Changeset 22677 in main


Ignore:
Timestamp:
03/11/21 07:48:01 (5 weeks ago)
Author:
Paul Leo
Message:

NMEPHT - New pages updated by SMM, adjusted for new structure for images and pdfs

Location:
adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/nmepht-content
Files:
18 added
7 edited

Legend:

Unmodified
Added
Removed
  • adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/nmepht-content/xml/html_content/health/breathing/Allergy.xml

    r22662 r22677  
    307307                                                                </li>
    308308                                                                <li>
    309                                                                         <a ibis:href="health/living/HealthyHomes.html" title="healthy homes">Healthy Homes</a>
     309                                                                        <a ibis:href="environment/living/HealthyHomes.html" title="healthy homes">Healthy Homes</a>
    310310                                                                </li>
    311311                                                        </ul>   
  • adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/nmepht-content/xml/html_content/health/breathing/COPD.xml

    r22375 r22677  
    2323
    2424                <header>
    25                         <img ibis:src="view/image/health/breathing/spirometry.jpg" title="Spirometry"/>
     25                        <img ibis:src="view/image/health/breathing/copd/spirometry.jpg" title="Spirometry"/>
    2626                        <h1>Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD)</h1>
    2727                </header>
     
    4242                        <section class="ImageInfoBlock">
    4343                                <figure title="Graphic of COPD effects">
    44                                         <img ibis:src="view/image/health/breathing/COPDgraphic.jpg"/>
     44                                        <img ibis:src="view/image/health/breathing/copd/COPDgraphic.jpg"/>
    4545                                        <figcaption>COPD effects in the lung
    4646                                        </figcaption>
     
    128128
    129129                                <figure title="wildfire smoke">
    130                                         <img ibis:src="view/image/health/breathing/smoke.png"/>
     130                                        <img ibis:src="view/image/health/breathing/copd/smoke.png"/>
    131131                                        <figcaption>Smoke from fires can make COPD worse.
    132132                                        </figcaption>
  • adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/nmepht-content/xml/html_content/health/cancer/Cancer.xml

    r22624 r22677  
    55        <TITLE>Cancer</TITLE>
    66
     7        <HTML_CLASS>Topic Health</HTML_CLASS>
     8        <OTHER_HEAD_CONTENT>
     9                <link ibis:href="css/Topic.css" rel="stylesheet" type="text/css"/>
     10                <link ibis:href="css/_SiteSpecific-Topic.css" rel="stylesheet" type="text/css"/>
     11
     12                <script ibis:src="js/jquery.scrollBlockListItems.js"/>
     13                <script>
     14                        var optionOverrides = {"maxSelectionsContainerHeight":120};
     15                        $( document ).ready(function() {
     16                                $(".Topic #moreData .Selections").scrollBlockListItems(optionOverrides);
     17                        });
     18                </script>
     19        </OTHER_HEAD_CONTENT>
     20
     21
    722        <CONTENT>
    823
    9                 <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="2"><SHOW/>
    10                         <TITLE>Description</TITLE>
    11                         <CONTENT>
    12                                 Cancer starts from the uncontrolled division of cells in the body.  As the abnormal cells
    13                                 continue to grow, they form a tumor.  As the tumor grows it can metastasize, or spread, and
    14                                 begin forming new tumors in different parts of the body.  Not all cancers behave the same way;
    15                                 different types of cancer have different growth rates and respond differently to anti-cancer
    16                                 treatments.  In medical terms, cancer is referred to as malignant neoplasms.
    17                         </CONTENT>
     24                <header>
     25                        <img ibis:src="view/image/health/cancer/cancer/southvalley-abq.jpg" title="Valle de Oro, Southwest Albuquerque"/>
     26                        <h1>Cancer</h1>
     27                </header>
     28
     29
     30                <section>
     31                        <h2>What is Cancer?</h2>
     32               
     33                <p>
     34                        Cancers are a group of about 100 related diseases where some cells in the body change and divide without control. As the abnormal cells continue to grow, they form a tumor. As the tumor grows it can metastasize, or spread, and begin forming new tumors in different parts of the body. Not all cancers behave the same way; different types of cancer have different growth rates and respond differently to anti-cancer treatments. In medical terms, cancer is referred to as malignant neoplasms.
     35                </p>
     36                <p>
     37                        About 1.7 million new cases of cancer are expected to be diagnosed during 2018 in the United States. U.S. cancer care costs were $147.3 billion in 2017. In the future, costs are likely to increase due to an aging population having more cancer, coupled with the costs of new, and often more expensive treatments which will be adopted as standards of care. The good news is that the overall cancer death rate in the U.S. fell 26% between 1991 and 2015. The National Cancer Institute (NCI) estimated that, in 2016, there were 15.5 million cancer survivors in the United States. The number of cancer survivors is expected to increase to <a href="#ref1" id="ref1.link" aria-describedby="footnote-label">20.3 million by 2026.</a>
     38                </p>
     39                <p>
     40                        <footer class="Footnotes"><ol>
     41                                <li id="ref1"> <a href="https://acsjournals.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.3322/caac.21349">
     42                                        Cancer treatment and survivorship statistics, 2016</a> Accessed 12/30/2020
     43                                <a href="#ref1.link" aria-label="Back to content">«</a></li>
     44                        </ol></footer>
     45                </p>   
     46                </section>
     47                <section class="SubSectionsContainer">
     48                        <h2>What are the Risk Factors?</h2>
     49                                <p>
     50                                        Major risk factors for cancer include  <a href="#ref2" id="ref2.link" aria-describedby="footnote-label">tobacco use, diet, lack of exercise, and sun exposure.</a>. For example, people who smoke cigarettes are <a href="#ref3" id="ref3.link" aria-describedby="footnote-label">15 to 30 times more likely to get lung cancer or die from lung cancer</a> than people who do not smoke. Researchers have also identified genetic risks for cancer. Compared to women without a family history, <a href="#ref4" id="ref4.link" aria-describedby="footnote-label">risk of breast cancer is about 1.5 times higher for women with one affected first-degree female relative and 2-4 times higher for women with more than one first-degree relative.</a>
     51                                </p>
     52                                <p>
     53                                        Nobody is immune from getting cancer. Even though scientific studies have shown that specific factors increase the risk for cancer, but sometimes people who have no known risk factors still develop cancer while others and people who have many risk factors, yet never do not develop cancer. The following list contains common cancer risk factors. It is important to remember that some of these are modifiable and some are not. Risk factors include:
     54                                </p>                   
     55                        <section class="ImageInfoBlock">
     56                                <figure title="fire fighter">
     57                                        <img ibis:src="view/image/health/cancer/cancer/firefighter.jpg"/>
     58                                        <figcaption>
     59                                                Certain workplace exposures can cause cancer
     60                                        </figcaption>
     61                                </figure>
     62                                <div>
     63                                       
     64                                                <ul>
     65                                                        <li>
     66                                                                Alcohol use                                                     
     67                                                        </li>
     68                                                        <li>
     69                                                                Exposure to cancer-causing substances
     70                                                        </li>
     71                                                        <li>
     72                                                                Chronic inflammation
     73                                                        </li>
     74                                                        <li>
     75                                                                Diet
     76                                                        </li>
     77                                                        <li>
     78                                                                Hormones                                                       
     79                                                        </li>
     80                                                        <li>
     81                                                                Immunosuppression
     82                                                        </li>
     83                                                        <li>
     84                                                                Some infectious diseases
     85                                                        </li>
     86                                                        <li>
     87                                                                Obesity
     88                                                        </li>
     89                                                        <li>
     90                                                                Radiation
     91                                                        </li>
     92                                                        <li>
     93                                                                Sunlight
     94                                                        </li>
     95                                                        <li>
     96                                                                Tobacco use and second-hand exposure to smoke
     97                                                        </li>
     98                                                        <li>
     99                                                                Older age; the risk of developing cancer increases with age
     100                                                        </li>
     101                                                        <li>
     102                                                                Race and ethnicity; people of certain races and ethnic backgrounds are at higher risk for certain types of cancer.
     103                                                        </li>
     104                                                </ul>
     105                                </div>
     106                        </section>
     107                        <h2>Health Tips</h2>
     108                                <p>
     109                                        There are many ways to reduce your risk for cancer. Following these guidelines will not only reduce your risk for cancer, but improve your general health as well:
     110                                </p>
     111                        <section class="ImageInfoBlock">
     112                                <div>
     113                                        <ul>
     114                                                <li>
     115                                                        Maintain a healthy weight
     116                                                </li>
     117                                                <li>
     118                                                        Exercise regularly
     119                                                </li>
     120                                                <li>
     121                                                        Do not smoke; if you already smoke, quit
     122                                                </li>
     123                                                <li>
     124                                                        If you drink alcohol, drink only in moderation
     125                                                </li>
     126                                                <li>
     127                                                        Receive proper immunizations; certain infectious diseases like the human papillomavirus (HPV) and Hepatitis B and C could lead to cancer later in life
     128                                                </li>
     129                                                <li>
     130                                                        Protect your skin from the sun; wear proper sun-protection clothing and use plenty of sunscreen when you are outside
     131                                                </li>
     132                                                <li>
     133                                                        Limit your exposure to environmental risk factors, such as asbestos, radon, arsenic, and benzene
     134                                                </li>
     135                                                <li>
     136                                                        Get regular medical check-ups, including cancer screenings like mammography, Pap and HPV tests, and colonoscopy. Early detection of cancer significantly improves the chances of a complete recovery.
     137                                                </li>
     138                                        </ul>
     139                                </div>
     140                               
     141
     142                                <figure title="broken cigarette">
     143                                        <img ibis:src="view/image/health/cancer/cancer/quitsmoking.jpg"/>
     144                                        <figcaption>Quitting smoking can greatly lower your risk of cancer
     145                                        </figcaption>
     146                                </figure>
     147                        </section>
     148                                <p>
     149                                        Screening: The Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) monitors the use of cancer screening tests such as mammography for breast cancer, Pap and HPV tests for cervical cancer,and fecal immunochemical tests and colonoscopy for colorectal cancer. You can find BRFSS data on our sister site NM IBIS.
     150                                </p>
     151                                <p>
     152                                        Note: NMTracking Indicator pages (see "Reports and Data" below) have useful information beyond statistics for individual cancers. Be sure to look at the <span class="Bold">More Information</span> menu on each indicator.
     153                                </p>
     154                                <p>
     155                                        <footer class="Footnotes"><ol>
     156                                                <li id="ref2">
     157                                                        Clapp RW, Howe GK, Jacobs M. Environmental and occupational causes of cancer re-visited. J Public Health Policy. 2006;27(1):61-76
     158                                                <a href="#ref2.link" aria-label="Back to content">«</a></li>
     159                                        </ol></footer>
     160                                        <footer class="Footnotes"><ol>
     161                                                <li id="ref3"> <a href="https://www.cdc.gov/cancer/lung/basic_info/risk_factors.htm">
     162                                                        CDC What are the risk factors for lung cancer?</a> Accessed 1/3/2020
     163                                                <a href="#ref3.link" aria-label="Back to content">«</a></li>
     164                                        </ol></footer>
     165                                        <footer class="Footnotes"><ol>
     166                                                <li id="ref4"> <a href="https://www.cancer.org/research/cancer-facts-statistics/breast-cancer-facts-figures.html">
     167                                                        ACS Breast Cancer Facts and Figures 2019-2020</a> Accessed 12/18/2020
     168                                                <a href="#ref4.link" aria-label="Back to content">«</a></li>
     169                                        </ol></footer> 
     170                                </p>                   
     171                </section>
     172                <section>
     173                        <div class="NotifiableCondition">
     174                                <h3>Notifiable Diseases or Conditions in New Mexico (N.M.A.C 7.4.3.13)</h3>
     175                                <p>
     176                                        Cancer: Report all malignant and in situ neoplasms and all intracranial neoplasms, regardless of the tissue of origin to NM DOH designee: New Mexico Tumor Registry, University of New Mexico School of Medicine, Albuquerque, NM 87131.
     177                                </p>                           
     178                        </div>
     179                </section>     
    18180                       
    19                 </ibis:ExpandableContent>
    20 
    21                 <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="2">
    22 
    23                         <TITLE>Learn About Cancer</TITLE>
    24                         <CONTENT>
    25                                 <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="3"><SHOW/>
    26                                         <TITLE>Why Important</TITLE>
    27                                         <CONTENT>
    28                                                 Approximately 1.4 million Americans are expected to be diagnosed with cancer during 2007.
    29                                                 The National Cancer Institute (NCI) estimated that in January 2003, there were approximately
    30                                                 10.3 million living Americans with a history of cancer. The risk of being diagnosed with
    31                                                 cancer increases as a person ages, and 77% of all cancers are diagnosed in Americans age
    32                                                 55 years or older. Cancer, a diverse group of diseases characterized by the uncontrolled
    33                                                 growth and spread of abnormal cells, is believed to be caused by both external and internal
    34                                                 risk factors.
    35                                         </CONTENT>
    36                                 </ibis:ExpandableContent>
    37 
    38                                 <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="3"><SHOW/>
    39                                         <TITLE>What is Known</TITLE>
    40                                         <CONTENT>
    41                                                 Major risk factors for cancer include tobacco use, diet, exercise, and sun exposure
    42                                                 (Clapp, Howe, Jacobs)<a href="#ref1"><sup>1</sup></a>.
    43                                                 For example, male smokers are about 23 times more likely to develop lung cancer than male non-smokers.
    44                                                 Researchers have also identified genetic risks for cancer. Female first degree relatives (mother,
    45                                                 sisters, and daughters) of women with breast cancer are about twice as likely to develop breast
    46                                                 cancer as women who do not have a family history of breast cancer
    47                                                 (Cancer Facts and Figures, 2007; ACS, 2007)<a href="#ref2"><sup>2</sup></a>.
