Changeset 22715 in main


Ignore:
Timestamp:
03/16/21 22:38:20 (4 weeks ago)
Author:
GarthBraithwaite_STG
Message:

nm epht content - Cleaned up html struct for health topics. Changed cardio dir to cardiovascular.

Location:
adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/nmepht-content/xml
Files:
40 edited
1 moved

Legend:

Unmodified
Added
Removed
  • adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/nmepht-content/xml/html_content/dataportal/Introduction.xml

    r22685 r22715  
    5353                                        </li>
    5454                                        <li>
    55                                                 <h2><a ibis:href="dataportal/query/PublicDatasetIndex.html">Queryable Public Datasets</a></h2>
     55                                                <h2><a ibis:href="dataportal/query/Index.html">Queryable Public Datasets</a></h2>
    5656                                                "Queryable Datasets" provides access to public, deidentified datasets with
    5757                                                user-defined data criteria.  The resultant data have limited contextual information
  • adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/nmepht-content/xml/html_content/health/breathing/Allergy.xml

    r22677 r22715  
    1212                <script ibis:src="js/jquery.scrollBlockListItems.js"/>
    1313                <script>
    14                         var optionOverrides = {"maxSelectionsContainerHeight":120};
    1514                        $( document ).ready(function() {
    16                                 $(".Topic #moreData .Selections").scrollBlockListItems(optionOverrides);
     15                                $(".Topic #downloadsResources .Selections").scrollBlockListItems( {"maxSelectionsContainerHeight":190});
    1716                        });
    1817                </script>
    1918        </OTHER_HEAD_CONTENT>
    20 
    2119
    2220        <CONTENT>
     
    2725                </header>
    2826
    29 
    3027                <section>
    3128                        <h2>Learn about Seasonal Allergies</h2>
    32                                 <p>
    33                                         Sneezing, itchy eyes and nose and throat congestion are the key symptoms of seasonal allergies, which often come on suddenly and last a few days to a few months. The trigger is likely pollen. When a person is allergic to pollen, the body treats these tiny particles as invaders. Histamine and other chemicals are released by one's body into the bloodstream to combat the pollen and causes allergy symptoms. Hay fever (also known as allergic rhinitis) symptoms happen when trees, grasses, and weeds release tiny grains of pollen into the air during the fertilization phase of their reproductive cycle.
    34                                 </p>   
    35                                 <p>
    36                                         The severity of allergy symptoms depends on the type of pollen a person is allergic to (a person can be allergic to more than one kind of pollen); when that pollen is released; how much pollen is in the air, and; how much contact the person has with that pollen.
    37                                 </p>
    38                                 <h2>Allergy Signs and Symptoms</h2>
    39                                 <p>
    40                                         Seasonal allergies typically show up in the spring, autumn, and during windy weather but can happen throughout the year depending on the release of pollen. The typical symptoms of seasonal allergies include:
    41                                 </p>   
    42                                 <p>
    43                                         <ul class="Indent">
    44                                                 <li>
    45                                                         sneezing
    46                                                 </li>
    47                                                 <li>
    48                                                         itchy nose and/or throat
    49                                                 </li>
    50                                                 <li>
    51                                                         nasal congestion
    52                                                 </li>
    53                                                 <li>
    54                                                         clear, runny nose
    55                                                 </li>
    56                                                 <li>
    57                                                         coughing
    58                                                 </li>
    59                                                 <li>
    60                                                         itchy, watery, and/or red eyes.
    61                                                 </li>
    62                                         </ul>
    63                                 </p>
     29                        <p>
     30                                Sneezing, itchy eyes and nose and throat congestion are the key symptoms of seasonal allergies, which often come on suddenly and last a few days to a few months. The trigger is likely pollen. When a person is allergic to pollen, the body treats these tiny particles as invaders. Histamine and other chemicals are released by one's body into the bloodstream to combat the pollen and causes allergy symptoms. Hay fever (also known as allergic rhinitis) symptoms happen when trees, grasses, and weeds release tiny grains of pollen into the air during the fertilization phase of their reproductive cycle.
     31                        </p>   
     32                        <p>
     33                                The severity of allergy symptoms depends on the type of pollen a person is allergic to (a person can be allergic to more than one kind of pollen); when that pollen is released; how much pollen is in the air, and; how much contact the person has with that pollen.
     34                        </p>
     35                        <h2>Allergy Signs and Symptoms</h2>
     36                        <p>
     37                                Seasonal allergies typically show up in the spring, autumn, and during windy weather but can happen throughout the year depending on the release of pollen. The typical symptoms of seasonal allergies include:
     38                        </p>   
     39                        <ul class="Indent">
     40                                <li>
     41                                        sneezing
     42                                </li>
     43                                <li>
     44                                        itchy nose and/or throat
     45                                </li>
     46                                <li>
     47                                        nasal congestion
     48                                </li>
     49                                <li>
     50                                        clear, runny nose
     51                                </li>
     52                                <li>
     53                                        coughing
     54                                </li>
     55                                <li>
     56                                        itchy, watery, and/or red eyes.
     57                                </li>
     58                        </ul>
    6459                </section>
    65 
    6660
    6761                <section class="SubSectionsContainer">
     
    7670
    7771                                <div>
    78                                 <p>
    79                                         <h3>Seasonal allergy health tips</h3>
    80                                 </p>
    81                                 <p>
    82                                         Reducing exposure to allergens such as pollen is the best way to lighten the symptoms for a person with seasonal allergies looking for relief. Tips include:
    83                                 </p>
    84                                 <p>
    85                                         <span class="Bold">Wash the pollen away</span> and keep it away every day.
    86                                 </p>
     72                                        <p>
     73                                                <h3>Seasonal allergy health tips</h3>
     74                                        </p>
     75                                        <p>
     76                                                Reducing exposure to allergens such as pollen is the best way to lighten the symptoms for a person with seasonal allergies looking for relief. Tips include:
     77                                        </p>
     78                                        <p>
     79                                                <span class="Bold">Wash the pollen away</span> and keep it away every day.
     80                                        </p>
    8781                                        <ul>
    8882                                                <li>
     
    107101                                </div>
    108102                        </section>
    109                                 <p>
    110                                         <span class="Bold">Plan your day</span>
    111                                 </p>
    112                                 <p>
    113                                         <ul class="Indent">
    114                                                 <li>
    115                                                         Check the daily pollen counts.
    116                                                 </li>
    117                                                 <li>
    118                                                         If possible, stay indoors when pollen counts are high.
    119                                                 </li>
    120                                                 <li>
    121                                                         Plan outdoor activities for days when pollen counts are lower or when pollination does not occur for the trees, grasses or weeds that tend to cause your symptoms.
    122                                                 </li>
    123                                                 <li>
    124                                                         Take a shower after being outside during periods of high pollination.
    125                                                 </li>
    126                                                 <li>
    127                                                         Avoid doing yard work such as mowing lawns and trimming trees during pollination.
    128                                                 </li>
    129                                         </ul>
    130                                 </p>   
    131                                 <p>
    132                                         <span class="Bold">Clean your home, </span>car, and work place.
    133                                 </p>
    134                                 <p>
    135                                         <ul class="Indent">
    136                                                 <li>
    137                                                         Dust frequently with a damp cloth and use a vacuum with a HEPA filter. In addition to vacuuming your floors, you should also clean upholstered furniture such as couches, chairs and car seats.
    138                                                 </li>
    139                                                 <li>
    140                                                         Deep clean in the spring, summer and autumn. Wash the walls, countertops, desks and other surfaces regularly with soap and water.
    141                                                 </li>
    142                                                 <li>
    143                                                         Wash your bedding. While it is common to wash and change bed sheets weekly, if you have seasonal allergies you should also wash blankets, comforters, and bedspreads. Use mattress and pillow covers that can take frequent washing.
    144                                                 </li>
    145                                                 <li>
    146                                                         Wash household items made of fabric such as table linens, throw rugs, and curtains.
    147                                                 </li>
    148                                                 <li>
    149                                                         With so many sunny days in New Mexico it may be tempting to dry your clothes, towels and bed sheets on an outdoor clothesline. Avoid doing this during pollination season of the trees, grasses or weeds.
    150                                                 </li>
    151                                                 <li>
    152                                                         Vacuum clean your car or truck frequently and wipe all surfaces with a damp cloth.
    153                                                 </li>
    154                                                 <li>
    155                                                         Periodically replace the filters in your heating (furnace) and cooling systems (air conditioner or swamp cooler).
    156                                                 </li>
    157                                                 <li>
    158                                                         Wash clothes that you wear every day, such a windbreakers, light jackets, sweatshirts and sweaters, frequently.
    159                                                 </li>
    160                                         </ul>
    161                                 </p>   
    162                                 <p>
    163                                         <span class="Bold">Landscape </span>for low pollen potential.
    164                                 </p>
    165                                 <p>
    166                                         <ul class="Indent">
    167                                                 <li>
    168                                                         Do you have wind-pollinating trees or shrubs right outside your bedroom window?
    169                                                 </li>
    170                                                 <li>
    171                                                         How close to your entryway is grass growing?
    172                                                 </li>
    173                                                 <li>
    174                                                         Choose landscape options carefully and keep pollination patterns in mind as you plan your yard and garden. For example, plant flowering plants that are pollinated by insects rather than by the wind. In New Mexico cacti and succulents are an option for people with seasonal allergies because these plants are drought-resistant and low pollen producers. Keep in mind that most trees pollinate with the wind and that male trees or shrubs produce more pollen than the female ones.
    175                                                 </li>
    176                                                 <li>
    177                                                         Check your local ordinances to learn which plants are not allowed in landscaping where you live.
    178                                                 </li>   
    179                                         </ul>
    180                                 </p>
    181                                 <p>
    182                                         <span class="Bold">Medical options</span>
    183                                 </p>   
    184 
    185                                 <p>
    186                                         Since New Mexico has many mild days of nice weather and great landscapes to explore, staying inside all the time may not be realistic for many. If this is the case for you; talk to your doctor about which medicines (sold over-the counter or prescription), such as nasal sprays would work for you. Your doctor may refer you to an allergist to help you find treatment options. Understanding when the high season is for the pollen you are allergic to is helpful, so you may plan your start date for treatments.
    187                                 </p>
    188                                
    189                                 <h2>New Mexico's Seasonal Pollen Periods</h2>
    190                                 <p>
    191                                                 If you notice a rise in symptoms in early spring, usually in March and April, this may be due to allergies of tree pollens. In central and northern New Mexico, often those trees are Juniper and Cottonwood. Juniper is known to begin releasing pollen as early as December, peaking in March and April. Cottonwood typically begins pollinating in March and this lasts through June.
    192                                         </p>   
    193                                         <p>
    194                                                 Weeds associated with seasonal allergies include ragweed (there are several kinds) and sagebrush which tend to pollinate in late summer and fall. Russian thistle, commonly known as tumbleweed, pollinates from spring through summer.
    195                                         </p>
     103
     104                        <span class="Bold">Plan your day</span>
     105                        <ul class="Indent">
     106                                <li>
     107                                        Check the daily pollen counts.
     108                                </li>
     109                                <li>
     110                                        If possible, stay indoors when pollen counts are high.
     111                                </li>
     112                                <li>
     113                                        Plan outdoor activities for days when pollen counts are lower or when pollination does not occur for the trees, grasses or weeds that tend to cause your symptoms.
     114                                </li>
     115                                <li>
     116                                        Take a shower after being outside during periods of high pollination.
     117                                </li>
     118                                <li>
     119                                        Avoid doing yard work such as mowing lawns and trimming trees during pollination.
     120                                </li>
     121                        </ul>
     122
     123                        <span class="Bold">Clean your home, </span>car, and work place.
     124                        <ul class="Indent">
     125                                <li>
     126                                        Dust frequently with a damp cloth and use a vacuum with a HEPA filter. In addition to vacuuming your floors, you should also clean upholstered furniture such as couches, chairs and car seats.
     127                                </li>
     128                                <li>
     129                                        Deep clean in the spring, summer and autumn. Wash the walls, countertops, desks and other surfaces regularly with soap and water.
     130                                </li>
     131                                <li>
     132                                        Wash your bedding. While it is common to wash and change bed sheets weekly, if you have seasonal allergies you should also wash blankets, comforters, and bedspreads. Use mattress and pillow covers that can take frequent washing.
     133                                </li>
     134                                <li>
     135                                        Wash household items made of fabric such as table linens, throw rugs, and curtains.
     136                                </li>
     137                                <li>
     138                                        With so many sunny days in New Mexico it may be tempting to dry your clothes, towels and bed sheets on an outdoor clothesline. Avoid doing this during pollination season of the trees, grasses or weeds.
     139                                </li>
     140                                <li>
     141                                        Vacuum clean your car or truck frequently and wipe all surfaces with a damp cloth.
     142                                </li>
     143                                <li>
     144                                        Periodically replace the filters in your heating (furnace) and cooling systems (air conditioner or swamp cooler).
     145                                </li>
     146                                <li>
     147                                        Wash clothes that you wear every day, such a windbreakers, light jackets, sweatshirts and sweaters, frequently.
     148                                </li>
     149                        </ul>
     150
     151                        <span class="Bold">Landscape </span>for low pollen potential.
     152                        <ul class="Indent">
     153                                <li>
     154                                        Do you have wind-pollinating trees or shrubs right outside your bedroom window?
     155                                </li>
     156                                <li>
     157                                        How close to your entryway is grass growing?
     158                                </li>
     159                                <li>
     160                                        Choose landscape options carefully and keep pollination patterns in mind as you plan your yard and garden. For example, plant flowering plants that are pollinated by insects rather than by the wind. In New Mexico cacti and succulents are an option for people with seasonal allergies because these plants are drought-resistant and low pollen producers. Keep in mind that most trees pollinate with the wind and that male trees or shrubs produce more pollen than the female ones.
     161                                </li>
     162                                <li>
     163                                        Check your local ordinances to learn which plants are not allowed in landscaping where you live.
     164                                </li>   
     165                        </ul>
     166                        <span class="Bold">Medical options</span>
     167
     168                        <p>
     169                                Since New Mexico has many mild days of nice weather and great landscapes to explore, staying inside all the time may not be realistic for many. If this is the case for you; talk to your doctor about which medicines (sold over-the counter or prescription), such as nasal sprays would work for you. Your doctor may refer you to an allergist to help you find treatment options. Understanding when the high season is for the pollen you are allergic to is helpful, so you may plan your start date for treatments.
     170                        </p>
     171                       
     172                        <h2>New Mexico's Seasonal Pollen Periods</h2>
     173                        <p>
     174                                        If you notice a rise in symptoms in early spring, usually in March and April, this may be due to allergies of tree pollens. In central and northern New Mexico, often those trees are Juniper and Cottonwood. Juniper is known to begin releasing pollen as early as December, peaking in March and April. Cottonwood typically begins pollinating in March and this lasts through June.
     175                        </p>   
     176                        <p>
     177                                Weeds associated with seasonal allergies include ragweed (there are several kinds) and sagebrush which tend to pollinate in late summer and fall. Russian thistle, commonly known as tumbleweed, pollinates from spring through summer.
     178                        </p>
     179
    196180                        <section class="ImageInfoBlock">
    197181                                <div>
    198                                        
    199182                                        <h3>
    200183                                                Pollination in the Central New Mexico/Albuquerque metro area
    201184                                        </h3>
    202                                                 <p>
    203                                                         <ul>                           
    204                                                                 <li>
    205                                                                         Elm pollen is produced from January through April.
    206                                                                 </li>
    207                                                                 <li>
    208                                                                         Ash pollen is produced from March through June.
    209                                                                 </li>
    210                                                                 <li>
    211                                                                         Cottonwood pollen is produced from March through June.
    212                                                                 </li>
    213                                                                 <li>
    214                                                                         Mulberry pollen is produced from April through May.
    215                                                                 </li>
    216                                                                
    217                                                                 <li>
    218                                                                         Sage pollen is produced from May through August.
    219                                                                 </li>
    220                                                                 <li>
    221                                                                         Grass pollen is produced from May through October.
    222                                                                 </li>
    223                                                                 <li>
    224                                                                         Ragweed pollen is produced from August through October.                                                 
    225                                                                 </li>   
    226                                                                 <li>
    227                                                                         Chenopodiaceae (common weeds) pollen is produced from April through August.
    228                                                                 </li>
    229                                                                 <li>
    230                                                                         Juniper/cedar pollen is produced from January through April and September through December.
    231                                                                 </li>
    232                                                                
    233                                                         </ul>
    234                                                 </p>
     185
     186                                        <ul>                           
     187                                                <li>
     188                                                        Elm pollen is produced from January through April.
     189                                                </li>
     190                                                <li>
     191                                                        Ash pollen is produced from March through June.
     192                                                </li>
     193                                                <li>
     194                                                        Cottonwood pollen is produced from March through June.
     195                                                </li>
     196                                                <li>
     197                                                        Mulberry pollen is produced from April through May.
     198                                                </li>
     199                                               
     200                                                <li>
     201                                                        Sage pollen is produced from May through August.
     202                                                </li>
     203                                                <li>
     204                                                        Grass pollen is produced from May through October.
     205                                                </li>
     206                                                <li>
     207                                                        Ragweed pollen is produced from August through October.                                                 
     208                                                </li>   
     209                                                <li>
     210                                                        Chenopodiaceae (common weeds) pollen is produced from April through August.
     211                                                </li>
     212                                                <li>
     213                                                        Juniper/cedar pollen is produced from January through April and September through December.
     214                                                </li>
     215                                               
     216                                        </ul>
     217
    235218                                        <p>
    236219                                                Source: City of Albuquerque Air Quality Bureau
    237220                                        </p>
    238                                         </div>
     221                                </div>
     222
    239223                                <figure title="New Mexico pollination by season">
    240224                                        <img ibis:src="view/image/health/breathing/allergy/pollen-periods.jpg"/>
     
    244228                        </section>
    245229                </section>
     230
    246231                <nav id="moreInformation" title="Links for more information">
    247 <!--
    248                         <h2>More Information</h2>
    249 -->
    250232                        <div id="downloadsResources">
    251233                                <h3>Downloads and Resources</h3>
     
