landmark can barely be outlined.
     183                                                </figcaption>
     184                                        </figure>
     185                                </section>
     186                        </section>
     187                        <section>
     188                                <h3>At anytime</h3>
     189                                <p>At any time, regardless of the visibility, if you are feeling as though you are having health effects from smoke, take precautions to avoid further exposure to smoke and consult a healthcare professional as needed. </p>
     190                        </section>
     191                        <section>
     192                                <h3>More Tips for Schools, Community Leaders, Event, Recreation and Sports Organizers, and Employers</h3>
     193                                <p>If you are a community leader, an event/sports organizer, physical education teacher, someone who serves a sensitive population, or supervises outdoor work: </p>
     194                                <ul class="Indent">
     195                                        <li>
     196                                                Learn how to use 5-3-1 Visibility Method to decide if you should move your activity and operations indoors, postpone or cancel.
     197                                        </li>
     198                                        <li>
     199                                                Have a back-up plan to move events or work indoors when you can.
     200                                        </li>
     201                                        <li>
     202                                                For large events, have a communications plan in place to inform participants, eventgoers and spectators.
     203                                        </li>
     204                                </ul>
     205                        </section>
     206                        <section>
     207                                <p>
     208                                        <span class="Bold">Communicate</span>
     209                                </p>
     210                                <p>As you postpone, reschedule, or cancel your event, let the community or participants know that these changes were done to protect their health.</p>
     211                                <ul class="Indent">
     212                                        <li>
     213                                                Use your local means of mass communication to let your community know of changes in the schedule. Common ways to communicate with you participates include phone trees, e-mail listserv, text messages.
     214                                        </li>
     215                                        <li>
     216                                                Use social media feeds such as an event page or a team page to announce the change of plans.
     217                                        </li>
     218                                        <li>
     219                                                Use your local media such as the newspaper, radio and television stations, and online news outlets to get the word out about the change of plans.
     220                                        </li>
     221                                        <li>
     222                                                Direct your participants to nmfireinfo.com to learn about fires in the state and to nmtracking.org to learn how they can protect their health on smoky days.
     223                                        </li>
     224                                </ul>
     225                        </section>
     226                        <section>
     227                                <p>
     228                                        <span class="Bold">Educate</span>
     229                                </p>
     230                                <p>Help educate your participants on how they can make decision during smoky days. We provide downloadable resources such as signs and flyers in the "Resources" below. </p>
     231                                <ul class="Indent">
     232                                        <li>
     233                                                You may post these in senior and community centers, near trailheads, campgrounds, libraries, worksites, community gathering areas, schools, sports fields, and medical centers.
     234                                        </li>
     235                                        <li>
     236                                                Share these resources as part of patient education to sensitive populations.
     237                                        </li>
     238                                        <li>
     239                                                Use these in door-to-door education during wildfires if you are frontline worker and response professional.
     240                                        </li>
     241                                        <li>
     242                                                Ask people to keep these handy, such as posting it on refrigerators and near doorways, so they may know what to do when it quickly becomes smoky outside.
     243                                        </li>
     244                                </ul>
     245                        </section>
     246                        <section>
     247                                <h3>Tips for Workplaces </h3>
     248                                <p>Make sure staff understand how to use the 5-3-1 Visibility Method.</p>
     249                                <ul class="Indent">
     250                                        <li>
     251                                                Adopt it as workplace policy to make quick decisions in the absence of air quality monitors.
     252                                        </li>
     253                                        <li>
     254                                                Examples of key people you should train in the 5-3-1 Visibility Method include:
     255                                                people who provide services for sensitive populations; physical education teachers; coaches;
     256                                                referees; recreation managers; school or daycare center administrators and teachers;
     257                                                community center or senior center managers; guides for fishing or outdoor excursions;
     258                                                people who manage a city, county, or tribal government; ranch or farm managers;
     259                                                emergency response officials, and site supervisors of outdoor labor.
     260                                        </li>
     261                                        <li>
     262                                                Provide a safe indoor workspace for worker who primarlay work outdoors.
     263                                        </li>
     264                                        <li>
     265                                                For workers who must still be outdoors such as emergency responders and public safety professionals, provide appropriate personal protection equipment.
     266                                        </li>
     267                                </ul>
     268                        </section>
     269                        <section>
     270                                <h3>More about the 5-3-1- Visibility Method</h3>
     271                                <p>The 5-3-1 Visibility Method has been adopted by entities in other states. Since the southwest United States typically has very low humidity, visibility can be an effective tool to determine if it is healthy to be outside when smoke is present.
     272                                        The visibility test is not appropriate or effective in areas with frequent high humidity, such as the southeastern United States when fog may limit visibility.
     273                                        The 5-3-1 Visibility Method is public campaign from the New Mexico Department of Health's Environmental Public Health Tracking Program and its state and federal partners.  </p>
     274                                <p>
     275                                        <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xcPSm0FH3AQ">New Mexico Fire Wildfire Response Video</a>
     276                                </p>
     277                        </section>
     278                </section>
     279                <section class="SubSectionsContainer">
     280                        <section>
     281                                <h2>Health Symptoms Caused By Smoke </h2>
     282                                <p>While not everyone will have the same sensitivity to wildfire smoke, it's still best to avoid breathing smoke as much as you can.
     283                                        When smoke is heavy like from a nearby a wildfire, it's bad for everyone.
     284                                        Smoke is made up of a complex mixture of gases and fine particles produced when wood and other organic materials burn.
