Changeset 13393 in main


Ignore:
Timestamp:
03/20/17 13:23:49 (3 years ago)
Author:
Lois Haggard
Message:

nm epht-view-content Jason's updated and new query and metadata files.

Location:
adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/epht-view-content/xml
Files:
22 edited

Legend:

Unmodified
Added
Removed
  • adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/epht-view-content/xml/html_content/environment/Fire.xml

    r13291 r13393  
    2424                                        <TITLE>Why Important</TITLE>
    2525                                        <CONTENT>
    26                                                 The severity of wildfire seasons depends on precipitation, temperature, fuel availability, and natural or human-related ignition. Each of these factors varies from year to year and place to place. Much of the yearly variation in fire season severity is climate related. For example, a snowy winter followed by a wet, cool spring tends to favor a lower severity fire season, while a dry winter followed by a warm, dry spring tends to favor a higher severity fire season. As climate change continues to make New Mexico warmer and drier, on average, the climatic risk of wildfires continues to rise.
     26                                                Wildfires are a fundamental part of New Mexico's landscape. An average of 285,000 acres burned each year between 1992 and 2013, with a low of 69,000 acres burned in 2001 and a high of 1,143,000 acres burned in 2011 (almost 1.5% of the state's land area). The severity of wildfire seasons depends on precipitation, temperature, fuel availability, and natural or human-related ignition. Each of these factors varies from year to year and place to place. Much of the yearly variation in fire season severity is climate related. For example, a snowy winter followed by a wet, cool spring tends to favor a lower severity fire season, while a dry winter followed by a warm, dry spring tends to favor a higher severity fire season.
    2727                                                <br/>
    2828                                                <br/>
    29                                                 The primary health threat from wildfire smoke occurs when fine particulates that enter the eyes and respiratory system. Individuals with preexisting conditions such as asthmas, COPD, emphysema, or heart disease are particularly vulnerable to wildfire smoke, although even healthy individuals can be significantly harmed by prolonged smoke exposure. Symptoms of smoke exposure usually include breathing discomfort and irritation of the eyes, nose, and throat. More severe symptoms may include chest tightness, wheezing, shortness of breath, and coughing.
     29                                                The primary health threat from wildfire smoke occurs when fine particulates are inhaled or come into contact with the eyes. Individuals with preexisting conditions such as asthma, COPD, emphysema, or heart disease are particularly vulnerable to wildfire smoke, though healthy individuals also can be harmed by prolonged smoke inhalation. Symptoms of smoke exposure may include breathing discomfort and irritation of the eyes, nose, and throat. More severe symptoms may include chest tightness, wheezing, shortness of breath, and coughing.
    3030                                        </CONTENT>
    3131                                </ibis:ExpandableContent>
     
    3434                                        <TITLE>Who is at Risk</TITLE>
    3535                                        <CONTENT>
    36                                                 Those most vulnerable to smoke-related impacts tend to be those with pre-existing respiratory health conditions, particularly older adults and very young children. Importantly, however, even healthy individuals can be harmed by and should take measures to avoid prolonged smoke exposure.
     36                                                Those most vulnerable to smoke-related impacts tend to be those with pre-existing respiratory health conditions, particularly older adults and very young children. However, even healthy individuals can be harmed by and should take measures to avoid prolonged smoke exposure.
    3737                                        </CONTENT>
    3838                                </ibis:ExpandableContent>
     
    4141                                        <TITLE>Health Tips</TITLE>
    4242                                        <CONTENT>
    43                                                 Staying indoors and keeping the indoor air clean is the easiest way to protect your lungs when it is smoky outside.
     43                                                Staying indoors and keeping the indoor air clean is the easiest way to protect yourself when it is smoky outside.
    4444                                                        <ul>
    4545                                                                <li>Reduce physical activity.</li>
     
    6464                                                <ibis:SelectionsList>
    6565                                                        <SELECTION>
    66                                                                 <TITLE>Wildfire Acreage and Number by County</TITLE>
    67                                                                 <LOCAL_URL>dataportal/query/result/fire/Fire/Fire.html</LOCAL_URL>
     66                                                                <TITLE>Wildfire: Acreage by County</TITLE>
     67                                                                <LOCAL_URL>dataportal/query/result/fire/Fire/AcresBurned.html</LOCAL_URL>
     68                                                        </SELECTION>
     69                                                        <SELECTION>
     70                                                                <TITLE>Wildfire: Number of Fires over 100 acres by County</TITLE>
     71                                                                <LOCAL_URL>dataportal/query/result/fire/Fire/NumberWildfires.html</LOCAL_URL>
    6872                                                        </SELECTION>
    6973                                                </ibis:SelectionsList>
  • adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/epht-view-content/xml/html_content/environment/climate/NMTemperature.xml

    r13291 r13393  
    1313                                <br/>
    1414                                <br/>
    15                                 This indicator focuses on exposure to high temperatures. It includes the number of days per year over various high-temperature thresholds for both air temperature and heat index. These data are intended to provide a better understanding of the spatial and temporal patterns of extreme heat in New Mexico and to help local communities design interventions and better understand the possible health effects.
     15                                This indicator focuses on exposure to high temperatures. It includes the number of days per year over various high-temperature thresholds for both air temperature and heat index. These data are intended to provide a better understanding of the spatial and temporal patterns of extreme heat in New Mexico and to help communities understand and prepare for the health risks of extreme heat.
    1616                        </CONTENT>
    1717                        <SHOW/>
     