    48                                                 <br/>
    49                                                 <hr/>
    50                                                 <div class="SmallerFont">
    51                                                         <a name="ref1"></a>1. <a href="XXX">NEED CITATION FOR Clapp, Howe, Jacobs</a>
    52                                                         <br/>
    53                                                         <a name="ref2"></a>2. <a href="XXX">NEED CITATION FOR Cancer Facts and Figures</a>
    54                                                         <br/>
    55                                                 </div>
    56 
    57                                         </CONTENT>
    58                                 </ibis:ExpandableContent>
    59 
    60                                 <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="3"><SHOW/>
    61                                         <TITLE>Who is at Risk</TITLE>
    62                                         <CONTENT>
    63                                                 Nobody is immune from getting cancer.  Even though scientific studies have shown that specific
    64                                                 factors increase the risk for cancer, sometimes people who have no risk factors still develop
    65                                                 cancer and people who have many risk factors do not develop cancer.  The following list contains
    66                                                 common cancer risk factors.  It is important to remember that some of these are modifiable and some
    67                                                 are not:
    68                                                 <ul class="Indent">
    69                                                         <li>Older age; the risk of developing cancer increases with age</li>
    70                                                         <li>Race and ethnicity; people of certain races and ethnic background are at higher risk for
    71                                                         certain types of cancer</li>
    72                                                         <li>Tobacco use</li>
    73                                                         <li>Certain environmental exposures</li>
    74                                                         <li>Genetics and family history</li>
    75                                                         <li>Certain medical conditions/diseases such as a weak immune system, diabetes, Crohn's disease,
    76                                                         or human papillomavirus (HPV) infection</li>
     181
     182                <nav id="moreInformation" title="Links for more information">
     183                        <div id="downloadsResources">
     184                                <h3>Downloads and Resources</h3>
     185                                <div class="Columns">
     186                                        <div class="Selections">
     187                                                <ul>
     188                                                        <li>
     189                                                                <a href="https://www.nmhealth.org/about/phd/pchb/ccp/" title="Comprehensive Cancer Control Program">Comprehensive Cancer Control Program</a>
     190                                                        </li>
     191                                                        <li>
     192                                                                <a href="https://www.nmhealth.org/about/phd/pchb/ccp/" title="Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program">Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program</a>
     193                                                        </li>
     194                                                        <li>
     195                                                                <a href="https://www.quitnownm.com/" title="QuitnowNM">TUPAC's Quit Now Cessation Services</a>
     196                                                        </li>
     197                                                        <li>
     198                                                                <a href="https://nmtrweb.unm.edu/" title="New Mexico Tumor Registry">New Mexico Tumor Registry</a>
     199                                                        </li>
     200                                                        <li>
     201                                                                <a href="https://ibis.health.state.nm.us/topic/healthcare/utilization/CancerScreening.html" title="NMIBIS">Cancer Screening on NM-IBIS</a>
     202                                                        </li>
    77203                                                </ul>
    78                                         </CONTENT>
    79                                 </ibis:ExpandableContent>
    80 
    81                                 <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="3"><SHOW/>
    82                                         <TITLE>Health Tips</TITLE>
    83                                         <CONTENT>
    84                                                 There are many ways to reduce your risk for cancer.  Following these guidelines will not only reduce
    85                                                 your risk for cancer, but improve your general health as well:
    86                                                 <ul class="Indent">
    87                                                         <li>Maintain a healthy weight</li>
    88                                                         <li>Exercise regularly</li>
    89                                                         <li>Do not smoke; if you already smoke, look for ways to quit</li>
    90                                                         <li>If you drink alcohol, drink only in moderation</li>
    91                                                         <li>Receive proper immunizations; certain infectious diseases like the human papillomavirus (HPV)
    92                                                         and Hepatitis B and C could lead to cancer later in life</li>
    93                                                         <li>Protect your skin from the sun; wear proper sun-protection clothing and use plenty of sunscreen
    94                                                         when you are outside</li>
    95                                                         <li>Limit your exposure to environmental risk factors, such as asbestos, radon, arsenic, and benzene</li>
    96                                                         <li>Get regular medical check-ups, including cancer screening tests like mammography, Pap test, and
    97                                                         colonoscopy. Early detection of cancer significantly improves the chances of a complete recovery.</li>
     204                                        </div>
     205                                        <img ibis:src="view/image/topic/downloads_resources.png"/>
     206                                </div>
     207                        </div>
     208
     209                        <div id="moreData" class="Columns">
     210                                <div id="relatedData">
     211                                        <img ibis:src="view/image/topic/related_data.png"/>
     212                                        <h3>Reports and Data</h3>
     213                                        <div class="Selections Scroll">
     214                                        </div>
     215                                        <button>Show All</button>
     216                                </div>
     217
     218                                <div id="relatedTopics">
     219                                        <img ibis:src="view/image/topic/related_topics.png"/>
     220                                        <h3>Related Topics</h3>
     221                                        <div class="Selections">
     222                                                <ul>
     223                                                        <li><a ibis:href="health/cancer/CancerConcernsWorkgroup.html" title="CCW">Cancer Concerns Workgroup</a></li>
     224                                                        <li><a ibis:href="environment/air/Radon.html" title="Radon">Radon</a></li>
    98225                                                </ul>
    99                                         </CONTENT>
    100                                 </ibis:ExpandableContent>
    101 
    102                                 <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="3"><SHOW/>
    103                                         <TITLE>FAQs and Resources</TITLE>
    104                                         <CONTENT>
    105                                                 Cancer data come from several sources:
    106                                                 <ul class="Indent">
    107                                                         <li>Screening: The <a href="http://www.cdc.gov/brfss/">Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System</a>
    108                                                         (BRFSS) monitors the use of preventive screening for a variety of cancer types such as mammography to
    109                                                         detect breast cancer, Pap tests for cervical cancer, colonoscopy for colorectal cancer, and PSA tests
    110                                                         for prostate cancer.</li>
    111                                                         <li>Incidence, stage at diagnosis, and survivorship: State <a href="http://www.cdc.gov/cancer/npcr/index.htm">
    112                                                         cancer registries</a> collect detailed information about cancer patients and the treatments they receive,
    113                                                         which makes the monitoring of trends in incidence and mortality as well as the evaluation of prevention
    114                                                         and control measures possible. </li>
    115                                                         <li>Mortality: <a href="http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/deaths.htm">Death certificates</a> are a fundamental
    116                                                         source of demographic, geographic, and cause-of-death information.  They make it possible to track every
    117                                                         death in the nation due to cancer.  Deaths are reported as being due to cancer when the cancer was the
    118                                                         underlying cause of death.</li>
    119                                                 </ul>           
    120                                         </CONTENT>
    121                                 </ibis:ExpandableContent>
    122                         </CONTENT>
    123                 </ibis:ExpandableContent>
    124                
    125                 <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="2"><SHOW/>
    126                         <TITLE>Topic Pages: Cancer</TITLE>
    127                         <CONTENT>
    128                                 <ibis:SelectionsList>
    129                                         <SELECTIONS>
    130                                                 <SELECTION>
    131                                                         <TITLE>Bladder</TITLE>
    132                                                         <DESCRIPTION></DESCRIPTION>
    133                                                         <LOCAL_URL>health/cancer/Bladder.html</LOCAL_URL>
    134                                                 </SELECTION>
    135                                                 <SELECTION>
    136                                                         <TITLE>Brain and Spinal Cord</TITLE>
    137                                                         <DESCRIPTION></DESCRIPTION>
    138                                                         <LOCAL_URL>health/cancer/BrainSpinalCord.html</LOCAL_URL>
    139                                                 </SELECTION>
    140                                                 <SELECTION>
    141                                                         <TITLE>Female Breast</TITLE>
    142                                                         <DESCRIPTION></DESCRIPTION>
    143                                                         <LOCAL_URL>health/cancer/FemaleBreast.html</LOCAL_URL>
    144                                                 </SELECTION>
    145                                                 <SELECTION>
    146                                                         <TITLE>Esophagus</TITLE>
    147                                                         <DESCRIPTION></DESCRIPTION>
    148                                                         <LOCAL_URL>health/cancer/Esophagus.html</LOCAL_URL>
    149                                                 </SELECTION>
    150                                                 <SELECTION>
    151                                                         <TITLE>Kidney, Renal</TITLE>
    152                                                         <DESCRIPTION></DESCRIPTION>
    153                                                         <LOCAL_URL>health/cancer/KidneyRenal.html</LOCAL_URL>
    154                                                 </SELECTION>
    155                                                 <SELECTION>
    156                                                         <TITLE>Larynx</TITLE>
    157                                                         <DESCRIPTION></DESCRIPTION>
    158                                                         <LOCAL_URL>health/cancer/Larynx.html</LOCAL_URL>
    159                                                 </SELECTION>
    160                                                 <SELECTION>
    161                                                         <TITLE>Leukemia</TITLE>
    162                                                         <DESCRIPTION></DESCRIPTION>
    163                                                         <LOCAL_URL>health/cancer/Leukemia.html</LOCAL_URL>
    164                                                 </SELECTION>
    165                                                 <SELECTION>
    166                                                         <TITLE>Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia</TITLE>
    167                                                         <DESCRIPTION>Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia</DESCRIPTION>
    168                                                         <LOCAL_URL>health/cancer/AcuteLymphocyticLeukemia.html</LOCAL_URL>
    169                                                 </SELECTION>
    170                                                 <SELECTION>
    171                                                         <TITLE>Acute Myeloid Leukemia</TITLE>
    172                                                         <DESCRIPTION>Acute Myeloid Leukemia</DESCRIPTION>
    173                                                         <LOCAL_URL>health/cancer/AcuteMyeloidLeukemia.html</LOCAL_URL>
    174                                                 </SELECTION>
    175                                                 <SELECTION>
    176                                                         <TITLE>Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia</TITLE>
    177                                                         <DESCRIPTION>Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia</DESCRIPTION>
    178                                                         <LOCAL_URL>health/cancer/ChronicLymphocyticLeukemia.html</LOCAL_URL>
    179                                                 </SELECTION>
    180                                                 <SELECTION>
    181                                                         <TITLE>Liver and Intrahepatic Bile Duct</TITLE>
    182                                                         <DESCRIPTION>Liver and Intrahepatic Bile Duct</DESCRIPTION>
    183                                                         <LOCAL_URL>health/cancer/LiverIntrahepaticBileDuct.html</LOCAL_URL>
    184                                                 </SELECTION>
    185                                                 <SELECTION>
    186                                                         <TITLE>Lung</TITLE>
    187                                                         <DESCRIPTION></DESCRIPTION>
    188                                                         <LOCAL_URL>health/cancer/Lung.html</LOCAL_URL>
    189                                                 </SELECTION>
    190                                                 <SELECTION>
    191                                                         <TITLE>Melanoma of the Skin</TITLE>
    192                                                         <DESCRIPTION>Melanoma of the Skin</DESCRIPTION>
    193                                                         <LOCAL_URL>health/cancer/SkinMelanoma.html</LOCAL_URL>
    194                                                 </SELECTION>
    195                                                 <SELECTION>
    196                                                         <TITLE>Mesothelioma</TITLE>
    197                                                         <DESCRIPTION></DESCRIPTION>
    198                                                         <LOCAL_URL>health/cancer/Mesothelioma.html</LOCAL_URL>
    199                                                 </SELECTION>
    200                                                 <SELECTION>
    201                                                         <TITLE>Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma</TITLE>
    202                                                         <DESCRIPTION>Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma</DESCRIPTION>
    203                                                         <LOCAL_URL>health/cancer/NonHodgkinsLymphoma.html</LOCAL_URL>
    204                                                 </SELECTION>
    205                                                 <SELECTION>
    206                                                         <TITLE>Oropharynx</TITLE>
    207                                                         <DESCRIPTION></DESCRIPTION>
    208                                                         <LOCAL_URL>health/cancer/Oropharynx.html</LOCAL_URL>
    209                                                 </SELECTION>
    210                                                 <SELECTION>
    211                                                         <TITLE>Pancreas</TITLE>
    212                                                         <DESCRIPTION></DESCRIPTION>
    213                                                         <LOCAL_URL>health/cancer/Pancreas.html</LOCAL_URL>
    214                                                 </SELECTION>
    215                                                 <SELECTION>
    216                                                         <TITLE>Thyroid</TITLE>
    217                                                         <DESCRIPTION></DESCRIPTION>
    218                                                         <LOCAL_URL>health/cancer/Thyroid.html</LOCAL_URL>
    219                                                 </SELECTION>
    220                                         </SELECTIONS>
    221                                 </ibis:SelectionsList>
    222                         </CONTENT>
    223                 </ibis:ExpandableContent>
    224                 <br/>
    225                
     226                                        </div>
     227                                </div>
     228                        </div>
     229                </nav>
     230
     231
     232                <section class="Citation">
     233                        <h2>Citation</h2>
     234                        Page content updated on 1/1/2020, Published on 1/1/2020
     235                       
     236                        <ibis:include ibis:href="xml/html_content/citation/SomeEpiGroupContactInfo.xml" children-only-flag="true"/>
     237                       
     238                        <ibis:include ibis:href="xml/html_content/citation/DeyonneSandoval.xml" children-only-flag="true"/>
     239                </section>
     240
    226241        </CONTENT>
    227        
    228242</HTML_CONTENT>
  • adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/nmepht-content/xml/html_content/health/cancer/CancerConcernsWorkgroup.xml

    r22662 r22677  
    137137                                                <ul>
    138138                                                        <li><a ibis:href="health/cancer/Cancer.html" title="Cancer">Cancer</a></li>
    139                                                         <li><a ibis:href="environment/Radon.html" title="Indoor Air Quality">Radon and Indoor Air Quality</a></li>
     139                                                        <li><a ibis:href="environment/air/Radon.html" title="Indoor Air Quality">Radon and Indoor Air Quality</a></li>
    140140                                                </ul>
    141141                                        </div>
  • adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/nmepht-content/xml/html_content/health/cardio/HeartAttack.xml

    r12244 r22677  
    33<HTML_CONTENT xmlns:ibis="http://www.ibisph.org">
    44
    5         <TITLE>Heart Attacks</TITLE>
    6 
     5        <TITLE>Heart Attack</TITLE>
     6
     7        <HTML_CLASS>Topic Health</HTML_CLASS>
     8        <OTHER_HEAD_CONTENT>
     9                <link ibis:href="css/Topic.css" rel="stylesheet" type="text/css"/>
     10                <link ibis:href="css/_SiteSpecific-Topic.css" rel="stylesheet" type="text/css"/>
     11
     12                <script ibis:src="js/jquery.scrollBlockListItems.js"/>
     13                <script>
     14                        var optionOverrides = {"maxSelectionsContainerHeight":120};
     15                        $( document ).ready(function() {
     16                                $(".Topic #moreData .Selections").scrollBlockListItems(optionOverrides);
     17                        });
     18                </script>
     19        </OTHER_HEAD_CONTENT>
    720        <CONTENT>
    8 
    9                 <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="2"><SHOW/>
    10                         <TITLE>Description</TITLE>
    11                         <CONTENT>
    12                                 Heart disease is the leading cause of death in the United States and in New Mexico.
    13                                 <ul>
    14                                         <li>Heart disease includes conditions that affect the normal structure and function of the heart and its valves and vessels.</li>
    15                                         <li>When blood flow to the heart is reduced, it causes coronary artery disease, which is a type of heart disease.</li>
    16                                         <li>Coronary artery disease is the chief cause of acute myocardial infarction (AMI), also called heart attack. <span class="lineTxt">
    17                                                 Learn more</span> about heart disease and heart attack: <a href="http://www.cdc.gov/heartdisease" title="CDC Heart Disease
    18                                                 Information, external site opens in new window or tab">www.cdc.gov/heartdisease</a> (external site).</li>
    19                                 </ul>
    20                         </CONTENT>
     21                <header>
     22                        <img ibis:src="view/image/health/cardiovascular/heart_attack/heartattack.jpg" title="Heart Attack"/>
     23                        <h1>Heart Attack</h1>
     24                </header>
     25                <section>
     26                        <h2>What Are Heart Attacks?</h2>
     27                        <p>
     28                                Heart disease is the leading cause of death in the United States and in New Mexico. Heart disease includes conditions that affect the normal structure and function of the heart and its valves and vessels. When blood flow to the heart is reduced, it causes coronary artery disease, which is a type of heart disease.