    277259                        </div>
    278260
    279        
    280 
    281                         <div id="moreData" class="Columns">
    282                                 <div id="relatedData">
    283                                         <img ibis:src="view/image/topic/related_data.png"/>
    284                                         <h3>Reports and Data</h3>
    285                                         <div class="Selections Scroll">
    286                                                 <ul>
    287                                                         <li>
    288                                                                 No related data available
    289                                                         </li>
    290                                                        
    291                                                 </ul>
    292                                                
    293                                         </div>
    294                                         <button>Show All</button>
    295                                 </div>
    296 
    297                                 <div id="relatedTopics">
    298                                         <img ibis:src="view/image/topic/related_topics.png"/>
    299                                         <h3>Related Topics</h3>
    300                                                 <div class="Selections">
    301                                                         <ul>
    302                                                                 <li>
    303                                                                         <a ibis:href="environment/air/OutdoorQuality.html" title="outdoor air quality">Outdoor Air Quality</a>
    304                                                                 </li>
    305                                                                 <li>
    306                                                                         <a ibis:href="health/breathing/Asthma.html" title="indoor air quality">Asthma</a>
    307                                                                 </li>
    308                                                                 <li>
    309                                                                         <a ibis:href="environment/living/HealthyHomes.html" title="healthy homes">Healthy Homes</a>
    310                                                                 </li>
    311                                                         </ul>   
    312                                                 </div>
    313                                 </div>
    314                         </div>
     261                        <ibis:TopicsMoreData topicSelectionsPath="../../../selections/health/breathing/allery/"/>
    315262                </nav>
    316 
    317 
    318                 <section class="Citation">
    319                         <h2>Citation</h2>
    320                         Page content updated on 12/21/2020, Published on 1/1/2020
    321                        
    322                         <ibis:include ibis:href="xml/html_content/citation/SomeEpiGroupContactInfo.xml" children-only-flag="true"/>
    323                        
    324                         <ibis:include ibis:href="xml/html_content/citation/DeyonneSandoval.xml" children-only-flag="true"/>
    325                 </section>
    326263
    327264        </CONTENT>
  • adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/nmepht-content/xml/html_content/health/breathing/Asthma.xml

    r22705 r22715  
    2424                        <h1>Asthma</h1>
    2525                </header>
    26                         <section>
    27                                 <h2>About Asthma in New Mexico</h2>
    28                                 <p>
    29                                         Asthma is one of the most common chronic diseases in New Mexico, with an estimated 136,000 (8.4%) adults and 26,000 (5.4%) children currently having the disease. People with asthma are more likely to miss school or work, report feelings of depression, and experience an overall reduced quality of life. Asthma is also costly, with expenses from routine checkups, emergency department visits, hospitalizations, and medications putting a significant burden on families, the health care sector, and the economy. Though it cannot be cured, asthma can be controlled through quality health care, appropriate medications, and good self-management skills. When asthma is controlled, people with the disease have few, if any, symptoms, and can live normal and productive lives. Asthma is frequently diagnosed in childhood. Sometimes asthma symptoms may go dormant for a number of years only to return later in adulthood. Occasionally, adults can develop asthma later in life. Given this complexity, two prevalence measures are helpful in assessing the disease burden: Lifetime prevalence (if an individual has ever been diagnosed as having asthma) and current prevalence (if the individual reports he or she still has asthma).
    30                                 </p>
    31                         </section>
     26
     27                <section>
     28                        <h2>About Asthma in New Mexico</h2>
     29                        <p>
     30                                Asthma is one of the most common chronic diseases in New Mexico, with an estimated 136,000 (8.4%) adults and 26,000 (5.4%) children currently having the disease. People with asthma are more likely to miss school or work, report feelings of depression, and experience an overall reduced quality of life. Asthma is also costly, with expenses from routine checkups, emergency department visits, hospitalizations, and medications putting a significant burden on families, the health care sector, and the economy. Though it cannot be cured, asthma can be controlled through quality health care, appropriate medications, and good self-management skills. When asthma is controlled, people with the disease have few, if any, symptoms, and can live normal and productive lives. Asthma is frequently diagnosed in childhood. Sometimes asthma symptoms may go dormant for a number of years only to return later in adulthood. Occasionally, adults can develop asthma later in life. Given this complexity, two prevalence measures are helpful in assessing the disease burden: Lifetime prevalence (if an individual has ever been diagnosed as having asthma) and current prevalence (if the individual reports he or she still has asthma).
     31                        </p>
     32                </section>
    3233
    3334                <section class="SubSectionsContainer">
  • adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/nmepht-content/xml/html_content/health/breathing/COPD.xml

    r22677 r22715  
    1212                <script ibis:src="js/jquery.scrollBlockListItems.js"/>
    1313                <script>
    14                         var optionOverrides = {"maxSelectionsContainerHeight":120};
    1514                        $( document ).ready(function() {
    16                                 $(".Topic #moreData .Selections").scrollBlockListItems(optionOverrides);
     15                                $(".Topic #downloadsResources .Selections").scrollBlockListItems( {"maxSelectionsContainerHeight":190});
    1716                        });
    1817                </script>
    1918        </OTHER_HEAD_CONTENT>
    20 
    2119
    2220        <CONTENT>
     
    2725                </header>
    2826
     27                <section>
     28                        <h2>What is COPD?</h2>
     29                </section>
    2930
    30                 <section>
    31                         <p>
    32                                 <h2>What is COPD?</h2>
    33                         </p>   
    34                 </section>
    3531                <section class="SubSectionsContainer">
    3632                        <p>
    3733                                Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a group of serious lung diseases that include emphysema and chronic bronchitis. COPD can cause coughing with, or without large amounts of mucus, wheezing, shortness of breath, chest tightness, and other symptoms. When COPD is severe, it can cause long-term disability and death. Lower respiratory diseases, which include COPD, are the 4th leading cause of death in the United States<a href="#ref1" id="ref1.link" aria-describedby="footnote-label"></a> and in New Mexico<a href="#ref2" id="ref2.link" aria-describedby="footnote-label"></a>.
    3834                        </p>
    39                                 <p>
     35                        <p>
    4036                                In COPD, less air flows in and out of the airways because of one or more of the following:                             
    4137                        </p>
     
    5147                                                <li>
    5248                                                        The airways and air sacs where oxygen and carbon dioxide are exchanged lose their elastic quality.
    53                                                 </li><p></p>
     49                                                </li>
    5450                                                <li>
    5551                                                        The walls between many of the air sacs are destroyed.
    56                                                 </li><p></p>
     52                                                </li>
    5753                                                <li>
    5854                                                        The walls of the airways become thick and inflamed.
    59                                                         </li><p></p>
     55                                                </li>
    6056                                                <li>
    6157                                                        The airways make more mucus than usual and can become clogged.
    62                                                 </li><p></p>
     58                                                </li>
    6359                                        </ul>
    6460                                </div>
    6561                        </section>
     62
    6663                        <section>
    6764                                <p>
     
    6966                                </p>
    7067                                <h3>Learn about COPD causes and risk factors</h3>
    71                                         <p></p>
    72                                         By far, the largest risk factor for COPD is smoking; Up to 75 percent of people who have COPD smoke or used to smoke<a href="#ref3" id="ref3.link" aria-describedby="footnote-label"></a>. Occupational exposures, (vapor, dust, gas or fumes) may account for about 15% of COPD but 25% of COPD among those who have never smoked<a href="#ref4" id="ref4.link" aria-describedby="footnote-label"></a>. Other environmental factors include exposure to motor vehicle exhaust and exposure to burning of biomass (e.g. cooking over wood stoves). Other factors include frequent respiratory infections in childhood and having Alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency, a rare genetic disorder<a href="#ref5" id="ref5.link" aria-describedby="footnote-label"></a>.
    73                                         <p></p>
    74                                         As of 2014, 15.7 million Americans reported having physician-diagnosed COPD, however it is there is a common belief that COPD often goes undiagnosed. There are also large racial, ethnic, socioeconomic, and gender biases in COPD prevalence. In 2013, the following U.S. groups were more likely to report having COPD<a href="#ref6" id="ref6.link" aria-describedby="footnote-label"></a>:
    75                                         <ul class="Indent">
     68                                By far, the largest risk factor for COPD is smoking; Up to 75 percent of people who have COPD smoke or used to smoke<a href="#ref3" id="ref3.link" aria-describedby="footnote-label"></a>. Occupational exposures, (vapor, dust, gas or fumes) may account for about 15% of COPD but 25% of COPD among those who have never smoked<a href="#ref4" id="ref4.link" aria-describedby="footnote-label"></a>. Other environmental factors include exposure to motor vehicle exhaust and exposure to burning of biomass (e.g. cooking over wood stoves). Other factors include frequent respiratory infections in childhood and having Alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency, a rare genetic disorder<a href="#ref5" id="ref5.link" aria-describedby="footnote-label"></a>.
     69                                As of 2014, 15.7 million Americans reported having physician-diagnosed COPD, however it is there is a common belief that COPD often goes undiagnosed. There are also large racial, ethnic, socioeconomic, and gender biases in COPD prevalence. In 2013, the following U.S. groups were more likely to report having COPD<a href="#ref6" id="ref6.link" aria-describedby="footnote-label"></a>:
     70                                <ul class="Indent">
     71                                        <li>
     72                                                Women
     73                                        </li>
     74                                        <li>
     75                                                People aged 65 to 74 years and over 75 years
     76                                        </li>
     77                                        <li>
     78                                                American Indians/Alaska Natives and multiracial non-Hispanics
     79                                        </li>
     80                                        <li>
     81                                                People who were unemployed, retired, or unable to work
     82                                        </li>
     83                                        <li>
     84                                                People with less than a high school education
     85                                        </li>
     86                                        <li>
     87                                                People who were divorced, widowed, or separated
     88                                        </li>
     89                                        <li>
     90                                                Current or former smokers
     91                                        </li>
     92                                        <li>
     93                                                People with a history of asthma.
     94                                        </li>
     95                                </ul>
     96                        </section>
     97
     98                        <section class="ImageInfoBlock">
     99                                <div>
     100                                        <h3>Tips for managing COPD</h3>
     101                                        <ul>
    76102                                                <li>
    77                                                         Women
     103                                                        <span class="Bold">Quit smoking</span> and keep your home smoke free. 
    78104                                                </li>
    79105                                                <li>
    80                                                         People aged 65 to 74 years and over 75 years
     106                                                        <span class="Bold">Visit your doctor regularly. </span> Let your provider know if any of your symptoms change over time.
    81107                                                </li>
    82108                                                <li>
    83                                                         American Indians/Alaska Natives and multiracial non-Hispanics
     109                                                        <span class="Bold">Protect yourself from germs that can affect the lungs.</span> Talk with your doctor about which vaccines to get, including for flu (influenza) and pneumonia.
    84110                                                </li>
    85111                                                <li>
    86                                                         People who were unemployed, retired, or unable to work
     112                                                        <span class="Bold">Prepare for disease flare-ups. </span> Know when and where to seek help for your symptoms. Get emergency care if you have severe symptoms, such as trouble catching your breath or talking.
    87113                                                </li>
    88114                                                <li>
    89                                                         People with less than a high school education
     115                                                        <span class="Bold">Pay attention to air quality outdoors. </span> Limit your time outside when pollution levels are high and during wildland fire smoke events.
    90116                                                </li>
    91117                                                <li>
    92                                                         People who were divorced, widowed, or separated
    93                                                 </li>
    94                                                 <li>
    95                                                         Current or former smokers
    96                                                 </li>
    97                                                 <li>
    98                                                         People with a history of asthma.
    99                                                 </li>
     118                                                        <span class="Bold">Pay attention to air quality indoors. </span>High pollutant levels inside the home can make breathing harder for people with COPD. Don't let others smoke in your home. Limit cooking methods that create smoke or fumes. Don't overuse harsh cleaning products. 
     119                                                </li>                                           
    100120                                        </ul>
    101                         </section>
    102                         <section class="ImageInfoBlock">
    103                                 <div>
    104                                         <p>
    105                                         <h3>Tips for managing COPD</h3>
    106                                         </p>
    107                                                         <ul>
    108                                                                 <li>
    109                                                                         <span class="Bold">Quit smoking</span> and keep your home smoke free. 
    110                                                                 </li>
    111                                                                 <li>
    112                                                                         <span class="Bold">Visit your doctor regularly. </span> Let your provider know if any of your symptoms change over time.
    113                                                                 </li>
    114                                                                 <li>
    115                                                                         <span class="Bold">Protect yourself from germs that can affect the lungs.</span> Talk with your doctor about which vaccines to get, including for flu (influenza) and pneumonia.
    116                                                                 </li>
    117                                                                 <li>
    118                                                                         <span class="Bold">Prepare for disease flare-ups. </span> Know when and where to seek help for your symptoms. Get emergency care if you have severe symptoms, such as trouble catching your breath or talking.
    119                                                                 </li>
    120                                                                 <li>
    121                                                                         <span class="Bold">Pay attention to air quality outdoors. </span> Limit your time outside when pollution levels are high and during wildland fire smoke events.
    122                                                                 </li>
    123                                                                 <li>
    124                                                                         <span class="Bold">Pay attention to air quality indoors. </span>High pollutant levels inside the home can make breathing harder for people with COPD. Don't let others smoke in your home. Limit cooking methods that create smoke or fumes. Don't overuse harsh cleaning products. 
    125                                                                 </li>                                           
    126                                                         </ul>
    127121                                </div> 
    128122
     
    134128                        </section>
    135129                </section>
    136 <footer class="Footnotes"><ol>
     130
     131                <footer class="Footnotes">
     132                        <ol>
    137133                                <li id="ref1"> <a href="https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/fastats/leading-causes-of-death.htm">
    138134                                        Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: Leading Causes of Death</a> Accessed 12/30/2020
    139                                 <a href="#ref1.link" aria-label="Back to content">«</a></li>
    140                         </ol></footer>
    141                         <footer class="Footnotes"><ol>
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     136                                </li>
    142137                                <li id="ref2"> <a href="https://ibis.health.state.nm.us/query/selection/mort/_MortSelection.html">
    143138                                        New Mexico Death Certificate Database, Bureau of Vital Records and Health Statistics, New Mexico Department of Health from New Mexico Department of Health, Indicator-Based Information System for Public Health website</a> Accessed 12/30/2020.
    144                                 <a href="#ref2.link" aria-label="Back to content">«</a></li>
    145                         </ol></footer>
    146                         <footer class="Footnotes"><ol>
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     140                                </li>
    147141                                <li id="ref3"> <a href="https://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health-topics/copd">
    148142                                        National Institutes of Health, National Heart, Blood, and Lung Institute: COPD</a> Accessed 12/31/2020.
    149143                                <a href="#ref3.link" aria-label="Back to content">«</a></li>
    150                         </ol></footer>
    151                         <footer class="Footnotes"><ol>
    152144                                <li id="ref4"> <a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.15585/mmwr.mm6813a2external icon">
    153145                                        Syamlal G, Doney B, Mazurek JM. Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Prevalence Among Adults Who Have Never Smoked, by Industry and Occupation - United States, 2013-2017. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep 2019;68:303-307. DOI:</a> Accessed 12/31/2020.
    154146                                <a href="#ref4.link" aria-label="Back to content">«</a></li>
    155                         </ol></footer>
    156                         <footer class="Footnotes"><ol>
    157147                                <li id="ref5"> <a href="https://rarediseases.info.nih.gov/diseases/5784/alpha-1-antitrypsin-deficiency">
    158148                                        National Institutes of Health, Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center: Alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency</a> Accessed 12/31/2020.
    159149                                <a href="#ref5.link" aria-label="Back to content">«</a></li>
    160                         </ol></footer> 
    161                         <footer class="Footnotes"><ol>
    162150                                <li id="ref6"> <a href="https://www.cdc.gov/copd/basics-about.html">
    163151                                        Centers for Disease Control and Prevention:deficiency: COPD Basics</a> Accessed 12/31/2020.
    164152                                <a href="#ref6.link" aria-label="Back to content">«</a></li>
    165                         </ol></footer> 
    166 
    167                 <section>
    168                         <h2></h2>
    169                 </section>
    170 
     153                        </ol>
     154                </footer>       
    171155
    172156                <nav id="moreInformation" title="Links for more information">
     
    189173                        </div>
    190174
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    192                                 <div id="relatedData">
    193                                         <img ibis:src="view/image/topic/related_data.png"/>
    194                                         <h3>Reports and Data</h3>
    195                                         <div class="Selections Scroll">
    196                                         </div>
    197                                         <button>Show All</button>
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    199 
    200                                 <div id="relatedTopics">
    201                                         <img ibis:src="view/image/topic/related_topics.png"/>
    202                                         <h3>Related Topics</h3>
    203                                         <div class="Selections">
    204                                                 <ul>
    205                                                         <li>
    206                                                                 <a ibis:href="environment/air/OutdoorQuality.html" title="outdoor air quality">Outdoor Air Quality</a>
    207                                                         </li>
    208                                                         <li>
    209                                                                 <a ibis:href="environment/air/IndoorQuality.html" title="indoor air quality">Indoor Air Quality</a>
    210                                                         </li>
    211                                                         <li>
    212                                                                 <a ibis:href="environment/air/FireAndSmoke.html" title="fire and smoke">Fire and Smoke</a>
    213                                                         </li>
    214                                                         <li>
    215                                                                 <a ibis:href="health/breathing/Asthma.html" title="asthma">Asthma</a>
    216                                                         </li>
    217                                                         <li>
    218                                                                 <a ibis:href="health/cardio/HeartAttack.html" title="heart attack">Heart Attack</a>
    219                                                         </li>
    220                                                 </ul>
    221                                         </div>
    222                                 </div>
    223                         </div>
     175                        <ibis:TopicsMoreData topicSelectionsPath="../../../selections/health/breathing/copd/"/>
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    225 
    226 
    227                 <section class="Citation">
    228                         <h2>Citation</h2>
    229                         Page content updated on 1/20/2021, Published on 1/1/2020
    230                        
    231                         <ibis:include ibis:href="xml/html_content/citation/SomeEpiGroupContactInfo.xml" children-only-flag="true"/>
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    235177
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  • adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/nmepht-content/xml/html_content/health/cancer/AcuteLymphocyticLeukemia.xml

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     18        </OTHER_HEAD_CONTENT>
    619
    720        <CONTENT>
  • adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/nmepht-content/xml/html_content/health/cancer/AcuteMyeloidLeukemia.xml

    r21970 r22715  
    44
    55        <TITLE>Acute Myeloid Leukemia</TITLE>
     6
     7        <HTML_CLASS>Topic Health</HTML_CLASS>
     8        <OTHER_HEAD_CONTENT>
     9                <link ibis:href="css/Topic.css" rel="stylesheet" type="text/css"/>
     10                <link ibis:href="css/_SiteSpecific-Topic.css" rel="stylesheet" type="text/css"/>
     11
     12                <script ibis:src="js/jquery.scrollBlockListItems.js"/>
     13                <script>
     14                        $( document ).ready(function() {
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     17                </script>
     18        </OTHER_HEAD_CONTENT>
    619
    720        <CONTENT>
  • adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/nmepht-content/xml/html_content/health/cancer/Bladder.xml

    r12244 r22715  
    44
    55        <TITLE>Bladder Cancer</TITLE>
     6
     7        <HTML_CLASS>Topic Health</HTML_CLASS>
     8        <OTHER_HEAD_CONTENT>
     9                <link ibis:href="css/Topic.css" rel="stylesheet" type="text/css"/>
     10                <link ibis:href="css/_SiteSpecific-Topic.css" rel="stylesheet" type="text/css"/>
     11
     12                <script ibis:src="js/jquery.scrollBlockListItems.js"/>
     13                <script>
     14                        $( document ).ready(function() {
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     17                </script>
     18        </OTHER_HEAD_CONTENT>
    619
    720        <CONTENT>
  • adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/nmepht-content/xml/html_content/health/cancer/BrainSpinalCord.xml

    r12244 r22715  
    44
    55        <TITLE>Brain and Spinal Cord Cancer</TITLE>
     6
     7        <HTML_CLASS>Topic Health</HTML_CLASS>
     8        <OTHER_HEAD_CONTENT>
     9                <link ibis:href="css/Topic.css" rel="stylesheet" type="text/css"/>
     10                <link ibis:href="css/_SiteSpecific-Topic.css" rel="stylesheet" type="text/css"/>
     11
     12                <script ibis:src="js/jquery.scrollBlockListItems.js"/>
     13                <script>
     14                        $( document ).ready(function() {
     15                                $(".Topic #downloadsResources .Selections").scrollBlockListItems( {"maxSelectionsContainerHeight":190});
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     18        </OTHER_HEAD_CONTENT>
    619
    720        <CONTENT>
  • adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/nmepht-content/xml/html_content/health/cancer/Cancer.xml

    r22677 r22715  
    1212                <script ibis:src="js/jquery.scrollBlockListItems.js"/>
    1313                <script>
    14                         var optionOverrides = {"maxSelectionsContainerHeight":120};
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    1918        </OTHER_HEAD_CONTENT>
    2019
    21 
    2220        <CONTENT>
    23 
    2421                <header>
    2522                        <img ibis:src="view/image/health/cancer/cancer/southvalley-abq.jpg" title="Valle de Oro, Southwest Albuquerque"/>
     
    2724                </header>
    2825
    29 
    3026                <section>
    3127                        <h2>What is Cancer?</h2>
    3228               
    33                 <p>
    34                         Cancers are a group of about 100 related diseases where some cells in the body change and divide without control. As the abnormal cells continue to grow, they form a tumor. As the tumor grows it can metastasize, or spread, and begin forming new tumors in different parts of the body. Not all cancers behave the same way; different types of cancer have different growth rates and respond differently to anti-cancer treatments. In medical terms, cancer is referred to as malignant neoplasms.
    35                 </p>
    36                 <p>
    37                         About 1.7 million new cases of cancer are expected to be diagnosed during 2018 in the United States. U.S. cancer care costs were $147.3 billion in 2017. In the future, costs are likely to increase due to an aging population having more cancer, coupled with the costs of new, and often more expensive treatments which will be adopted as standards of care. The good news is that the overall cancer death rate in the U.S. fell 26% between 1991 and 2015. The National Cancer Institute (NCI) estimated that, in 2016, there were 15.5 million cancer survivors in the United States. The number of cancer survivors is expected to increase to <a href="#ref1" id="ref1.link" aria-describedby="footnote-label">20.3 million by 2026.</a>
    38                 </p>
    39                 <p>
     29                        <p>
     30                                Cancers are a group of about 100 related diseases where some cells in the body change and divide without control. As the abnormal cells continue to grow, they form a tumor. As the tumor grows it can metastasize, or spread, and begin forming new tumors in different parts of the body. Not all cancers behave the same way; different types of cancer have different growth rates and respond differently to anti-cancer treatments. In medical terms, cancer is referred to as malignant neoplasms.
     31                        </p>
     32                        <p>
     33                                About 1.7 million new cases of cancer are expected to be diagnosed during 2018 in the United States. U.S. cancer care costs were $147.3 billion in 2017. In the future, costs are likely to increase due to an aging population having more cancer, coupled with the costs of new, and often more expensive treatments which will be adopted as standards of care. The good news is that the overall cancer death rate in the U.S. fell 26% between 1991 and 2015. The National Cancer Institute (NCI) estimated that, in 2016, there were 15.5 million cancer survivors in the United States. The number of cancer survivors is expected to increase to <a href="#ref1" id="ref1.link" aria-describedby="footnote-label">20.3 million by 2026.</a>
     34                        </p>
    4035                        <footer class="Footnotes"><ol>
    4136                                <li id="ref1"> <a href="https://acsjournals.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.3322/caac.21349">
     