    2424                                        <TITLE>Why Important</TITLE>
    2525                                        <CONTENT>
    26                                                 Extreme heat raises the risk of heat related illnesses such as heat cramps, heat edema, and heat stroke.  Extreme heat also can raise morbidity and mortality rates by putting additional physiological stress on people with pre-existing physical vulnerabilities, including respiratory, cardiac, and renal conditions. In other words, extreme heat exposure not only raises the risk of heat stroke and other heat-specific conditions, it also can make us more vulnerable to other health conditions.
     26                                                Extreme heat raises the risk of <a href="https://nmtracking.org/health/heatstress/Heat.html"
     27                                                title="nmtracking.org Heat Stress, Opens in new window or tab">heat stress and heat related illnesses</a>, including heat cramps, heat edema, and heat stroke. Extreme heat also can raise morbidity and mortality risk by putting additional physical stress on people with pre-existing health issues, including respiratory, cardiovascular, and renal conditions.
    2728                                        </CONTENT>
    2829                                </ibis:ExpandableContent>
     
    3132                                        <TITLE>Who is at Risk</TITLE>
    3233                                        <CONTENT>
    33                                                 Those most vulnerable to extreme heat tend to be those with pre-existing health conditions, older adults, very young children, people with disabilities, people who work outdoors, people with lower incomes, and people who are socially isolated.
     34                                                Those most vulnerable to extreme heat tend to be people with pre-existing health conditions, older adults, very young children, people with disabilities, people who work outdoors, people with lower incomes, and people who are socially isolated.
    3435                                        </CONTENT>
    3536                                </ibis:ExpandableContent>
     
    3839                                        <TITLE>Health Tips</TITLE>
    3940                                        <CONTENT>
    40                                                 There are several best practices that can help keep you and others safe from extreme heat exposure:
     41                                                There are several best practices that can help keep you and others safe from heat stress:
    4142                                                        <ul>
    4243                                                                <li>Limit the amount of time spent in hot conditions.</li>
    4344                                                                <li>Take breaks in a cooler environment. Continuous heat exposure is more hazardous than intermittent heat exposure.</li>
    44                                                                 <li>Limit sun exposure (e.g. shade trees, wide brimmed hats).</li>
     45                                                                <li>Limit sun exposure (e.g., shade trees, wide brimmed hats).</li>
    4546                                                                <li>Stay well hydrated.</li>
    4647                                                                <li>Avoid physical activity during the hottest part of the day. Move strenuous activities to mornings and evenings if possible.</li>
    4748                                                                <li>Increase air movement with a ceiling or floor fan. If you do not have air conditioning, open your windows at night to let the heat escape.</li>
    48                                                                 <li>Check on friends, family, and neighbors who may be vulnerable to heat, especially those who may not have anyone else to check on them. Social isolation is one of the biggest risk factors for extreme heat. If you know someone who, for example, is older and has no air conditioning, call or stop by to talk about the weather and make sure they are doing okay.</li>
     49                                                                <li>Check on friends, family, and neighbors who may be vulnerable to heat, especially if they do not have anyone else to check on them. Social isolation is one of the biggest risk factors during extreme heat. If you know someone who, for example, is older and has no air conditioning, call or stop by to talk about the weather and make sure they are doing okay.</li>
    4950                                                        </ul>
    5051                                        </CONTENT>
     
    5455                                        <TITLE>Temperature vs Heat Index</TITLE>
    5556                                        <CONTENT>
    56                                                 Temperature is the standard, basic measure of heat. It is what we typically see on thermometers, weather apps, and TV weather forecasts.
     57                                                Temperature is the standard, basic measure of heat. It is what we typically see on thermometers, weather apps on our phones, and TV weather forecasts.
    5758                                                <br/>
    5859                                                <br/>
     