     29                        </p>
     30                        <p>
     31                                Coronary artery disease (CAD) is the main cause of heart attack, also called myocardial infarction (MI). This happens when a part of the heart muscle doesn't get enough blood. Blood carries carrying vital oxygen and nutrients to the heart. The more time that passes without treatment to restore blood flow, the greater the damage to the heart muscle, which is why it is so important to <span class="Bold">call 911 right away</span> if you have symptoms of a heart attack.
     32                        </p>
     33                </section>
     34                <section class="SubSectionsContainer">
     35                        <h2>Learn About Heart Attacks</h2>
     36
     37                        <section class="ImageInfoBlock">
     38                                <figure title="woman having a heart attack">
     39                                        <img ibis:src="view/image/health/cardiovascular/heart_attack/woman.jpg"/>
     40                                        <figcaption>Symptoms of a heart attack in women may be different from those in men.
     41                                        </figcaption>
     42                                </figure>
     43
     44                                <div>
     45                                        <h3>The major symptoms of a heart attack are:</h3>
     46                                                <ul>
     47                                                        <li>
     48                                                                Chest pain or discomfort. Most heart attacks involve discomfort in the center or left side of the chest that lasts for more than a few minutes or that goes away and comes back. The discomfort can feel like uncomfortable pressure, squeezing, fullness, or pain.
     49                                                        </li>
     50                                                        <li>
     51                                                                Feeling weak, light-headed, or faint. You may also break out into a cold sweat.
     52                                                        </li>
     53                                                        <li>
     54                                                                Pain or discomfort in the jaw, neck, or back.
     55                                                        </li>
     56                                                        <li>
     57                                                                Pain or discomfort in one or both arms or shoulders.
     58                                                        </li>
     59                                                        <li>
     60                                                                Shortness of breath. This often comes along with chest discomfort, but shortness of breath also can happen before chest discomfort.
     61                                                        </li>
     62                                                        <li>
     63                                                                Other symptoms of a heart attack could include unusual or unexplained tiredness and nausea or vomiting. Women are more likely to have these other symptoms.
     64                                                        </li>
     65                                               
     66                                                </ul>
     67                                </div>
     68                        </section>
     69                        <section>
     70                                <p>
     71                                        <h3>Why important?</h3>
     72                                </p>
     73                                <p>
     74                                        It has been estimated that every 40 seconds a person in America has a heart attack. Among Americans over 20 years of age, new and recurrent heart attacks in both men and women occurred in <a href="#ref1" id="ref1.link" aria-describedby="footnote-label">3.7% of the U.S. population, or 7,900,000 (4.9 million men and 3.0 million women). Corresponding prevalence by race and ethnicity is 5.4% for white men, 2.5% for white women, 3.9% for black men, and 3.3% for black women.</a>
     75                                </p>
     76                                <p>
     77                                        <h3>What are the risk factors?</h3>
     78                                </p>
     79                                <p>
     80                                        You are at risk if you have certain inherited genetic factors that cannot be changed but that can be improved with lifestyle changes, such as a healthful diet and exercise and working with a doctor to manage risks with medications or cardiac rehabilitation to prevent further attacks if you have already had a heart attack. Other, modifiable risk factors are caused by chosen activities but can be improved with lifestyle changes.
     81                                </p>
     82                                <p>
     83                                        Examples of those at risk from inherited or non-modifiable factors include:
     84                                </p>
     85                                <p>
     86                                        <ul class="Indent">
     87                                                <li>
     88                                                        People with inherited hypertension (high blood pressure).
     89                                                </li>
     90                                                <li>
     91                                                        People with inherited low levels of HDL (high-density lipoprotein) or high levels of LDL (low-density lipoprotein) blood cholesterol.
     92                                                </li>
     93                                                <li>
     94                                                        People with a family history of heart disease (especially with onset before age 55).
     95                                                </li>
     96                                                <li>
     97                                                        People with diabetes (type 1 or type 2).
     98                                                </li>
     99                                                <li>
     100                                                        Aging men and women. Men are at risk at an earlier age than women but after the onset of menopause, women are equally at risk.
     101                                                </li>
     102                                        </ul>
     103                                </p>   
     104                                <p>
     105                                        Examples of modifiable risk factors include:
     106                                </p>
     107                                <p>
     108                                        <ul class="Indent">
     109                                                <li>
     110                                                        Tobacco smoking
     111                                                </li>
     112                                                <li>
     113                                                        Acquired hypertension (high blood pressure)
     114                                                </li>
     115                                                <li>
     116                                                        Acquired low levels of HDL (high-density lipoprotein) or high levels of LDL (low-density lipoprotein) blood cholesterol
     117                                                </li>
     118                                                <li>
     119                                                        High stress levels
     120                                                </li>
     121                                                <li>
     122                                                        Leading a sedentary lifestyle (i.e., not much exercise)
     123                                                </li>
     124                                                <li>
     125                                                        Being overweight by 30 percent or more.
     126                                                </li>
     127                                        </ul>
     128                                </p>
     129                                <p>
     130                                        Environmental risk factors being investigated include air pollution, which has been reported to increase the risk of hospitalization for heart attack. One form of air pollution is particulate matter (PM) such as particles from dust storms, burning fuels from vehicles, burning coal from power plants, and wildfire smoke.
     131                                </p>   
     132                        </section><br></br>
     133                                <br></br>
     134                                        <h2>Health Tips</h2>
     135                               
     136                        <section class="ImageInfoBlock">
     137                                <div>
     138                                        <ul>
     139                                                <li>
     140                                                        Take charge of your medical conditions such as obesity, high blood pressure and diabetes.
     141                                                </li>                           
     142                                                <li>
     143                                                        See your health care provider as the first step in making changes. He or she can determine if you have genetic or inherited risk factors that cannot be changed, but that can be managed and can help you develop a management plan.
     144                                                </li>
     145                                                <li>
     146                                                        The CDC recommends having your cholesterol blood levels checked at least every 4 to 6 years and more often if you have already been diagnosed with, or have a family history of, high cholesterol.
     147                                                </li>
     148                                                <li>
     149                                                        If you have diabetes, monitor your blood sugar levels carefully. Talk to your health care provider about treatment options.
     150                                                </li>
     151                                                <li>
     152                                                        Take medications to treat high blood cholesterol, high blood pressure, or diabetes as directed. Never stop taking medications without first talking to your provider or pharmacist.
     153                                                </li>
     154                                        </ul>
     155                                </div>
     156
     157                                <figure title="healthy salad">
     158                                        <img ibis:src="view/image/health/cardiovascular/heart_attack/healthy-food.jpg"/>
     159                                        <figcaption>A healthy diet can help reduce the risk of heart attack.
     160                                        </figcaption>
     161                                </figure>
     162                        </section>
     163                </section>
     164                        <footer class="Footnotes"><ol>
     165                                <li id="ref1"> <a href="https://www.ahajournals.org/doi/10.1161/CIR.0000000000000659">
     166                                        Benjamin et al. Heart Disease and Stroke Statistics-2019 Update: A Report From the American Heart Association</a> Accessed 12/30/2020
     167                                <a href="#ref1.link" aria-label="Back to content">«</a></li>
     168                        </ol></footer> 
     169                <nav id="moreInformation" title="Links for more information">
     170                        <div id="downloadsResources">
     171                                <h3>Downloads and Resources</h3>
     172                                <div class="Columns">
     173                                        <div class="Selections">
     174                                                <li><a href="https://www.nmhealth.org/about/phd/pchb/hdsp/" title="New Mexico HDSPP">Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention Program, Population and Community Health Bureau, Public Health Division, NMDOH</a></li>
     175                                                <li><a href="https://millionhearts.hhs.gov/data-reports/factsheets/ABCS.html" title="Million Hearts®">Million Hearts® U.S. Department of Health and Human Services</a></li>
     176                                        </div>
     177                                        <img ibis:src="view/image/topic/downloads_resources.png"/>
     178                                </div>
     179                        </div>
     180
     181                        <div id="moreData" class="Columns">
     182                                <div id="relatedData">
     183                                        <img ibis:src="view/image/topic/related_data.png"/>
     184                                        <h3>Reports and Data</h3>
     185                                        <div class="Selections Scroll">
     186                                               
     187                                        </div>
     188                                        <button>Show All</button>
     189                                </div>
     190
     191                                <div id="relatedTopics">
     192                                        <img ibis:src="view/image/topic/related_topics.png"/>
     193                                        <h3>Related Topics</h3>
     194                                        <div class="Selections">
     195                                                <ul>
     196                                                        <li><a ibis:href="environment/air/OutdoorQuality.html" title="Outdoor Air Quality">Outdoor Air Quality</a></li>
     197                                                        <li><a ibis:href="environment/air/FireAndSmoke.html" title="Fire and Smoke">Fire and Smoke</a></li>
     198                                                </ul>
     199                                        </div>
     200                                </div>
     201                        </div>
     202                </nav>
     203
     204
     205                <section class="Citation">
     206                        <h2>Citation</h2>
     207                        Page content updated on 1/1/2021, Published on 1/1/2020
    21208                       
    22                 </ibis:ExpandableContent>
    23 
    24                 <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="2">
    25 
    26                         <TITLE>Learn About Heart Attacks</TITLE>
    27                         <CONTENT>
    28                                 <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="3"><SHOW/>
    29                                         <TITLE>Why Important</TITLE>
    30                                         <CONTENT>
    31                                                 No single AMI surveillance system is in place in the United States, nor does such a system exist for coronary heart disease (CHD) in general.
    32                                                 Mortality is the sole descriptor for national data for AMI. Estimates of incidence and prevalence of AMI and CHD are largely based on survey
    33                                                 samples (e.g., NHANES) or large cohort studies such as the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study.In 2007, the American Heart Association
    34                                                 estimated 565,000 new attacks and 300,000 recurrent attacks of MI annually (National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute: based on unpublished data
    35                                                 from the ARIC study and the Cardiovascular Health Study [CHS]). Among Americans aged >20 years, new and recurrent MI prevalence for both men and
    36                                                 women represented 3.7% of the U.S. population, or 7,900,000 (4.9 million men and 3.0 million women). Corresponding prevalence by race and ethnicity
    37                                                 is 5.4% for white men, 2.5% for white women, 3.9% for black men, and 3.3% for black women.
    38                                         </CONTENT>
    39                                 </ibis:ExpandableContent>
    40 
    41         <!--                    <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="3">
    42                                         <TITLE>What is Known</TITLE>
    43                                         <CONTENT>
    44                                                 [Put content here]
    45                                         </CONTENT>
    46                                 </ibis:ExpandableContent>
    47         -->
    48                                 <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="3"><SHOW/>
    49                                         <TITLE>Who is at Risk</TITLE>
    50                                         <CONTENT>
    51                                                 Many risk factors for heart attacks are known; some are still being investigated.
    52                                                 <ul>
    53                                                         <li>Well-known risk factors: diabetes, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, cigarette smoking. <span class="lineTxt">Learn more</span> about
    54                                                                 your risk for heart attack in the <span class="ital">What are the risks?</span> section, below. </li>
    55                                                         <li>Environmental risk factors being investigated include air pollution, which has been reported to increase the risk of hospitalization for heart attack.</li>
    56                                                         <li>One form of air pollution is particulate matter (PM) and it includes particles from dust storms, burning fuels from vehicles, burning coal
    57                                                                 from power plants, and wildfire smoke. <!--<span class="lineTxt">Learn more</span> about <a href="cardio_airqual">particulate matter and heart attacks</a> on the next page.--></li>
    58                                                 </ul>
    59                                                 What are the risks?
    60                                                 <br/>You are at risk if you have certain inherited genetic factors. These factors include those you are born with that cannot be changed but that can be
    61                                                         improved with lifestyle changes (such as a healthful diet and exercise) and working with a doctor to take appropriate medications.
    62                                                 <br/>You are also at risk if you have acquired risk factors. These factors are caused by chosen activities but can be improved with lifestyle changes
    63                                                         (such as a healthful diet and exercise) and working with a doctor to take appropriate medications.