     285                                        The biggest health threat comes when people breath in the microscopic smoke particles which can penetrate deep into your lungs causing health problems. </p>
     286                        </section>
     287                        <section>
     288                                <h3>General Symptoms From Smoke</h3>
     289                                <p> Smoke can trigger a range of symptoms for anyone which may include burning eyes, a runny nose, cough, phlegm, wheezing and difficulty breathing. </p>
     290                                <ul class="Indent">
     291                                        <li> Regardless of your health and age it always best to reduce exposure to smoke as much as you can. </li>
     292                                        <li> Stay hydrated and follow your doctor's advice about medicines or prescriptions you take.</li>
     293                                </ul>
     294                        </section>
     295                        <section>
     296                                <h3>Who is at most risk?</h3>
     297                                <p>Smoke may worsen symptoms for people who have pre-existing respiratory conditions. </p>
     298                                <ul class="Indent">
     299                                        <li> People with heart, lung disease, or cardiovascular disease might experience chest pain, palpitations, shortness of breath, or fatigue.</li>
     300                                        <li> People with seasonal allergies, asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) including not being able to breathe as deeply or as vigorously as usual,
     301                                                and may experience symptoms such as coughing, phlegm, chest discomfort, wheezing and shortness of breath.</li>
     302                                        <li> In addition to avoiding being outside on smoky days, you should follow your health management plan from your health care provider, or if you have asthma, follow your asthma management plan.</li>
     303                                        <li> If you develop symptoms which do not respond to your usual medication, contact your health care provider immediately. If you think you are having a heart attack or stroke, dial 9-1-1.</li>
     304                                </ul>
     305                        </section>
     306                        <section>
     307                                <h2>COVID-19 Safety During Smoky Days and Wildland Fires</h2>
     308                                <p>Smoke from wildfires may cause people to have more severe reactions if they are infected COVID-19.
     309                                        Wildfire smoke is a complex mixture of air pollutants that can harm your health such as irritate your lungs, cause inflammation and may alter immune function that makes it harder to fight COVID-19 and other respiratory infections.</p>
     310                        </section>
     311                        <section>
     312                                <h3>People most prone to risk</h3>
     313                                <ul class="Indent">
     314                                        <li>People who have been diagnosed with COVID-19 or another respiratory infection, even after symptoms have resolved.</li>
     315                                        <li>People who have pre-existing respiratory conditions such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), interstitial lung disease (ILD), or lung cancer. </li>
     316                                        <li>Anyone at increased risk for COVID-19 infection.</li>
     317                                </ul>
     318                                <p>If you have a chronic health condition, work with your healthcare providers to create a management plan for smoky conditions.
     319                                        If you use rescue medications, make sure that you always have an ample supply at home and carry them with you during the wildfire season. </p>
     320                        </section>
     321                        <section>
     322                                <h3>What you should do if you have symptoms</h3>
     323                                <p> Exposure to wildfire smoke and COVID-19 can both cause respiratory symptoms such as a dry cough, sore throat, or difficulty breathing.
     324                                        If you have severe symptoms such as difficulty breathing or chest pain, call 911 right away or get to an Emergency Department.
     325                                        If you have mild symptoms call your healthcare provider. If you suspect you have COVID-19 see CV.nmhealth.org for guidance.</p>
     326                        </section>
     327                        <section>
     328                                <h3>Ways to reduce smoke exposure and reduce the spread of COVID-19 during smoke events</h3>
     329                                <p>It is important to and reduce your risk of getting the virus and help reduce the virus spread by following the COVID-19 safety guidelines for New Mexico.</p>
     330                                <ul class="Indent">
     331                                        <li>Follow the recommendations for New Mexico and your county such as wearing masks, social distancing, and frequent hand washing. </li>
     332                                        <li>Sign up for vaccinations and testing. Visit CV.nmhealth.org for guidance. </li>
     333                                        <li>Continue to wear cloth or paper masks to reduce the COVID-19 spread but you should not rely on these types of masks for smoke protection because smoke particles are too fine to be filtered by such masks.
     334                                                It is best to stay indoors during wildland fires in a place with clean air, such as your home or a workplace that follows COVID-19 safety practices. </li>
     335                                </ul>
     336                                <p>The best way to protect against the potentially harmful effects of wildfire smoke is to reduce exposure, improve your indoor air quality or seek cleaner air spaces.</p>
     337                                <ul class="Indent">
     338                                        <li>Use the 5-3-1 Visibility Method, (listed above) to assess air quality conditions in your area. </li>
     339                                        <li>Stay indoors as much as you can, such as in your home or workplace. </li>
     340                                        <li>You can create a cleaner air space at home to protect yourself from wildfire smoke during the COVID-19 pandemic by following the tips above.</li>
     341                                        <li>Finding cleaner air away from your home can be more challenging under physical distancing guidelines because public facilities such as libraries, community centers, and shopping malls might be closed or at limited capacity.
     342                                                It is best to check with these places before you go and to follow the guidelines for reducing COVID-19 spread.</li>
     343                                </ul>
     344                        </section>
     345                </section>
    212346                <section>
    213                 <h3>At anytime</h3>
    214                 <br></br>
    215                 <p>At any time, regardless of the visibility, if you are feeling as though you are having health effects from smoke, take precautions to avoid further exposure to smoke and consult a healthcare professional as needed. </p>
    216                 </section>
    217                 <br></br>
    218                
    219                 <section>
    220                 <h3>More Tips for Schools, Community Leaders, Event, Recreation and Sports Organizers, and Employers</h3>
    221                 <br></br>
    222                 <p>If you are a community leader, an event/sports organizer, physical education teacher, someone who serves a sensitive population, or supervises outdoor work: </p>
    223                                        
    224                                         <ul class="Indent">
    225                                                 <li>
    226                                                         Learn how to use 5-3-1 Visibility Method to decide if you should move your activity and operations indoors, postpone or cancel.