    6061                                                <br/>
    6162                                                <br/>
    62                                                 In many parts of the country, heat index is almost always higher than air temperature because of persistently high humidity. However, very low relative humidity levels (less than 13%) actually causes heat index to be lower than air temperature, because sweat evaporates very rapidly under these conditions. In New Mexico, such low humidities are common at mid-day during the summer, which causes the maximum heat index to often be lower than the maximum air temperature.
     63                                                In many parts of the country, heat index is almost always higher than air temperature because of persistently high humidity. However, very low relative humidity levels (less than 13%) actually cause heat index to be lower than air temperature, because sweat evaporates very rapidly under these conditions. In New Mexico, such low humidities are common at mid-day during the summer, which causes the maximum heat index to often be lower than the maximum air temperature.
     64                                        </CONTENT>
     65                                </ibis:ExpandableContent>
     66
     67                                <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="3">
     68                                        <TITLE>Temperature and Heat Index Percentiles</TITLE>
     69                                        <CONTENT>
     70                                                The 90th, 95th, and 98th percentiles for temperature and heat index were calculated using May-September daily maximum temperatures from 1981-2010 for each grid cell in New Mexico. The number of days exceeding those thresholds at each location were then calculated for each year.
     71                                                <br/>
     72                                                <br/>
     73                                                "Percentile" refers to the percent of days with temperatures below some threshold. For example, if the 90th percentile for daily high temperature is 83&#176;F, then 90% of days had high temperatures less than 83&#176;F. Similarly, if the 95th temperature percentile is 87&#176;F, then 95% of days had high temperatures less than 87&#176;F.
     74                                                <br/>
     75                                                <br/>                                           
     76                                                Percentiles are often used for assessing heat risk because people in different regions are adapted to different temperatures. For example, a June temperature of 100&#176;F may be quite typical in Phoenix but exceptionally hot and hazardous in Seattle.     Percentiles help us understand how unusual a given temperature is in each location.     
    6377                                        </CONTENT>
    6478                                </ibis:ExpandableContent>
  • adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/epht-view-content/xml/metadata/BladderCancerIncidence.xml

    r13364 r13393  
    9191</procstep>
    9292<procstep>
    93 <procdesc>NM EPHT data queries through nmtracking.org (NMTracking) result in query-specific data sets that are aggregated by geographic unit. These aggregated data are dynamically joined to boundary data sets for display in the NMTracking interactive map. Boundaries are for County, Census Tract, and Small Areas and are created using U.S. Census 2010 boundary data. The Small Areas data set consists of combined Census tracts and was developed at the NM Department of Health. New Mexico Small Areas are 108 geographic areas across the state with population size that is just large enough to calculate rates for selected health events (e.g., asthma mortality, female breast cancer incidence). Most (95%) New Mexico small-area population sizes range from 9,000 to 30,000 persons. Some counties have multiple small areas (e.g., Bernalillo County has 34 small areas within its boundaries). In other cases, whole counties (e.g., Harding, Quay, and DeBaca) are combined to create a single small area. Please, note that some data queries and displays might be available only to those with restricted-access permissions. Mapped results for the interactive data query include options for a background with an NM base map or shaded relief. Both background maps are served from the NM Resource Geographic Information System (NM RGIS, rgis.unm.edu) or other servers hosted at UNM Earth Data Analysis Center.</procdesc>
     93<procdesc>NM EPHT data queries through nmtracking.org (NMTracking) result in query-specific data sets that are aggregated by geographic unit. These aggregated data are dynamically joined to boundary data sets for display in the NMTracking interactive map. Boundaries are for County, Census Tract, and Small Areas and are created using U.S. Census 2010 boundary data. The Small Areas data set consists of combined Census tracts and was developed at the NM Department of Health. New Mexico Small Areas are 108 geographic areas across the state with population size that is just large enough to calculate rates for selected health events (e.g., asthma mortality, female breast cancer incidence). Most (95%) New Mexico small-area population sizes range from 9,000 to 30,000 persons. Some counties have multiple small areas (e.g., Bernalillo County has 34 small areas within its boundaries). In other cases, whole counties (e.g., Harding, Quay, and DeBaca) are combined to create a single small area. Please, note that some data queries and displays might be available only to those with restricted-access permissions. NMTracking maps display a background with a New Mexico base map option. Both background maps are served from &copy; Thunderforest (www.thunderforest.com) and &copy; OpenStreetMap contributors (http://www.openstreetmap.org/copyright).</procdesc>
    9494<procdate>20170105</procdate>
    9595</procstep>
  • adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/epht-view-content/xml/metadata/Brain_OtherCNSCancerIncidence.xml

    r13364 r13393  
    101101Please note that some data queries and displays might be available only to those with restricted-access permissions.&#13;
    102102&#13;
    103 Mapped results for the interactive data query include options for a background with an NM base map or shaded relief. Both background maps are served from the NM Resource Geographic Information System (NM RGIS,&#13;
    104 rgis.unm.edu) or other servers hosted at UNM Earth Data Analysis Center.</procdesc>
     103NMTracking maps display a background with a New Mexico base map option. Both background maps are served from &copy; Thunderforest (www.thunderforest.com) and &copy; OpenStreetMap contributors (http://www.openstreetmap.org/copyright).</procdesc>
    105104<procdate>20170105</procdate>
    106105</procstep>
  • adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/epht-view-content/xml/metadata/EsophagusCancerIncidence.xml