    64                                                 <br/>Examples of those at risk from inherited factors include:
    65                                                 <ul>
    66                                                         <li>People with inherited hypertension (high blood pressure).</li>
    67                                                         <li>People with inherited low levels of HDL (high-density lipoprotein) or high levels of LDL (low-density lipoprotein) blood cholesterol.</li>
    68                                                         <li>People with a family history of heart disease (especially with onset before age 55).</li>
    69                                                         <li>Aging men and women.</li>
    70                                                         <li>People with diabetes (type 1 or type 2).</li>
    71                                                         <li>Women, after the onset of menopause generally men are at risk at an earlier age than women but after the onset of menopause, women are equally at risk.</li>
    72                                                 </ul>
    73                                                 <br/> Examples of acquired risk factors include:
    74                                                 <ul>
    75                                                         <li>Acquired hypertension (high blood pressure).</li>
    76                                                         <li>Acquired low levels of HDL (high-density lipoprotein) or high levels of LDL (low-density lipoprotein) blood cholesterol.</li>
    77                                                         <li>High stress levels.</li>
    78                                                         <li>Leading a sedentary lifestyle (i.e., not much exercise).</li>
    79                                                         <li>Being overweight by 30 percent or more.</li>
    80                                                 </ul>
    81                
    82                                         </CONTENT>
    83                                 </ibis:ExpandableContent>
    84 
    85                                 <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="3"><SHOW/>
    86                                         <TITLE>Health Tips</TITLE>
    87                                         <CONTENT>
    88                                                 Start with the following:
    89                                                 <ul>
    90                                                         <li>
    91                                                                 <span class="lineTxt">Identify</span> which of the risk factors apply to you.</li>
    92                                                         <li>
    93                                                                 <span class="lineTxt">Become aware</span> of conditions like hypertension or abnormal cholesterol levels, which can be silent killers.</li>
    94                                                         <li>
    95                                                                 <span class="lineTxt">Modify risk factors</span> that are acquired not inherited through lifestyle changes. See your physician as the first step in starting right away to make these changes.</li>
    96                                                         <li>
    97                                                                 <span class="lineTxt">See your physician</span> as the first step in making changes. He or she can determine if you have genetic or inherited risk factors that cannot be changed, but that can be managed.</li>
    98                                                 </ul>
    99                                         </CONTENT>
    100                                 </ibis:ExpandableContent>
    101 
    102         <!--                    <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="3">
    103                                         <TITLE>FAQs and Resources</TITLE>
    104                                         <CONTENT>
    105                                                 [Put content here]
    106                                         </CONTENT>
    107                                 </ibis:ExpandableContent>
    108         -->
    109                         </CONTENT>
    110                 </ibis:ExpandableContent>
    111 
    112                 <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="2"><SHOW/>
    113                         <TITLE>Explore Data</TITLE>
    114                         <CONTENT>
    115                                 <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="3"><SHOW/>
    116                                         <TITLE>Indicator Reports with data tables, charts, and more detailed information</TITLE>
    117                                         <CONTENT>
    118                                                 <ibis:SelectionsList>
    119                                                         <SELECTION>
    120                                                                 <TITLE>Cardiovascular Disease - Heart Disease Deaths</TITLE>
    121                                                                 <LOCAL_URL>dataportal/indicator/view/CardioVasDiseaseHeartDeath.Year.NM_US.html</LOCAL_URL>
    122                                                         </SELECTION>
    123                                                         <SELECTION>
    124                                                                 <TITLE>Cardiovascular Disease - Acute Myocardial Infarction (AMI) Hospitalizations</TITLE>
    125                                                                 <LOCAL_URL>dataportal/indicator/view/CardioAMIHosp.GE35.Rate.Cnty.NM_TX.html</LOCAL_URL>
    126                                                         </SELECTION>
    127                                                 </ibis:SelectionsList>
    128                                         </CONTENT>
    129                                 </ibis:ExpandableContent>
    130 
    131                                 <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="3"><SHOW/>
    132                                         <TITLE>Custom Data Queries</TITLE>
    133                                         <CONTENT>
    134                                                 <h3>In-state Hospitalizations</h3>
    135                                                 <ibis:SelectionsList>
    136                                                         <SELECTION>
    137                                                                 <TITLE>New Mexico Acute Myocardial Infarction Hospital Admissions</TITLE>
    138                                                                 <LOCAL_URL>dataportal/query/result/hidd/HIDDMI/NMMICounts.html</LOCAL_URL>
    139                                                         </SELECTION>
    140                                                         <SELECTION>
    141                                                                 <TITLE>New Mexico Acute Myocardial Infarction Hospital Admissions, Ages 35 Years +</TITLE>
    142                                                                 <LOCAL_URL>dataportal/query/result/hidd/HIDDMI/NMMICounts35.html</LOCAL_URL>
    143                                                         </SELECTION>
    144                                                         <SELECTION>
    145                                                                 <TITLE>Acute Myocardial Infarction Hospital Admissions Crude Rates per 10,000 Population</TITLE>
    146                                                                 <LOCAL_URL>dataportal/query/result/hidd/HIDDMI/NMMICrudeRate.html</LOCAL_URL>
    147                                                         </SELECTION>
    148                                                         <SELECTION>
    149                                                                 <TITLE>Acute Myocardial Infarction Hospital Admission Crude Rates per 10,000 Population, Ages 35+</TITLE>
    150                                                                 <LOCAL_URL>dataportal/query/result/hidd/HIDDMI/NMMICrudeRate35.html</LOCAL_URL>
    151                                                         </SELECTION>
    152                                                         <SELECTION>
    153                                                                 <TITLE>Acute Myocardial Infarction Age-adjusted Rates per 10,000 Population</TITLE>
    154                                                                 <LOCAL_URL>dataportal/query/result/hidd/HIDDMI/NMMIAgeRate.html</LOCAL_URL>
    155                                                         </SELECTION>
    156                                                         <SELECTION>
    157                                                                 <TITLE>Acute Myocardial Infarction Age-adjusted Rates per 10,000 Population, Ages 35 years +</TITLE>
    158                                                                 <LOCAL_URL>dataportal/query/result/hidd/HIDDMI/NMMIAgeRate35.html</LOCAL_URL>
    159                                                         </SELECTION>
    160                                                 </ibis:SelectionsList>
    161                                                 <h3>Including Texas Hospitalizations</h3>
    162                                                 <ibis:SelectionsList>
    163                                                         <SELECTION>
    164                                                                 <TITLE>New Mexico Acute Myocardial Infarction Hospital Admissions Including Texas Hospitalizations</TITLE>
    165                                                                 <LOCAL_URL>dataportal/query/result/hidd/HIDDMITX/NMTXMICounts.html</LOCAL_URL>
    166                                                         </SELECTION>
    167                                                         <SELECTION>
    168                                                                 <TITLE>New Mexico Acute Myocardial Infarction Hospital Admissions, Ages 35 Years + Including Texas Hospitalizations</TITLE>
    169                                                                 <LOCAL_URL>dataportal/query/result/hidd/HIDDMITX/NMTXMICounts35.html</LOCAL_URL>
    170                                                         </SELECTION>
    171                                                         <SELECTION>
    172                                                                 <TITLE>Acute Myocardial Infarction Hospital Admissions Crude Rates per 10,000 Population Including Texas Hospitalizations</TITLE>
    173                                                                 <LOCAL_URL>dataportal/query/result/hidd/HIDDMITX/NMTXMICrudeRate.html</LOCAL_URL>
    174                                                         </SELECTION>
    175                                                         <SELECTION>
    176                                                                 <TITLE>Acute Myocardial Infarction Hospital Admission Crude Rates per 10,000 Population, Ages 35+ Including Texas Hospitalizations</TITLE>
    177                                                                 <LOCAL_URL>dataportal/query/result/hidd/HIDDMITX/NMTXMICrudeRate35.html</LOCAL_URL>
    178                                                         </SELECTION>
    179                                                         <SELECTION>
    180                                                                 <TITLE>Acute Myocardial Infarction Age-adjusted Rates per 10,000 Population Including Texas Hospitalizations</TITLE>
    181                                                                 <LOCAL_URL>dataportal/query/result/hidd/HIDDMITX/NMTXMIAgeRate.html</LOCAL_URL>
    182                                                         </SELECTION>
    183                                                         <SELECTION>
    184                                                                 <TITLE>Acute Myocardial Infarction Age-adjusted Rates per 10,000 Population, Ages 35 years + Including Texas Hospitalizations</TITLE>
    185                                                                 <LOCAL_URL>dataportal/query/result/hidd/HIDDMITX/NMTXMIAgeRate35.html</LOCAL_URL>
    186                                                         </SELECTION>
    187                                                 </ibis:SelectionsList>
    188                                         </CONTENT>
    189                                 </ibis:ExpandableContent>
    190 
    191                                 <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="3"><SHOW/>
    192                                         <TITLE>About the Data</TITLE>
    193                                         <CONTENT>
    194                                                 <ibis:SelectionsList id="IndicatorList">
    195                                                         <SELECTION>
    196                                                                 <TITLE>Acute Myocardial Hospitalizations Texas Metadata File</TITLE>
    197                                                                 <LOCAL_URL>dataportal/metadata/AMIHospitalization.html</LOCAL_URL>
    198                                                         </SELECTION>
    199                                                         <SELECTION>
    200                                                                 <TITLE>Acute Myocardial Infarction Hospitalizations including Texas Metadata File</TITLE>
    201                                                                 <LOCAL_URL>dataportal/metadata/AMI_HospitalizationsIncludingTexas.html</LOCAL_URL>
    202                                                         </SELECTION>
    203                                                         <SELECTION>
    204                                                                 <TITLE>Acute Myocardial Infarction in State Hospitalizations Metadata File</TITLE>
    205                                                                 <LOCAL_URL>dataportal/metadata/AMI_In-stateHospitalizations.html</LOCAL_URL>
    206                                                         </SELECTION>
    207                                                 </ibis:SelectionsList>
    208                                         </CONTENT>
    209                                 </ibis:ExpandableContent>
    210                         </CONTENT>
    211                 </ibis:ExpandableContent>
     209                        <ibis:include ibis:href="xml/html_content/citation/SomeEpiGroupContactInfo.xml" children-only-flag="true"/>
     210                       
     211                        <ibis:include ibis:href="xml/html_content/citation/DeyonneSandoval.xml" children-only-flag="true"/>
     212                </section>
    212213
    213214        </CONTENT>
  • adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/nmepht-content/xml/html_content/health/climate/HeatIllness.xml

    r22619 r22677  
    33<HTML_CONTENT xmlns:ibis="http://www.ibisph.org">
    44
    5         <TITLE>Heat Stress</TITLE>
     5        <TITLE>Heat Related Illness</TITLE>
     6        <HTML_CLASS>Topic Health</HTML_CLASS>
     7        <OTHER_HEAD_CONTENT>
     8                <link ibis:href="css/Topic.css" rel="stylesheet" type="text/css"/>
     9                <link ibis:href="css/_SiteSpecific-Topic.css" rel="stylesheet" type="text/css"/>
     10
     11<!--
     12        Optional List Items Show More button:  This can be applied to other selection blocks as well. 
     13-->
     14                <script ibis:src="js/jquery.scrollBlockListItems.js"/>
     15                <script>
     16                        $( document ).ready(function() {
     17                                $(".Topic #downloadsResources .Selections").scrollBlockListItems( {"maxSelectionsContainerHeight":190});
     18                        });
     19                </script>
     20                <style>
     21                        .Topic #content section.ImageInfoBlock figure { max-width: 35%; }
     22                        .Topic #content section.ImageInfoBlock { align-items: normal; }
     23                        .Topic #content section.ImageInfoBlock div
     24                        {
     25                                margin-top: 2rem;
     26                                max-width: 500px;
     27                        }
     28                </style>
     29        </OTHER_HEAD_CONTENT>
     30
    631
    732        <CONTENT>
    833
    9                 <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="2"><SHOW/>
    10                         <TITLE>Description</TITLE>
    11                         <CONTENT>
    12                                 <h4> Health Risks with Extreme Heat Stress </h4>
    13                                 During extreme heat and heat waves New Mexicans can be at risk for heat stress.
    14                                 Heat stress is heat-related illness which can have many symptoms. This includes
    15                                 adverse health conditions such as heat exhaustion which can lead to heat stroke.
    16                                 <ul>
    17                                         <li>Heat exhaustion can develop after several days of exposure to high
    18                                                 temperatures and inadequate or unbalanced replacement of fluids.
    19                                                 Its main signs include heavy sweating, muscle cramps, as well as
    20                                                 feeling tired, weak and/or dizzy.</li>
    21                                         <li> Heat stroke is the most serious heat-related illness and happens
    22                                                 when the body loses its ability to sweat. Dehydration and over exposure
    23                                                 to the sun can cause heat stroke. The main sign of heat stroke is an
    24                                                 elevated body temperature greater than 104 degrees and changes in mental
    25                                                 status ranging from personality changes to confusion.</li>
    26                                 </ul>
    27                         </CONTENT>
    28                 </ibis:ExpandableContent>
    29 
    30                 <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="2"><SHOW/>
    31                         <TITLE>Learn About Heat</TITLE>
    32                         <CONTENT>
    33                                 <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="3"><SHOW/>
    34                                         <TITLE>Why Important</TITLE>
    35                                         <CONTENT>
    36                                                 Heat stroke is the most serious heat-related illness and happens when the body
    37                                                 loses its ability to sweat. Dehydration and over exposure to the sun can cause
    38                                                 heat stroke. The main sign of heat stroke is an elevated body temperature greater
    39                                                 than 104 degrees and changes in mental status ranging from personality changes
    40                                                 to confusion.
    41                                         </CONTENT>
    42                                 </ibis:ExpandableContent>
    43 
    44         <!--                    <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="3"><SHOW/>
    45                                         <TITLE>What is Known</TITLE>
    46                                         <CONTENT>
    47                                                 [Put content here]
    48                                         </CONTENT>
    49                                 </ibis:ExpandableContent>
    50         -->
    51                                 <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="3"><SHOW/>
    52                                         <TITLE>Who is at Risk</TITLE>
    53                                         <CONTENT>
    54                                                 <h4>Who Can Be Affected</h4>
    55                                                 Anyone can be affected. People at highest risk are the elderly, the very young,
    56                                                 and people with existing chronic diseases such as heart disease, and people
    57                                                 without access to air conditioning. But even young and healthy people can get
    58                                                 sick from the heat if they participate in strenuous physical activities during
    59                                                 hot weather.
    60                                                 <br/><br/>
    61                                                 If you live in the southern part of the state it is important to stay cool even
    62                                                 though you may feel you are accustomed to the hot temperatures. Make sure your
    63                                                 children and your elderly loved ones are in air conditioned place and are drinking
    64                                                 plenty of water. A recent Department of Health report indicates that in southern
    65                                                 New Mexico where high temperatures are common in the summer, there is an increased
    66                                                 risk of visits to the emergency room for heat-related illness. Residents in this
    67                                                 area could be at high risk of heat stress especially in June and July.