    227                                                 </li>
    228                                                 <li>
    229                                                         Have a back-up plan to move events or work indoors when you can.
    230                                                 </li>
    231                                                 <li>
    232                                                         For large events, have a communications plan in place to inform participants, eventgoers and spectators.
    233                                                 </li>
    234                                         </ul>
    235                 </section>
    236        
    237                 <section>
    238                 <P><span class="Bold">Communicate</span> </P>
    239                 <p>As you postpone, reschedule, or cancel your event, let the community or participants know that these changes were done to protect their health.</p>
    240                                        
    241                                         <ul class="Indent">
    242                                                 <li>
    243                                                 Use your local means of mass communication to let your community know of changes in the schedule. Common ways to communicate with you participates include phone trees, e-mail listserv, text messages.
    244                                                 </li>
    245                                                 <li>
    246                                                 Use social media feeds such as an event page or a team page to announce the change of plans.
    247                                                 </li>
    248                                                 <li>
    249                                                 Use your local media such as the newspaper, radio and television stations, and online news outlets to get the word out about the change of plans.
    250                                                 </li>
    251                                                 <li>
    252                                                 Direct your participants to nmfireinfo.com to learn about fires in the state and to nmtracking.org to learn how they can protect their health on smoky days.
    253                                                 </li>
    254                                         </ul>
    255                 </section>
    256                
    257                 <section>
    258                 <P><span class="Bold">Educate</span> </P>
    259                 <p>Help educate your participants on how they can make decision during smoky days. We provide downloadable resources such as signs and flyers in the "Resources" below. </p>
    260                                        
    261                                         <ul class="Indent">
    262                                                 <li>
    263                                                 You may post these in senior and community centers, near trailheads, campgrounds, libraries, worksites, community gathering areas, schools, sports fields, and medical centers.
    264                                                 </li>
    265                                                 <li>
    266                                                 Share these resources as part of patient education to sensitive populations.
    267                                                 </li>
    268                                                 <li>
    269                                                 Use these in door-to-door education during wildfires if you are frontline worker and response professional.
    270                                                 </li>
    271                                                 <li>
    272                                                 Ask people to keep these handy, such as posting it on refrigerators and near doorways, so they may know what to do when it quickly becomes smoky outside.
    273                                                 </li>
    274                                         </ul>
    275                 </section>
    276                 <br></br>
    277                
    278                 <section>
    279                 <h3>Tips for Workplaces </h3>
    280                 <br></br>
    281                 <p>Make sure staff understand how to use the 5-3-1 Visibility Method.</p>
    282                                        
    283                                         <ul class="Indent">
    284                                                 <li>
    285                                                 Adopt it as workplace policy to make quick decisions in the absence of air quality monitors.
    286                                                 </li>
    287                                                 <li>
    288                                                 Examples of key people you should train in the 5-3-1 Visibility Method include:
    289                                                 people who provide services for sensitive populations; physical education teachers; coaches;
    290                                                 referees; recreation managers; school or daycare center administrators and teachers;
    291                                                 community center or senior center managers; guides for fishing or outdoor excursions;
    292                                                 people who manage a city, county, or tribal government; ranch or farm managers;
    293                                                 emergency response officials, and site supervisors of outdoor labor.
    294                                                 </li>
    295                                                 <li>
    296                                                 Provide a safe indoor workspace for worker who primarlay work outdoors.
    297                                                 </li>
    298                                                 <li>
    299                                                 For workers who must still be outdoors such as emergency responders and public safety professionals, provide appropriate personal protection equipment.
    300                                                 </li>
    301                                         </ul>
    302                 </section>
    303                 <br></br>
    304                
    305                 <section>
    306                 <h3>More about the 5-3-1- Visibility Method</h3>
    307                 <br></br>
    308                 <p>The 5-3-1 Visibility Method has been adopted by entities in other states. Since the southwest United States typically has very low humidity, visibility can be an effective tool to determine if it is healthy to be outside when smoke is present.
    309                    The visibility test is not appropriate or effective in areas with frequent high humidity, such as the southeastern United States when fog may limit visibility.
    310                    The 5-3-1 Visibility Method is public campaign from the New Mexico Department of Health's Environmental Public Health Tracking Program and its state and federal partners.  </p>
    311                    
    312                    <P>  <TODO> Can this video be put here? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xcPSm0FH3AQ </TODO></P>
    313                 </section>
    314         </section>
    315                 <br></br>
    316        
    317 
    318                 <section class="SubSectionsContainer">
    319        
    320        
    321                 <section>               
    322                 <h2>Health Symptoms Caused By Smoke </h2>
    323                 <p>While not everyone will have the same sensitivity to wildfire smoke, it's still best to avoid breathing smoke as much as you can.
    324                         When smoke is heavy like from a nearby a wildfire, it's bad for everyone.
    325                         Smoke is made up of a complex mixture of gases and fine particles produced when wood and other organic materials burn.