    r13364 r13393  
    9191</procstep>
    9292<procstep>
    93 <procdesc>NM EPHT data queries through nmtracking.org (NMTracking) result in query-specific data sets that are aggregated by geographic unit. These aggregated data are dynamically joined to boundary data sets for display in the NMTracking interactive map. Boundaries are for County, Census Tract, and Small Areas and are created using U.S. Census 2010 boundary data. The Small Areas data set consists of combined Census tracts and was developed at the NM Department of Health. New Mexico Small Areas are 108 geographic areas across the state with population size that is just large enough to calculate rates for selected health events (e.g., asthma mortality, female breast cancer incidence). Most (95%) New Mexico small-area population sizes range from 9,000 to 30,000 persons. Some counties have multiple small areas (e.g., Bernalillo County has 34 small areas within its boundaries). In other cases, whole counties (e.g., Harding, Quay, and DeBaca) are combined to create a single small area. Please, note that some data queries and displays might be available only to those with restricted-access permissions. Mapped results for the interactive data query include options for a background with an NM base map or shaded relief. Both background maps are served from the NM Resource Geographic Information System (NM RGIS, rgis.unm.edu) or other servers hosted at UNM Earth Data Analysis Center.</procdesc>
     93<procdesc>NM EPHT data queries through nmtracking.org (NMTracking) result in query-specific data sets that are aggregated by geographic unit. These aggregated data are dynamically joined to boundary data sets for display in the NMTracking interactive map. Boundaries are for County, Census Tract, and Small Areas and are created using U.S. Census 2010 boundary data. The Small Areas data set consists of combined Census tracts and was developed at the NM Department of Health. New Mexico Small Areas are 108 geographic areas across the state with population size that is just large enough to calculate rates for selected health events (e.g., asthma mortality, female breast cancer incidence). Most (95%) New Mexico small-area population sizes range from 9,000 to 30,000 persons. Some counties have multiple small areas (e.g., Bernalillo County has 34 small areas within its boundaries). In other cases, whole counties (e.g., Harding, Quay, and DeBaca) are combined to create a single small area. Please, note that some data queries and displays might be available only to those with restricted-access permissions. NMTracking maps display a background with a New Mexico base map option. Both background maps are served from &copy; Thunderforest (www.thunderforest.com) and &copy; OpenStreetMap contributors (http://www.openstreetmap.org/copyright).</procdesc>
    9494<procdate>20170105</procdate>
    9595</procstep>
  • adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/epht-view-content/xml/metadata/FemaleBreastCancerIncidence.xml

    r13364 r13393  
    106106to those with restricted-access permissions.&#13;
    107107&#13;
    108 Mapped results for the interactive data query include options for a&#13;
    109 background with an NM base map or shaded relief. Both background maps&#13;
    110 are served from the NM Resource Geographic Information System (NM RGIS,&#13;
    111 rgis.unm.edu) or other servers hosted at UNM Earth Data Analysis Center.&#13;
     108NMTracking maps display a background with a New Mexico base map option. Both background maps are served from &copy; Thunderforest (www.thunderforest.com) and &copy; OpenStreetMap contributors (http://www.openstreetmap.org/copyright).&#13;
    112109</procdesc>
    113110<procdate>20170105</procdate>
  • adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/epht-view-content/xml/metadata/Kidney_and_RenalPelvis_CancerIncidence.xml

    r13364 r13393  
    9090</procstep>
    9191<procstep>
    92 <procdesc>NM EPHT data queries through nmtracking.org (NMTracking) result in query-specific data sets that are aggregated by geographic unit. These aggregated data are dynamically joined to boundary data sets for display in the NMTracking interactive map. Boundaries are for County, Census Tract, and Small Areas and are created using U.S. Census 2010 boundary data. The Small Areas data set consists of combined Census tracts and was developed at the NM Department of Health. New Mexico Small Areas are 108 geographic areas across the state with population size that is just large enough to calculate rates for selected health events (e.g., asthma mortality, female breast cancer incidence). Most (95%) New Mexico small-area population sizes range from 9,000 to 30,000 persons. Some counties have multiple small areas (e.g., Bernalillo County has 34 small areas within its boundaries). In other cases, whole counties (e.g., Harding, Quay, and De Baca) are combined to create a single small area. Please, note that some data queries and displays might be available only to those with restricted-access permissions. Mapped results for the interactive data query include options for a background with an NM base map or shaded relief. Both background maps are served from the NM Resource Geographic Information System (NM RGIS, rgis.unm.edu) or other servers hosted at UNM Earth Data Analysis Center.</procdesc>
     92<procdesc>NM EPHT data queries through nmtracking.org (NMTracking) result in query-specific data sets that are aggregated by geographic unit. These aggregated data are dynamically joined to boundary data sets for display in the NMTracking interactive map. Boundaries are for County, Census Tract, and Small Areas and are created using U.S. Census 2010 boundary data. The Small Areas data set consists of combined Census tracts and was developed at the NM Department of Health. New Mexico Small Areas are 108 geographic areas across the state with population size that is just large enough to calculate rates for selected health events (e.g., asthma mortality, female breast cancer incidence). Most (95%) New Mexico small-area population sizes range from 9,000 to 30,000 persons. Some counties have multiple small areas (e.g., Bernalillo County has 34 small areas within its boundaries). In other cases, whole counties (e.g., Harding, Quay, and De Baca) are combined to create a single small area. Please, note that some data queries and displays might be available only to those with restricted-access permissions. NMTracking maps display a background with a New Mexico base map option. Both background maps are served from &copy; Thunderforest (www.thunderforest.com) and &copy; OpenStreetMap contributors (http://www.openstreetmap.org/copyright).</procdesc>
    9393<procdate>20170105</procdate>
    9494</procstep>
  • adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/epht-view-content/xml/metadata/LarynxCancerIncidence.xml