    4338                                <a href="#ref1.link" aria-label="Back to content">«</a></li>
    4439                        </ol></footer>
    45                 </p>   
    4640                </section>
     41
    4742                <section class="SubSectionsContainer">
    4843                        <h2>What are the Risk Factors?</h2>
    49                                 <p>
    50                                         Major risk factors for cancer include  <a href="#ref2" id="ref2.link" aria-describedby="footnote-label">tobacco use, diet, lack of exercise, and sun exposure.</a>. For example, people who smoke cigarettes are <a href="#ref3" id="ref3.link" aria-describedby="footnote-label">15 to 30 times more likely to get lung cancer or die from lung cancer</a> than people who do not smoke. Researchers have also identified genetic risks for cancer. Compared to women without a family history, <a href="#ref4" id="ref4.link" aria-describedby="footnote-label">risk of breast cancer is about 1.5 times higher for women with one affected first-degree female relative and 2-4 times higher for women with more than one first-degree relative.</a>
    51                                 </p>
    52                                 <p>
    53                                         Nobody is immune from getting cancer. Even though scientific studies have shown that specific factors increase the risk for cancer, but sometimes people who have no known risk factors still develop cancer while others and people who have many risk factors, yet never do not develop cancer. The following list contains common cancer risk factors. It is important to remember that some of these are modifiable and some are not. Risk factors include:
    54                                 </p>                   
     44                        <p>
     45                                Major risk factors for cancer include  <a href="#ref2" id="ref2.link" aria-describedby="footnote-label">tobacco use, diet, lack of exercise, and sun exposure.</a>. For example, people who smoke cigarettes are <a href="#ref3" id="ref3.link" aria-describedby="footnote-label">15 to 30 times more likely to get lung cancer or die from lung cancer</a> than people who do not smoke. Researchers have also identified genetic risks for cancer. Compared to women without a family history, <a href="#ref4" id="ref4.link" aria-describedby="footnote-label">risk of breast cancer is about 1.5 times higher for women with one affected first-degree female relative and 2-4 times higher for women with more than one first-degree relative.</a>
     46                        </p>
     47                        <p>
     48                                Nobody is immune from getting cancer. Even though scientific studies have shown that specific factors increase the risk for cancer, but sometimes people who have no known risk factors still develop cancer while others and people who have many risk factors, yet never do not develop cancer. The following list contains common cancer risk factors. It is important to remember that some of these are modifiable and some are not. Risk factors include:
     49                        </p>                   
    5550                        <section class="ImageInfoBlock">
    5651                                <figure title="fire fighter">
     
    6055                                        </figcaption>
    6156                                </figure>
     57
    6258                                <div>
    63                                        
    64                                                 <ul>
    65                                                         <li>
    66                                                                 Alcohol use                                                     
    67                                                         </li>
    68                                                         <li>
    69                                                                 Exposure to cancer-causing substances
    70                                                         </li>
    71                                                         <li>
    72                                                                 Chronic inflammation
    73                                                         </li>
    74                                                         <li>
    75                                                                 Diet
    76                                                         </li>
    77                                                         <li>
    78                                                                 Hormones                                                       
    79                                                         </li>
    80                                                         <li>
    81                                                                 Immunosuppression
    82                                                         </li>
    83                                                         <li>
    84                                                                 Some infectious diseases
    85                                                         </li>
    86                                                         <li>
    87                                                                 Obesity
    88                                                         </li>
    89                                                         <li>
    90                                                                 Radiation
    91                                                         </li>
    92                                                         <li>
    93                                                                 Sunlight
    94                                                         </li>
    95                                                         <li>
    96                                                                 Tobacco use and second-hand exposure to smoke
    97                                                         </li>
    98                                                         <li>
    99                                                                 Older age; the risk of developing cancer increases with age
    100                                                         </li>
    101                                                         <li>
    102                                                                 Race and ethnicity; people of certain races and ethnic backgrounds are at higher risk for certain types of cancer.
    103                                                         </li>
    104                                                 </ul>
     59                                        <ul>
     60                                                <li>
     61                                                        Alcohol use                                                     
     62                                                </li>
     63                                                <li>
     64                                                        Exposure to cancer-causing substances
     65                                                </li>
     66                                                <li>
     67                                                        Chronic inflammation
     68                                                </li>
     69                                                <li>
     70                                                        Diet
     71                                                </li>
     72                                                <li>
     73                                                        Hormones                                                       
     74                                                </li>
     75                                                <li>
     76                                                        Immunosuppression
     77                                                </li>
     78                                                <li>
     79                                                        Some infectious diseases
     80                                                </li>
     81                                                <li>
     82                                                        Obesity
     83                                                </li>
     84                                                <li>
     85                                                        Radiation
     86                                                </li>
     87                                                <li>
     88                                                        Sunlight
     89                                                </li>
     90                                                <li>
     91                                                        Tobacco use and second-hand exposure to smoke
     92                                                </li>
     93                                                <li>
     94                                                        Older age; the risk of developing cancer increases with age
     95                                                </li>
     96                                                <li>
     97                                                        Race and ethnicity; people of certain races and ethnic backgrounds are at higher risk for certain types of cancer.
     98                                                </li>
     99                                        </ul>
    105100                                </div>
    106101                        </section>
     102
    107103                        <h2>Health Tips</h2>
    108                                 <p>
    109                                         There are many ways to reduce your risk for cancer. Following these guidelines will not only reduce your risk for cancer, but improve your general health as well:
    110                                 </p>
     104                        <p>
     105                                There are many ways to reduce your risk for cancer. Following these guidelines will not only reduce your risk for cancer, but improve your general health as well:
     106                        </p>
     107
    111108                        <section class="ImageInfoBlock">
    112109                                <div>
     
    139136                                </div>
    140137                               
    141 
    142138                                <figure title="broken cigarette">
    143139                                        <img ibis:src="view/image/health/cancer/cancer/quitsmoking.jpg"/>
     
    146142                                </figure>
    147143                        </section>
    148                                 <p>
    149                                         Screening: The Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) monitors the use of cancer screening tests such as mammography for breast cancer, Pap and HPV tests for cervical cancer,and fecal immunochemical tests and colonoscopy for colorectal cancer. You can find BRFSS data on our sister site NM IBIS.
    150                                 </p>
    151                                 <p>
    152                                         Note: NMTracking Indicator pages (see "Reports and Data" below) have useful information beyond statistics for individual cancers. Be sure to look at the <span class="Bold">More Information</span> menu on each indicator.
    153                                 </p>
    154                                 <p>
    155                                         <footer class="Footnotes"><ol>
    156                                                 <li id="ref2">
    157                                                         Clapp RW, Howe GK, Jacobs M. Environmental and occupational causes of cancer re-visited. J Public Health Policy. 2006;27(1):61-76
    158                                                 <a href="#ref2.link" aria-label="Back to content">«</a></li>
    159                                         </ol></footer>
    160                                         <footer class="Footnotes"><ol>
    161                                                 <li id="ref3"> <a href="https://www.cdc.gov/cancer/lung/basic_info/risk_factors.htm">
    162                                                         CDC What are the risk factors for lung cancer?</a> Accessed 1/3/2020
    163                                                 <a href="#ref3.link" aria-label="Back to content">«</a></li>
    164                                         </ol></footer>
    165                                         <footer class="Footnotes"><ol>
    166                                                 <li id="ref4"> <a href="https://www.cancer.org/research/cancer-facts-statistics/breast-cancer-facts-figures.html">
    167                                                         ACS Breast Cancer Facts and Figures 2019-2020</a> Accessed 12/18/2020
    168                                                 <a href="#ref4.link" aria-label="Back to content">«</a></li>
    169                                         </ol></footer> 
    170                                 </p>                   
     144
     145                        <p>
     146                                Screening: The Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) monitors the use of cancer screening tests such as mammography for breast cancer, Pap and HPV tests for cervical cancer,and fecal immunochemical tests and colonoscopy for colorectal cancer. You can find BRFSS data on our sister site NM IBIS.
     147                        </p>
     148                        <p>
     149                                Note: NMTracking Indicator pages (see "Reports and Data" below) have useful information beyond statistics for individual cancers. Be sure to look at the <span class="Bold">More Information</span> menu on each indicator.
     150                        </p>
     151
     152                        <footer class="Footnotes"><ol>
     153                                <li id="ref2">
     154                                        Clapp RW, Howe GK, Jacobs M. Environmental and occupational causes of cancer re-visited. J Public Health Policy. 2006;27(1):61-76
     155                                <a href="#ref2.link" aria-label="Back to content">«</a></li>
     156                                <li id="ref3"> <a href="https://www.cdc.gov/cancer/lung/basic_info/risk_factors.htm">
     157                                        CDC What are the risk factors for lung cancer?</a> Accessed 1/3/2020
     158                                <a href="#ref3.link" aria-label="Back to content">«</a></li>
     159                                <li id="ref4"> <a href="https://www.cancer.org/research/cancer-facts-statistics/breast-cancer-facts-figures.html">
     160                                        ACS Breast Cancer Facts and Figures 2019-2020</a> Accessed 12/18/2020
     161                                <a href="#ref4.link" aria-label="Back to content">«</a></li>
     162                        </ol></footer> 
    171163                </section>
     164
    172165                <section>
    173166                        <div class="NotifiableCondition">
     
    179172                </section>     
    180173                       
    181 
    182174                <nav id="moreInformation" title="Links for more information">
    183175                        <div id="downloadsResources">
     
    207199                        </div>
    208200
    209                         <div id="moreData" class="Columns">
    210                                 <div id="relatedData">
    211                                         <img ibis:src="view/image/topic/related_data.png"/>
    212                                         <h3>Reports and Data</h3>
    213                                         <div class="Selections Scroll">
    214                                         </div>
    215                                         <button>Show All</button>
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    217 
    218                                 <div id="relatedTopics">
    219                                         <img ibis:src="view/image/topic/related_topics.png"/>
    220                                         <h3>Related Topics</h3>
    221                                         <div class="Selections">
    222                                                 <ul>
    223                                                         <li><a ibis:href="health/cancer/CancerConcernsWorkgroup.html" title="CCW">Cancer Concerns Workgroup</a></li>
    224                                                         <li><a ibis:href="environment/air/Radon.html" title="Radon">Radon</a></li>
    225                                                 </ul>
    226                                         </div>
    227                                 </div>
    228                         </div>
     201                        <ibis:TopicsMoreData topicSelectionsPath="../../../selections/health/cancer/cancer/"/>
    229202                </nav>
    230 
    231 
    232                 <section class="Citation">
    233                         <h2>Citation</h2>
    234                         Page content updated on 1/1/2020, Published on 1/1/2020
    235                        
    236                         <ibis:include ibis:href="xml/html_content/citation/SomeEpiGroupContactInfo.xml" children-only-flag="true"/>
    237                        
    238                         <ibis:include ibis:href="xml/html_content/citation/DeyonneSandoval.xml" children-only-flag="true"/>
    239                 </section>
    240203
    241204        </CONTENT>
  • adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/nmepht-content/xml/html_content/health/cancer/CancerConcernsWorkgroup.xml

    r22677 r22715  
    1212                <script ibis:src="js/jquery.scrollBlockListItems.js"/>
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    2019
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    2220        <CONTENT>
    23 
    2421                <header>
    2522                        <img ibis:src="view/image/health/cancer/workgroup/magnifyCCW.jpg" title="NM Cancer Concerns Work Group"/>
     
    2724                </header>
    2825
    29 
    3026                <section>
    3127                        <h2>About the New Mexico Cancer Concerns Work Group</h2>
    32                                 <p>
    33                                         The New Mexico Cancer Concerns Work Group (CCW) responds to inquiries from the public, health professionals, or other people who are concerned about cancers among a specified group of people, such as in a community or a workplace. The process involves coordinated and standardized responses from the New Mexico Department of Health and the New Mexico Tumor Registry. These responses are based on an exploration of data available to the work group.                         
    34                                 </p>
    35                                 <p>
    36                                         The CCW includes epidemiologists and health promotion experts from complementary fields such as cancer, environmental health, occupational health, toxicology, and/or occupational medicine. As a multi-agency collaborative, the CCW is comprised of New Mexico Department of Health staff from the Population and Community Health Bureau's Cancer Section, the Environmental Health Epidemiology Bureau, and Tribal Epidemiology staff from the Community Health Systems Epidemiology Bureau, as well as staff from the New Mexico Tumor Registry at the University of New Mexico Cancer Center and Health Sciences Center. The Tumor Registry is part of the National Cancer Institute's Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) Program.
    37                                 </p>
    38                                 <h2>What We Offer</h2>
    39                                 <p>
    40                                         The New Mexico CCW provides coordinated and standardized responses to inquiries about cancer in NM based on an exploration of data available from the New Mexico Tumor Registry. The response typically entails a customized analysis to reveal current incidence rates, stratified by race/ethnicity (if relevant) and trend data if needed. When feasible, the CCW provides educational information about the types of cancers diagnosed that may have occurred within the geographic area of concern (e.g., where the people diagnosed with cancer live). This serves to empower the inquirer by helping him/her gain an understanding of the risk factors (e.g., age, smoking) for the cancer(s) of concern and known common causes (e.g., radon exposure) of the cancer(s).
    41                                 </p>
    42                                 <h3>What We Look For</h3>
    43                                 <p>
    44                                         When a cancer concern is received we look at relevant New Mexico county cancer incidence rates to determine if there are any statistically significant differences. Next, if warranted, we will examine: What is the geographic area of concern (i.e., where did the cancer cases occur)? How many people lived and/or worked in the area? What is the time frame of concern? When were the cancers diagnosed? Are the diagnoses within the time frame of concern the same type(s) of cancer(s)? Are the diagnoses rare cancers? Is the length of residency or employment in the locale of concern consistent with the known latency of the cancer(s)? Did the people diagnosed with cancer live or work in the place of concern during the time it takes for the cancer(s) to develop? Within the time frame and geographic area of concern, were there key known risk factors present for the type(s) of cancer(s) diagnosed (e.g., lifestyle, genetic, or exposure to occupational and/or environmental carcinogens)?
    45                                 </p>
    46        
     28                        <p>
     29                                The New Mexico Cancer Concerns Work Group (CCW) responds to inquiries from the public, health professionals, or other people who are concerned about cancers among a specified group of people, such as in a community or a workplace. The process involves coordinated and standardized responses from the New Mexico Department of Health and the New Mexico Tumor Registry. These responses are based on an exploration of data available to the work group.                         
     30                        </p>
     31                        <p>
     32                                The CCW includes epidemiologists and health promotion experts from complementary fields such as cancer, environmental health, occupational health, toxicology, and/or occupational medicine. As a multi-agency collaborative, the CCW is comprised of New Mexico Department of Health staff from the Population and Community Health Bureau's Cancer Section, the Environmental Health Epidemiology Bureau, and Tribal Epidemiology staff from the Community Health Systems Epidemiology Bureau, as well as staff from the New Mexico Tumor Registry at the University of New Mexico Cancer Center and Health Sciences Center. The Tumor Registry is part of the National Cancer Institute's Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) Program.
     33                        </p>
     34                        <h2>What We Offer</h2>
     35                        <p>
     36                                The New Mexico CCW provides coordinated and standardized responses to inquiries about cancer in NM based on an exploration of data available from the New Mexico Tumor Registry. The response typically entails a customized analysis to reveal current incidence rates, stratified by race/ethnicity (if relevant) and trend data if needed. When feasible, the CCW provides educational information about the types of cancers diagnosed that may have occurred within the geographic area of concern (e.g., where the people diagnosed with cancer live). This serves to empower the inquirer by helping him/her gain an understanding of the risk factors (e.g., age, smoking) for the cancer(s) of concern and known common causes (e.g., radon exposure) of the cancer(s).
     37                        </p>
     38                        <h3>What We Look For</h3>
     39                        <p>
     40                                When a cancer concern is received we look at relevant New Mexico county cancer incidence rates to determine if there are any statistically significant differences. Next, if warranted, we will examine: What is the geographic area of concern (i.e., where did the cancer cases occur)? How many people lived and/or worked in the area? What is the time frame of concern? When were the cancers diagnosed? Are the diagnoses within the time frame of concern the same type(s) of cancer(s)? Are the diagnoses rare cancers? Is the length of residency or employment in the locale of concern consistent with the known latency of the cancer(s)? Did the people diagnosed with cancer live or work in the place of concern during the time it takes for the cancer(s) to develop? Within the time frame and geographic area of concern, were there key known risk factors present for the type(s) of cancer(s) diagnosed (e.g., lifestyle, genetic, or exposure to occupational and/or environmental carcinogens)?
     41                        </p>
    4742                </section>
    4843
     
    5651                                </figure>
    5752                                <div>
     53                                        <h3>Things to consider as you explore your concern:</h3>
    5854                                        <ul>
    59                                                 <h3>Things to consider as you explore your concern:</h3>
    6055                                                <li>
    6156                                                        Are the diagnoses in the population of concern the same type of cancer?
     
    6459                                                        What are the common lifestyles and habits of those diagnosed with the same type of cancer?
    6560                                                </li>
    66                                                 <p>
    67                                                 <h3>When submitting an inquiry to the CCW it is helpful if you provide the following:</h3>
    68                                                 </p>
     61                                        </ul>
     62
     63                                        <h3>When submitting an inquiry to the CCW it is helpful if you provide the following:</h3>
     64                                        <ul>
    6965                                                <li>
    7066                                                        The specific geographic area of concern (e.g., county).
     