    326                         The biggest health threat comes when people breath in the microscopic smoke particles which can penetrate deep into your lungs causing health problems. </p>
    327                 </section>
    328                
    329                 <section>
    330                 <h3>General Symptoms From Smoke</h3>
    331                 <br></br>
    332                         <p> Smoke can trigger a range of symptoms for anyone which may include burning eyes, a runny nose, cough, phlegm, wheezing and difficulty breathing. </p>
    333                         <ul class="Indent">
    334                         <li> Regardless of your health and age it always best to reduce exposure to smoke as much as you can. </li>
    335                         <li> Stay hydrated and follow your doctor's advice about medicines or prescriptions you take.</li>
    336                         </ul>
    337                 </section>
    338                        
    339                         <br></br>
    340                        
    341                         <section>
    342                         <h3>Who is at most risk?</h3>
    343                         <br></br>
    344                         <p>Smoke may worsen symptoms for people who have pre-existing respiratory conditions. </p>
    345                         <ul class="Indent">
    346                         <li> People with heart, lung disease, or cardiovascular disease might experience chest pain, palpitations, shortness of breath, or fatigue.</li>
    347                         <li> People with seasonal allergies, asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) including not being able to breathe as deeply or as vigorously as usual,
    348                         and may experience symptoms such as coughing, phlegm, chest discomfort, wheezing and shortness of breath.</li>
    349                         <li> In addition to avoiding being outside on smoky days, you should follow your health management plan from your health care provider, or if you have asthma, follow your asthma management plan.</li>
    350                         <li> If you develop symptoms which do not respond to your usual medication, contact your health care provider immediately. If you think you are having a heart attack or stroke, dial 9-1-1.</li>
    351                         </ul>
    352                 </section>
    353                         <br></br>
    354                        
    355                 <section>       
    356                 <h2>COVID-19 Safety During Smoky Days and Wildland Fires</h2>
    357                 <p>Smoke from wildfires may cause people to have more severe reactions if they are infected COVID-19.
    358                 Wildfire smoke is a complex mixture of air pollutants that can harm your health such as irritate your lungs, cause inflammation and may alter immune function that makes it harder to fight COVID-19 and other respiratory infections.</p>
    359                 </section>
    360                
    361                 <section>
    362                 <h3>People most prone to risk</h3>
    363                 <br></br>
    364                 <ul class="Indent">
    365                 <li>People who have been diagnosed with COVID-19 or another respiratory infection, even after symptoms have resolved.</li>
    366                 <li>People who have pre-existing respiratory conditions such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), interstitial lung disease (ILD), or lung cancer. </li>
    367                 <li>Anyone at increased risk for COVID-19 infection.</li>
    368                 </ul>
    369                 <p>If you have a chronic health condition, work with your healthcare providers to create a management plan for smoky conditions.
    370                 If you use rescue medications, make sure that you always have an ample supply at home and carry them with you during the wildfire season. </p>
    371                 </section>
    372                 <br></br>
    373                
    374                 <section>
    375                 <h3>What you should do if you have symptoms</h3>
    376                 <br></br>
    377                 <p> Exposure to wildfire smoke and COVID-19 can both cause respiratory symptoms such as a dry cough, sore throat, or difficulty breathing.
    378                 If you have severe symptoms such as difficulty breathing or chest pain, call 911 right away or get to an Emergency Department.
    379                 If you have mild symptoms call your healthcare provider. If you suspect you have COVID-19 see CV.nmhealth.org for guidance.</p>
    380                 </section>
    381                 <br></br>
    382                
    383                 <section>
    384                 <h3>Ways to reduce smoke exposure and reduce the spread of COVID-19 during smoke events</h3>
    385                 <br></br>
    386                 <p>It is important to and reduce your risk of getting the virus and help reduce the virus spread by following the COVID-19 safety guidelines for New Mexico.</p>
    387                 <ul class="Indent">
    388                 <li>Follow the recommendations for New Mexico and your county such as wearing masks, social distancing, and frequent hand washing. </li>
    389                 <li>Sign up for vaccinations and testing. Visit CV.nmhealth.org for guidance. </li>
    390                 <li>Continue to wear cloth or paper masks to reduce the COVID-19 spread but you should not rely on these types of masks for smoke protection because smoke particles are too fine to be filtered by such masks.
    391                 It is best to stay indoors during wildland fires in a place with clean air, such as your home or a workplace that follows COVID-19 safety practices. </li>
    392                 </ul>
    393                
    394                 <p>The best way to protect against the potentially harmful effects of wildfire smoke is to reduce exposure, improve your indoor air quality or seek cleaner air spaces.</p>
    395                 <ul class="Indent">
    396                 <li>Use the 5-3-1 Visibility Method, (listed above) to assess air quality conditions in your area. </li>
    397                 <li>Stay indoors as much as you can, such as in your home or workplace. </li>
    398                 <li>You can create a cleaner air space at home to protect yourself from wildfire smoke during the COVID-19 pandemic by following the tips above.</li>
    399                 <li>Finding cleaner air away from your home can be more challenging under physical distancing guidelines because public facilities such as libraries, community centers, and shopping malls might be closed or at limited capacity.
    400                 It is best to check with these places before you go and to follow the guidelines for reducing COVID-19 spread.</li>
    401                 </ul>
    402                 </section>
    403         </section>     
    404                
    405         <br></br>
    406        
    407         <section>
    408                 <h2>More ways to protect yourself on smoky days</h2>
    409                
    410                 <section>
    411                 <p>In addition to using the 5-3-1 Visibility Method and staying indoors when it is smoky outside you can do more to protect your health on smoky days. </p>
    412                 </section>
    413                
    414                 <section>
    415                 <h3>Keep indoors clean</h3>
    416                 <br></br>
    417                 <p>Staying indoors and keeping the indoor air as clean as possible is the easiest way to protect your lungs when it is smoky outside. </p>
    418                 <p>Improve indoor air quality during a smoke event: </p>
    419                 <ul class="Indent">
    420                 <li>Keep windows and doors closed.</li>
    421                 <li>Stop use of all fragrances such as spray air fresheners, candles, wax melts, and chemically scented household products.</li>
    422                 <li>Don't use a vacuum cleaner during a smoke event because it can stir up particles already inside your home.</li>
    423                 <li>Turn off electric fragrance dispensers or scented wax melting devices.</li>
    424                 <li>Stop use of anything that burns, such as candles, fireplaces, or gas stoves.</li>
    425                 <li>Avoid use of sprays including cleaning and grooming products.</li>
    426                 <li>Try an air purifier. Several hardware stores sell air purifiers of varying features and price ranges.