    r13364 r13393  
    9191</procstep>
    9292<procstep>
    93 <procdesc>NM EPHT data queries through nmtracking.org (NMTracking) result in query-specific data sets that are aggregated by geographic unit. These aggregated data are dynamically joined to boundary data sets for display in the NMTracking interactive map. Boundaries are for County, Census Tract, and Small Areas and are created using U.S. Census 2010 boundary data. The Small Areas data set consists of combined Census tracts and was developed at the NM Department of Health. New Mexico Small Areas are 108 geographic areas across the state with population size that is just large enough to calculate rates for selected health events (e.g., asthma mortality, female breast cancer incidence). Most (95%) New Mexico small-area population sizes range from 9,000 to 30,000 persons. Some counties have multiple small areas (e.g., Bernalillo County has 34 small areas within its boundaries). In other cases, whole counties (e.g., Harding, Quay, and DeBaca) are combined to create a single small area. Please, note that some data queries and displays might be available only to those with restricted-access permissions. Mapped results for the interactive data query include options for a background with an NM base map or shaded relief. Both background maps are served from the NM Resource Geographic Information System (NM RGIS, rgis.unm.edu) or other servers hosted at UNM Earth Data Analysis Center.</procdesc>
     93<procdesc>NM EPHT data queries through nmtracking.org (NMTracking) result in query-specific data sets that are aggregated by geographic unit. These aggregated data are dynamically joined to boundary data sets for display in the NMTracking interactive map. Boundaries are for County, Census Tract, and Small Areas and are created using U.S. Census 2010 boundary data. The Small Areas data set consists of combined Census tracts and was developed at the NM Department of Health. New Mexico Small Areas are 108 geographic areas across the state with population size that is just large enough to calculate rates for selected health events (e.g., asthma mortality, female breast cancer incidence). Most (95%) New Mexico small-area population sizes range from 9,000 to 30,000 persons. Some counties have multiple small areas (e.g., Bernalillo County has 34 small areas within its boundaries). In other cases, whole counties (e.g., Harding, Quay, and DeBaca) are combined to create a single small area. Please, note that some data queries and displays might be available only to those with restricted-access permissions. NMTracking maps display a background with a New Mexico base map option. Both background maps are served from &copy; Thunderforest (www.thunderforest.com) and &copy; OpenStreetMap contributors (http://www.openstreetmap.org/copyright).</procdesc>
    9494<procdate>20150216</procdate>
    9595</procstep>
  • adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/epht-view-content/xml/metadata/LeukemiaIncidence.xml

    r13364 r13393  
    9292</procstep>
    9393<procstep>
    94 <procdesc>NM EPHT data queries through nmtracking.org (NMTracking) result in query-specific data sets that are aggregated by geographic unit. These aggregated data are dynamically joined to boundary data sets for display in the NMTracking interactive map. Boundaries are for County, Census Tract, and Small Areas and are created using U.S. Census 2010 boundary data.&#13;
    95 &#13;
    96 The Small Areas data set consists of combined Census tracts and was developed at the NM Department of Health. New Mexico Small Areas are 108 geographic areas across the state with population size that is just large enough to calculate rates for selected health events (e.g., asthma&#13;
    97 mortality, female breast cancer incidence). Most (95%) New Mexico small-area population sizes range from 9,000 to 30,000 persons. Some counties have multiple small areas (e.g., Bernalillo County has 34 small areas within its boundaries). In other cases, whole counties (e.g.,&#13;
    98 Harding, Quay, and DeBaca) are combined to create a single small area.&#13;
    99 &#13;
    100 Please, note that some data queries and displays might be available only to those with restricted-access permissions.&#13;
    101 &#13;
    102 Mapped results for the interactive data query include options for a background with an NM base map or shaded relief. Both background maps are served from the NM Resource Geographic Information System (NM RGIS,&#13;
    103 rgis.unm.edu) or other servers hosted at UNM Earth Data Analysis Center.&#13;
     94<procdesc>NM EPHT data queries through nmtracking.org (NMTracking) result in query-specific data sets that are aggregated by geographic unit. These aggregated data are dynamically joined to boundary data sets for display in the NMTracking interactive map. Boundaries are for County, Census Tract, and Small Areas and are created using U.S. Census 2010 boundary data. The Small Areas data set consists of combined Census tracts and was developed at the NM Department of Health. New Mexico Small Areas are 108 geographic areas across the state with population size that is just large enough to calculate rates for selected health events (e.g., asthma mortality, female breast cancer incidence). Most (95%) New Mexico small-area population sizes range from 9,000 to 30,000 persons. Some counties have multiple small areas (e.g., Bernalillo County has 34 small areas within its boundaries). In other cases, whole counties (e.g., Harding, Quay, and DeBaca) are combined to create a single small area. Please, note that some data queries and displays might be available only to those with restricted-access permissions. NMTracking maps display a background with a New Mexico base map option. Both background maps are served from &copy; Thunderforest (www.thunderforest.com) and &copy; OpenStreetMap contributors (http://www.openstreetmap.org/copyright).
    10495</procdesc>
    10596<procdate>20170105</procdate>
  • adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/epht-view-content/xml/metadata/Liver_and_BileDuct_CancerIncidence.xml