    8985                        </section>
    9086                </section>
     87
    9188                <section>
    9289                        <h2>Limitations of the CCW</h2>
    93                                 <p>
    94                                         The capacity of the Cancer Concerns Work Group is limited to examining the available cancer data from the New Mexico Tumor Registry. By providing information resulting from an initial examination of those data, the CCW can empower the inquirer to look for clues in a more strategic manner (such as exploring personal risk factors) and encourages the inquirer and community of concern to pursue suitable preventive measures for specific cancers. It is important to note that the Cancer Concerns Work Group realizes that it is possible that a cancer concern inquiry may result in the identification of a true cancer cluster; however, finding a clear environmental cause is difficult. Most identified cancer excesses are not related to known environmental causes, but instead appear to be due to personal risk factors, genetic causes, normal random variation in cancer occurrence, or unknown factors.
    95                                 </p>
    96                                 <p>
     90                        <p>
     91                                The capacity of the Cancer Concerns Work Group is limited to examining the available cancer data from the New Mexico Tumor Registry. By providing information resulting from an initial examination of those data, the CCW can empower the inquirer to look for clues in a more strategic manner (such as exploring personal risk factors) and encourages the inquirer and community of concern to pursue suitable preventive measures for specific cancers. It is important to note that the Cancer Concerns Work Group realizes that it is possible that a cancer concern inquiry may result in the identification of a true cancer cluster; however, finding a clear environmental cause is difficult. Most identified cancer excesses are not related to known environmental causes, but instead appear to be due to personal risk factors, genetic causes, normal random variation in cancer occurrence, or unknown factors.
     92                        </p>
     93
    9794                        <h3>Where and how to submit an inquiry:</h3>   
    98                                 </p>
    99                                 <p>
    100                                         Inquiries may be submitted to nmtr-ccw@salud.unm.edu. To learn more about inquiry submission, please call 1-800-303-4503. <span class="Bold">Please note, this is a monitored message line and will not be answered by a live person.</span>
    101                                 </p>
     95                        <p>
     96                                Inquiries may be submitted to nmtr-ccw@salud.unm.edu. To learn more about inquiry submission, please call 1-800-303-4503. <span class="Bold">Please note, this is a monitored message line and will not be answered by a live person.</span>
     97                        </p>
    10298                </section>
    103 
    10499
    105100                <nav id="moreInformation" title="Links for more information">
     
    122117                        </div>
    123118
    124                         <div id="moreData" class="Columns">
    125                                 <div id="relatedData">
    126                                         <img ibis:src="view/image/topic/related_data.png"/>
    127                                         <h3>Reports and Data</h3>
    128                                         <div class="Selections Scroll">
    129                                         </div>
    130                                         <button>Show All</button>
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    132 
    133                                 <div id="relatedTopics">
    134                                         <img ibis:src="view/image/topic/related_topics.png"/>
    135                                         <h3>Related Topics</h3>
    136                                         <div class="Selections">
    137                                                 <ul>
    138                                                         <li><a ibis:href="health/cancer/Cancer.html" title="Cancer">Cancer</a></li>
    139                                                         <li><a ibis:href="environment/air/Radon.html" title="Indoor Air Quality">Radon and Indoor Air Quality</a></li>
    140                                                 </ul>
    141                                         </div>
    142                                 </div>
    143                         </div>
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    145 
    146 
    147                 <section class="Citation">
    148                         <h2>Citation</h2>
    149                         Page content updated on 1/22/2021, Published on 1/1/2020
    150                        
    151                         <ibis:include ibis:href="xml/html_content/citation/SomeEpiGroupContactInfo.xml" children-only-flag="true"/>
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    153                         <ibis:include ibis:href="xml/html_content/citation/DeyonneSandoval.xml" children-only-flag="true"/>
    154                 </section>
    155121
    156122        </CONTENT>
  • adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/nmepht-content/xml/html_content/health/cancer/ChronicLymphocyticLeukemia.xml

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    44
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    619
    720        <CONTENT>
  • adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/nmepht-content/xml/html_content/health/cancer/Esophagus.xml

    r15536 r22715  
    44
    55        <TITLE>Esophagus Cancer</TITLE>
     6
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    619
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  • adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/nmepht-content/xml/html_content/health/cancer/FemaleBreast.xml

    r15465 r22715  
    44
    55        <TITLE>Female Breast Cancer</TITLE>
     6
     7        <HTML_CLASS>Topic Health</HTML_CLASS>
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    619
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  • adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/nmepht-content/xml/html_content/health/cancer/KidneyRenal.xml

    r12244 r22715  
    44
    55        <TITLE>Kidney, Renal Cancer</TITLE>
     6
     7        <HTML_CLASS>Topic Health</HTML_CLASS>
     8        <OTHER_HEAD_CONTENT>
     9                <link ibis:href="css/Topic.css" rel="stylesheet" type="text/css"/>
     10                <link ibis:href="css/_SiteSpecific-Topic.css" rel="stylesheet" type="text/css"/>
     11
     12                <script ibis:src="js/jquery.scrollBlockListItems.js"/>
     13                <script>
     14                        $( document ).ready(function() {
     15                                $(".Topic #downloadsResources .Selections").scrollBlockListItems( {"maxSelectionsContainerHeight":190});
     16                        });
     17                </script>
     18        </OTHER_HEAD_CONTENT>
    619
    720        <CONTENT>
  • adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/nmepht-content/xml/html_content/health/cancer/Larynx.xml

    r17487 r22715  
    44
    55        <TITLE>Larynx Cancer</TITLE>
     6
     7        <HTML_CLASS>Topic Health</HTML_CLASS>
     8        <OTHER_HEAD_CONTENT>
     9                <link ibis:href="css/Topic.css" rel="stylesheet" type="text/css"/>
     10                <link ibis:href="css/_SiteSpecific-Topic.css" rel="stylesheet" type="text/css"/>
     11
     12                <script ibis:src="js/jquery.scrollBlockListItems.js"/>
     13                <script>
     14                        $( document ).ready(function() {
     15                                $(".Topic #downloadsResources .Selections").scrollBlockListItems( {"maxSelectionsContainerHeight":190});
     16                        });
     17                </script>
     18        </OTHER_HEAD_CONTENT>
    619
    720        <CONTENT>
  • adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/nmepht-content/xml/html_content/health/cancer/Leukemia.xml

    r21970 r22715  
    44
    55        <TITLE>Leukemia</TITLE>
     6
     7        <HTML_CLASS>Topic Health</HTML_CLASS>
     8        <OTHER_HEAD_CONTENT>
     9                <link ibis:href="css/Topic.css" rel="stylesheet" type="text/css"/>
     10                <link ibis:href="css/_SiteSpecific-Topic.css" rel="stylesheet" type="text/css"/>
     11
     12                <script ibis:src="js/jquery.scrollBlockListItems.js"/>
     13                <script>
     14                        $( document ).ready(function() {
     15                                $(".Topic #downloadsResources .Selections").scrollBlockListItems( {"maxSelectionsContainerHeight":190});
     16                        });
     17                </script>
     18        </OTHER_HEAD_CONTENT>
    619
    720        <CONTENT>
  • adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/nmepht-content/xml/html_content/health/cancer/LiverIntrahepaticBileDuct.xml

    r12244 r22715  
    44
    55        <TITLE>Liver and Intrahepatic Bile Duct Cancers</TITLE>
     6
     7        <HTML_CLASS>Topic Health</HTML_CLASS>
     8        <OTHER_HEAD_CONTENT>
     9                <link ibis:href="css/Topic.css" rel="stylesheet" type="text/css"/>
     10                <link ibis:href="css/_SiteSpecific-Topic.css" rel="stylesheet" type="text/css"/>
     11
     12                <script ibis:src="js/jquery.scrollBlockListItems.js"/>
     13                <script>
     14                        $( document ).ready(function() {
     15                                $(".Topic #downloadsResources .Selections").scrollBlockListItems( {"maxSelectionsContainerHeight":190});
     16                        });
     17                </script>
     18        </OTHER_HEAD_CONTENT>
    619
    720        <CONTENT>
  • adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/nmepht-content/xml/html_content/health/cancer/Lung.xml

    r22662 r22715  
    44
    55        <TITLE>Lung Cancer</TITLE>
     6
    67        <HTML_CLASS>Topic Health</HTML_CLASS>
    78        <OTHER_HEAD_CONTENT>
    89                <link ibis:href="css/Topic.css" rel="stylesheet" type="text/css"/>
    910                <link ibis:href="css/_SiteSpecific-Topic.css" rel="stylesheet" type="text/css"/>
     11
     12                <script ibis:src="js/jquery.scrollBlockListItems.js"/>
     13                <script>
     14                        $( document ).ready(function() {
     15                                $(".Topic #downloadsResources .Selections").scrollBlockListItems( {"maxSelectionsContainerHeight":190});
     16                        });
     17                </script>
    1018        </OTHER_HEAD_CONTENT>
    1119       
  • adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/nmepht-content/xml/html_content/health/cancer/Mesothelioma.xml

    r12244 r22715  
    44
    55        <TITLE>Mesothelioma</TITLE>
     6
     7        <HTML_CLASS>Topic Health</HTML_CLASS>
     8        <OTHER_HEAD_CONTENT>
     9                <link ibis:href="css/Topic.css" rel="stylesheet" type="text/css"/>
     10                <link ibis:href="css/_SiteSpecific-Topic.css" rel="stylesheet" type="text/css"/>
     11
     12                <script ibis:src="js/jquery.scrollBlockListItems.js"/>
     13                <script>
     14                        $( document ).ready(function() {
     15                                $(".Topic #downloadsResources .Selections").scrollBlockListItems( {"maxSelectionsContainerHeight":190});
     16                        });
     17                </script>
     18        </OTHER_HEAD_CONTENT>
    619
    720        <CONTENT>
  • adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/nmepht-content/xml/html_content/health/cancer/NonHodgkinsLymphoma.xml

    r12244 r22715  
    44
    55        <TITLE>Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma</TITLE>
     6
     7        <HTML_CLASS>Topic Health</HTML_CLASS>
     8        <OTHER_HEAD_CONTENT>
     9                <link ibis:href="css/Topic.css" rel="stylesheet" type="text/css"/>
     10                <link ibis:href="css/_SiteSpecific-Topic.css" rel="stylesheet" type="text/css"/>
     11
     12                <script ibis:src="js/jquery.scrollBlockListItems.js"/>
     13                <script>
     14                        $( document ).ready(function() {
     15                                $(".Topic #downloadsResources .Selections").scrollBlockListItems( {"maxSelectionsContainerHeight":190});
     16                        });
     17                </script>
     18        </OTHER_HEAD_CONTENT>
    619
    720        <CONTENT>
  • adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/nmepht-content/xml/html_content/health/cancer/Oropharynx.xml

    r15536 r22715  
    44
    55        <TITLE>Oropharynx Cancer</TITLE>
     6
     7        <HTML_CLASS>Topic Health</HTML_CLASS>
     8        <OTHER_HEAD_CONTENT>
     9                <link ibis:href="css/Topic.css" rel="stylesheet" type="text/css"/>
     10                <link ibis:href="css/_SiteSpecific-Topic.css" rel="stylesheet" type="text/css"/>
     11
     12                <script ibis:src="js/jquery.scrollBlockListItems.js"/>
     13                <script>
     14                        $( document ).ready(function() {
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     17                </script>
     18        </OTHER_HEAD_CONTENT>
    619
    720        <CONTENT>
  • adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/nmepht-content/xml/html_content/health/cancer/Pancreas.xml

    r17487 r22715  
    44
    55        <TITLE>Pancreas Cancers</TITLE>
     6
     7        <HTML_CLASS>Topic Health</HTML_CLASS>
     8        <OTHER_HEAD_CONTENT>
     9                <link ibis:href="css/Topic.css" rel="stylesheet" type="text/css"/>
     10                <link ibis:href="css/_SiteSpecific-Topic.css" rel="stylesheet" type="text/css"/>
     11
     12                <script ibis:src="js/jquery.scrollBlockListItems.js"/>
     13                <script>
     14                        $( document ).ready(function() {
     15                                $(".Topic #downloadsResources .Selections").scrollBlockListItems( {"maxSelectionsContainerHeight":190});
     16                        });
     17                </script>
     18        </OTHER_HEAD_CONTENT>
    619
    720        <CONTENT>
  • adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/nmepht-content/xml/html_content/health/cancer/SkinMelanoma.xml

    r12357 r22715  
    44
    55        <TITLE>Melanoma of the Skin</TITLE>
     6
     7        <HTML_CLASS>Topic Health</HTML_CLASS>
     8        <OTHER_HEAD_CONTENT>
     9                <link ibis:href="css/Topic.css" rel="stylesheet" type="text/css"/>
     10                <link ibis:href="css/_SiteSpecific-Topic.css" rel="stylesheet" type="text/css"/>
     11
     12                <script ibis:src="js/jquery.scrollBlockListItems.js"/>
     13                <script>
     14                        $( document ).ready(function() {
     15                                $(".Topic #downloadsResources .Selections").scrollBlockListItems( {"maxSelectionsContainerHeight":190});
     16                        });
     17                </script>
     18        </OTHER_HEAD_CONTENT>
    619
    720        <CONTENT>
  • adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/nmepht-content/xml/html_content/health/cancer/Thyroid.xml

    r12244 r22715  
    44
    55        <TITLE>Thyroid Cancer</TITLE>
     6
     7        <HTML_CLASS>Topic Health</HTML_CLASS>
     8        <OTHER_HEAD_CONTENT>
     9                <link ibis:href="css/Topic.css" rel="stylesheet" type="text/css"/>
     10                <link ibis:href="css/_SiteSpecific-Topic.css" rel="stylesheet" type="text/css"/>
     11
     12                <script ibis:src="js/jquery.scrollBlockListItems.js"/>
     13                <script>
     14                        $( document ).ready(function() {
     15                                $(".Topic #downloadsResources .Selections").scrollBlockListItems( {"maxSelectionsContainerHeight":190});
     16                        });
     17                </script>
     18        </OTHER_HEAD_CONTENT>
    619
    720        <CONTENT>
  • adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/nmepht-content/xml/html_content/health/cardiovascular/HeartAttack.xml

    r22677 r22715  
    1212                <script ibis:src="js/jquery.scrollBlockListItems.js"/>
    1313                <script>
    14                         var optionOverrides = {"maxSelectionsContainerHeight":120};
    1514                        $( document ).ready(function() {
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    1817                </script>
    1918        </OTHER_HEAD_CONTENT>
     19
    2020        <CONTENT>
    2121                <header>
     
    2323                        <h1>Heart Attack</h1>
    2424                </header>
     25
    2526                <section>
    2627                        <h2>What Are Heart Attacks?</h2>
     
    3233                        </p>
    3334                </section>
     35
    3436                <section class="SubSectionsContainer">
    3537                        <h2>Learn About Heart Attacks</h2>
     
    4446                                <div>
    4547                                        <h3>The major symptoms of a heart attack are:</h3>
    46                                                 <ul>
    47                                                         <li>
    48                                                                 Chest pain or discomfort. Most heart attacks involve discomfort in the center or left side of the chest that lasts for more than a few minutes or that goes away and comes back. The discomfort can feel like uncomfortable pressure, squeezing, fullness, or pain.
    49                                                         </li>
    50                                                         <li>
    51                                                                 Feeling weak, light-headed, or faint. You may also break out into a cold sweat.
    52                                                         </li>
    53                                                         <li>
    54                                                                 Pain or discomfort in the jaw, neck, or back.
    55                                                         </li>
    56                                                         <li>
    57                                                                 Pain or discomfort in one or both arms or shoulders.
    58                                                         </li>
    59                                                         <li>
    60                                                                 Shortness of breath. This often comes along with chest discomfort, but shortness of breath also can happen before chest discomfort.
    61                                                         </li>
    62                                                         <li>
    63                                                                 Other symptoms of a heart attack could include unusual or unexplained tiredness and nausea or vomiting. Women are more likely to have these other symptoms.
    64                                                         </li>
    65                                                
    66                                                 </ul>
     48                                        <ul>
     49                                                <li>
     50                                                        Chest pain or discomfort. Most heart attacks involve discomfort in the center or left side of the chest that lasts for more than a few minutes or that goes away and comes back. The discomfort can feel like uncomfortable pressure, squeezing, fullness, or pain.
     51                                                </li>
     52                                                <li>
     53                                                        Feeling weak, light-headed, or faint. You may also break out into a cold sweat.
     54                                                </li>
     55                                                <li>
     56                                                        Pain or discomfort in the jaw, neck, or back.
     57                                                </li>
     58                                                <li>
     59                                                        Pain or discomfort in one or both arms or shoulders.
     60                                                </li>
     61                                                <li>
     62                                                        Shortness of breath. This often comes along with chest discomfort, but shortness of breath also can happen before chest discomfort.
     63                                                </li>
     64                                                <li>
     65                                                        Other symptoms of a heart attack could include unusual or unexplained tiredness and nausea or vomiting. Women are more likely to have these other symptoms.
     66                                                </li>
     67                                        </ul>
    6768                                </div>
    6869                        </section>
     70
    6971                        <section>
    70                                 <p>
    71                                         <h3>Why important?</h3>
    72                                 </p>
     72                                <h3>Why important?</h3>
    7373                                <p>
    7474                                        It has been estimated that every 40 seconds a person in America has a heart attack. Among Americans over 20 years of age, new and recurrent heart attacks in both men and women occurred in <a href="#ref1" id="ref1.link" aria-describedby="footnote-label">3.7% of the U.S. population, or 7,900,000 (4.9 million men and 3.0 million women). Corresponding prevalence by race and ethnicity is 5.4% for white men, 2.5% for white women, 3.9% for black men, and 3.3% for black women.</a>
    7575                                </p>
    76                                 <p>
    77                                         <h3>What are the risk factors?</h3>
    78                                 </p>
     76
     77                                <h3>What are the risk factors?</h3>
    7978                                <p>
    8079                                        You are at risk if you have certain inherited genetic factors that cannot be changed but that can be improved with lifestyle changes, such as a healthful diet and exercise and working with a doctor to manage risks with medications or cardiac rehabilitation to prevent further attacks if you have already had a heart attack. Other, modifiable risk factors are caused by chosen activities but can be improved with lifestyle changes.
     
    8382                                        Examples of those at risk from inherited or non-modifiable factors include:
    8483                                </p>
    85                                 <p>
    86                                         <ul class="Indent">
    87                                                 <li>
    88                                                         People with inherited hypertension (high blood pressure).
    89                                                 </li>
    90                                                 <li>
    91                                                         People with inherited low levels of HDL (high-density lipoprotein) or high levels of LDL (low-density lipoprotein) blood cholesterol.
    92                                                 </li>
    93                                                 <li>
    94                                                         People with a family history of heart disease (especially with onset before age 55).
    95                                                 </li>
    96                                                 <li>
    97                                                         People with diabetes (type 1 or type 2).
    98                                                 </li>
    99                                                 <li>
    100                                                         Aging men and women. Men are at risk at an earlier age than women but after the onset of menopause, women are equally at risk.
    101                                                 </li>
    102                                         </ul>
    103                                 </p>   
    104                                 <p>
    105                                         Examples of modifiable risk factors include:
    106                                 </p>
    107                                 <p>
    108                                         <ul class="Indent">
    109                                                 <li>
    110                                                         Tobacco smoking
    111                                                 </li>
    112                                                 <li>
    113                                                         Acquired hypertension (high blood pressure)
    114                                                 </li>
    115                                                 <li>
    116                                                         Acquired low levels of HDL (high-density lipoprotein) or high levels of LDL (low-density lipoprotein) blood cholesterol
    117                                                 </li>
    118                                                 <li>
    119                                                         High stress levels
    120                                                 </li>
    121                                                 <li>
    122                                                         Leading a sedentary lifestyle (i.e., not much exercise)
    123                                                 </li>
    124                                                 <li>
    125                                                         Being overweight by 30 percent or more.
    126                                                 </li>
    127                                         </ul>
    128                                 </p>
     84                                <ul class="Indent">
     85                                        <li>
     86                                                People with inherited hypertension (high blood pressure).
     87                                        </li>
     88                                        <li>
     89                                                People with inherited low levels of HDL (high-density lipoprotein) or high levels of LDL (low-density lipoprotein) blood cholesterol.
     90                                        </li>
     91                                        <li>
     92                                                People with a family history of heart disease (especially with onset before age 55).
     93                                        </li>
     94                                        <li>
     95                                                People with diabetes (type 1 or type 2).
     96                                        </li>
     97                                        <li>
     98                                                Aging men and women. Men are at risk at an earlier age than women but after the onset of menopause, women are equally at risk.
     99                                        </li>
     100                                </ul>
     101
     102                                <h4>Examples of modifiable risk factors include:</h4>
     103                                <ul class="Indent">
     104                                        <li>
     105                                                Tobacco smoking
     106                                        </li>
     107                                        <li>
     108                                                Acquired hypertension (high blood pressure)
     109                                        </li>
     110                                        <li>
     111                                                Acquired low levels of HDL (high-density lipoprotein) or high levels of LDL (low-density lipoprotein) blood cholesterol
     112                                        </li>
     113                                        <li>
     114                                                High stress levels
     115                                        </li>
     116                                        <li>
     117                                                Leading a sedentary lifestyle (i.e., not much exercise)
     118                                        </li>
     119                                        <li>
     120                                                Being overweight by 30 percent or more.
     121                                        </li>
     122                                </ul>
     123
    129124                                <p>
    130125                                        Environmental risk factors being investigated include air pollution, which has been reported to increase the risk of hospitalization for heart attack. One form of air pollution is particulate matter (PM) such as particles from dust storms, burning fuels from vehicles, burning coal from power plants, and wildfire smoke.
    131126                                </p>   
    132                         </section><br></br>
    133                                 <br></br>
    134                                         <h2>Health Tips</h2>
    135                                
     127                        </section>
     128
     129                        <h2>Health Tips</h2>
    136130                        <section class="ImageInfoBlock">
    137131                                <div>
     
    162156                        </section>
    163157                </section>
    164                         <footer class="Footnotes"><ol>
    165                                 <li id="ref1"> <a href="https://www.ahajournals.org/doi/10.1161/CIR.0000000000000659">
    166                                         Benjamin et al. Heart Disease and Stroke Statistics-2019 Update: A Report From the American Heart Association</a> Accessed 12/30/2020
    167                                 <a href="#ref1.link" aria-label="Back to content">«</a></li>
    168                         </ol></footer> 
     158
     159                <footer class="Footnotes"><ol>
     160                        <li id="ref1"> <a href="https://www.ahajournals.org/doi/10.1161/CIR.0000000000000659">
     161                                Benjamin et al. Heart Disease and Stroke Statistics-2019 Update: A Report From the American Heart Association</a> Accessed 12/30/2020
     162                        <a href="#ref1.link" aria-label="Back to content">«</a></li>
     163                </ol></footer> 
     164
    169165                <nav id="moreInformation" title="Links for more information">
    170166                        <div id="downloadsResources">
     