    427                         You can also make a temporary air filter with a box fan and a furnace filter. There are many online videos that demonstrate how to do this. </li>
    428                 </ul>
    429                
    430                 <p>Improve indoor air quality year-round:
    431                 </p>
    432                 <ul class="Indent">
    433                 <li>Take off your shoes when coming inside your home.</li>
    434                 <li>Do not smoke or use vapor cigarettes, or e-cigs indoors. </li>
    435                 <li>Avoid using art sprays or industrial sprays indoors.</li>
    436                 <li>Always store chemicals and pesticides outside of your living area such as in a garage or shed.</li>
    437                 <li>Eliminate the use of pesticides indoors.</li>
    438                 <li>If you have asthma, allergies, respiratory health conditions, or other sensitivities,
    439                         eliminate the use of chemically scented products that emit chemicals into the air such as candles;
    440                         wax melts; and spray, solid, or diffused air fresheners including those that operate on electric dispensers. </li>
    441                 </ul>   
    442                 </section>
    443                 <br></br>
    444                
    445                 <section>
    446                 <h3>Reduce physical activity and stay hydrated</h3>
    447                 <br></br>
    448                 <p>Limit outdoor exercise when it is smoky outside and choose lower-intensity activities.</p>
    449                 <p>Stay hydrated by drinking plenty of water. Overheating can cause serious health problems. Get tips for staying cool on Heat Related Illness page. </p>
    450                 </section>
    451                 <br></br>
    452                
    453                 <section>
    454                 <h3>Choose the right mask</h3>
    455                 <br></br>
    456                 <p>Using visibility and staying indoors when it is smoky outside is an easy way to protect your health.
    457                 If you must go outside, only certain masks may offer protection (i.e. N95, N100, P100) from wildfire smoke.
    458                 These special masks are called a "particulate respirator." See our factsheet in the Resources below for guidance on mask selection and proper mask use.
    459                 </p>
    460                
    461                 <p>Many types of other masks have health protection benefits, but these types will not filter out the very fine and tiny particles caused by smoke.
    462                 Such masks include paper masks, dust masks or masks made to reduce virus spread (homemade or manufactured).
    463                 Wet handkerchiefs also do not filter the fine smoke particles.</p>
    464                 </section>
    465                 <br></br>
    466                
    467                 <section>
    468                 <h3>Cool your home and car safely </h3>
    469                 <br></br>
    470                 <p>Whenever possible, use air conditioners, heat pumps, fans, and closed window shades to keep your cleaner air space cooler on hot days and stay hydrated by drinking water.</p>
    471                
    472                 <ul class="Indent">
    473                 <li>If you use an air conditioner (refrigerated air) keep the fresh-air intake closed and the filter clean to prevent outdoor smoke from getting inside and keep window covering closed. Change the filter frequently.</li>
    474                 <li>Most swamp coolers/evaporative coolers have filter pore sizes that are much too large to filter out particles from smoke.
    475                 If it smells like your swamp cooler is bringing in smoke from the outside, or if it is clearly smoky in your area, it's best to turn the unit off until the outside air quality improves. </li>
    476                 <li>If you do not have an air conditioner and it is too warm to stay inside with the windows closed, seek shelter elsewhere such as at a cooling center or at a relative's or friend's home or public places such as public libraries, community centers, senior centers and other public places that may have air conditioning.
    477                 Check before you go as many locations close in the evening or might have limited capacity or be closed during the pandemic and other outbreaks. </li>
    478                 <li>Only run the air conditioner in your automobile if you use the re-circulated air option.
    479                 If your car does not have a re-circulation option and it is extremely hot it is best to avoid commuting.
    480                 Keep the windows closed. Keep the indoor air clean by not smoking, using vapor cigarettes/ e-cigs, and car fragrances. </li>
    481                 <li>Stay hydrated by drinking plenty of water. Overheating can cause serious health problems. Get tips for staying cool on Heat Related Illness page. </li>
    482                 </ul>
    483                 </section>
    484                
    485         </section>
    486        
    487         <nav id="moreInformation" title="Links for more information">
    488                 <div id="downloadsResources">
     347                        <h2>More ways to protect yourself on smoky days</h2>
     348                        <section>
     349                                <p>In addition to using the 5-3-1 Visibility Method and staying indoors when it is smoky outside you can do more to protect your health on smoky days. </p>
     350                        </section>
     351                        <section>
     352                                <h3>Keep indoors clean</h3>
     353                                <p>Staying indoors and keeping the indoor air as clean as possible is the easiest way to protect your lungs when it is smoky outside. </p>
     354                                <p>Improve indoor air quality during a smoke event: </p>
     355                                <ul class="Indent">
     356                                        <li>Keep windows and doors closed.</li>
     357                                        <li>Stop use of all fragrances such as spray air fresheners, candles, wax melts, and chemically scented household products.</li>
     358                                        <li>Don't use a vacuum cleaner during a smoke event because it can stir up particles already inside your home.</li>
     359                                        <li>Turn off electric fragrance dispensers or scented wax melting devices.</li>
     360                                        <li>Stop use of anything that burns, such as candles, fireplaces, or gas stoves.</li>
     361                                        <li>Avoid use of sprays including cleaning and grooming products.</li>
     362                                        <li>Try an air purifier. Several hardware stores sell air purifiers of varying features and price ranges.