    68                                                 <br/><br/>
    69                                                 <a ibis:href="view/pdf/health/heatstress/ERHeatRelatedIllness083119.pdf">
    70                                                         <img ibis:src="image/icon/16/pdf.gif" alt="pdf" />
    71                                                         Heat Related Illness Report
    72                                                 </a>
    73                                                 <br/><br/>
    74                                                 See the Heat Stress Emergency Department Visits in New Mexico on the
    75                                                 <a ibis:href="data_query.html" target="_blank">NM Tracking Data Query.</a>
     34                <header>
     35                        <img ibis:src="view/image/health/climate/heat/sunset.jpg" title="New Mexico summer sunset"/>
     36                        <h1>Heat Related Illness</h1>
     37                </header>
     38
     39
     40                <section>
     41                        <h2>What is Heat Related Illness(HRI)?</h2>
     42                        <p>
     43                                During periods of extreme heat and heat waves New Mexicans can be at risk for heat stress, but even if the temperatures aren't extreme, a person can be affected by heat related illness if they aren't taking the right precautions. Heat stress is heat-related illness (HRI) which can have many symptoms. HRI includes adverse health conditions ranging from heat rash and sunburn, to heat cramps, heat exhaustion, and heat stroke. If severe, any of these conditions can lead to a trip to the emergency room. If heat stroke is not treated promptly, it can lead to coma and death.
     44                        </p>
     45               
     46                </section>
     47
     48                <section class="SubSectionsContainer">
     49                        <p>
     50                                <h2>How to Recognize and Treat HRI</h2>
     51                        </p>
     52                        <section class="ImageInfoBlock">
     53                                <figure title="woman with HRI">
     54                                        <img ibis:src="view/image/health/climate/heat/heat stress.jpg"/>
     55                                        <figcaption>
     56                                                Is it heat exhaustion or heat stroke?
     57                                        </figcaption>
     58                                </figure>
     59                                <div>
     60                                        <ul>
     61                                                <li>
     62                                                        <span class="Bold">Heat rash</span> appears mainly in the folds of the skin as red clusters of small blisters that look like pimples. This can be treated by staying cool and dry and keeping the rash dry.
     63                                                </li>
     64                                                <li>
     65                                                        <span class="Bold">Sunburn</span> painful, warm, red skin that may develop blisters if severe. Get out of the sun if you develop a sunburn and stay out until it has completely healed. Reduce the heat with cool, damp cloths or a cool bath; you can also apply moisturizing lotions to affected areas. Don't break the blisters.
     66                                                </li>
     67                                                <li>
     68                                                        <span class="Bold">Heat cramps</span> muscle pain or spasms that is accompanied by heavy sweating, especially during intense exercise. Stop any physical activity and move to a cool place. Drink water or a sports drink and wait for the cramps to go away before starting activity again. Get medical help right away if the cramps last longer than an hour, you are on a low sodium diet, or if you have heart problems.
    7669                                               
    77                                         </CONTENT>
    78                                 </ibis:ExpandableContent>
    79 
    80                                 <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="3"><SHOW/>
    81                                         <TITLE>Health Tips</TITLE>
    82                                         <CONTENT>
    83                                                 The Department of Health and U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention advises you to take these steps to prevent
    84                                                 heat-related illnesses, injuries, and deaths during hot weather:
    85                                                         <ul>
    86                                                                 <li>Stay cool indoors; do not rely on a fan as your primary cooling device. </li>
    87                                                                 <li>Drink more water than usual </li>
    88                                                                 <li>Avoid alcohol or liquids containing high amounts of sugar </li>
    89                                                                 <li>Replace salt and minerals. </li>
    90                                                                 <li>Wear lightweight, light-colored clothing. </li>
    91                                                                 <li>Schedule outdoor activities carefully. </li>
    92                                                                 <li>Pace yourself. </li>
    93                                                                 <li>Monitor people at high risk. </li>
    94                                                                 <li>Do not leave children or pets in cars. </li>
    95                                                         </ul>
    96                                                 <h3>Children</h3>
    97                                                 Make sure children stay hydrated and remain indoors in a place with air conditioning
    98                                                 on hot days. On those hot summer days when temperatures are at the highest consider
    99                                                 going to a local public library, museum, and a community center. These are good places
    100                                                 for child activity time because often these sites have air conditioning (refrigerated
    101                                                 air).
    102                                                 <br/><br/>                                             
    103                                                 Children or animals can be seriously injured or die as temperatures rise within just 10
    104                                                 to 30 minutes of being left alone in a car. Do not leave your children or pets in the car
    105                                                 while you are running errands no matter how quick you think it will be. Studies show the
    106                                                 practice of leaving a vehicle window partially open, or cracked, has little effect on
    107                                                 decreasing temperature inside.
    108                                                 <br/>
    109                                                 <h3>Seniors</h3>
    110                                                 It is important that adults age 65 and older stay cool. During hot temperatures recreational
    111                                                 sports and activities should be done indoors in a cool setting such as at a local senior center.
    112                                                 Senior Centers, shopping malls and public libraries are great places to beat the heat. Seniors
    113                                                 who are members of local senior centers should take advantage of their membership on hot days.
    114                                                 Check up on elderly or ill relatives who are living on their own during the summer months when
    115                                                 temperatures soar. It is critical for loved ones and neighbors to check on seniors who are
    116                                                 vulnerable to extreme heat and may need access to a cool environment. If you  know of someone
    117                                                 who is homebound and without a properly functioning air conditioner, visit or call them to ask
    118                                                 how they are doing.
    119                                                 <br/><br/>
    120                                                 To find services for seniors in your community call 800-432-2080.
    121                                                 <br/>
    122                                                 <h3>Outdoor Workers</h3>
    123                                                 Outdoor workers in agriculture, construction, and other industries are exposed to a great deal
    124                                                 of exertional and environmental heat stress that may lead to severe illness or death. The National
    125                                                 Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) recommends that employers have a plan in
    126                                                 place to prevent heat-related illness. The plan should include hydration (drinking plenty of
    127                                                 water), acclimatization (getting used to weather conditions), and schedules that alternate work
    128                                                 with rest. Employers should also train workers about the hazards of working in hot environments
    129                                                 [NIOSH 1986, 2008, 2010; OSHA-NIOSH 2011].
    130                                                
    131                                                 <br/><br/>
    132                                                         <a ibis:href="view/pdf/workers.pdf">
    133                                                         <img ibis:src="image/icon/16/pdf.gif" alt="pdf" />
    134                                                         Preventing Heat-related Illness or Death of Outdoor Workers (683.8 KB)</a>
    135                                                 <br/><br/>
    136                                                         <a ibis:href="view/pdf/Infofactsheet.pdf">
    137                                                         <img ibis:src="image/icon/16/pdf.gif" alt="pdf" />
    138                                                         Protecting Workers from Heat Illness (218.2 KB)</a>
    139                                                 <br/><br/>
    140                                                 To learn more about occupational health and to learn how to report occupational illness or injury visit the health department's
    141                                                         <a href="http://www.health.state.nm.us/eheb/occhealth.shtml" target="_blank">Occupational Health Surveillance Program.</a>
    142                                                 <br/><br/>
    143                                                 Are you fire worker? Workers and volunteers face hazards even after fires are extinguished, including heat stress. Learn more about
    144                                                         <a ibis:href="environ_exposure/fire-and-smoke/smoke-fire-worker-safety.html" target="_blank">Fire worker and volunteer safety.</a>
    145                                         </CONTENT>
    146                                 </ibis:ExpandableContent>
    147 
    148         <!--                    <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="3"><SHOW/>
    149                                         <TITLE>FAQs and Resources</TITLE>
    150                                         <CONTENT>
    151                                                 [Put content here]
    152                                         </CONTENT>
    153                                 </ibis:ExpandableContent>
    154         -->
    155                         </CONTENT>
    156                 </ibis:ExpandableContent>
    157 
    158                 <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="2"><SHOW/>
    159                         <TITLE>Explore Data</TITLE>
    160                         <CONTENT>
    161                                 <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="3"><SHOW/>
    162                                         <TITLE>Indicator Reports with data tables, charts, and more detailed information</TITLE>
    163                                         <CONTENT>
    164                                                 <ibis:SelectionsList>
    165                                                         <SELECTION>
    166                                                                 <TITLE>Heat Stress Emergency Department Visits</TITLE>
    167                                                                 <LOCAL_URL>dataportal/indicator/view/EnvHlthHeatED.AARates.Sex.Year.html</LOCAL_URL>
    168                                                         </SELECTION>
    169                                                         <SELECTION>
    170                                                                 <TITLE>Heat Stress Hospitalizations</TITLE>
    171                                                                 <LOCAL_URL>dataportal/indicator/view/EnvHlthHeatHosp.Visits.Sex.Year.html</LOCAL_URL>
    172                                                         </SELECTION>
    173                                                 </ibis:SelectionsList>
    174                                         </CONTENT>
    175                                 </ibis:ExpandableContent>
    176 
    177                                 <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="3"><SHOW/>
    178                                         <TITLE>Custom Data Queries</TITLE>
    179                                         <CONTENT>
    180                                                 <ibis:SelectionsList>
    181                                                         <SELECTION>
    182                                                                 <TITLE>New Mexico Resident Heat Stress ED Visits, May-September</TITLE>
    183                                                                 <LOCAL_URL>dataportal/query/result/ed/EDHeat/CountHeat.html</LOCAL_URL>
    184                                                         </SELECTION>
    185                                                         <SELECTION>
    186                                                                 <TITLE>Heat Stress ED Visits Crude Rate per 100,000 population, May-September</TITLE>
    187                                                                 <LOCAL_URL>dataportal/query/result/ed/EDHeat/CrudeRateHeat.html</LOCAL_URL>
    188                                                         </SELECTION>
    189                                                         <SELECTION>
    190                                                                 <TITLE>Age-adjusted Rates, Heat Stress ED Visits Per 100,000 Population, May-September</TITLE>
    191                                                                 <LOCAL_URL>dataportal/query/result/ed/EDHeat/AgeRateHeat.html</LOCAL_URL>
    192                                                         </SELECTION>
    193                                                         <SELECTION>
    194                                                                 <TITLE>New Mexico Heat Stress Hospital Admissions</TITLE>
    195                                                                 <LOCAL_URL>dataportal/query/result/hidd/HIDDHeat/CountHeat.html</LOCAL_URL>
    196                                                         </SELECTION>
    197                                                         <SELECTION>
    198                                                                 <TITLE>Heat Stress Hospital Admissions Crude Rates per 100,000 Population</TITLE>
    199                                                                 <LOCAL_URL>dataportal/query/result/hidd/HIDDHeat/CrudeRateHeat.html</LOCAL_URL>
    200                                                         </SELECTION>
    201                                                         <SELECTION>
    202                                                                 <TITLE>Heat Stress Age-adjusted Rates per 100,000 Population</TITLE>
    203                                                                 <LOCAL_URL>dataportal/query/result/hidd/HIDDHeat/AgeRateHeat</LOCAL_URL>
    204                                                         </SELECTION>
    205                                                         <SELECTION>
    206                                                                 <TITLE>New Mexico Resident Heat Deaths</TITLE>
    207                                                                 <LOCAL_URL>dataportal/query/result/mortmc/MortMCHeat/CountHeat.html</LOCAL_URL>
    208                                                         </SELECTION>
    209                                                         <SELECTION>
    210                                                                 <TITLE>Heat Deaths Crude Rate per 100,000 population</TITLE>
    211                                                                 <LOCAL_URL>dataportal/query/result/mortmc/MortMCHeat/CrudeRateHeat.html</LOCAL_URL>
    212                                                         </SELECTION>
    213                                                         <SELECTION>
    214                                                                 <TITLE>Age-adjusted Rates, Heat Deaths Per 100,000 Population</TITLE>
    215                                                                 <LOCAL_URL>dataportal/query/result/mortmc/MortMCHeat/AgeRateHeat.html</LOCAL_URL>
    216                                                         </SELECTION>
    217                                                 </ibis:SelectionsList>
    218                                         </CONTENT>
    219                                 </ibis:ExpandableContent>
    220 
    221                                 <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="3"><SHOW/>
    222                                         <TITLE>About the Data</TITLE>
    223                                         <CONTENT>
    224                                                 <ibis:SelectionsList id="IndicatorList">
    225                                                         <SELECTION>
    226                                                                 <TITLE>Heat Stress Hospitalizations Metadata File</TITLE>
    227                                                                 <LOCAL_URL>dataportal/metadata/HeatStressHosp.html</LOCAL_URL>
    228                                                         </SELECTION>
    229                                                         <SELECTION>
    230                                                                 <TITLE>Heat Stress ED Visits Metadata File</TITLE>
    231                                                                 <LOCAL_URL>dataportal/metadata/HeatStressEDVisits.html</LOCAL_URL>
    232                                                         </SELECTION>
    233                                                 </ibis:SelectionsList>
    234                                         </CONTENT>
    235                                 </ibis:ExpandableContent>
    236                         </CONTENT>
    237                 </ibis:ExpandableContent>
     70                                                </li>                                                                           
     71                                        </ul>
     72                                </div>
     73                                                       
     74                        </section>
     75                                <li>
     76                                        <span class="Bold">Heat exhaustion</span> appears with heavy sweating; cold, clammy skin; a fast, weak pulse; nausea or vomiting; muscle cramps; tiredness or weakness; dizziness; headache; and fainting. To treat, move to a cool place, loosen clothing, cool down with damp cloths or take a cool bath and sip water. If you are throwing up, symptoms last longer than an hour, or worsen get medical help right away.
     77                                        </li>
     78                                        <li>
     79                                                <span class="Bold">Heat stroke</span> is the most serious HRI and happens when the body loses its ability to sweat. Body temperature will climb (103 degrees or higher), skin will be hot, red and dry or damp. Pulse will be fast and strong and a headache, nausea, dizziness and confusion and passing out can occur. It is important to recognize heat stroke in others as they may not recognize the danger that they are in because of confusion. Heat stroke is a medical emergency, so call 911 right away. Try to lower the person's body temperature with cool, wet cloths or a cool bath. Do not give them anything to drink.
     80                                        </li>
     81                        <section>
     82                                <p>
     83                                        <h2>Who is at Risk?</h2>
     84                                </p>
     85                                <p>
     86                                        Anyone can be affected. People at highest risk are the elderly, the very young, people with existing chronic diseases such as heart disease, people on certain medications, and people without access to air conditioning. But even young and healthy people can get sick from the heat if they participate in strenuous physical activities without taking precautions or ignoring signs and symptoms of HRI during hot weather.