    179175                        </div>
    180176
    181                         <div id="moreData" class="Columns">
    182                                 <div id="relatedData">
    183                                         <img ibis:src="view/image/topic/related_data.png"/>
    184                                         <h3>Reports and Data</h3>
    185                                         <div class="Selections Scroll">
    186                                                
    187                                         </div>
    188                                         <button>Show All</button>
    189                                 </div>
    190 
    191                                 <div id="relatedTopics">
    192                                         <img ibis:src="view/image/topic/related_topics.png"/>
    193                                         <h3>Related Topics</h3>
    194                                         <div class="Selections">
    195                                                 <ul>
    196                                                         <li><a ibis:href="environment/air/OutdoorQuality.html" title="Outdoor Air Quality">Outdoor Air Quality</a></li>
    197                                                         <li><a ibis:href="environment/air/FireAndSmoke.html" title="Fire and Smoke">Fire and Smoke</a></li>
    198                                                 </ul>
    199                                         </div>
    200                                 </div>
    201                         </div>
     177                        <ibis:TopicsMoreData topicSelectionsPath="../../../selections/health/cardiovascular/heart_attack/"/>
    202178                </nav>
    203 
    204 
    205                 <section class="Citation">
    206                         <h2>Citation</h2>
    207                         Page content updated on 1/1/2021, Published on 1/1/2020
    208                        
    209                         <ibis:include ibis:href="xml/html_content/citation/SomeEpiGroupContactInfo.xml" children-only-flag="true"/>
    210                        
    211                         <ibis:include ibis:href="xml/html_content/citation/DeyonneSandoval.xml" children-only-flag="true"/>
    212                 </section>
    213179
    214180        </CONTENT>
  • adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/nmepht-content/xml/html_content/health/cardiovascular/Stroke.xml

    r12244 r22715  
    44
    55        <TITLE>Stroke</TITLE>
     6
     7        <HTML_CLASS>Topic Health</HTML_CLASS>
     8        <OTHER_HEAD_CONTENT>
     9                <link ibis:href="css/Topic.css" rel="stylesheet" type="text/css"/>
     10                <link ibis:href="css/_SiteSpecific-Topic.css" rel="stylesheet" type="text/css"/>
     11
     12                <script ibis:src="js/jquery.scrollBlockListItems.js"/>
     13                <script>
     14                        $( document ).ready(function() {
     15                                $(".Topic #downloadsResources .Selections").scrollBlockListItems( {"maxSelectionsContainerHeight":190});
     16                        });
     17                </script>
     18        </OTHER_HEAD_CONTENT>
    619
    720        <CONTENT>
  • adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/nmepht-content/xml/html_content/health/climate/HeatIllness.xml

    r22677 r22715  
    44
    55        <TITLE>Heat Related Illness</TITLE>
     6
    67        <HTML_CLASS>Topic Health</HTML_CLASS>
    78        <OTHER_HEAD_CONTENT>
     
    910                <link ibis:href="css/_SiteSpecific-Topic.css" rel="stylesheet" type="text/css"/>
    1011
    11 <!--
    12         Optional List Items Show More button:  This can be applied to other selection blocks as well. 
    13 -->
    1412                <script ibis:src="js/jquery.scrollBlockListItems.js"/>
    1513                <script>
     
    2927        </OTHER_HEAD_CONTENT>
    3028
    31 
    3229        <CONTENT>
    33 
    3430                <header>
    3531                        <img ibis:src="view/image/health/climate/heat/sunset.jpg" title="New Mexico summer sunset"/>
    3632                        <h1>Heat Related Illness</h1>
    3733                </header>
    38 
    3934
    4035                <section>
     
    4742
    4843                <section class="SubSectionsContainer">
    49                         <p>
    50                                 <h2>How to Recognize and Treat HRI</h2>
    51                         </p>
     44                        <h2>How to Recognize and Treat HRI</h2>
    5245                        <section class="ImageInfoBlock">
    5346                                <figure title="woman with HRI">
     
    7366                                                       
    7467                        </section>
     68
     69                        <ul>
    7570                                <li>
    7671                                        <span class="Bold">Heat exhaustion</span> appears with heavy sweating; cold, clammy skin; a fast, weak pulse; nausea or vomiting; muscle cramps; tiredness or weakness; dizziness; headache; and fainting. To treat, move to a cool place, loosen clothing, cool down with damp cloths or take a cool bath and sip water. If you are throwing up, symptoms last longer than an hour, or worsen get medical help right away.
    77                                         </li>
    78                                         <li>
    79                                                 <span class="Bold">Heat stroke</span> is the most serious HRI and happens when the body loses its ability to sweat. Body temperature will climb (103 degrees or higher), skin will be hot, red and dry or damp. Pulse will be fast and strong and a headache, nausea, dizziness and confusion and passing out can occur. It is important to recognize heat stroke in others as they may not recognize the danger that they are in because of confusion. Heat stroke is a medical emergency, so call 911 right away. Try to lower the person's body temperature with cool, wet cloths or a cool bath. Do not give them anything to drink.
    80                                         </li>
     72                                </li>
     73                                <li>
     74                                        <span class="Bold">Heat stroke</span> is the most serious HRI and happens when the body loses its ability to sweat. Body temperature will climb (103 degrees or higher), skin will be hot, red and dry or damp. Pulse will be fast and strong and a headache, nausea, dizziness and confusion and passing out can occur. It is important to recognize heat stroke in others as they may not recognize the danger that they are in because of confusion. Heat stroke is a medical emergency, so call 911 right away. Try to lower the person's body temperature with cool, wet cloths or a cool bath. Do not give them anything to drink.
     75                                </li>
     76                        </ul>
     77
    8178                        <section>
    82                                 <p>
    83                                         <h2>Who is at Risk?</h2>
    84                                 </p>
     79                                <h2>Who is at Risk?</h2>
    8580                                <p>
    8681                                        Anyone can be affected. People at highest risk are the elderly, the very young, people with existing chronic diseases such as heart disease, people on certain medications, and people without access to air conditioning. But even young and healthy people can get sick from the heat if they participate in strenuous physical activities without taking precautions or ignoring signs and symptoms of HRI during hot weather.
     
    8984                                        If you live in the southern part of the state it is important to be heat-aware even though you may feel that you are accustomed to the hot temperatures. Make sure children and elderly loved ones are in a cool place and are drinking plenty of water. A recent Department of Health report indicates that in southern New Mexico where high temperatures are common in the summer, there is an increased risk of visits to the emergency room for heat-related illness.
    9085                                </p>
    91                                 <p>
    92                                         <h3>Children</h3>
    93                                 </p>
     86
     87                                <h3>Children</h3>
    9488                                <p>
    9589                                        Make sure children stay hydrated and remain indoors in a place with air conditioning on hot days. On those hot summer days when temperatures are at the highest consider going to a local public library, museum, or a community center with air-conditioning if you don't have air-conditioning in your home.
     
    9892                                        Children or animals can be seriously injured or die as temperatures rise within a few minutes of being left alone in a hot car. Do not leave your children or pets in the car while you are running errands no matter how quick you think it will be. Studies show the practice of leaving a vehicle window partially open, or cracked, has little effect on decreasing temperature inside.
    9993                                </p>
    100                                 <p>
    101                                         <h3>Seniors</h3>
    102                                 </p>
     94
     95                                <h3>Seniors</h3>
    10396                                <p>
    10497                                        It is important that adults age 65 and older stay cool. On high-heat days recreational sports and activities should be done indoors in a cool setting such as at a local senior center. Senior centers, shopping malls and public libraries are great places to beat the heat. Check up on elderly or homebound relatives and neighbors who are living on their own during the summer months when temperatures soar. It is critical for loved ones and neighbors to check on seniors as we lose the ability to self-regulate our body temperatures as we age. If you know of someone who is homebound and without a properly functioning air conditioner, visit or call them to ask how they are doing. To find services for seniors in your community call 800-432-2080.
     
    111104                                </p>                   
    112105                        </section>
    113                                         <p>
    114                                                 <h2>Health Tips</h2>
    115                                         </p>
    116                                         <p>
    117                                                 The New Mexico Department of Health and U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention advises you to take these steps to prevent heat-related illnesses, injuries, and deaths during hot weather:
    118                                         </p>                   
     106
     107                        <h2>Health Tips</h2>
     108                        <p>
     109                                The New Mexico Department of Health and U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention advises you to take these steps to prevent heat-related illnesses, injuries, and deaths during hot weather:
     110                        </p>                   
    119111
    120112                        <section class="ImageInfoBlock">
     
    160152
    161153                <nav id="moreInformation" title="Links for more information">
    162 <!--
    163                         <h2>More Information</h2>
    164 -->
    165154                        <div id="downloadsResources">
    166155                                <h3>Downloads and Resources</h3>
     
    206195                                </div>
    207196                        </div>
    208 <TODO>Please fix formatting on IR-query and related topic blocks</TODO>
    209                         <div id="moreData">
    210                                 <div id="relatedData">
    211                                         <img ibis:src="view/image/topic/related_data.png"/>
    212                                         <h3>Explore Related Data</h3>
    213 
    214                 <ibis:Popup
    215                         additionalClasses="Above" controlClass="Button"
    216                         controlID="ipSelectionsMenuControl" 
    217                         controlType="radio" controlName="dataSelectionControl"
    218                         controlTitle="Select a Related Indicator Report"
    219                         description="Show/hide list of Related Indicator Reports associated with this topic"
    220                 >
    221                         <h3>Related Indicator Reports</h3>
    222                         <p class="Overview">
    223                                 Indicator reports provide numeric data with public health context
    224                                 for environmental factors or health outcomes potentially related
    225                                 to those environmental factors.
    226                         </p>
    227                         <p>
    228                                 Select a related indicator report:
    229                         </p>
    230 
    231                         <ibis:SelectionsList headingLevel="3">
    232                                 <SELECTIONS>
    233                                         <SELECTION>
    234                                                 <TITLE>Biomonitoring</TITLE>
    235                                                 <LOCAL_URL>environment/Biomonitoring.html</LOCAL_URL>
    236                                         </SELECTION>
    237                                         <SELECTION>
    238                                                 <TITLE>Environmental Exposure A-Z</TITLE>
    239                                                 <LOCAL_URL>environment/ExposureA-Z.html</LOCAL_URL>
    240                                         </SELECTION>
    241                                 </SELECTIONS>
    242                         </ibis:SelectionsList>
    243                 </ibis:Popup>
    244 
    245                 <ibis:Popup
    246                         additionalClasses="Above" controlClass="Button"
    247                         controlID="querySelectionsMenuControl"
    248                         controlType="radio" controlName="dataSelectionControl"
    249                         controlTitle="Select a Related Queryable Dataset"
    250                         description="Show/hide list of Related Queryable Datasets associated with this topic"
    251                 >
    252                         <h3>Related Queryable Datasets</h3>
    253                         <p class="Overview">
    254                                 Explore environmental exposure and health outcomes data, and view
    255                                 in a data table, map, graph, or chart. Download the data and
    256                                 metadata in a variety of formats.
    257                         </p>
    258                         <p>
    259                                 Select a related queryable dataset:
    260                         </p>
    261 
    262                         <ibis:SelectionsList headingLevel="3">
    263                                 <SELECTIONS>
    264                                         <SELECTION>
    265                                                 <TITLE>Biomonitoring</TITLE>
    266                                                 <LOCAL_URL>environment/Biomonitoring.html</LOCAL_URL>
    267                                         </SELECTION>
    268                                         <SELECTION>
    269                                                 <TITLE>Environmental Exposure A-Z</TITLE>
    270                                                 <LOCAL_URL>environment/ExposureA-Z.html</LOCAL_URL>
    271                                         </SELECTION>
    272                                 </SELECTIONS>
    273                         </ibis:SelectionsList>
    274                 </ibis:Popup>
    275                                 </div>
    276 
    277                                 <div id="relatedTopics">
    278                                         <img ibis:src="view/image/topic/related_topics.png"/>
    279                                         <h3>Related Environment Topics</h3>
    280                                         <div class="Selections">
    281                                                 <ul>
    282                                                         <li><a ibis:href="environment/climate/ExtremeTemperatures.html" title="Extreme Temperatures">Extreme Temperatures</a></li>
    283                                                 </ul>
    284                                         </div>
    285                                 </div>
    286                         </div>
     197
     198                        <ibis:TopicsMoreData topicSelectionsPath="../../../selections/health/climate/heat/"/>
    287199                </nav>
    288200
  • adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/nmepht-content/xml/html_content/health/occupational/HealthImpactAssessmentToolkit.xml

    r16840 r22715  
    44
    55        <TITLE>Health Impact Assessment Toolkit</TITLE>
     6
     7        <HTML_CLASS>Topic Health</HTML_CLASS>
     8        <OTHER_HEAD_CONTENT>
     9                <link ibis:href="css/Topic.css" rel="stylesheet" type="text/css"/>
     10                <link ibis:href="css/_SiteSpecific-Topic.css" rel="stylesheet" type="text/css"/>
     11
     12                <script ibis:src="js/jquery.scrollBlockListItems.js"/>
     13                <script>
     14                        $( document ).ready(function() {
     15                                $(".Topic #downloadsResources .Selections").scrollBlockListItems( {"maxSelectionsContainerHeight":190});
     16                        });
     17                </script>
     18        </OTHER_HEAD_CONTENT>
     19
    620        <CONTENT>
     21
    722                <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="2"><SHOW/>
    823                        <TITLE>Health Impact Assessment</TITLE>
  • adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/nmepht-content/xml/html_content/health/occupational/OccupationalHealth.xml

    r22619 r22715  
    44
    55        <TITLE>Healthy Homes</TITLE>
     6
     7        <HTML_CLASS>Topic Health</HTML_CLASS>
     8        <OTHER_HEAD_CONTENT>
     9                <link ibis:href="css/Topic.css" rel="stylesheet" type="text/css"/>
     10                <link ibis:href="css/_SiteSpecific-Topic.css" rel="stylesheet" type="text/css"/>
     11
     12                <script ibis:src="js/jquery.scrollBlockListItems.js"/>
     13                <script>
     14                        $( document ).ready(function() {
     15                                $(".Topic #downloadsResources .Selections").scrollBlockListItems( {"maxSelectionsContainerHeight":190});
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     17                </script>
     18        </OTHER_HEAD_CONTENT>
    619
    720        <CONTENT>
  • adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/nmepht-content/xml/html_content/health/poisonings/CarbonMonoxidePoisoning.xml

    r15759 r22715  
    44
    55        <TITLE>Carbon Monoxide Poisoning</TITLE>
     6
     7        <HTML_CLASS>Topic Health</HTML_CLASS>
     8        <OTHER_HEAD_CONTENT>
     9                <link ibis:href="css/Topic.css" rel="stylesheet" type="text/css"/>
     10                <link ibis:href="css/_SiteSpecific-Topic.css" rel="stylesheet" type="text/css"/>
     11
     12                <script ibis:src="js/jquery.scrollBlockListItems.js"/>
     13                <script>
     14                        $( document ).ready(function() {
     15                                $(".Topic #downloadsResources .Selections").scrollBlockListItems( {"maxSelectionsContainerHeight":190});
     16                        });
     17                </script>
     18        </OTHER_HEAD_CONTENT>
    619
    720        <CONTENT>
  • adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/nmepht-content/xml/html_content/health/poisonings/ChildhoodLeadPoisoning.xml

    r22677 r22715  
    1313                <script>
    1414                        $( document ).ready(function() {
    15                                 $(".Topic #moreData           .Selections").scrollBlockListItems( {"maxSelectionsContainerHeight":120});
    1615                                $(".Topic #downloadsResources .Selections").scrollBlockListItems( {"maxSelectionsContainerHeight":190});
    1716                        });
    1817                </script>
    1918        </OTHER_HEAD_CONTENT>
    20 
    2119
    2220        <CONTENT>
     
    2927                <section>
    3028                        <h2>What is Lead Poisoning?</h2>
    31                                 <p>
    32                                         Lead is a toxic metal found in our environment.  It can be found in dust, air, soil, water, and even inside our homes.  While lead is a natural occurring mineral found in the earth's crust, humans are exposed to lead mostly through its use in products and hobbies such as stained-glass making, guns and ammunition, or lead in imported plastics. Historic sources are lead water pipes, lead-based paint, and soils contaminated with leaded gasoline.  Lead enters the body by breathing or swallowing lead or lead dust.  Lead is poisonous to the human body.  Once lead enters the body, it can have negative health impacts on all bodily systems.
    33                                 </p>
     29                        <p>
     30                                Lead is a toxic metal found in our environment.  It can be found in dust, air, soil, water, and even inside our homes.  While lead is a natural occurring mineral found in the earth's crust, humans are exposed to lead mostly through its use in products and hobbies such as stained-glass making, guns and ammunition, or lead in imported plastics. Historic sources are lead water pipes, lead-based paint, and soils contaminated with leaded gasoline.  Lead enters the body by breathing or swallowing lead or lead dust.  Lead is poisonous to the human body.  Once lead enters the body, it can have negative health impacts on all bodily systems.
     31                        </p>
     32
    3433                        <h3>Childhood lead poisoning</h3>
    35                                 <p>
    36                                         Lead exposure in American children remains a major health concern, however current US estimates on the number of children with elevated blood lead levels are not known as data are not collected uniformly by states. The CDC defines an elevated blood lead level (elevated BLL) as a single blood lead test (capillary or venous) at or above the CDC blood lead reference value of 5 mcg/dL established in 2012 <a href="#ref1" id="ref1.link" aria-describedby="footnote-label"></a>. In New Mexico, a child is considered to have an elevated blood lead level (EBLL) at a concentration of 5 mcg/dL or greater.
    37                                 </p>                   
    38                                 <p>
    39                                         Lead in the body can harm nearly every organ system, including the nervous, blood, hormonal, kidney, and reproductive systems. Because the bodies of young children absorb lead more readily than adults, children's brains are rapidly developing and establishing critical neural connections in the first three years of life, children are more susceptible to harmful health effects from lead than adults. Additionally, the normal behaviors of very young children, such as crawling, exploring, teething, and putting objects in their mouth, put them at an increased risk for lead exposure. There is no known safe level of exposure to lead. Although children from all social and economic levels can be affected by lead, the poorest children are the most at risk due to a host of socioeconomic factors such as lack of access to high quality foods and living in substandard housing. New Mexico requires all children enrolled in Medicaid be tested for lead exposure at ages 12 months and 24 months.
    40                                 </p>
    41                                 <p>
    42                                 <footer class="Footnotes"><ol>
    43                                 <li id="ref1"> <a href="https://www.cdc.gov/nceh/lead/data/case-definitions-classifications.htm">
    44                                         Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention Standard Surveillance Definitions and Classifications </a> Accessed 1/30/2021
    45                                 <a href="#ref1.link" aria-label="Back to content">«</a></li>
    46                                 </ol></footer>
    47                         </p>
    48                         </section>
     34                        <p>
     35                                Lead exposure in American children remains a major health concern, however current US estimates on the number of children with elevated blood lead levels are not known as data are not collected uniformly by states. The CDC defines an elevated blood lead level (elevated BLL) as a single blood lead test (capillary or venous) at or above the CDC blood lead reference value of 5 mcg/dL established in 2012 <a href="#ref1" id="ref1.link" aria-describedby="footnote-label"></a>. In New Mexico, a child is considered to have an elevated blood lead level (EBLL) at a concentration of 5 mcg/dL or greater.
     36                        </p>                   
     37                        <p>
     38                                Lead in the body can harm nearly every organ system, including the nervous, blood, hormonal, kidney, and reproductive systems. Because the bodies of young children absorb lead more readily than adults, children's brains are rapidly developing and establishing critical neural connections in the first three years of life, children are more susceptible to harmful health effects from lead than adults. Additionally, the normal behaviors of very young children, such as crawling, exploring, teething, and putting objects in their mouth, put them at an increased risk for lead exposure. There is no known safe level of exposure to lead. Although children from all social and economic levels can be affected by lead, the poorest children are the most at risk due to a host of socioeconomic factors such as lack of access to high quality foods and living in substandard housing. New Mexico requires all children enrolled in Medicaid be tested for lead exposure at ages 12 months and 24 months.
     39                        </p>
     40                        <footer class="Footnotes"><ol>
     41                        <li id="ref1"> <a href="https://www.cdc.gov/nceh/lead/data/case-definitions-classifications.htm">
     42                                Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention Standard Surveillance Definitions and Classifications </a> Accessed 1/30/2021
     43                        <a href="#ref1.link" aria-label="Back to content">«</a></li>
     44                        </ol></footer>
     45                </section>
    4946                <section class="SubSectionsContainer">
    5047                        <h2>What are the Health Effects of Lead Poisoning?</h2>
    51                                 <h3>Children</h3>
    52                                         <p>
    53                                                 For children, especially those under the age of 6, lead can cause serious health problems that may cause lifelong damage.  Some of the effects include: brain and nervous system damage, learning difficulties, limited attention span, behavioral problems, hyperactivity, decreased growth, kidney damage, hearing loss, and anemia. If not detected, and at very high blood lead levels, seizures, coma, and death can occur.
    54                                         </p>
    55                                 <h3>Adults</h3>
    56                                         <p>
    57                                                 Adults can suffer from damage to the nervous, heart, and circulatory systems.  An increase in blood pressure can be common.  Other effects include decreased kidney function and reproductive problems in both men and women.
    58                                         </p>
    59                                         <p>
    60                                                 Pregnant woman who are lead poisoned can experience high blood pressure, miscarriage or stillborn births, premature births, or babies born at a low birth weight. Lead can be passed to the unborn baby through the placenta and damage the baby's brain and central nervous system.  Lead can also be passed to the baby through breast milk.
    61                                         </p>
     48                        <h3>Children</h3>
     49                        <p>
     50                                For children, especially those under the age of 6, lead can cause serious health problems that may cause lifelong damage.  Some of the effects include: brain and nervous system damage, learning difficulties, limited attention span, behavioral problems, hyperactivity, decreased growth, kidney damage, hearing loss, and anemia. If not detected, and at very high blood lead levels, seizures, coma, and death can occur.
     51                        </p>
     52
     53                        <h3>Adults</h3>
     54                        <p>
     55                                Adults can suffer from damage to the nervous, heart, and circulatory systems.  An increase in blood pressure can be common.  Other effects include decreased kidney function and reproductive problems in both men and women.
     56                        </p>
     57                        <p>
     58                                Pregnant woman who are lead poisoned can experience high blood pressure, miscarriage or stillborn births, premature births, or babies born at a low birth weight. Lead can be passed to the unborn baby through the placenta and damage the baby's brain and central nervous system.  Lead can also be passed to the baby through breast milk.
     59                        </p>
     60
    6261                        <section class="ImageInfoBlock">
    6362                                <figure title="colicky baby">
     