     363                                                You can also make a temporary air filter with a box fan and a furnace filter. There are many online videos that demonstrate how to do this. </li>
     364                                </ul>
     365                                <p>Improve indoor air quality year-round:
     366                                </p>
     367                                <ul class="Indent">
     368                                        <li>Take off your shoes when coming inside your home.</li>
     369                                        <li>Do not smoke or use vapor cigarettes, or e-cigs indoors. </li>
     370                                        <li>Avoid using art sprays or industrial sprays indoors.</li>
     371                                        <li>Always store chemicals and pesticides outside of your living area such as in a garage or shed.</li>
     372                                        <li>Eliminate the use of pesticides indoors.</li>
     373                                        <li>If you have asthma, allergies, respiratory health conditions, or other sensitivities,
     374                                                eliminate the use of chemically scented products that emit chemicals into the air such as candles;
     375                                                wax melts; and spray, solid, or diffused air fresheners including those that operate on electric dispensers. </li>
     376                                </ul>
     377                        </section>
     378                        <section>
     379                                <h3>Reduce physical activity and stay hydrated</h3>
     380                                <p>Limit outdoor exercise when it is smoky outside and choose lower-intensity activities.</p>
     381                                <p>Stay hydrated by drinking plenty of water. Overheating can cause serious health problems. Get tips for staying cool on Heat Related Illness page. </p>
     382                        </section>
     383                        <section>
     384                                <h3>Choose the right mask</h3>
     385                                <p>Using visibility and staying indoors when it is smoky outside is an easy way to protect your health.
     386                                        If you must go outside, only certain masks may offer protection (i.e. N95, N100, P100) from wildfire smoke.
     387                                        These special masks are called a "particulate respirator." See our factsheet in the Resources below for guidance on mask selection and proper mask use.
     388                                </p>
     389                                <p>Many types of other masks have health protection benefits, but these types will not filter out the very fine and tiny particles caused by smoke.
     390                                        Such masks include paper masks, dust masks or masks made to reduce virus spread (homemade or manufactured).
     391                                        Wet handkerchiefs also do not filter the fine smoke particles.</p>
     392                        </section>
     393                        <section>
     394                                <h3>Cool your home and car safely </h3>
     395                                <p>Whenever possible, use air conditioners, heat pumps, fans, and closed window shades to keep your cleaner air space cooler on hot days and stay hydrated by drinking water.</p>
     396                                <ul class="Indent">
     397                                        <li>If you use an air conditioner (refrigerated air) keep the fresh-air intake closed and the filter clean to prevent outdoor smoke from getting inside and keep window covering closed. Change the filter frequently.</li>
     398                                        <li>Most swamp coolers/evaporative coolers have filter pore sizes that are much too large to filter out particles from smoke.
     399                                                If it smells like your swamp cooler is bringing in smoke from the outside, or if it is clearly smoky in your area, it's best to turn the unit off until the outside air quality improves. </li>
     400                                        <li>If you do not have an air conditioner and it is too warm to stay inside with the windows closed, seek shelter elsewhere such as at a cooling center or at a relative's or friend's home or public places such as public libraries, community centers, senior centers and other public places that may have air conditioning.
     401                                                Check before you go as many locations close in the evening or might have limited capacity or be closed during the pandemic and other outbreaks. </li>
     402                                        <li>Only run the air conditioner in your automobile if you use the re-circulated air option.
     403                                                If your car does not have a re-circulation option and it is extremely hot it is best to avoid commuting.
     404                                                Keep the windows closed. Keep the indoor air clean by not smoking, using vapor cigarettes/ e-cigs, and car fragrances. </li>
     405                                        <li>Stay hydrated by drinking plenty of water. Overheating can cause serious health problems. Get tips for staying cool on Heat Related Illness page. </li>
     406                                </ul>
     407                        </section>
     408                </section>
     409                <nav id="moreInformation"
     410                        title="Links for more information">
     411                        <div id="downloadsResources">
    489412                                <h3>Downloads and Resources</h3>
    490413                                <div class="Columns">
    491414                                        <div>
    492                                         <div class="Selections">
    493                                 <ul>
    494                                         <li>
    495                                                 <a ibis:href="view/pdf/environment/air/fire/5-3-1.Card.Guide.pdf"
    496                                                         title="downloadable pdf" class="PDF">
    497                                                         5-3-1 Cards from NM EPHT
    498                                                 </a>
    499                                         </li>
    500                                                         <br/>
    501                                         <li>
    502                                                                 <a ibis:href="view/pdf/environment/air/fire/5-3-1.PatientEducation.Factsheet.pdf">5-3-1 Poster and Patient Guide from NM EPHT</a>
    503                                                         </li>
    504                                                         <br/>
    505                                                        
    506                                         <li>
    507                                                                 <a ibis:href="view/pdf/environment/air/fire/5-3-1_postcard_Espanol_2018.pdf">5-3-1 Cards from NM EPHT in Spanish</a>
    508                                                         </li>
    509                                                         <br/>
    510                                         <li>
    511                                                                 <a ibis:href="view/pdf/environment/air/fire/5-3-1_Poster_Spanish.pdf">Poster and Patient Guide from NM EPHT in Spanish</a>
    512                                                         </li>
    513                                                         <br/>   
    514                                                        
    515                                         <li>