    r13364 r13393  
    9090</procstep>
    9191<procstep>
    92 <procdesc>NM EPHT data queries through nmtracking.org (NMTracking) result in query-specific data sets that are aggregated by geographic unit. These aggregated data are dynamically joined to boundary data sets for display in the NMTracking interactive map. Boundaries are for County, Census Tract, and Small Areas and are created using U.S. Census 2010 boundary data. The Small Areas data set consists of combined Census tracts and was developed at the NM Department of Health. New Mexico Small Areas are 108 geographic areas across the state with population size that is just large enough to calculate rates for selected health events (e.g., asthma mortality, female breast cancer incidence). Most (95%) New Mexico small-area population sizes range from 9,000 to 30,000 persons. Some counties have multiple small areas (e.g., Bernalillo County has 34 small areas within its boundaries). In other cases, whole counties (e.g., Harding, Quay, and DeBaca) are combined to create a single small area. Please, note that some data queries and displays might be available only to those with restricted-access permissions. Mapped results for the interactive data query include options for a background with an NM base map or shaded relief. Both background maps are served from the NM Resource Geographic Information System (NM RGIS, rgis.unm.edu) or other servers hosted at UNM Earth Data Analysis Center.</procdesc>
     92<procdesc>NM EPHT data queries through nmtracking.org (NMTracking) result in query-specific data sets that are aggregated by geographic unit. These aggregated data are dynamically joined to boundary data sets for display in the NMTracking interactive map. Boundaries are for County, Census Tract, and Small Areas and are created using U.S. Census 2010 boundary data. The Small Areas data set consists of combined Census tracts and was developed at the NM Department of Health. New Mexico Small Areas are 108 geographic areas across the state with population size that is just large enough to calculate rates for selected health events (e.g., asthma mortality, female breast cancer incidence). Most (95%) New Mexico small-area population sizes range from 9,000 to 30,000 persons. Some counties have multiple small areas (e.g., Bernalillo County has 34 small areas within its boundaries). In other cases, whole counties (e.g., Harding, Quay, and DeBaca) are combined to create a single small area. Please, note that some data queries and displays might be available only to those with restricted-access permissions. NMTracking maps display a background with a New Mexico base map option. Both background maps are served from &copy; Thunderforest (www.thunderforest.com) and &copy; OpenStreetMap contributors (http://www.openstreetmap.org/copyright).</procdesc>
    9393<procdate>20170105</procdate>
    9494</procstep>
  • adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/epht-view-content/xml/metadata/LungCancerIncidence.xml