    7069                                <div>
    7170                                        <h3>Symptoms of lead poisoning</h3>
    72                                                 <p>
    73                                                         For both children and adults, there may be no obvious symptoms of lead poisoning. Symptoms may not appear until blood lead levels are quite high. Often the symptoms people do experience may be mistaken for other illnesses.
    74                                                 </p>
    75                                                 <ul>
    76                                                         <li>
    77                                                                 Lack of desire to eat food
    78                                                         </li>
    79                                                         <li>
    80                                                                 Loss of recently acquired skills (in young children)
    81                                                         </li>
    82                                                         <li>
    83                                                                 Drowsiness
    84                                                         </li>
    85                                                         <li>
    86                                                                 Irritability
    87                                                         </li>   
    88                                                         <li>
    89                                                                 Headache
    90                                                         </li>                                           
    91                                                         <li>
    92                                                                 Lack of energy
    93                                                         </li>
    94                                                         <li>
    95                                                                 Constipation
    96                                                         </li>
    97                                                         <li>
    98                                                                 Stomach cramps
    99                                                         </li>
    100                                                         <li>
    101                                                                 Trouble sleeping
    102                                                         </li>
    103                                                 </ul>
     71                                        <p>
     72                                                For both children and adults, there may be no obvious symptoms of lead poisoning. Symptoms may not appear until blood lead levels are quite high. Often the symptoms people do experience may be mistaken for other illnesses.
     73                                        </p>
     74                                        <ul>
     75                                                <li>
     76                                                        Lack of desire to eat food
     77                                                </li>
     78                                                <li>
     79                                                        Loss of recently acquired skills (in young children)
     80                                                </li>
     81                                                <li>
     82                                                        Drowsiness
     83                                                </li>
     84                                                <li>
     85                                                        Irritability
     86                                                </li>   
     87                                                <li>
     88                                                        Headache
     89                                                </li>                                           
     90                                                <li>
     91                                                        Lack of energy
     92                                                </li>
     93                                                <li>
     94                                                        Constipation
     95                                                </li>
     96                                                <li>
     97                                                        Stomach cramps
     98                                                </li>
     99                                                <li>
     100                                                        Trouble sleeping
     101                                                </li>
     102                                        </ul>
    104103                                </div>
    105104                        </section>
    106105
    107106                        <section class="ImageInfoBlock">
    108                        
    109107                                <div>
    110108                                        <h3>Lead sources</h3>
     
    112110                                                The sources of lead in the environment are numerous. Some of the more common sources for exposure in children include:
    113111                                        </p>
    114                                                 <ul>
    115                                                         <li>
    116                                                                 Parent's hobbies that include the use of lead (such as making stained glass windows, hunting, fishing, target shooting)
    117                                                         </li>                                                   
    118                                                         <li>
    119                                                                 Parent's work that includes the use of lead, such as recycling or making automotive batteries, painting, radiator repair (take home lead on work clothes or shoes)
    120                                                         </li>
    121                                                         <li>
    122                                                                 Certain toy jewelry or older toys
    123                                                         </li>
    124                                                         <li>
    125                                                                 Antiques and antigue decorative items
    126                                                         </li>
    127                                                         <li>
    128                                                                 Lead-based paint found in buildings older than 1978
    129                                                         </li>
    130                                                         <li>
    131                                                                 Some imported foods or candies (some candies from Mexico have been found to have lead)
    132                                                         </li>
    133                                                         <li>
    134                                                                 Some imported canned goods due to the lead soldering
    135                                                         </li>
    136                                                         <li>
    137                                                                 Food and liquids stored in lead crystal or lead-glazed pottery or porcelain
    138                                                         </li>
    139                                                         <li>
    140                                                                 Dust created during the remodeling of older homes. Lead can also contaminate the soil outside the home
    141                                                         </li>
    142                                                         <li>
    143                                                                 Folk medicines and remedies (azarcon and greta, which are used for upset stomach or indigestion; pay-loo-ah, which is used for rash or fever; kohl or alkohl, which is used as eye cosmetic, to treat skin infections, or as umbilical stump remedy).
    144                                                         </li>
    145                                                 </ul>
     112                                        <ul>
     113                                                <li>
     114                                                        Parent's hobbies that include the use of lead (such as making stained glass windows, hunting, fishing, target shooting)
     115                                                </li>                                                   
     116                                                <li>
     117                                                        Parent's work that includes the use of lead, such as recycling or making automotive batteries, painting, radiator repair (take home lead on work clothes or shoes)
     118                                                </li>
     119                                                <li>
     120                                                        Certain toy jewelry or older toys
     121                                                </li>
     122                                                <li>
     123                                                        Antiques and antigue decorative items
     124                                                </li>
     125                                                <li>
     126                                                        Lead-based paint found in buildings older than 1978
     127                                                </li>
     128                                                <li>
     129                                                        Some imported foods or candies (some candies from Mexico have been found to have lead)
     130                                                </li>
     131                                                <li>
     132                                                        Some imported canned goods due to the lead soldering
     133                                                </li>
     134                                                <li>
     135                                                        Food and liquids stored in lead crystal or lead-glazed pottery or porcelain
     136                                                </li>
     137                                                <li>
     138                                                        Dust created during the remodeling of older homes. Lead can also contaminate the soil outside the home
     139                                                </li>
     140                                                <li>
     141                                                        Folk medicines and remedies (azarcon and greta, which are used for upset stomach or indigestion; pay-loo-ah, which is used for rash or fever; kohl or alkohl, which is used as eye cosmetic, to treat skin infections, or as umbilical stump remedy).
     142                                                </li>
     143                                        </ul>
    146144                                </div>
    147145                                <figure title="pottery">
     
    150148                                        </figcaption>
    151149                                </figure>               
    152                                        
    153150                        </section>
     151
    154152                        <section>
     153                                <h3>Lead in drinking water</h3>                                         
    155154                                <p>
    156                                         <h3>Lead in drinking water</h3>                                         
    157                                         </p>
    158                                         <p>
    159                                                 Lead being introduced into water from the disruption of lead containing service lines, such as a meter installation, is mostly associated with older water systems of which there are few in New Mexico. Lead is more likely to be a concern with water systems than in private wells.   
    160                                         </p>
    161                                                 <p>
    162                                                         <ul>
    163                                                                 <li>
    164                                                                         Testing the water is the only way to know if lead is present.
    165                                                                 </li>
    166                                                                 <li>
    167                                                                         Low pH (pH below 6.5) can cause corrosion of plumbing components and dissolve metals like lead, copper and zinc into the water.
    168                                                                 </li>
    169                                                                 <li>
    170                                                                         Household plumbing fixtures, welding solder, and pipe fittings made prior to 1986 may contain lead. Some plumbing components manufactured prior to 2014 may contain up to 8% lead.
    171                                                                 </li>
    172                                                                 <li>
    173                                                                         To remove lead, the USEPA recommends using a NSF/ANSI Standard 53 certified filter.
    174                                                                 </li>
    175                                                         </ul>
    176                                                         </p>
    177                                                 <p>
    178                                                         <span class="Bold">Testing for lead in private well water </span>is recommended:
    179                                                 </p>
    180                                                 <p>
    181                                                         <ul>
    182                                                                 <li>
    183                                                                         At least once, and again after any disturbance to the well such as maintenance.
    184                                                                 </li>
    185                                                                 <li>
    186                                                                         If pregnant women or children under age 6 live in the house.
    187                                                                 </li>
    188                                                                 <li>
    189                                                                         If lead pipes or fixtures are in the home or suspected to be in the home.
    190                                                                 </li>
    191                                                                 <li>
    192                                                                         After water treatment is installed.
    193                                                                 </li>
    194                                                                 <li>
    195                                                                         The recommend action Level for lead in drinking water is 0.015 milligrams per Liter (mg/L).
    196                                                                 </li>
    197                                                         </ul>
    198                                                 </p>
    199                                                 <p>
    200                                                         <span class="Bold">To reduce lead </span>in water:
    201                                                 </p>
    202                                                 <p>
    203                                                         <ul>
    204                                                                 <li>
    205                                                                         Flush pipes for two minutes if the water hasn't been used for six hours or more.
    206                                                                 </li>
    207                                                                 <li>
    208                                                                         The US Environmental Protection Agency provides guidance to help consumers find certified lead reducing point of use (at the sink) filters.
    209                                                                 </li>
    210                                                         </ul>
    211                                                 </p>
    212                                                
     155                                        Lead being introduced into water from the disruption of lead containing service lines, such as a meter installation, is mostly associated with older water systems of which there are few in New Mexico. Lead is more likely to be a concern with water systems than in private wells.   
     156                                </p>
     157                                <ul>
     158                                        <li>
     159                                                Testing the water is the only way to know if lead is present.
     160                                        </li>
     161                                        <li>
     162                                                Low pH (pH below 6.5) can cause corrosion of plumbing components and dissolve metals like lead, copper and zinc into the water.
     163                                        </li>
     164                                        <li>
     165                                                Household plumbing fixtures, welding solder, and pipe fittings made prior to 1986 may contain lead. Some plumbing components manufactured prior to 2014 may contain up to 8% lead.
     166                                        </li>
     167                                        <li>
     168                                                To remove lead, the USEPA recommends using a NSF/ANSI Standard 53 certified filter.
     169                                        </li>
     170                                </ul>
     171                                <p>
     172                                        <span class="Bold">Testing for lead in private well water </span>is recommended:
     173                                </p>
     174                                <ul>
     175                                        <li>
     176                                                At least once, and again after any disturbance to the well such as maintenance.
     177                                        </li>
     178                                        <li>
     179                                                If pregnant women or children under age 6 live in the house.
     180                                        </li>
     181                                        <li>
     182                                                If lead pipes or fixtures are in the home or suspected to be in the home.
     183                                        </li>
     184                                        <li>
     185                                                After water treatment is installed.
     186                                        </li>
     187                                        <li>
     188                                                The recommend action Level for lead in drinking water is 0.015 milligrams per Liter (mg/L).
     189                                        </li>
     190                                </ul>
     191                                <span class="Bold">To reduce lead </span>in water:
     192                                <ul>
     193                                        <li>
     194                                                Flush pipes for two minutes if the water hasn't been used for six hours or more.
     195                                        </li>
     196                                        <li>
     197                                                The US Environmental Protection Agency provides guidance to help consumers find certified lead reducing point of use (at the sink) filters.
     198                                        </li>
     199                                </ul>
    213200                        </section>
    214201                </section>
     202
    215203                <section>
    216                
    217204                        <h2>Lead Poisoning Prevention Tips</h2>
     205                        <p>
     206                                <h3>Protect yourself and your family from lead exposure by:</h3>
     207                        </p>
     208                        <ul>
     209                                <li>
     210                                        <span class="Bold">Removing shoes before going inside your home </span>to avoid tracking in lead from soil. Help your family get into the habit of taking their shoes off when they come inside the house.
     211                                </li>
     212                                <li>
     213                                        <span class="Bold">Showering and changing clothes after finishing the task </span>if you remodel buildings built before 1978 or if your work or hobbies involve working with lead-based products. Don't launder work clothes with the rest of your family's laundry.
     214                                </li>
     215                                <li>
     216                                        <span class="Bold">Wash your hands frequently </span>if you work with lead. Don't smoke or eat while working with lead.
     217                                </li>
     218                                <li>
     219                                        <span class="Bold">Check the Consumer Product Safety Commission website </span>for recalls on products that may contain lead, especially toys and children's clothing (see link in "Downloads and Resources" below.
     220                                </li>
     221                                <li>
     222                                        <span class="Bold">Avoid using home remedies and cosmetics </span>that may contain lead.
     223                                </li>
     224                                <li>
     225                                        <span class="Bold">Check your home for items that may potentially contain lead </span>such as jewelry, toys, and older painted furniture that may be chipping.
     226                                </li>
     227                                <li>
     228                                        <span class="Bold">Make sure children eat healthy and nutritious meals </span>as recommended by the National Dietary Guidelines, because children with good diets absorb less lead. A diet high in vitamin C, iron, and calcium can help reduce lead absorption.
     229                                </li>
     230                        </ul>
     231
     232                        <h3>
     233                                If you think that your child has been exposed to lead
     234                        </h3>
     235                        <p>
     236                                Ask a doctor to test your child for lead.  Both Federal and State Medicaid regulations require that all children enrolled in Medicaid be tested at 12 months and again at 24 months of age. Children between the ages of 36 months and 72 months of age must receive a screening blood lead test if they have not been previously screened for lead poisoning. No state is exempt from this requirement.
     237                        </p>
     238                        <p>
     239                                Contact the Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention Program at NMDOH for more information (see "Downloads and Resources" below).
     240                        </p>
     241                        <div class="NotifiableCondition">
     242                                <h3>Notifiable Diseases or Conditions in New Mexico (N.M.A.C 7.4.3.13)</h3>
    218243                                <p>
    219                                         <h3>Protect yourself and your family from lead exposure by:</h3>
     244                                        All levels of lead in blood are reportable to the New Mexico Department of Health. Report to Epidemiology and Response Division, NM Department of Health, P.O. Box 26110, Santa Fe, NM 87502-6110; or call 505-827-0006.
    220245                                </p>
    221                                         <ul>
    222                                                 <li>
    223                                                         <span class="Bold">Removing shoes before going inside your home </span>to avoid tracking in lead from soil. Help your family get into the habit of taking their shoes off when they come inside the house.
    224                                                 </li>
    225                                                 <li>
    226                                                         <span class="Bold">Showering and changing clothes after finishing the task </span>if you remodel buildings built before 1978 or if your work or hobbies involve working with lead-based products. Don't launder work clothes with the rest of your family's laundry.
    227                                                 </li>
    228                                                 <li>
    229                                                         <span class="Bold">Wash your hands frequently </span>if you work with lead. Don't smoke or eat while working with lead.
    230                                                 </li>
    231                                                 <li>
    232                                                         <span class="Bold">Check the Consumer Product Safety Commission website </span>for recalls on products that may contain lead, especially toys and children's clothing (see link in "Downloads and Resources" below.
    233                                                 </li>
    234                                                 <li>
    235                                                         <span class="Bold">Avoid using home remedies and cosmetics </span>that may contain lead.
    236                                                 </li>
    237                                                 <li>
    238                                                         <span class="Bold">Check your home for items that may potentially contain lead </span>such as jewelry, toys, and older painted furniture that may be chipping.
    239                                                 </li>
    240                                                 <li>
    241                                                         <span class="Bold">Make sure children eat healthy and nutritious meals </span>as recommended by the National Dietary Guidelines, because children with good diets absorb less lead. A diet high in vitamin C, iron, and calcium can help reduce lead absorption.
    242                                                 </li>
    243                                         </ul>
    244                                 <p>
    245 
    246                                         <h3>
    247                                                 If you think that your child has been exposed to lead
    248                                         </h3>
    249                                 </p>   
    250                                 <p>
    251                                         Ask a doctor to test your child for lead.  Both Federal and State Medicaid regulations require that all children enrolled in Medicaid be tested at 12 months and again at 24 months of age. Children between the ages of 36 months and 72 months of age must receive a screening blood lead test if they have not been previously screened for lead poisoning. No state is exempt from this requirement.
    252                                 </p>
    253                                 <p>
    254                                         Contact the Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention Program at NMDOH for more information (see "Downloads and Resources" below).
    255                                 </p>
    256                                 <div class="NotifiableCondition">
    257                                         <h3>Notifiable Diseases or Conditions in New Mexico (N.M.A.C 7.4.3.13)</h3>
    258                                         <p>
    259                                                 All levels of lead in blood are reportable to the New Mexico Department of Health. Report to Epidemiology and Response Division, NM Department of Health, P.O. Box 26110, Santa Fe, NM 87502-6110; or call 505-827-0006.
    260                                         </p>
    261                                 </div>
    262                         </section>
    263                        
    264                        
     246                        </div>
     247                </section>
     248
    265249                <nav id="moreInformation" title="Links for more information">
    266250                        <div id="downloadsResources">
     
    289273                        </div>
    290274
    291                         <div id="moreData" class="Columns">
    292                                 <div id="relatedData">
    293                                         <img ibis:src="view/image/topic/related_data.png"/>
    294                                         <h3>Explore Related Data</h3>
    295                                         <div class="Selections Scroll">
    296                                                 <ul>
    297                                                         <li><a ibis:href="indicator/summary/some_ip_name.html" title="some appropriate link title">Indicator 1 title</a></li>
    298                                                         <li><a ibis:href="query/result/some_QM_name/some_QM_config.html" title="some appropriate link title">Queryable dataset 1 title</a></li>
    299                                                 </ul>
    300                                         </div>
    301                                         <button>Show All</button>
    302                                 </div>
    303 
    304                                 <div id="relatedTopics">
    305                                         <img ibis:src="view/image/topic/related_topics.png"/>
    306                                         <h3>Related Topics</h3>
    307                                         <div class="Selections">
    308                                                 <ul>
    309                                                         <li><a ibis:href="environment/water/PrivateWells.html" title="Private ">Private Wells</a></li>
    310                                                 </ul>
    311                                         </div>
    312                                 </div>
    313                         </div>
     275                        <ibis:TopicsMoreData topicSelectionsPath="../../../selections/health/poisoning/lead/"/>
    314276                </nav>
    315 
    316 
    317                 <section class="Citation">
    318                         <h2>Citation</h2>
    319                         Page content updated on 1/30/2021, Published on 1/1/2020
    320                        
    321                         <ibis:include ibis:href="xml/html_content/citation/SomeEpiGroupContactInfo.xml" children-only-flag="true"/>
    322                        
    323                         <ibis:include ibis:href="xml/html_content/citation/DeyonneSandoval.xml" children-only-flag="true"/>
    324                 </section>
    325277
    326278        </CONTENT>
  • adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/nmepht-content/xml/html_content/health/reproductive/BirthDefects.xml

    r22142 r22715  
    55        <TITLE>Birth Defects</TITLE>
    66
    7 Set the CSS for the page.  This controls main image title background color and
    8 will likely be used for other styles.  For now, values are always "Topic" and either
    9 "Health" or "Environment":
    107        <HTML_CLASS>Topic Health</HTML_CLASS>
    118        <OTHER_HEAD_CONTENT>
     