    516                                                                 <a ibis:href="view/pdf/environment/air/fire/Smoke_and_Masks.01.18.13.pdf">Guide to Masks from NM EPHT </a>
    517                                                         </li>
    518                                                         <br/>
    519                                         <li>
    520                                                                 <a ibis:href="view/pdf/environment/air/fire/Smoke_COVID_Factsheet_NMEPHT_2020.pdf">Smoke and COVID-19 Safety Factsheet from NM EPHT </a>
    521                                                         </li>
    522                                                         <br/>
    523                                        
    524                                         <li>
    525                                                                 <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xcPSm0FH3AQ">New Mexico Fire Wildfire Response Video</a>
    526                                                         </li>
    527                                                         <br/>                   
    528                                                        
    529                                         <li>
    530                                                                 <a href="https://nmfireinfo.com/">New Mexico Fire Information</a>
    531                                                         </li>
    532                                                         <br/>   
    533                                                        
    534                                         <li>
    535                                                                 <a href="https://nmtracking.org/health/breathing/Asthma.html"> New Mexico Asthma Information</a>
    536                                                         </li>
    537                                                         <br/>   
    538 
    539                                         <li>
    540                                                                 <a href="https://nmtracking.org/environment/air/IndoorQuality.html"> New Mexico Indoor Air Quality Information</a>
    541                                                         </li>
    542                                                         <br/>   
    543                                         <li>
    544                                                                 <a href="https://nmtracking.org/environment/air/OutdoorQuality.html"> New Mexico Indoor Outdoor Quality Information</a>
    545                                                         </li>
    546                                                         <br/>   
    547                                                        
    548                                                                
    549                                 </ul>
    550                                 </div>
    551                                 <button>Show All</button>
     415                                                <div class="Selections">
     416                                                        <ul>
     417                                                                <li>
     418                                                                        <a ibis:href="view/pdf/environment/air/fire/5-3-1.Card.Guide.pdf"
     419                                                                                title="downloadable pdf"
     420                                                                                class="PDF">
     421                                                                                5-3-1 Cards from NM EPHT
     422                                                                        </a>
     423                                                                </li>
     424                                                                <li>
     425                                                                        <a ibis:href="view/pdf/environment/air/fire/5-3-1.PatientEducation.Factsheet.pdf"
     426                                                                                title="downloadable pdf"
     427                                                                                class="PDF">
     428                                                                                5-3-1 Poster and Patient Guide from NM EPHT
     429                                                                        </a>
     430                                                                </li>
     431                                                                <li>
     432                                                                        <a ibis:href="view/pdf/environment/air/fire/5-3-1_postcard_Espanol_2018.pdf"
     433                                                                                title="downloadable pdf"
     434                                                                                class="PDF">
     435                                                                                5-3-1 Cards from NM EPHT in Spanish
     436                                                                        </a>
     437                                                                </li>
     438                                                                <li>
     439                                                                        <a ibis:href="view/pdf/environment/air/fire/5-3-1_Poster_Spanish.pdf"
     440                                                                                title="downloadable pdf"
     441                                                                                class="PDF">
     442                                                                                Poster and Patient Guide from NM EPHT in Spanish
     443                                                                        </a>
     444                                                                </li>
     445                                                                <li>
     446                                                                        <a ibis:href="view/pdf/environment/air/fire/Smoke_and_Masks.01.18.13.pdf"
     447                                                                                title="downloadable pdf"
     448                                                                                class="PDF">
     449                                                                                Guide to Masks from NM EPHT
     450                                                                        </a>
     451                                                                </li>
     452                                                                <li>
     453                                                                        <a ibis:href="view/pdf/environment/air/fire/Smoke_COVID_Factsheet_NMEPHT_2020.pdf"
     454                                                                                title="downloadable pdf"
     455                                                                                class="PDF">
     456                                                                                Smoke and COVID-19 Safety Factsheet from NM EPHT
     457                                                                        </a>
     458                                                                </li>
     459                                                                <li>
     460                                                                        <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xcPSm0FH3AQ">New Mexico Fire Wildfire Response Video</a>
     461                                                                </li>
     462                                                                <li>
     463                                                                        <a href="https://nmfireinfo.com/">New Mexico Fire Information</a>