     87                                </p>
     88                                <p>
     89                                        If you live in the southern part of the state it is important to be heat-aware even though you may feel that you are accustomed to the hot temperatures. Make sure children and elderly loved ones are in a cool place and are drinking plenty of water. A recent Department of Health report indicates that in southern New Mexico where high temperatures are common in the summer, there is an increased risk of visits to the emergency room for heat-related illness.
     90                                </p>
     91                                <p>
     92                                        <h3>Children</h3>
     93                                </p>
     94                                <p>
     95                                        Make sure children stay hydrated and remain indoors in a place with air conditioning on hot days. On those hot summer days when temperatures are at the highest consider going to a local public library, museum, or a community center with air-conditioning if you don't have air-conditioning in your home.
     96                                </p>
     97                                <p>
     98                                        Children or animals can be seriously injured or die as temperatures rise within a few minutes of being left alone in a hot car. Do not leave your children or pets in the car while you are running errands no matter how quick you think it will be. Studies show the practice of leaving a vehicle window partially open, or cracked, has little effect on decreasing temperature inside.
     99                                </p>
     100                                <p>
     101                                        <h3>Seniors</h3>
     102                                </p>
     103                                <p>
     104                                        It is important that adults age 65 and older stay cool. On high-heat days recreational sports and activities should be done indoors in a cool setting such as at a local senior center. Senior centers, shopping malls and public libraries are great places to beat the heat. Check up on elderly or homebound relatives and neighbors who are living on their own during the summer months when temperatures soar. It is critical for loved ones and neighbors to check on seniors as we lose the ability to self-regulate our body temperatures as we age. If you know of someone who is homebound and without a properly functioning air conditioner, visit or call them to ask how they are doing. To find services for seniors in your community call 800-432-2080.
     105                                </p>
     106                                <p>
     107                                        <h3>Outdoor Workers</h3>
     108                                </p>
     109                                <p>
     110                                        Outdoor workers in agriculture, construction, and other industries are exposed to a great deal of exertional and environmental heat stress that may lead to severe illness or death. The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) recommends that employers have a plan in place to prevent heat-related illness. The plan should include hydration (drinking plenty of water), acclimatization (getting used to weather conditions), and schedules that alternate work with rest. Employers should also train workers about the hazards of working in hot environments
     111                                </p>                   
     112                        </section>
     113                                        <p>
     114                                                <h2>Health Tips</h2>
     115                                        </p>
     116                                        <p>
     117                                                The New Mexico Department of Health and U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention advises you to take these steps to prevent heat-related illnesses, injuries, and deaths during hot weather:
     118                                        </p>                   
     119
     120                        <section class="ImageInfoBlock">
     121                                <div>                           
     122                                        <ul>
     123                                                <li>
     124                                                        Stay cool indoors; do not rely on a fan as your primary cooling device
     125                                                </li>
     126                                                <li>
     127                                                        Drink more water than usual
     128                                                </li>
     129                                                <li>
     130                                                        Avoid alcohol or liquids containing high amounts of sugar
     131                                                </li>
     132                                                <li>
     133                                                        Replace salt and minerals in your body
     134                                                </li>
     135                                                <li>
     136                                                        Wear lightweight, light-colored clothing
     137                                                </li>
     138                                                <li>
     139                                                        Schedule outdoor activities for cooler times of the day
     140                                                </li>
     141                                                <li>
     142                                                        Pace yourself
     143                                                </li>
     144                                                <li>
     145                                                        Monitor people at high risk
     146                                                </li>
     147                                                <li>
     148                                                        Do not leave children or pets in cars.
     149                                                </li>                           
     150                                        </ul>
     151                                </div>
     152                                <figure title="Man drinking water">
     153                                        <img ibis:src="view/image/health/climate/heat/drinkwater.jpg"/>
     154                                        <figcaption>
     155                                                Drink water to stay hydrated.
     156                                        </figcaption>
     157                                </figure>
     158                        </section>
     159                </section>
     160
     161                <nav id="moreInformation" title="Links for more information">
     162<!--
     163                        <h2>More Information</h2>
     164-->
     165                        <div id="downloadsResources">
     166                                <h3>Downloads and Resources</h3>
     167                                <div class="Columns">
     168                                        <div><div class="Selections">
     169                                                <ul>
     170                                                        <li>
     171                                                                <a ibis:href="view/pdf/health/climate/heat/ERHeatRelatedIllness083119.pdf"
     172                                                                        title="downloadable pdf" class="PDF"
     173                                                                        >
     174                                                                        Epidemiology ReportHeat Related Illness 2013-2017 .
     175                                                                </a>
     176                                                        </li>
     177                                                        <li>
     178                                                                <a ibis:href="view/pdf/health/climate/heat/workers.pdf"
     179                                                                        title="downloadable pdf" class="PDF"
     180                                                                        >
     181                                                                        NIOSH Preventing Heat-related Illness or Death of Outdoor Workers.
     182                                                                </a>
     183                                                        </li>
     184                                                        <li>
     185                                                                <a ibis:href="view/pdf/health/climate/heat/OSHA.pdf"
     186                                                                        title="OSHA-NIOSH Infosheet" class="PDF"
     187                                                                >
     188                                                                        Protecting Workers From Heat Illness.
     189                                                                </a>
     190                                                        </li>
     191                                                        <li>
     192                                                                <a href="https://www.nia.nih.gov/health/hot-weather-safety-older-adults" class="External">
     193                                                                        NIH Hot Weather Safety for Older Adults
     194                                                                </a>
     195                                                        </li>
     196                                                        <li>
     197                                                                <a href="https://www.cdc.gov/disasters/extremeheat/children.html" class="External">
     198                                                                        CDC Heat and Infants and Children
     199                                                                </a>
     200                                                        </li>
     201                                                </ul>
     202                                        </div>
     203                                        <button>Show All</button>
     204                                        </div>
     205                                        <img ibis:src="view/image/topic/downloads_resources.png"/>
     206                                </div>
     207                        </div>
     208<TODO>Please fix formatting on IR-query and related topic blocks</TODO>
     209                        <div id="moreData">
     210                                <div id="relatedData">
     211                                        <img ibis:src="view/image/topic/related_data.png"/>
     212                                        <h3>Explore Related Data</h3>
     213
     214                <ibis:Popup
     215                        additionalClasses="Above" controlClass="Button"
     216                        controlID="ipSelectionsMenuControl" 
     217                        controlType="radio" controlName="dataSelectionControl"
     218                        controlTitle="Select a Related Indicator Report"
     219                        description="Show/hide list of Related Indicator Reports associated with this topic"
     220                >
     221                        <h3>Related Indicator Reports</h3>
     222                        <p class="Overview">
     223                                Indicator reports provide numeric data with public health context
     224                                for environmental factors or health outcomes potentially related
     225                                to those environmental factors.
     226                        </p>
     227                        <p>
     228                                Select a related indicator report:
     229                        </p>
     230
     231                        <ibis:SelectionsList headingLevel="3">
     232                                <SELECTIONS>
     233                                        <SELECTION>
     234                                                <TITLE>Biomonitoring</TITLE>
     235                                                <LOCAL_URL>environment/Biomonitoring.html</LOCAL_URL>
     236                                        </SELECTION>
     237                                        <SELECTION>
     238                                                <TITLE>Environmental Exposure A-Z</TITLE>
     239                                                <LOCAL_URL>environment/ExposureA-Z.html</LOCAL_URL>
     240                                        </SELECTION>
     241                                </SELECTIONS>
     242                        </ibis:SelectionsList>
     243                </ibis:Popup>
     244
     245                <ibis:Popup
     246                        additionalClasses="Above" controlClass="Button"
     247                        controlID="querySelectionsMenuControl"
     248                        controlType="radio" controlName="dataSelectionControl"
     249                        controlTitle="Select a Related Queryable Dataset"
     250                        description="Show/hide list of Related Queryable Datasets associated with this topic"
     251                >
     252                        <h3>Related Queryable Datasets</h3>
     253                        <p class="Overview">
     254                                Explore environmental exposure and health outcomes data, and view
     255                                in a data table, map, graph, or chart. Download the data and
     256                                metadata in a variety of formats.
     257                        </p>
     258                        <p>
     259                                Select a related queryable dataset:
     260                        </p>
     261
     262                        <ibis:SelectionsList headingLevel="3">
     263                                <SELECTIONS>
     264                                        <SELECTION>
     265                                                <TITLE>Biomonitoring</TITLE>
     266                                                <LOCAL_URL>environment/Biomonitoring.html</LOCAL_URL>
     267                                        </SELECTION>
     268                                        <SELECTION>
     269                                                <TITLE>Environmental Exposure A-Z</TITLE>
     270                                                <LOCAL_URL>environment/ExposureA-Z.html</LOCAL_URL>
     271                                        </SELECTION>
     272                                </SELECTIONS>
     273                        </ibis:SelectionsList>
     274                </ibis:Popup>
     275                                </div>
     276
     277                                <div id="relatedTopics">
     278                                        <img ibis:src="view/image/topic/related_topics.png"/>
     279                                        <h3>Related Environment Topics</h3>
     280                                        <div class="Selections">
     281                                                <ul>
     282                                                        <li><a ibis:href="environment/climate/ExtremeTemperatures.html" title="Extreme Temperatures">Extreme Temperatures</a></li>
     283                                                </ul>
     284                                        </div>
     285                                </div>
     286                        </div>
     287                </nav>
    238288
    239289        </CONTENT>
  • adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/nmepht-content/xml/html_content/health/poisonings/ChildhoodLeadPoisoning.xml

    r22576 r22677  
    33<HTML_CONTENT xmlns:ibis="http://www.ibisph.org">
    44
    5         <TITLE>Childhood Lead Poisoning</TITLE>
     5        <TITLE>Lead Poisoning</TITLE>
     6
     7        <HTML_CLASS>Topic Health</HTML_CLASS>
     8        <OTHER_HEAD_CONTENT>
     9                <link ibis:href="css/Topic.css" rel="stylesheet" type="text/css"/>
     10                <link ibis:href="css/_SiteSpecific-Topic.css" rel="stylesheet" type="text/css"/>
     11
     12                <script ibis:src="js/jquery.scrollBlockListItems.js"/>
     13                <script>
     14                        $( document ).ready(function() {
     15                                $(".Topic #moreData           .Selections").scrollBlockListItems( {"maxSelectionsContainerHeight":120});
     16                                $(".Topic #downloadsResources .Selections").scrollBlockListItems( {"maxSelectionsContainerHeight":190});
     17                        });
     18                </script>
     19        </OTHER_HEAD_CONTENT>
     20
    621
    722        <CONTENT>
    823
    9                 <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="2"><SHOW/>
    10                         <TITLE>Description</TITLE>
    11                         <CONTENT>
    12                                 Environmental lead is a common toxic metal in our environment. People may be
    13                                 exposed to lead by breathing or swallowing lead or lead dust.
    14                                 Once it enters the body, lead can become a health hazard.
    15                                 <br/><br/>
    16                                 Lead exposure in children remains a major health concern. Approximately half a
    17                                 million US children aged 1-5 years have blood lead levels greater than 5 micrograms
    18                                 of lead per deciliter of blood (mcg/dL), the
    19                                 CDC <a href="https://nmhealth.org/resource/view/267/"> Blood Lead Reference Level</a> based
    20                                 on the 97.5th percentile of blood lead level distribution in US children aged
    21                                 1-5 years. In New Mexico, a child is considered to have an elevated blood lead
    22                                 level (EBLL) at a concentration of 5 mcg/dL or greater.
    23                         </CONTENT>
    24                 </ibis:ExpandableContent>
    25                 <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="2">
    26                         <TITLE>Learn About Childhood Lead Poisoning</TITLE>
    27                         <CONTENT>
    28                                 <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="3"><SHOW/>
    29                                         <TITLE>Why Important</TITLE>
    30                                         <CONTENT>
    31                                                 Environmental lead is a common toxic metal, present in all areas of the United States. Lead exposure and lead poisoning are preventable.
    32                                                 Lead exposure can adversely affect nearly every organ and system in the body, including the nervous, blood, hormonal, kidney, and
    33                                                 reproductive systems. Children are more vulnerable to lead poisoning than adults. Children from all social and economic levels can
    34                                                 be affected. The bodies of young children absorb lead more readily than adults. During the first three years of life, children's
    35                                                 brains are growing the fastest, developing the critical connections in the nervous system that control thought, learning, hearing,
    36                                                 movement, behavior, and emotions. The normal behaviors of children at this age, such as crawling, exploring, teething, and putting
    37                                                 objects in their mouth, put them at an increased risk for lead exposure. Even blood lead levels lower than 10 micrograms per deciliter
    38                                                 (ug/dL) may be associated with negative outcomes for children, such as cognitive impairment and learning disabilities, delayed development,
    39                                                 changes in behavior, kidney problems and anemia. There is no known safe level of exposure to lead. The state requires all children enrolled
    40                                                 in Medicaid be tested for lead exposure at ages 12 months and 24 months.
    41                                         </CONTENT>
    42                                 </ibis:ExpandableContent>
    43 
    44         <!--                    <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="3">
    45                                         <TITLE>What is Known</TITLE>
    46                                         <CONTENT>
    47                                                 [Put content here]
    48                                         </CONTENT>
    49                                 </ibis:ExpandableContent>
    50         -->
    51                                 <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="3"><SHOW/>
    52                                         <TITLE>Who is at Risk</TITLE>
    53                                         <CONTENT>
    54                                                 All children under age six have high potential for exposure to lead and lead poisoning because they tend to put hands or other objects that
    55                                                 may contain lead into their mouths. Children from all social and economic levels can be affected by lead poisoning, but children living at
    56                                                 or below poverty level, who live in older housing built before 1978, are at greatest risk for lead poisoning.
    57                                                 <h4>Paint and Dust</h4>
    58                                                 The major source of lead exposure among children is lead-based paint and lead-containing dust found in older buildings.
    59                                                 Lead-based paints were banned for use in housing in 1978. Houses and other buildings built before 1978, especially those built before 1950,
    60                                                 may contain lead-based paint. If you live in or regularly visit homes built before 1978, you may be at risk for lead exposure and poisoning.