    1310                <link ibis:href="css/_SiteSpecific-Topic.css" rel="stylesheet" type="text/css"/>
    1411
    15 <!--
    16         Optional List Items Show More button:  This can be applied to other selection blocks as well.
    17 -->
    18 <TODO>What does this green text pertain to? Is this to insert a linking topic list at the top of the page?</TODO>
    1912                <script ibis:src="js/jquery.scrollBlockListItems.js"/>
    2013                <script>
    21                         var optionOverrides = {"maxSelectionsContainerHeight":120};
    2214                        $( document ).ready(function() {
    23                                 $(".Topic #moreData .Selections").scrollBlockListItems(optionOverrides);
     15                                $(".Topic #downloadsResources .Selections").scrollBlockListItems( {"maxSelectionsContainerHeight":190});
    2416                        });
    2517                </script>
    2618        </OTHER_HEAD_CONTENT>
    2719
    28 
    2920        <CONTENT>
    30 
    3121                <header>
    32                         <img ibis:src="view/image/health/birthdefects/ultrasound.png" title="ultrasound"/>
     22                        <img ibis:src="view/image/health/birth/defects/ultrasound.png" title="ultrasound"/>
    3323                        <h1>Birth Defects</h1>
    3424                </header>
    35 
    3625
    3726                <section>
    3827                        <h2>What are birth defects?</h2>
    3928                        <p>
    40                                 Birth is a complex and wonderful process and fortunately, the birth outcome for most women is a full-term and healthy baby. As the fetus develops, there are critical windows when environmental exposures or genetic changes could damage the fetal growth and function. When this damage occurs, it results in what is called a birth defect.  Most birth defects happen during the first 3 months of pregnancy but can occur at any point. Birth defects are a large public health problem that affects over 120,000 children in the United States. About 1 (one) out of every 33 babies is born with a birth defect. Birth defects are the leading causes of infant deaths. Babies born with birth defects have a greater chance of illness, long-term disability, and are also more likely to be born preterm (before the 37th week of pregnancy) than babies without birth defects. While some risk factors that contribute to birth defects are known, others require more research. Birth is a complex and wonderful process and fortunately, the birth outcome for most women is a full-term and healthy baby. As the fetus develops, there are critical windows when environmental exposures or genetic changes could damage the fetal growth and function. When this damage occurs, it results in what is called a birth defect.  Most birth defects happen during the first 3 months of pregnancy but can occur at any point. Birth defects are a large public health problem that affects over 120,000 children in the United States. About 1 (one) out of every 33 babies is born with a birth defect. Birth defects are the leading causes of infant deaths. Babies born with birth defects have a greater chance of illness, long-term disability, and are also more likely to be born preterm (before the 37th week of pregnancy) than babies without birth defects. While some risk factors that contribute to birth defects are known, others require more research. <p></p>
    41 <TODO> Paragraph width is too wide. According to Brett Shirley's assessment, if paragraph widths are going to be 900px wide across the site, there should be nor more than 3 lines of text. More than 3 lines of text should be limited ot 600 px wide for easier legibility.</TODO>   
     29                                Birth is a complex and wonderful process and fortunately, the birth
     30                                outcome for most women is a full-term and healthy baby. As the fetus
     31                                develops, there are critical windows when environmental exposures or
     32                                genetic changes could damage the fetal growth and function. When this
     33                                damage occurs, it results in what is called a birth defect.  Most birth
     34                                defects happen during the first 3 months of pregnancy but can occur at
     35                                any point. Birth defects are a large public health problem that affects
     36                                over 120,000 children in the United States. About 1 (one) out of every
     37                                33 babies is born with a birth defect. Birth defects are the leading
     38                                causes of infant deaths. Babies born with birth defects have a greater
     39                                chance of illness, long-term disability, and are also more likely to be
     40                                born preterm (before the 37th week of pregnancy) than babies without birth
     41                                defects. While some risk factors that contribute to birth defects are known,
     42                                others require more research. Birth is a complex and wonderful process and
     43                                fortunately, the birth outcome for most women is a full-term and healthy
     44                                baby. As the fetus develops, there are critical windows when environmental
     45                                exposures or genetic changes could damage the fetal growth and function.
     46                                When this damage occurs, it results in what is called a birth defect.  Most
     47                                birth defects happen during the first 3 months of pregnancy but can occur at
     48                                any point. Birth defects are a large public health problem that affects over
     49                                120,000 children in the United States. About 1 (one) out of every 33 babies
     50                                is born with a birth defect. Birth defects are the leading causes of infant
     51                                deaths. Babies born with birth defects have a greater chance of illness,
     52                                long-term disability, and are also more likely to be born preterm (before
     53                                the 37th week of pregnancy) than babies without birth defects. While some
     54                                risk factors that contribute to birth defects are known, others require
     55                                more research.
    4256                        </p>
     57
    4358                        <h3>New Mexico Birth Defects Prevention and Surveillance Program</h3>
    4459                        <p>
     
    4863                                The NMBDPSP is comprised of an epidemiologist and a Health Educator.  The epidemiologist tracks birth defects in order to identify trends or changes in the prevalence of the different birth defects under surveillance with the purpose of developing strategies to reduce the risks of developing the birth defect in the future. The health educator uses the surveillance information to produce health prevention materials and to compile resources for families and community members whose lives are impacted by a loved one with a birth defect.
    4964                        </p>
    50 
    5165                </section>
    52 
    5366
    5467                <section class="SubSectionsContainer">
     
    6477
    6578                                <div>
    66                                        
    6779                                        <ul class="Indent">
    6880                                                <li>
     
    94106                                                </li>
    95107                                        </ul>
    96 
    97108                                </div>
    98109                        </section>
     110
    99111                        <section>
    100                                                 While these factors can increase the risks of having a baby with birth defects, there are measures that can be taken to reduce the risks , like:
    101                                                 <ul class="Indent">
    102                                                         <li>
    103                                                                 Taking 400mcg of folic acid before and during any pregnancy. However, if the mother has had a baby with neural tube defects, scientists advise to increase the intake to 4,000 mcg of folic acid                                               
    104                                                         </li>
    105                                                         <li>
    106                                                                 Not smoking, drinking alcohol or using illegal drugs
    107                                                         </li>
    108                                                         <li>
    109                                                                 Talking to your doctor about any medications you take, including supplements
    110                                                         </li>
    111                                                         <li>
    112                                                                 Talking to your doctor about your job and if you might come into contact with chemicals
    113                                                         </li>
    114                                                         <li>
    115                                                                 Eating healthy and exercising
    116                                                         </li>
    117                                                 </ul>
    118                                         <p>
    119                                                 Even while having a healthy pregnancy or taking precautionary measures, it is not possible to completely eliminate the risks of having a baby with a birth defect. Some birth defects can be caused by genetic mutations, some others are of unknown etiology.
    120                                         </p>
     112                                While these factors can increase the risks of having a baby with birth defects, there are measures that can be taken to reduce the risks , like:
     113                                <ul class="Indent">
     114                                        <li>
     115                                                Taking 400mcg of folic acid before and during any pregnancy. However, if the mother has had a baby with neural tube defects, scientists advise to increase the intake to 4,000 mcg of folic acid                                               
     116                                        </li>
     117                                        <li>
     118                                                Not smoking, drinking alcohol or using illegal drugs
     119                                        </li>
     120                                        <li>
     121                                                Talking to your doctor about any medications you take, including supplements
     122                                        </li>
     123                                        <li>
     124                                                Talking to your doctor about your job and if you might come into contact with chemicals
     125                                        </li>
     126                                        <li>
     127                                                Eating healthy and exercising
     128                                        </li>
     129                                </ul>
     130                                <p>
     131                                        Even while having a healthy pregnancy or taking precautionary measures, it is not possible to completely eliminate the risks of having a baby with a birth defect. Some birth defects can be caused by genetic mutations, some others are of unknown etiology.
     132                                </p>
    121133<TODO>How do I get the gray bar to appear here?</TODO>                                   
    122134                        </section>
     135
    123136                        <section class="SubSectionsContainer">
    124137                                <h2>What Are The Birth Defects?</h2>
    125                                         <p>
    126                                                 <h3>
    127                                                         Oro-facial defects
    128                                                 </h3>
    129                                         </p>
    130                                                 <p>
    131                                                         Oro-facial birth defects affect some part of the face such as lips, mouth, or ears. The most common birth defects are cleft lip and cleft palate. Cleft lip/palate are birth defects that occur when a baby's lip or mouth do not form properly during pregnancy. As a fetus develops during pregnancy, body tissue from each side of the head grow toward the center of the face and join together to make the face. This joining of tissue forms the facial features, like the lips and mouth. If the tissue does not join together over the lip, this can cause a cleft lip. A cleft palate occurs when the tissue does not join together to form the roof of the mouth. Sometimes a baby will have both a cleft lip and a cleft palate. A baby that has a cleft lip or cleft palate can have trouble feeding and talking, can have ear infections, can have hearing problems, and can have issues with their teeth.
    132                                                 </p>
    133                                                 <p>
    134                                                         The causes of orofacial clefts among most infants are unknown. Some known factors that are associated with oro-facial clefts are smoking during pregnancy, maternal diabetes, and certain medications taken by the mother during pregnancy. Oro-facial clefts can often be diagnosed during pregnancy through the use of routine ultrasounds. They can also be diagnosed at time of birth. In rare cases, it may be later in life before an oro-facial cleft is diagnosed.
    135                                                 </p>
    136                                                 <p>
    137                                                         Treatment options vary by case but can often include multiple surgeries as a child grows to correct the oro-facial cleft. Always discuss treatment options with your baby's doctor. Babies born with an oro-facial cleft do well and lead healthy lives.
    138                                                 </p>
    139                                                         <p>
    140                                                         <ul class="Indent">
    141                                                                 <li>
    142                                                                         Cleft lip
    143                                                                 </li>
    144                                                                 <li>
    145                                                                         Cleft palate
    146                                                                 </li>
    147                                                                 <li>
    148                                                                         Anotia/Microtia (missing or small ears)
    149                                                                 </li>
    150                                                         </ul>
    151                                                 </p>     
    152                                 </section>             
    153                                 <section class="ImageInfoBlock">
     138                                <h3>Oro-facial defects</h3>
     139                                <p>
     140                                        Oro-facial birth defects affect some part of the face such as lips, mouth, or ears. The most common birth defects are cleft lip and cleft palate. Cleft lip/palate are birth defects that occur when a baby's lip or mouth do not form properly during pregnancy. As a fetus develops during pregnancy, body tissue from each side of the head grow toward the center of the face and join together to make the face. This joining of tissue forms the facial features, like the lips and mouth. If the tissue does not join together over the lip, this can cause a cleft lip. A cleft palate occurs when the tissue does not join together to form the roof of the mouth. Sometimes a baby will have both a cleft lip and a cleft palate. A baby that has a cleft lip or cleft palate can have trouble feeding and talking, can have ear infections, can have hearing problems, and can have issues with their teeth.
     141                                </p>
     142                                <p>
     143                                        The causes of orofacial clefts among most infants are unknown. Some known factors that are associated with oro-facial clefts are smoking during pregnancy, maternal diabetes, and certain medications taken by the mother during pregnancy. Oro-facial clefts can often be diagnosed during pregnancy through the use of routine ultrasounds. They can also be diagnosed at time of birth. In rare cases, it may be later in life before an oro-facial cleft is diagnosed.
     144                                </p>
     145                                <p>
     146                                        Treatment options vary by case but can often include multiple surgeries as a child grows to correct the oro-facial cleft. Always discuss treatment options with your baby's doctor. Babies born with an oro-facial cleft do well and lead healthy lives.
     147                                </p>
     148                                <ul class="Indent">
     149                                        <li>
     150                                                Cleft lip
     151                                        </li>
     152                                        <li>
     153                                                Cleft palate
     154                                        </li>
     155                                        <li>
     156                                                Anotia/Microtia (missing or small ears)
     157                                        </li>
     158                                </ul>
     159                        </section>             
     160
     161                        <section class="ImageInfoBlock">
    154162                                <div>
    155163                                        <h3>Congenital heart defects</h3>
     
    158166                                                Congenital heart defects (CHDs) are the most common type of birth defect. A child is said to have a CHD when they are born with a heart not normally formed. Approximately, 25% of CHDs are considered critical (CCHD), with the child needing medical intervention, often surgery, within the first year of life. There are several different CHDs, with seven of those considered CCHDs. With advancing medical care and treatment, babies with a CHD are living longer and healthier lives.
    159167                                        </p>
    160                                         <p>
    161                                                 <span class="Bold">What are the symptoms of a heart defect?</span>
     168                                        <p class="Bold">What are the symptoms of a heart defect?
    162169                                        </p>
    163170                                        <p>
    164171                                                It is important for parents and caregivers to be able to identify the symptoms of a heart defect and seek medical help immediately in case any of them are noticed.
    165172                                        </p>
    166                                                 <ul class="Indent">
    167                                                         <li>
    168                                                                 Pounding heart
    169                                                         </li>
    170                                                         <li>
    171                                                                 Weak pulse 
    172                                                         </li>
    173                                                         <li>
    174                                                                 Pale or blue-colored skin, nails, or lips
    175                                                         </li>   
    176                                                         <li>
    177                                                                 Fast or troubled breathing
    178                                                         </li>
    179                                                         <li>
    180                                                                 Poor feeding
    181                                                         </li>
    182                                                         <li>
    183                                                                 Very sleepy
    184                                                         </li>
    185                                                         <p></p>
    186                                                 </ul>
    187                                         <p>
    188                                                 <span class="Bold">What is New Mexico doing to protect my baby?</span>
    189                                         </p>
     173                                        <ul class="Indent">
     174                                                <li>
     175                                                        Pounding heart
     176                                                </li>
     177                                                <li>
     178                                                        Weak pulse 
     179                                                </li>
     180                                                <li>
     181                                                        Pale or blue-colored skin, nails, or lips
     182                                                </li>   
     183                                                <li>
     184                                                        Fast or troubled breathing
     185                                                </li>
     186                                                <li>
     187                                                        Poor feeding
     188                                                </li>
     189                                                <li>
     190                                                        Very sleepy
     191                                                </li>
     192                                        </ul>
     193                                       
     194                                        BELOW ARE REALLY HEADINGs...
     195                                        <p class="Bold">What is New Mexico doing to protect my baby?</p>
    190196                                        <p>
    191197                                                All birthing facilities in New Mexico are required to check newborns for birth defects, including CHDs. Parents choosing to forego this screening must sign a waiver
     
    194200                                                The screen for CHDs, called pulse oximetry, is painless and measures the baby's pulse and the level of oxygen in the baby's blood. Screening performed in the birthing facility before discharge allows immediate referral for follow-up testing if it is necessary.
    195201                                        </p>
    196                                                 <ul class="Indent">
    197                                                         <li>
    198                                                                 D-transposition of the great arteries
    199                                                         </li>
    200                                                         <li>
    201                                                                 Tetralogy of Fallot
    202                                                         </li>
    203                                                         <li>
    204                                                                 Pulmonary atresia
    205                                                         </li>
    206                                                         <li>
    207                                                                 Tricuspid atresia
    208                                                         </li>
    209                                                         <li>
    210                                                                 Hypoplastic left heart syndrome
    211                                                         </li>           
    212                                                         <li>
    213                                                                 Total anomalous pulmonary venus connection
    214                                                         </li>
    215                                                         <li>
    216                                                                 Atrial septal defect
    217                                                         </li>                                                           
    218                                                         <li>
    219                                                                 Atrioventricular septal defect
    220                                                         </li>
    221                                                         <li>
    222                                                                 Coarctation of the aorta
    223                                                         </li>                                                   
    224                                                         <li>
    225                                                                 Truncus arteriosus
    226                                                         </li>
    227                                                         <li>
    228                                                                 Ventricular septal defect
    229                                                         </li>
    230                                                         <li>
    231                                                                 Double-outlet right ventricle
    232                                                         </li>
    233                                                         <li>
    234                                                                 Ebstein anomaly
    235                                                         </li>
    236                                                         <li>
    237                                                                 Interrupted aortic arch
    238                                                         </li>
    239                                                         <li>
    240                                                                 Single ventricle
    241                                                         </li>
    242                                                 </ul>
     202                                        <ul class="Indent">
     203                                                <li>
     204                                                        D-transposition of the great arteries
     205                                                </li>
     206                                                <li>
     207                                                        Tetralogy of Fallot
     208                                                </li>
     209                                                <li>
     210                                                        Pulmonary atresia
     211                                                </li>
     212                                                <li>
     213                                                        Tricuspid atresia
     214                                                </li>
     215                                                <li>
     216                                                        Hypoplastic left heart syndrome
     217                                                </li>           
     218                                                <li>
     219                                                        Total anomalous pulmonary venus connection
     220                                                </li>
     221                                                <li>
     222                                                        Atrial septal defect
     223                                                </li>                                                           
     224                                                <li>
     225                                                        Atrioventricular septal defect
     226                                                </li>
     227                                                <li>
     228                                                        Coarctation of the aorta
     229                                                </li>                                                   
     230                                                <li>
     231                                                        Truncus arteriosus
     232                                                </li>
     233                                                <li>
     234                                                        Ventricular septal defect
     235                                                </li>
     236                                                <li>
     237                                                        Double-outlet right ventricle
     238                                                </li>
     239                                                <li>
     240                                                        Ebstein anomaly
     241                                                </li>
     242                                                <li>
     243                                                        Interrupted aortic arch
     244                                                </li>
     245                                                <li>
     246                                                        Single ventricle
     247                                                </li>
     248                                        </ul>
    243249                                       
    244                                         </div>
    245                                         <figure >
    246                                                 <img ibis:src="view/image/health/birthdefects/newborn.png"/>
    247                                         </figure>
     250                                </div>
     251
     252                                <figure>
     253                                        <img ibis:src="view/image/health/birthdefects/newborn.png"/>
     254                                </figure>
    248255<TODO>Is there a way to anchor the picture to a list, rather than the block of text? It can either go with the heart defects list or with the symptom list above</TODO>
    249                                 </section>
     256                        </section>
    250257
    251258                        <section>
    252                                
    253259                                <div>
    254260                                        <h3>Neural Tube Defects</h3>
    255                                                 <p>
    256                                                         The neural tube is the early form of the brain and spine of a fetus and develops very early during pregnancy, often before a woman knows she is pregnant. Neural Tube Defects (NTDs) occur when the neural tube does not close properly.
    257                                                 </p>
    258                                                 <p>
    259                                                         The causes of NTDs are not fully known, however, one prevention method of NTDs that doctors recommend is that any woman of reproductive age take 400 mcg of folic acid daily. For women who have had a pregnancy affected by an NTD, doctors recommend that they consume 4,000mcg of folic acid starting 1 month before planning on becoming pregnant. When planning to become pregnant, women should always seek advice from their primary care provider.
    260                                                 </p>
    261                                                 <p>
    262                                                         NTDs are frequently diagnosed early in pregnancy using ultrasounds or are diagnosed at birth. Treatment will vary for each case and diagnosis. It is important to work with your baby's doctor to determine appropriate treatment plans. While some NTDs may be mild (like some cases of spina bifida) and result in a person living to their fullest potential, babies born with anencephaly often will die shortly after birth.
    263                                                 </p>
    264                                                 <p></p>
    265                                                 The types of neural tube defects are:
    266                                                         <ul class="Indent">
    267                                                                 <li>
    268                                                                         Spina Bifida
    269                                                                 </li>
    270                                                                 <li>
    271                                                                         Anencephaly
    272                                                                 </li>
    273                                                                 <li>
    274                                                                         Encephalocele
    275                                                                 </li>
    276                                                                 <li>
    277                                                                         Microcephaly
    278                                                                 </li>
    279                                                                 <li>
    280                                                                         Aniridia
    281                                                                 </li>
    282                                                         </ul>
    283                                                 <p></p>
     261                                        <p>
     262                                                The neural tube is the early form of the brain and spine of a fetus and develops very early during pregnancy, often before a woman knows she is pregnant. Neural Tube Defects (NTDs) occur when the neural tube does not close properly.
     263                                        </p>
     264                                        <p>
     265                                                The causes of NTDs are not fully known, however, one prevention method of NTDs that doctors recommend is that any woman of reproductive age take 400 mcg of folic acid daily. For women who have had a pregnancy affected by an NTD, doctors recommend that they consume 4,000mcg of folic acid starting 1 month before planning on becoming pregnant. When planning to become pregnant, women should always seek advice from their primary care provider.
     266                                        </p>
     267                                        <p>
     268                                                NTDs are frequently diagnosed early in pregnancy using ultrasounds or are diagnosed at birth. Treatment will vary for each case and diagnosis. It is important to work with your baby's doctor to determine appropriate treatment plans. While some NTDs may be mild (like some cases of spina bifida) and result in a person living to their fullest potential, babies born with anencephaly often will die shortly after birth.
     269                                        </p>
     270
     271                                        <h3>The types of neural tube defects are:</h3>
     272                                        <ul class="Indent">
     273                                                <li>
     274                                                        Spina Bifida
     275                                                </li>
     276                                                <li>
     277                                                        Anencephaly
     278                                                </li>
     279                                                <li>
     280                                                        Encephalocele
     281                                                </li>
     282                                                <li>
     283                                                        Microcephaly
     284                                                </li>
     285                                                <li>
     286                                                        Aniridia
     287                                                </li>
     288                                        </ul>
    284289                                </div>
    285290                        </section>
    286291                </section>
    287292
    288 
    289293                <section>
    290                
    291                                 <h3>Notifiable Condiation (Reportable to NMDOH)</h3>
     294                        <h3>Notifiable Condiation (Reportable to NMDOH)</h3>
    292295<TODO>We need a way to make the notifiable conditions info stand out. Is it possible to put it in a text box or change the font/color? Maybe this is a Brett question</TODO>                           
    293                        
    294296                </section>
    295297
    296298<TODO>Rearrange the blocks so that the indicator reports and queries block is the widest block - maybe even lose the photo for more space and emphasis</TODO>
    297299
    298 
    299300                <nav id="moreInformation" title="Links for more information">
    300 <!--
    301                         <h2>More Information</h2>
    302 -->
    303301                        <div id="downloadsResources">
    304302                                <h3>Downloads and Resources</h3>
     