     464                                                                </li>
     465                                                                <li>
     466                                                                        <a href="https://nmtracking.org/health/breathing/Asthma.html"> New Mexico Asthma Information</a>
     467                                                                </li>
     468                                                                <li>
     469                                                                        <a href="https://nmtracking.org/environment/air/IndoorQuality.html"> New Mexico Indoor Air Quality Information</a>
     470                                                                </li>
     471                                                                <li>
     472                                                                        <a href="https://nmtracking.org/environment/air/OutdoorQuality.html"> New Mexico Indoor Outdoor Quality Information</a>
     473                                                                </li>
     474                                                        </ul>
     475                                                </div>
     476                                                <button>Show All</button>
    552477                                        </div>
    553478                                        <img ibis:src="view/image/topic/downloads_resources.png"/>
    554479                                </div>
    555480                        </div>
    556                         <!--
    557                         <div id="moreData" class="Columns">
    558                                 <div id="relatedData">
    559                                         <img ibis:src="view/image/topic/related_data.png"/>
    560                                         <h3>Reports and Data</h3>
    561                                         <div class="Selections Scroll">
    562                                                 <ul>
    563                                                 <li><a ibis:href="indicator/summary/https://nmtracking.org/dataportal/indicator/view/AirQualPM25.Percent.Cnty.html" title="PM2.5 Levels">Health Indicator Report of Air Quality - Particulate Matter (PM2.5) Level</a></li>
    564                                                         <li><a ibis:href="indicator/summary/https://nmtracking.org/dataportal/indicator/view/AsthmaEDAll.Year.NM_US.html" title="Asthma ED Visits">Asthma Emergency Department Encounters</a></li>
    565 
    566                                                         <li><a ibis:href="https://nmtracking.org/dataportal/query/result/wildlandfires/WildlandFires/NumberWildfires.html" title="Number of Wildland Fires">Number of Wildland Fires</a></li>
    567                                                        
    568                                                 </ul>
    569                                         </div>
    570                                         <button>Show All</button>
    571                                 </div>
    572                                
    573                                 <div id="relatedTopics">
    574                                         <img ibis:src="view/image/topic/related_topics.png"/>
    575                                         <h3>Related Topics</h3>
    576                                         <div class="Selections">
    577                                         <ul>
    578                                         <li><a ibis:href="https://nmtracking.org/health/breathing/Asthma.html" title="Asthma">Asthma</a></li>
    579                                                         <li><a ibis:href="https://nmtracking.org/environment/air/IndoorQuality.html" title="Indoor Air Quality">Indoor Air Quality</a></li>
    580                                                         <li><a ibis:href="https://nmtracking.org/environment/air/OutdoorQuality.html" title="Outdoor Air Quality">Outdoor Air Quality</a></li>
    581                                                 </ul>
    582                                         </div>
    583                                 </div>
    584                         </div>
    585                         -->
     481                        <!-- PGL - related topics, indicator reports are controlled by Sectionfiles located in directory below -->
    586482                        <ibis:TopicsMoreData topicSelectionsPath="../../../selections/environment/air/fire/"/>
    587483                </nav>
     
    591487                </section>
    592488                -->
    593                                        
    594                
    595        
    596 
    597489        </CONTENT>
    598490</HTML_CONTENT>
  • adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/nmepht-content/xml/selections/environment/air/fire/indicator_profiles.xml

    r22714 r22731  
    11<?xml version="1.0" encoding="ISO-8859-1"?>
    2 
    3 <SELECTIONS>
    4         <TITLE></TITLE>
     2<SELECTIONS>
     3        <TITLE>Air Quality</TITLE>
    54        <SELECTION>
    6 
     5                <TITLE>Particulate Matter (PM2.5) Level</TITLE>
     6                <SELECTIONS>
     7                        <SELECTION>
     8                                <TITLE>Air Quality - Particulate Matter (PM2.5) Level</TITLE>
     9                                <LOCAL_URL>dataportal/indicator/view/AirQualPM25.Percent.Cnty.html</LOCAL_URL>
     10                        </SELECTION>
     11                </SELECTIONS>
     12        </SELECTION>
     13        <SELECTION>
     14                <TITLE>Asthma</TITLE>
     15                <SELECTIONS>
     16                        <SELECTION>
     17                                <TITLE>Asthma Emergency Department Encounters</TITLE>
     18                                <LOCAL_URL>dataportal/indicator/view/AsthmaEDAll.Year.NM_US.html</LOCAL_URL>
     19                        </SELECTION>
     20                </SELECTIONS>
    721        </SELECTION>
    822</SELECTIONS>
  • adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/nmepht-content/xml/selections/environment/air/fire/query_modules.xml

    r22714 r22731  
    22
    33<SELECTIONS>
    4         <TITLE></TITLE>
     4        <TITLE>Wildland Fires</TITLE>
    55        <SELECTION>
    6 
     6                <TITLE>Number of Wildland Fires</TITLE>
     7                <LOCAL_URL>dataportal/query/result/wildlandfires/WildlandFires/NumberWildfires.html</LOCAL_URL>
    78        </SELECTION>
    89</SELECTIONS>
  • adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/nmepht-content/xml/selections/environment/air/fire/topics.xml

    r22714 r22731  
    33<SELECTIONS>
    44        <SELECTION>
    5                 <TITLE>Outdoor Air</TITLE>
     5                <TITLE>Asthma</TITLE>
    66                <DESCRIPTION></DESCRIPTION>
    7                 <LOCAL_URL>environment/air/OutdoorQuality.html</LOCAL_URL>
     7                <LOCAL_URL>health/breathing/Asthma.html</LOCAL_URL>
    88        </SELECTION>
    99        <SELECTION>
    10                 <TITLE>Indoor Air</TITLE>
     10                <TITLE>Indoor Air Quality</TITLE>
    1111                <DESCRIPTION></DESCRIPTION>
    1212                <LOCAL_URL>environment/air/IndoorQuality.html</LOCAL_URL>
    1313        </SELECTION>
    1414        <SELECTION>
    15                 <TITLE>Radon</TITLE>
     15                <TITLE>Outdoor Air Quality</TITLE>
    1616                <DESCRIPTION></DESCRIPTION>
    17                 <LOCAL_URL>environment/air/Radon.html</LOCAL_URL>
    18         </SELECTION>
    19         <SELECTION>
    20                 <TITLE>Fire and Smoke</TITLE>
    21                 <DESCRIPTION></DESCRIPTION>
    22                 <LOCAL_URL>environment/air/FireAndSmoke.html</LOCAL_URL>
     17                <LOCAL_URL>environment/air/OutdoorQuality.html</LOCAL_URL>
    2318        </SELECTION>
    2419</SELECTIONS>
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