    61                                                 This includes grandparents' or other family members' homes and in-home daycares.<br/>
    62                                                 Deteriorating paint (chipping, flaking, and peeling) and paint disturbed during home remodeling add to lead dust, contaminate soils around
    63                                                 the home, and make paint chips and dust-containing lead accessible to children. Children can be exposed to lead by eating lead-based paint
    64                                                 painted with lead-based paint, sucking on jewelry that contains lead, or swallowing house dust or soil that contains lead.<br/>
    65                                                 Lead exposure may come from sources other than housing, such as:
    66                                                 <ul>
    67                                                         <li>Hobbies that include the use of lead (such as making stained glass windows, hunting, fishing, target shooting).</li>
    68                                                         <li>Work that includes the use of lead, such as recycling or making automotive batteries, painting, radiator repair.</li>
    69                                                         <li>"Take home" lead on clothes worn at work can transfer in the car and home.</li>
    70                                                         <li>Drinking water (lead pipes, solder, brass fixtures, and valves can all leach lead).</li>
    71                                                         <li>Food and liquids stored in lead crystal or lead-glazed pottery or porcelain (lead can leach in food from these sources).</li>
    72                                                         <li>Folk medicines and remedies (azarcon and greta, which are used for upset stomach or indigestion; pay-loo-ah, which is used
    73                                                                 for rash or fever; kohl or alkohl, which is used as eye cosmetic, to treat skin infections, or as umbilical stump remedy).</li>
    74                                                         <li>Some jewelry and types of metal toy jewelry or older toys.</li>
    75                                                         <li>Plants and animals from areas where air, water, or soil are contaminated with lead (the amounts of lead may build up in
    76                                                                 plants and if animals eat contaminated plants or other animals some lead may retain in their bodies).</li>
    77                                                 </ul>
    78                                         </CONTENT>
    79                                 </ibis:ExpandableContent>
    80 
    81                                 <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="3"><SHOW/>
    82                                         <TITLE>Health Tips</TITLE>
    83                                         <CONTENT>
    84                                                 You can protect your family by understanding common ways a person can be exposed and minimizing those exposures. Then take other actions for protection, such as
    85                                                 frequently cleaning, washing hands, good nutrition, and by removing common items in the home that may contain lead, such as home remedies, some jewelry, and certain toys.
    86                                                 <span class="Bold">To protect yourself and your family,</span> take simple steps to reduce your exposure to lead:
    87                                                 <ul>
    88                                                         <li>Clean and <span class="Bold">remove shoes before going inside your home</span> to avoid tracking in lead from soil. Place shoe racks or trays near the doorway
    89                                                                 to help your family get into the habit of taking their shoes off when they come inside the house.</li>
    90                                                         <li><span class="Bold">Shower and change clothes after finishing the task</span> if you remodel buildings built before 1978 or if your work or hobbies involve working
    91                                                                 with lead-based products</li>
    92                                                         <li><span class="Bold">Wash your hands frequently</span> and when you go into your home. Make sure children wash their hands often and also when they get home from
    93                                                                 school and come inside after playing outside.</li>
    94                                                         <li>Damp-mop floors, damp-wipe surfaces, and often wash a child's hands (especially before they eat and before nap time and bed time), pacifiers, toys, and stuffed
    95                                                                 animals to reduce exposure to lead. <span class="Bold">Caution:</span> NEVER MIX AMMONIA AND BLEACH PRODUCTS TOGETHER BECAUSE THEY CAN FORM A DANGEROUS GAS.</li>
    96                                                         <li>Use only cold water from the tap for drinking, cooking, and for making a baby formula. Hot water may contain a higher amount of lead, and most of the lead in
    97                                                                 household water usually comes from the plumbing in your house, not from the public water supply.</li>
    98                                                         <li><span class="Bold">Avoid</span> using home remedies and cosmetics, such as <span class="Bold">azarcon, greta, pay-loo-ah, kohl, alkohl,</span> that contain lead.</li>
    99                                                         <li>Check your home for items that may potentially contain lead, such as jewelry, toys, and older painted furniture that may be chipping.</li>
    100                                                 </ul>
    101                                                         <span class="Bold">Protecting Children</span>
    102                                                 <ul>
    103                                                         <li>Ask a doctor to test your child if you are concerned about a child being exposed to lead. </li>
    104                                                         <li>Both Federal and State Medicaid regulations require that all children enrolled in Medicaid be tested at 12 months and again at 24 months of age. Children between
    105                                                                 the ages of 36 months and 72 months of age must receive a screening blood lead test if they have not been previously screened for lead poisoning. No state is
    106                                                                 exempt from this requirement.</li>
    107                                                         <li>Talk to the New Mexico Department of Health (at the toll free phone number 1-888-878-8992 or DOH-EHEB@state.nm.us) about testing paint and dust from your home for
    108                                                                 lead if you live in a house or apartment built before 1978, especially if young children live with you or visit you.</li>
    109                                                         <li><span class="Bold">Make sure children eat healthy and nutritious meals</span> as recommended by the National Dietary Guidelines, because children with good diets
    110                                                                 absorb less lead. A diet high in vitamin C, iron, and calcium can help reduce lead absorption.</li>
    111                                                         <!--<li>Learn more from <span style="font-family: 'Trebuchet MS', Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 18px; line-height: 18px; text-align: justify; background-color:
    112                                                         rgb(255, 255, 255);"><span class="plugin_link"><a href="http://nmhealth.org/about/erd/eheb/lppp/" target="_top">Lead Poisoning Prevention Program</a></span></span></li>-->
    113                                                 </ul>
    114                                         </CONTENT>
    115                                 </ibis:ExpandableContent>
    116 
    117         <!--                    <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="3">
    118                                         <TITLE>FAQs and Resources</TITLE>
    119                                         <CONTENT>
    120                                                 [Put content here]
    121                                         </CONTENT>
    122                                 </ibis:ExpandableContent>
    123         -->
    124                         </CONTENT>
    125                 </ibis:ExpandableContent>
    126 
    127                 <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="2"><SHOW/>
    128                         <TITLE>Explore Data</TITLE>
    129                         <CONTENT>
    130                                 <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="3"><SHOW/>
    131                                         <TITLE>Indicator Reports with data tables, charts, and more detailed information</TITLE>
    132                                         <CONTENT>
    133                                                 <ibis:SelectionsList>
    134                                                         <SELECTION>
    135                                                                 <TITLE>Lead Exposure - Children Under Age Three Years with Confirmed Elevated Blood Lead Levels</TITLE>
    136                                                                 <LOCAL_URL>dataportal/indicator/view/LeadExpConfirmPosChildAge3.Pct.Cnty.html</LOCAL_URL>
    137                                                         </SELECTION>
    138                                                         <SELECTION>
    139                                                                 <TITLE>Lead Exposure - Children Born in the Same Year and Tested for Lead Before Age Three Years</TITLE>
    140                                                                 <LOCAL_URL>dataportal/indicator/view/LeadExpTestChildAge3.Cnty.html</LOCAL_URL>
    141                                                         </SELECTION>
    142                                                         <SELECTION>
    143                                                                 <TITLE>Lead Exposure - Children Born in the Same Year and Tested for Lead Before Age Six Years</TITLE>
    144                                                                 <LOCAL_URL>dataportal/indicator/view/LeadExpTestChildAgeUnder6.Year.html</LOCAL_URL>
    145                                                         </SELECTION>
    146                                                         <SELECTION>
    147                                                                 <TITLE>New Mexico Population Demographics - Homes Built Before 1950</TITLE>
    148                                                                 <LOCAL_URL>dataportal/indicator/view/NMPopDemo1950Homes.Cnty.html</LOCAL_URL>
    149                                                         </SELECTION>
    150                                                         <SELECTION>
    151                                                                 <TITLE>New Mexico Population Demographics - Children Under Age 5 Living in Poverty</TITLE>
    152                                                                 <LOCAL_URL>dataportal/indicator/view/NMPopDemoChildPovUnder5.Cnty.html</LOCAL_URL>
    153                                                         </SELECTION>
    154                                                 </ibis:SelectionsList>
    155                                         </CONTENT>
    156                                 </ibis:ExpandableContent>
    157 
    158                                 <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="3"><SHOW/>
    159                                         <TITLE>Custom Data Queries</TITLE>
    160                                         <CONTENT>
    161                                                 <h5>Annual</h5>
    162                                                 <ibis:SelectionsList>
    163                                                         <SELECTION>
    164                                                                 <TITLE>Children Tested Before Age 6 (Count and %)</TITLE>
    165                                                                 <LOCAL_URL>dataportal/query/builder/childlead/ChildleadAnnual/AnnualPctTested.html</LOCAL_URL>
    166                                                         </SELECTION>
    167                                                         <SELECTION>
    168                                                                 <TITLE>Children Tested Before Age 6 with Blood Lead Levels between 5 and 10 mcg/dL (Count and %)</TITLE>
    169                                                                 <LOCAL_URL>dataportal/query/builder/childlead/ChildleadAnnual/AnnualRateElevated5_10.html</LOCAL_URL>
    170                                                         </SELECTION>
    171                                                         <SELECTION>
    172                                                                 <TITLE>Children Tested Before Age 6 with Blood Lead Levels of 10 mcg/dL or More (Count and %)</TITLE>
    173                                                                 <LOCAL_URL>dataportal/query/builder/childlead/ChildleadAnnual/AnnualRateElevated10.html</LOCAL_URL>
    174                                                         </SELECTION>
    175                                                 </ibis:SelectionsList>
    176                                                 <h5>Cohort</h5>
    177                                                 <ibis:SelectionsList>
    178                                                         <SELECTION>
    179                                                                 <TITLE>Children Born in a Given Year and Tested Before Age 3 (Count and %)</TITLE>
    180                                                                 <LOCAL_URL>dataportal/query/builder/childlead/ChildleadCohort/CohortPctTested.html</LOCAL_URL>
    181                                                         </SELECTION>
    182                                                         <SELECTION>
    183                                                                 <TITLE>Children Born in a Given Year and Tested Before Age 3 with Blood Lead Levels between 5 and 10 mcg/dL (Count and %)</TITLE>
    184                                                                 <LOCAL_URL>dataportal/query/builder/childlead/ChildleadCohort/CohortRateElevated5_10.html</LOCAL_URL>
    185                                                         </SELECTION>
    186                                                         <SELECTION>
    187                                                                 <TITLE>Children Born in a Given Year and Tested Before Age 3 with Blood Lead Levels of 10 mcg/dL or More (Count and %)</TITLE>
    188                                                                 <LOCAL_URL>dataportal/query/builder/childlead/ChildleadCohort/CohortRateElevated10.html</LOCAL_URL>
    189                                                         </SELECTION>
    190                                                 </ibis:SelectionsList>
    191                                                 <h5>Risk Factors</h5>
    192                                                 <ibis:SelectionsList>
    193                                                         <SELECTION>
    194                                                                 <TITLE>Homes Built Before 1950 (Count and %)</TITLE>
    195                                                                 <LOCAL_URL>dataportal/query/builder/childlead/LeadRisk/Befr1950.html</LOCAL_URL>
    196                                                         </SELECTION>
    197                                                         <SELECTION>
    198                                                                 <TITLE>Homes Built Before 1980 (Count and %)</TITLE>
    199                                                                 <LOCAL_URL>dataportal/query/builder/childlead/LeadRisk/Befr1980.html</LOCAL_URL>
    200                                                         </SELECTION>
    201                                                         <SELECTION>
    202                                                                 <TITLE>Children Under Age 5 Living in Poverty (Count and %)</TITLE>
    203                                                                 <LOCAL_URL>dataportal/query/builder/childlead/LeadRisk/Pov5.html</LOCAL_URL>
    204                                                         </SELECTION>
    205                                                 </ibis:SelectionsList>
    206                                         </CONTENT>
    207                                 </ibis:ExpandableContent>
    208 
    209                                 <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="3"><SHOW/>
    210                                         <TITLE>About the Data</TITLE>
    211                                         <CONTENT>
    212                                                 <ibis:SelectionsList id="IndicatorList">
    213                                                         <SELECTION>
    214                                                                 <TITLE>New Mexico Childhood Lead Poisoning Birth Cohort 2012 Metadata File</TITLE>
    215                                                                 <LOCAL_URL>dataportal/metadata/NM_Lead_CLP2.html</LOCAL_URL>
    216                                                         </SELECTION>
    217                                                         <SELECTION>
    218                                                                 <TITLE>New Mexico Annual Childhood Lead Poisoning 2015 Metadata File</TITLE>
    219                                                                 <LOCAL_URL>dataportal/metadata/NM_Lead_CLP4.html</LOCAL_URL>
    220                                                         </SELECTION>
    221                                                 </ibis:SelectionsList>
    222                                         </CONTENT>
    223                                 </ibis:ExpandableContent>
    224                         </CONTENT>
    225                 </ibis:ExpandableContent>
     24                <header>
     25                        <img ibis:src="view/image/health/poisonings/lead/cerrillosmine.jpg" title="Cerrillos NM abandoned mines - besides turquoise, lead and other metals were mined here."/>
     26                        <h1>Lead Poisoning</h1>
     27                </header>
     28                       
     29                <section>
     30                        <h2>What is Lead Poisoning?</h2>
     31                                <p>
     32                                        Lead is a toxic metal found in our environment.  It can be found in dust, air, soil, water, and even inside our homes.  While lead is a natural occurring mineral found in the earth's crust, humans are exposed to lead mostly through its use in products and hobbies such as stained-glass making, guns and ammunition, or lead in imported plastics. Historic sources are lead water pipes, lead-based paint, and soils contaminated with leaded gasoline.  Lead enters the body by breathing or swallowing lead or lead dust.  Lead is poisonous to the human body.  Once lead enters the body, it can have negative health impacts on all bodily systems.
     33                                </p>
     34                        <h3>Childhood lead poisoning</h3>
     35                                <p>
     36                                        Lead exposure in American children remains a major health concern, however current US estimates on the number of children with elevated blood lead levels are not known as data are not collected uniformly by states. The CDC defines an elevated blood lead level (elevated BLL) as a single blood lead test (capillary or venous) at or above the CDC blood lead reference value of 5 mcg/dL established in 2012 <a href="#ref1" id="ref1.link" aria-describedby="footnote-label"></a>. In New Mexico, a child is considered to have an elevated blood lead level (EBLL) at a concentration of 5 mcg/dL or greater.