    315313                        </div>
    316314
    317                         <div id="moreData" class="Columns">
    318                                 <div id="relatedData">
    319                                         <img ibis:src="view/image/topic/related_data.png"/>
    320                                         <h3>Reports and Data</h3>
    321                                         <div class="Selections Scroll">
    322                                                 <ul>
    323                                                         <li><a ibis:href="dataportal/indicator/summary/BirthDefectAnen.Cnty.html" title="Prevalence of Anencephaly">Prevalence of Anencephaly per 10,000 live births</a></li>
    324                                                         <li><a ibis:href="dataportal/indicator/summary/BirthDefectCL.Cnty.html" title="Prevalence of Cleft Lip">Prevalence of Cleft Lip with or without Cleft Palate per 10,000 Live Births</a></li>
    325                                                         <li><a ibis:href="dataportal/indicator/summary/BirthDefectCP.Cnty.html" title="Prevalence of Cleft Palate">Prevalence of Cleft Palate without Cleft Lip per 10,000 Live Births</a></li>
    326                                                         <li><a ibis:href="dataportal/indicator/summary/BirthDefectGastroschisis.Cnty.html" title="Prevalence of Gastroschisis">Prevalence of Gastroschisis per 10,000 Live Births</a></li>
    327                                                         <li><a ibis:href="dataportal/indicator/summary/BirthDefectHLH.Cnty.html" title="Prevalence of Hypoplastic LH Syndrome">Prevalence of Hypoplastic Left Heart Syndrome per 10,000 Live Births</a></li>
    328                                                         <li><a ibis:href="dataportal/indicator/summary/BirthDefectHypospadias.Cnty.html" title="Prevalence of Hypospadias">Prevalence of Hypospadias per 10,000 Live Male Births</a></li>
    329                                                         <li><a ibis:href="dataportal/indicator/summary/BirthDefectLowerLimb.Cnty.html" title="Prevalence of Lower Limb Deficiencies">Prevalence of Lower Limb Deficiencies per 10,000 Live Births</a></li>
    330                                                         <li><a ibis:href="dataportal/indicator/summary/BirthDefectSpina.Cnty.html" title="Prevalence of Spina Bifida">Prevalence of Spina Bifida (without Anencephaly) per 10,000 Live Births</a></li> 
    331                                                         <li><a ibis:href="dataportal/indicator/summary/BirthDefectTOF.Cnty.html" title="Prevalence of Tetralogy of Fallot">Prevalence of Tetralogy of Fallot per 10,000 Live Births</a></li>
    332                                                         <li><a ibis:href="dataportal/indicator/summary/BirthDefectTGA.Cnty.html" title="Prevalence of Transposition of the Great Arteries">Prevalence of Transposition of the Great Arteries (Vessels) per 10,000 Live Births</a></li>
    333                                                         <li><a ibis:href="dataportal/indicator/summary/BirthDefectDS.LT35.Cnty.html" title="Prevalence of Trisomy 21 under 35">Prevalence of Trisomy 21 (Down Syndrome) - Births to Mothers Under Age 35 per 10,000 Live Births</a></li>
    334                                                         <li><a ibis:href="dataportal/indicator/summary/BirthDefectDS.GE35.Cnty.html" title="Prevalence of Trisomy 21 over 35">Prevalence of Trisomy 21 (Down Syndrome) - Births to Mothers Age 35 and Over per 10,000 Live Births</a></li>
    335                                                         <li><a ibis:href="dataportal/indicator/summary/BirthDefectUpperLimb.Cnty.html" title="Prevalence of Upper Limb Deficiencies">Prevalence of Upper Limb Deficiencies per 10,000 Live Births</a></li>
    336 <TODO>Should the gueries go to the query builder page or to the results page?</TODO>
    337                                                         <li><a ibis:href="query/result/some_QM_name/some_QM_config.html" title="some appropriate link title">The 12 Birth Defects Tracked in New Mexcio: Crude Rates Per 10,000 Live Births</a></li>
    338                                                         <li><a ibis:href="query/result/some_QM_name/some_QM_config.html" title="some appropriate link title">Queryable dataset 2 title</a></li>
    339                                                         <li><a ibis:href="query/result/some_QM_name/some_QM_config.html" title="some appropriate link title">Queryable dataset 1 title</a></li>
    340                                                         <li><a ibis:href="query/result/some_QM_name/some_QM_config.html" title="some appropriate link title">Queryable dataset 2 title</a></li>
    341                                                         <li><a ibis:href="query/result/some_QM_name/some_QM_config.html" title="some appropriate link title">Queryable dataset 1 title</a></li>
    342                                                         <li><a ibis:href="query/result/some_QM_name/some_QM_config.html" title="some appropriate link title">Queryable dataset 2 title</a></li>
    343                                                         <li><a ibis:href="query/result/some_QM_name/some_QM_config.html" title="some appropriate link title">Queryable dataset 1 title</a></li>
    344                                                         <li><a ibis:href="query/result/some_QM_name/some_QM_config.html" title="some appropriate link title">Queryable dataset 2 title</a></li>
    345                                                 </ul>
    346                                         </div>
    347                                         <button>Show All</button>
    348                                 </div>
    349 
    350                                 <div id="relatedTopics">
    351                                         <img ibis:src="view/image/topic/related_topics.png"/>
    352                                         <h3>Related Topics</h3>
    353                                         <div class="Selections">
    354                                                 <ul>
    355                                                         <li><a ibis:href="health/some_topic_dir/some_topic_name.html" title="some appropriate link title">Health Topic a</a></li>
    356                                                         <li><a ibis:href="health/some_topic_dir/some_topic_name.html" title="some appropriate link title">Health Topic b</a></li>
    357                                                         <li><a ibis:href="health/some_topic_dir/some_topic_name.html" title="some appropriate link title">Health Topic c</a></li>
    358                                                 </ul>
    359                                         </div>
    360                                 </div>
    361                         </div>
     315                        <ibis:TopicsMoreData topicSelectionsPath="../../../selections/health/birth/defects/"/>
    362316                </nav>
    363 
    364 
    365                 <section class="Citation">
    366                         <h2>Citation</h2>
    367                         Page content updated on 11/24/2020, Published on 1/1/2020
    368                        
    369                         <ibis:include ibis:href="xml/html_content/citation/SomeEpiGroupContactInfo.xml" children-only-flag="true"/>
    370                        
    371                         <ibis:include ibis:href="xml/html_content/citation/DeyonneSandoval.xml" children-only-flag="true"/>
    372                 </section>
    373317
    374318        </CONTENT>
  • adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/nmepht-content/xml/html_content/health/reproductive/Fertility.xml

    r16061 r22715  
    44
    55        <TITLE>Fertility</TITLE>
     6
     7        <HTML_CLASS>Topic Health</HTML_CLASS>
     8        <OTHER_HEAD_CONTENT>
     9                <link ibis:href="css/Topic.css" rel="stylesheet" type="text/css"/>
     10                <link ibis:href="css/_SiteSpecific-Topic.css" rel="stylesheet" type="text/css"/>
     11
     12                <script ibis:src="js/jquery.scrollBlockListItems.js"/>
     13                <script>
     14                        $( document ).ready(function() {
     15                                $(".Topic #downloadsResources .Selections").scrollBlockListItems( {"maxSelectionsContainerHeight":190});
     16                        });
     17                </script>
     18        </OTHER_HEAD_CONTENT>
    619
    720        <CONTENT>
  • adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/nmepht-content/xml/html_content/health/reproductive/InfantMort.xml

    r16107 r22715  
    55        <TITLE>Infant Mortality</TITLE>
    66
     7        <HTML_CLASS>Topic Health</HTML_CLASS>
     8        <OTHER_HEAD_CONTENT>
     9                <link ibis:href="css/Topic.css" rel="stylesheet" type="text/css"/>
     10                <link ibis:href="css/_SiteSpecific-Topic.css" rel="stylesheet" type="text/css"/>
     11
     12                <script ibis:src="js/jquery.scrollBlockListItems.js"/>
     13                <script>
     14                        $( document ).ready(function() {
     15                                $(".Topic #downloadsResources .Selections").scrollBlockListItems( {"maxSelectionsContainerHeight":190});
     16                        });
     17                </script>
     18        </OTHER_HEAD_CONTENT>
     19
    720        <CONTENT>
     21
    822                <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="2"><SHOW/>
    923                        <TITLE>Description</TITLE>
  • adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/nmepht-content/xml/html_content/health/reproductive/LowBirthWeight.xml

    r17487 r22715  
    44
    55        <TITLE>Low Birth Weight</TITLE>
     6
     7        <HTML_CLASS>Topic Health</HTML_CLASS>
     8        <OTHER_HEAD_CONTENT>
     9                <link ibis:href="css/Topic.css" rel="stylesheet" type="text/css"/>
     10                <link ibis:href="css/_SiteSpecific-Topic.css" rel="stylesheet" type="text/css"/>
     11
     12                <script ibis:src="js/jquery.scrollBlockListItems.js"/>
     13                <script>
     14                        $( document ).ready(function() {
     15                                $(".Topic #downloadsResources .Selections").scrollBlockListItems( {"maxSelectionsContainerHeight":190});
     16                        });
     17                </script>
     18        </OTHER_HEAD_CONTENT>
    619
    720        <CONTENT>
  • adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/nmepht-content/xml/html_content/health/reproductive/Outcomes.xml

    r22619 r22715  
    1212                <script ibis:src="js/jquery.scrollBlockListItems.js"/>
    1313                <script>
    14                         var optionOverrides = {"maxSelectionsContainerHeight":120};
    1514                        $( document ).ready(function() {
    16                                 $(".Topic #moreData .Selections").scrollBlockListItems(optionOverrides);
     15                                $(".Topic #downloadsResources .Selections").scrollBlockListItems( {"maxSelectionsContainerHeight":190});
    1716                        });
    1817                </script>
    1918        </OTHER_HEAD_CONTENT>
    2019
    21 
    2220        <CONTENT>
    23 
    2421                <header>
    25                         <img ibis:src="view/image/Health/repro_outcomes/birds.jpg" title="Reproductive Outcomes"/>
     22                        <img ibis:src="view/image/health/birth/outcomes/birds.jpg" title="Reproductive Outcomes"/>
    2623                        <h1>Reproductive and Birth Outcomes</h1>
    2724                </header>
    28 
    2925
    3026                <section>
     
    3430                       
    3531                </section>
    36 
    3732
    3833                <section class="SubSectionsContainer">
     
    6964                                </div>
    7065                        </section>
     66
    7167                        <section>
    72                                 <p>
    73                                         <h2>Risks and importance of the measures</h2>
    74                                 </p>
     68                                <h2>Risks and importance of the measures</h2>
    7569                                <p>
    7670                                        <span class="Bold">Preterm birth:</span> risk factors include delivering a premature baby in the past, being pregnant with multiples, tobacco use and substance abuse, and short time (less than 18 months) between pregnancies. Additionally, pregnancy complications can result in preterm birth because the baby must be delivered early. However, a woman can still have a premature birth even if she has no known risk factors.
     
    9892                                </p>
    9993                        </section>
     94
    10095                        <h2>Tips for healthy birth outcomes</h2>
    101                                
    102                                 <p>
    103                                         The causes of low birth weight, preterm birth and infant mortality are often related. Therefore, to prevent these conditions it is important for all women of reproductive age to adopt healthy behaviors such as:
    104                                 </p>
     96                        <p>
     97                                The causes of low birth weight, preterm birth and infant mortality are often related. Therefore, to prevent these conditions it is important for all women of reproductive age to adopt healthy behaviors such as:
     98                        </p>
    10599
    106100                        <section class="ImageInfoBlock">
     
    153147                               
    154148                                <figure title="new family">
    155                                         <img ibis:src="view/image/health/repro_outcomes/family_newborn.jpg"/>
     149                                        <img ibis:src="view/image/health/birth/outcomes/family_newborn.jpg"/>
    156150                                        <figcaption>
    157151                                                Tips for healthy outcomes
     
    160154                        </section>
    161155                </section>
    162 
    163 
    164                 <section>
    165                         <h2></h2>
    166                 </section>
    167 
    168156
    169157                <nav id="moreInformation" title="Links for more information">
     
    177165                        </div>
    178166
    179                         <div id="moreData" class="Columns">
    180                                 <div id="relatedData">
    181                                         <img ibis:src="view/image/topic/related_data.png"/>
    182                                         <h3>Reports and Data</h3>
    183                                         <div class="Selections Scroll">
    184                                         </div>
    185                                         <button>Show All</button>
    186                                 </div>
    187 
    188                                 <div id="relatedTopics">
    189                                         <img ibis:src="view/image/topic/related_topics.png"/>
    190                                         <h3>Related Topics</h3>
    191                                         <div class="Selections">
    192                                         </div>
    193                                 </div>
    194                         </div>
     167                        <ibis:TopicsMoreData topicSelectionsPath="../../../selections/health/birth/outcomes/"/>
    195168                </nav>
    196 
    197 
    198                 <section class="Citation">
    199                         <h2>Citation</h2>
    200                         Page content updated on 1/1/2020, Published on 1/1/2020
    201                        
    202                         <ibis:include ibis:href="xml/html_content/citation/SomeEpiGroupContactInfo.xml" children-only-flag="true"/>
    203                        
    204                         <ibis:include ibis:href="xml/html_content/citation/DeyonneSandoval.xml" children-only-flag="true"/>
    205                 </section>
    206169
    207170        </CONTENT>
  • adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/nmepht-content/xml/html_content/health/reproductive/PretermBirths.xml

    r16126 r22715  
    44
    55        <TITLE>Preterm Births</TITLE>
     6
     7        <HTML_CLASS>Topic Health</HTML_CLASS>
     8        <OTHER_HEAD_CONTENT>
     9                <link ibis:href="css/Topic.css" rel="stylesheet" type="text/css"/>
     10                <link ibis:href="css/_SiteSpecific-Topic.css" rel="stylesheet" type="text/css"/>
     11
     12                <script ibis:src="js/jquery.scrollBlockListItems.js"/>
     13                <script>
     14                        $( document ).ready(function() {
     15                                $(".Topic #downloadsResources .Selections").scrollBlockListItems( {"maxSelectionsContainerHeight":190});
     16                        });
     17                </script>
     18        </OTHER_HEAD_CONTENT>
    619
    720        <CONTENT>
  • adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/nmepht-content/xml/html_content/health/reproductive/SexRatio.xml

    r14867 r22715  
    44
    55        <TITLE>Sex Ratio at Birth</TITLE>
     6
     7        <HTML_CLASS>Topic Health</HTML_CLASS>
     8        <OTHER_HEAD_CONTENT>
     9                <link ibis:href="css/Topic.css" rel="stylesheet" type="text/css"/>
     10                <link ibis:href="css/_SiteSpecific-Topic.css" rel="stylesheet" type="text/css"/>
     11
     12                <script ibis:src="js/jquery.scrollBlockListItems.js"/>
     13                <script>
     14                        $( document ).ready(function() {
     15                                $(".Topic #downloadsResources .Selections").scrollBlockListItems( {"maxSelectionsContainerHeight":190});
     16                        });
     17                </script>
     18        </OTHER_HEAD_CONTENT>
    619
    720        <CONTENT>
  • adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/nmepht-content/xml/selections/health/cardiovascular/topics.xml

    r22714 r22715  
    66                <TITLE>Heart Attack</TITLE>
    77                <DESCRIPTION></DESCRIPTION>
    8                 <LOCAL_URL>health/cardio/HeartAttack.html</LOCAL_URL>
     8                <LOCAL_URL>health/cardiovascular/HeartAttack.html</LOCAL_URL>
    99        </SELECTION>
    1010
     
    1212                <TITLE>Stroke</TITLE>
    1313                <DESCRIPTION></DESCRIPTION>
    14                 <LOCAL_URL>health/cardio/Stroke.html</LOCAL_URL>
     14                <LOCAL_URL>health/cardiovascular/Stroke.html</LOCAL_URL>
    1515        </SELECTION>
    1616</SELECTIONS>
  • adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/nmepht-content/xml/selections/health/poisonings/co/query_modules.xml

    r22714 r22715  
    55        <SELECTION>
    66                <TITLE>Carbon Monoxide Exposures and Outcomes</TITLE>
    7                 <SELECTION>
    8                         <TITLE>Carbon Monoxide (CO) Exposures, Poison and Drug Information Center Calls, Counts</TITLE>
    9                         <LOCAL_URL>dataportal/query/result/pcc/PCCCOexposure/Count.html</LOCAL_URL>
    10                 </SELECTION>
    11                 <SELECTION>
    12                         <TITLE>CO Exposures, Poison and Drug Information Center Calls, Crude Rates Per 100,000 Population</TITLE>
    13                         <LOCAL_URL>dataportal/query/result/pcc/PCCCOexposure/CrudeRate.html</LOCAL_URL>
    14                 </SELECTION>
    15                 <SELECTION>
    16                         <TITLE>CO Exposures, Poison and Drug Information Center Calls, Age-Adjusted Rates Per 100,000 Population</TITLE>
    17                         <LOCAL_URL>dataportal/query/result/pcc/PCCCOexposure/AgeRate.html</LOCAL_URL>
    18                 </SELECTION>
     7                <SELECTIONS>
     8                        <SELECTION>
     9                                <TITLE>Carbon Monoxide (CO) Exposures, Poison and Drug Information Center Calls, Counts</TITLE>
     10                                <LOCAL_URL>dataportal/query/result/pcc/PCCCOexposure/Count.html</LOCAL_URL>
     11                        </SELECTION>
     12                        <SELECTION>
     13                                <TITLE>CO Exposures, Poison and Drug Information Center Calls, Crude Rates Per 100,000 Population</TITLE>
     14                                <LOCAL_URL>dataportal/query/result/pcc/PCCCOexposure/CrudeRate.html</LOCAL_URL>
     15                        </SELECTION>
     16                        <SELECTION>
     17                                <TITLE>CO Exposures, Poison and Drug Information Center Calls, Age-Adjusted Rates Per 100,000 Population</TITLE>
     18                                <LOCAL_URL>dataportal/query/result/pcc/PCCCOexposure/AgeRate.html</LOCAL_URL>
     19                        </SELECTION>
     20                </SELECTIONS>
    1921        </SELECTION>
    2022
    2123        <SELECTION>
    22                 <TITLE>Carbon Monoxide Poisoning</TITLE>
     24                <TITLE>ED Visits</TITLE>
    2325                <SELECTIONS>
    2426                        <SELECTION>
     
    3436                                <LOCAL_URL>dataportal/query/result/ed/EDCO/AgeRateCO.html</LOCAL_URL>
    3537                        </SELECTION>
     38                </SELECTIONS>
     39        </SELECTION>
    3640
     41        <SELECTION>
     42                <TITLE>HIDD</TITLE>
     43                <SELECTIONS>
    3744                        <SELECTION>
    3845                                <TITLE>CO Poisoning Hospital Admissions, UNFR Counts</TITLE>
     
    4754                                <LOCAL_URL>dataportal/query/result/hidd/HIDDCO/AgeRateCO.html</LOCAL_URL>
    4855                        </SELECTION>
     56                </SELECTIONS>
     57        </SELECTION>
    4958
     59        <SELECTION>
     60                <TITLE>Mortality</TITLE>
     61                <SELECTIONS>
    5062                        <SELECTION>
    5163                                <TITLE>CO Poisoning Deaths, UNFR</TITLE>
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