    r13364 r13393  
    9191</procstep>
    9292<procstep>
    93 <procdesc>NM EPHT data queries through nmtracking.org (NMTracking) result in query-specific data sets that are aggregated by geographic unit. These aggregated data are dynamically joined to boundary data sets for display in the NMTracking interactive map. Boundaries are for County, Census Tract, and Small Areas and are created using U.S. Census 2010 boundary data.&#13;
    94 &#13;
    95 The Small Areas data set consists of combined Census tracts and was developed at the NM Department of Health. New Mexico Small Areas are 108 geographic areas across the state with population size that is just large enough to calculate rates for selected health events (e.g., asthma&#13;
    96 mortality, female breast cancer incidence). Most (95%) New Mexico small-area population sizes range from 9,000 to 30,000 persons. Some counties have multiple small areas (e.g., Bernalillo County has 34 small areas within its boundaries). In other cases, whole counties (e.g.,&#13;
    97 Harding, Quay, and DeBaca) are combined to create a single small area.&#13;
    98 &#13;
    99 Please note that some data queries and displays might be available only to those with restricted-access permissions.&#13;
    100 &#13;
    101 Mapped results for the interactive data query include options for a background with an NM base map or shaded relief. Both background maps are served from the NM Resource Geographic Information System (NM RGIS,&#13;
    102 rgis.unm.edu) or other servers hosted at UNM Earth Data Analysis Center.</procdesc>
     93<procdesc>NM EPHT data queries through nmtracking.org (NMTracking) result in query-specific data sets that are aggregated by geographic unit. These aggregated data are dynamically joined to boundary data sets for display in the NMTracking interactive map. Boundaries are for County, Census Tract, and Small Areas and are created using U.S. Census 2010 boundary data. The Small Areas data set consists of combined Census tracts and was developed at the NM Department of Health. New Mexico Small Areas are 108 geographic areas across the state with population size that is just large enough to calculate rates for selected health events (e.g., asthma mortality, female breast cancer incidence). Most (95%) New Mexico small-area population sizes range from 9,000 to 30,000 persons. Some counties have multiple small areas (e.g., Bernalillo County has 34 small areas within its boundaries). In other cases, whole counties (e.g., Harding, Quay, and DeBaca) are combined to create a single small area. Please note that some data queries and displays might be available only to those with restricted-access permissions. NMTracking maps display a background with a New Mexico base map option. Both background maps are served from &copy; Thunderforest (www.thunderforest.com) and &copy; OpenStreetMap contributors (http://www.openstreetmap.org/copyright).</procdesc>
    10394<procdate>20170105</procdate>
    10495</procstep>
  • adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/epht-view-content/xml/metadata/Melanoma_Incidence.xml

    r13364 r13393  
    9090</procstep>
    9191<procstep>
    92 <procdesc>NM EPHT data queries through nmtracking.org (NMTracking) result in query-specific data sets that are aggregated by geographic unit. These aggregated data are dynamically joined to boundary data sets for display in the NMTracking interactive map. Boundaries are for County, Census Tract, and Small Areas and are created using U.S. Census 2010 boundary data. The Small Areas data set consists of combined Census tracts and was developed at the NM Department of Health. New Mexico Small Areas are 108 geographic areas across the state with population size that is just large enough to calculate rates for selected health events (e.g., asthma mortality, female breast cancer incidence). Most (95%) New Mexico small-area population sizes range from 9,000 to 30,000 persons. Some counties have multiple small areas (e.g., Bernalillo County has 34 small areas within its boundaries). In other cases, whole counties (e.g., Harding, Quay, and DeBaca) are combined to create a single small area. Please, note that some data queries and displays might be available only to those with restricted-access permissions. Mapped results for the interactive data query include options for a background with an NM base map or shaded relief. Both background maps are served from the NM Resource Geographic Information System (NM RGIS, rgis.unm.edu) or other servers hosted at UNM Earth Data Analysis Center.</procdesc>
     92<procdesc>NM EPHT data queries through nmtracking.org (NMTracking) result in query-specific data sets that are aggregated by geographic unit. These aggregated data are dynamically joined to boundary data sets for display in the NMTracking interactive map. Boundaries are for County, Census Tract, and Small Areas and are created using U.S. Census 2010 boundary data. The Small Areas data set consists of combined Census tracts and was developed at the NM Department of Health. New Mexico Small Areas are 108 geographic areas across the state with population size that is just large enough to calculate rates for selected health events (e.g., asthma mortality, female breast cancer incidence). Most (95%) New Mexico small-area population sizes range from 9,000 to 30,000 persons. Some counties have multiple small areas (e.g., Bernalillo County has 34 small areas within its boundaries). In other cases, whole counties (e.g., Harding, Quay, and DeBaca) are combined to create a single small area. Please, note that some data queries and displays might be available only to those with restricted-access permissions. NMTracking maps display a background with a New Mexico base map option. Both background maps are served from &copy; Thunderforest (www.thunderforest.com) and &copy; OpenStreetMap contributors (http://www.openstreetmap.org/copyright).</procdesc>
    9393<procdate>20170105</procdate>
    9494</procstep>
  • adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/epht-view-content/xml/metadata/Mesothelioma_Incidence.xml