     37                                </p>                   
     38                                <p>
     39                                        Lead in the body can harm nearly every organ system, including the nervous, blood, hormonal, kidney, and reproductive systems. Because the bodies of young children absorb lead more readily than adults, children's brains are rapidly developing and establishing critical neural connections in the first three years of life, children are more susceptible to harmful health effects from lead than adults. Additionally, the normal behaviors of very young children, such as crawling, exploring, teething, and putting objects in their mouth, put them at an increased risk for lead exposure. There is no known safe level of exposure to lead. Although children from all social and economic levels can be affected by lead, the poorest children are the most at risk due to a host of socioeconomic factors such as lack of access to high quality foods and living in substandard housing. New Mexico requires all children enrolled in Medicaid be tested for lead exposure at ages 12 months and 24 months.
     40                                </p>
     41                                <p>
     42                                <footer class="Footnotes"><ol>
     43                                <li id="ref1"> <a href="https://www.cdc.gov/nceh/lead/data/case-definitions-classifications.htm">
     44                                        Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention Standard Surveillance Definitions and Classifications </a> Accessed 1/30/2021
     45                                <a href="#ref1.link" aria-label="Back to content">«</a></li>
     46                                </ol></footer>
     47                        </p>
     48                        </section>
     49                <section class="SubSectionsContainer">
     50                        <h2>What are the Health Effects of Lead Poisoning?</h2>
     51                                <h3>Children</h3>
     52                                        <p>
     53                                                For children, especially those under the age of 6, lead can cause serious health problems that may cause lifelong damage.  Some of the effects include: brain and nervous system damage, learning difficulties, limited attention span, behavioral problems, hyperactivity, decreased growth, kidney damage, hearing loss, and anemia. If not detected, and at very high blood lead levels, seizures, coma, and death can occur.
     54                                        </p>
     55                                <h3>Adults</h3>
     56                                        <p>
     57                                                Adults can suffer from damage to the nervous, heart, and circulatory systems.  An increase in blood pressure can be common.  Other effects include decreased kidney function and reproductive problems in both men and women.
     58                                        </p>
     59                                        <p>
     60                                                Pregnant woman who are lead poisoned can experience high blood pressure, miscarriage or stillborn births, premature births, or babies born at a low birth weight. Lead can be passed to the unborn baby through the placenta and damage the baby's brain and central nervous system.  Lead can also be passed to the baby through breast milk.
     61                                        </p>
     62                        <section class="ImageInfoBlock">
     63                                <figure title="colicky baby">
     64                                        <img ibis:src="view/image/health/poisonings/lead/sickbaby.jpg"/>
     65                                        <figcaption>
     66                                                Symptoms can look like other conditions, such as colic.
     67                                        </figcaption>
     68                                </figure>
     69
     70                                <div>
     71                                        <h3>Symptoms of lead poisoning</h3>
     72                                                <p>
     73                                                        For both children and adults, there may be no obvious symptoms of lead poisoning. Symptoms may not appear until blood lead levels are quite high. Often the symptoms people do experience may be mistaken for other illnesses.
     74                                                </p>
     75                                                <ul>
     76                                                        <li>
     77                                                                Lack of desire to eat food
     78                                                        </li>
     79                                                        <li>
     80                                                                Loss of recently acquired skills (in young children)
     81                                                        </li>
     82                                                        <li>
     83                                                                Drowsiness
     84                                                        </li>
     85                                                        <li>
     86                                                                Irritability
     87                                                        </li>   
     88                                                        <li>
     89                                                                Headache
     90                                                        </li>                                           
     91                                                        <li>
     92                                                                Lack of energy
     93                                                        </li>
     94                                                        <li>
     95                                                                Constipation
     96                                                        </li>
     97                                                        <li>
     98                                                                Stomach cramps
     99                                                        </li>
     100                                                        <li>
     101                                                                Trouble sleeping
     102                                                        </li>
     103                                                </ul>
     104                                </div>
     105                        </section>
     106
     107                        <section class="ImageInfoBlock">
     108                       
     109                                <div>
     110                                        <h3>Lead sources</h3>
     111                                        <p>
     112                                                The sources of lead in the environment are numerous. Some of the more common sources for exposure in children include:
     113                                        </p>
     114                                                <ul>
     115                                                        <li>
     116                                                                Parent's hobbies that include the use of lead (such as making stained glass windows, hunting, fishing, target shooting)
     117                                                        </li>                                                   
     118                                                        <li>
     119                                                                Parent's work that includes the use of lead, such as recycling or making automotive batteries, painting, radiator repair (take home lead on work clothes or shoes)
     120                                                        </li>
     121                                                        <li>
     122                                                                Certain toy jewelry or older toys
     123                                                        </li>
     124                                                        <li>
     125                                                                Antiques and antigue decorative items
     126                                                        </li>
     127                                                        <li>
     128                                                                Lead-based paint found in buildings older than 1978
     129                                                        </li>
     130                                                        <li>
     131                                                                Some imported foods or candies (some candies from Mexico have been found to have lead)
     132                                                        </li>
     133                                                        <li>
     134                                                                Some imported canned goods due to the lead soldering
     135                                                        </li>
     136                                                        <li>
     137                                                                Food and liquids stored in lead crystal or lead-glazed pottery or porcelain
     138                                                        </li>
     139                                                        <li>
     140                                                                Dust created during the remodeling of older homes. Lead can also contaminate the soil outside the home
     141                                                        </li>
     142                                                        <li>
     143                                                                Folk medicines and remedies (azarcon and greta, which are used for upset stomach or indigestion; pay-loo-ah, which is used for rash or fever; kohl or alkohl, which is used as eye cosmetic, to treat skin infections, or as umbilical stump remedy).
     144                                                        </li>
     145                                                </ul>
     146                                </div>
     147                                <figure title="pottery">
     148                                        <img ibis:src="view/image/health/poisonings/lead/pottery.jpg"/>
     149                                        <figcaption>Lead can leach from lead-based glazes on pottery.
     150                                        </figcaption>
     151                                </figure>               
     152                                       
     153                        </section>
     154                        <section>
     155                                <p>
     156                                        <h3>Lead in drinking water</h3>                                         
     157                                        </p>
     158                                        <p>
     159                                                Lead being introduced into water from the disruption of lead containing service lines, such as a meter installation, is mostly associated with older water systems of which there are few in New Mexico. Lead is more likely to be a concern with water systems than in private wells.   
     160                                        </p>
     161                                                <p>
     162                                                        <ul>
     163                                                                <li>
     164                                                                        Testing the water is the only way to know if lead is present.
     165                                                                </li>
     166                                                                <li>
     167                                                                        Low pH (pH below 6.5) can cause corrosion of plumbing components and dissolve metals like lead, copper and zinc into the water.
     168                                                                </li>
     169                                                                <li>
     170                                                                        Household plumbing fixtures, welding solder, and pipe fittings made prior to 1986 may contain lead. Some plumbing components manufactured prior to 2014 may contain up to 8% lead.
     171                                                                </li>
     172                                                                <li>
     173                                                                        To remove lead, the USEPA recommends using a NSF/ANSI Standard 53 certified filter.
     174                                                                </li>
     175                                                        </ul>
     176                                                        </p>
     177                                                <p>
     178                                                        <span class="Bold">Testing for lead in private well water </span>is recommended:
     179                                                </p>
     180                                                <p>
     181                                                        <ul>
     182                                                                <li>
     183                                                                        At least once, and again after any disturbance to the well such as maintenance.
     184                                                                </li>
     185                                                                <li>
     186                                                                        If pregnant women or children under age 6 live in the house.
     187                                                                </li>
     188                                                                <li>
     189                                                                        If lead pipes or fixtures are in the home or suspected to be in the home.
     190                                                                </li>
     191                                                                <li>
     192                                                                        After water treatment is installed.
     193                                                                </li>
     194                                                                <li>
     195                                                                        The recommend action Level for lead in drinking water is 0.015 milligrams per Liter (mg/L).
     196                                                                </li>
     197                                                        </ul>
     198                                                </p>
     199                                                <p>
     200                                                        <span class="Bold">To reduce lead </span>in water:
     201                                                </p>
     202                                                <p>
     203                                                        <ul>
     204                                                                <li>
     205                                                                        Flush pipes for two minutes if the water hasn't been used for six hours or more.
     206                                                                </li>
     207                                                                <li>
     208                                                                        The US Environmental Protection Agency provides guidance to help consumers find certified lead reducing point of use (at the sink) filters.
     209                                                                </li>
     210                                                        </ul>
     211                                                </p>
     212                                               
     213                        </section>
     214                </section>
     215                <section>
     216               
     217                        <h2>Lead Poisoning Prevention Tips</h2>
     218                                <p>
     219                                        <h3>Protect yourself and your family from lead exposure by:</h3>
     220                                </p>
     221                                        <ul>
     222                                                <li>
     223                                                        <span class="Bold">Removing shoes before going inside your home </span>to avoid tracking in lead from soil. Help your family get into the habit of taking their shoes off when they come inside the house.
     224                                                </li>
     225                                                <li>
     226                                                        <span class="Bold">Showering and changing clothes after finishing the task </span>if you remodel buildings built before 1978 or if your work or hobbies involve working with lead-based products. Don't launder work clothes with the rest of your family's laundry.
     227                                                </li>
     228                                                <li>
     229                                                        <span class="Bold">Wash your hands frequently </span>if you work with lead. Don't smoke or eat while working with lead.
     230                                                </li>
     231                                                <li>
     232                                                        <span class="Bold">Check the Consumer Product Safety Commission website </span>for recalls on products that may contain lead, especially toys and children's clothing (see link in "Downloads and Resources" below.
     233                                                </li>
     234                                                <li>
     235                                                        <span class="Bold">Avoid using home remedies and cosmetics </span>that may contain lead.
     236                                                </li>
     237                                                <li>
     238                                                        <span class="Bold">Check your home for items that may potentially contain lead </span>such as jewelry, toys, and older painted furniture that may be chipping.
     239                                                </li>
     240                                                <li>
     241                                                        <span class="Bold">Make sure children eat healthy and nutritious meals </span>as recommended by the National Dietary Guidelines, because children with good diets absorb less lead. A diet high in vitamin C, iron, and calcium can help reduce lead absorption.
     242                                                </li>
     243                                        </ul>
     244                                <p>
     245
     246                                        <h3>
     247                                                If you think that your child has been exposed to lead
     248                                        </h3>
     249                                </p>   
     250                                <p>
     251                                        Ask a doctor to test your child for lead.  Both Federal and State Medicaid regulations require that all children enrolled in Medicaid be tested at 12 months and again at 24 months of age. Children between the ages of 36 months and 72 months of age must receive a screening blood lead test if they have not been previously screened for lead poisoning. No state is exempt from this requirement.
     252                                </p>
     253                                <p>
     254                                        Contact the Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention Program at NMDOH for more information (see "Downloads and Resources" below).
     255                                </p>
     256                                <div class="NotifiableCondition">
     257                                        <h3>Notifiable Diseases or Conditions in New Mexico (N.M.A.C 7.4.3.13)</h3>
     258                                        <p>
     259                                                All levels of lead in blood are reportable to the New Mexico Department of Health. Report to Epidemiology and Response Division, NM Department of Health, P.O. Box 26110, Santa Fe, NM 87502-6110; or call 505-827-0006.
     260                                        </p>
     261                                </div>
     262                        </section>
     263                       
     264                       
     265                <nav id="moreInformation" title="Links for more information">
     266                        <div id="downloadsResources">
     267                                <h3>Downloads and Resources</h3>
     268                                <div class="Columns">
     269                                        <div><div class="Selections">
     270                                                <ul>
     271                                                        <li>
     272                                                                <a href="https://www.nmhealth.org/publication/view/regulation/372/" title="Notifiable Conditions in New Mexico">Notifiable Conditions in New Mexico</a>
     273                                                        </li>                                           
     274                                                        <li>
     275                                                                <a href="https://www.nmhealth.org/about/erd/eheb/clppp/" title="New Mexico Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention Program">New Mexico Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention Program</a>
     276                                                        </li>                                           
     277                                                        <li>
     278                                                                <a href="https://www.cpsc.gov/" title="U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission" class="External">United States Consumer Product Safety Commission</a>
     279                                                        </li>
     280                                                        <li>
     281                                                                <a href="https://www.cdc.gov/nceh/lead/default.htm" title="CDC Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention Program" class="External">Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention Program</a>
     282                                                        </li>   
     283                                                </ul>
     284                                        </div>
     285                                        <button>Show All</button>
     286                                        </div>
     287                                        <img ibis:src="view/image/topic/downloads_resources.png"/>
     288                                </div>
     289                        </div>
     290
     291                        <div id="moreData" class="Columns">
     292                                <div id="relatedData">
     293                                        <img ibis:src="view/image/topic/related_data.png"/>
     294                                        <h3>Explore Related Data</h3>
     295                                        <div class="Selections Scroll">
     296                                                <ul>
     297                                                        <li><a ibis:href="indicator/summary/some_ip_name.html" title="some appropriate link title">Indicator 1 title</a></li>
     298                                                        <li><a ibis:href="query/result/some_QM_name/some_QM_config.html" title="some appropriate link title">Queryable dataset 1 title</a></li>
     299                                                </ul>
     300                                        </div>
     301                                        <button>Show All</button>
     302                                </div>
     303
     304                                <div id="relatedTopics">
     305                                        <img ibis:src="view/image/topic/related_topics.png"/>
     306                                        <h3>Related Topics</h3>
     307                                        <div class="Selections">
     308                                                <ul>
     309                                                        <li><a ibis:href="environment/water/PrivateWells.html" title="Private ">Private Wells</a></li>
     310                                                </ul>
     311                                        </div>
     312                                </div>
     313                        </div>
     314                </nav>
     315
     316
     317                <section class="Citation">
     318                        <h2>Citation</h2>
     319                        Page content updated on 1/30/2021, Published on 1/1/2020
     320                       
     321                        <ibis:include ibis:href="xml/html_content/citation/SomeEpiGroupContactInfo.xml" children-only-flag="true"/>
     322                       
     323                        <ibis:include ibis:href="xml/html_content/citation/DeyonneSandoval.xml" children-only-flag="true"/>
     324                </section>
    226325
    227326        </CONTENT>
Note: See TracChangeset for help on using the changeset viewer.