    r13364 r13393  
    9090</procstep>
    9191<procstep>
    92 <procdesc>NM EPHT data queries through nmtracking.org (NMTracking) result in query-specific data sets that are aggregated by geographic unit. These aggregated data are dynamically joined to boundary data sets for display in the NMTracking interactive map. Boundaries are for County, Census Tract, and Small Areas and are created using U.S. Census 2010 boundary data. The Small Areas data set consists of combined Census tracts and was developed at the NM Department of Health. New Mexico Small Areas are 108 geographic areas across the state with population size that is just large enough to calculate rates for selected health events (e.g., asthma mortality, female breast cancer incidence). Most (95%) New Mexico small-area population sizes range from 9,000 to 30,000 persons. Some counties have multiple small areas (e.g., Bernalillo County has 34 small areas within its boundaries). In other cases, whole counties (e.g., Harding, Quay, and DeBaca) are combined to create a single small area. Please, note that some data queries and displays might be available only to those with restricted-access permissions. Mapped results for the interactive data query include options for a background with an NM base map or shaded relief. Both background maps are served from the NM Resource Geographic Information System (NM RGIS, rgis.unm.edu) or other servers hosted at UNM Earth Data Analysis Center.</procdesc>
     92<procdesc>NM EPHT data queries through nmtracking.org (NMTracking) result in query-specific data sets that are aggregated by geographic unit. These aggregated data are dynamically joined to boundary data sets for display in the NMTracking interactive map. Boundaries are for County, Census Tract, and Small Areas and are created using U.S. Census 2010 boundary data. The Small Areas data set consists of combined Census tracts and was developed at the NM Department of Health. New Mexico Small Areas are 108 geographic areas across the state with population size that is just large enough to calculate rates for selected health events (e.g., asthma mortality, female breast cancer incidence). Most (95%) New Mexico small-area population sizes range from 9,000 to 30,000 persons. Some counties have multiple small areas (e.g., Bernalillo County has 34 small areas within its boundaries). In other cases, whole counties (e.g., Harding, Quay, and DeBaca) are combined to create a single small area. Please, note that some data queries and displays might be available only to those with restricted-access permissions. NMTracking maps display a background with a New Mexico base map option. Both background maps are served from &copy; Thunderforest (www.thunderforest.com) and &copy; OpenStreetMap contributors (http://www.openstreetmap.org/copyright).</procdesc>
    9393<procdate>20170105</procdate>
    9494</procstep>
  • adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/epht-view-content/xml/metadata/NonHodgkinsLymphomaIncidence.xml

    r13364 r13393  
    9292</procstep>
    9393<procstep>
    94 <procdesc>NM EPHT data queries through nmtracking.org (NMTracking) result in query-specific data sets that are aggregated by geographic unit. These aggregated data are dynamically joined to boundary data sets for display in the NMTracking interactive map. Boundaries are for County, Census&#13;
    95 Tract, and Small Areas and are created using U.S. Census 2010 boundary data.&#13;
    96 &#13;
    97 The Small Areas data set consists of combined Census tracts and was developed at the NM Department of Health. New Mexico Small Areas are 108 geographic areas across the state with population size that is just large enough to calculate rates for selected health events (e.g., asthma&#13;
    98 mortality, female breast cancer incidence). Most (95%) New Mexico small-area population sizes range from 9,000 to 30,000 persons. Some counties have multiple small areas (e.g., Bernalillo County has 34 small areas within its boundaries). In other cases, whole counties (e.g.,&#13;
    99 Harding, Quay, and DeBaca) are combined to create a single small area.&#13;
    100 &#13;
    101 Please note that some data queries and displays might be available only to those with restricted-access permissions.&#13;
    102 &#13;
    103 Mapped results for the interactive data query include options for a background with an NM base map or shaded relief. Both background maps are served from the NM Resource Geographic Information System (NM RGIS,&#13;
    104 rgis.unm.edu) or other servers hosted at UNM Earth Data Analysis Center.</procdesc>
     94<procdesc>NM EPHT data queries through nmtracking.org (NMTracking) result in query-specific data sets that are aggregated by geographic unit. These aggregated data are dynamically joined to boundary data sets for display in the NMTracking interactive map. Boundaries are for County, Census Tract, and Small Areas and are created using U.S. Census 2010 boundary data. The Small Areas data set consists of combined Census tracts and was developed at the NM Department of Health. New Mexico Small Areas are 108 geographic areas across the state with population size that is just large enough to calculate rates for selected health events (e.g., asthma mortality, female breast cancer incidence). Most (95%) New Mexico small-area population sizes range from 9,000 to 30,000 persons. Some counties have multiple small areas (e.g., Bernalillo County has 34 small areas within its boundaries). In other cases, whole counties (e.g., Harding, Quay, and DeBaca) are combined to create a single small area. Please note that some data queries and displays might be available only to those with restricted-access permissions. NMTracking maps display a background with a New Mexico base map option. Both background maps are served from &copy; Thunderforest (www.thunderforest.com) and &copy; OpenStreetMap contributors (http://www.openstreetmap.org/copyright).</procdesc>
    10595<procdate>20170105</procdate>
    10696</procstep>
  • adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/epht-view-content/xml/metadata/OropharynxCancerIncidence.xml

    r13364 r13393  
    9191</procstep>
    9292<procstep>
    93 <procdesc>NM EPHT data queries through nmtracking.org (NMTracking) result in query-specific data sets that are aggregated by geographic unit. These aggregated data are dynamically joined to boundary data sets for display in the NMTracking interactive map. Boundaries are for County, Census Tract, and Small Areas and are created using U.S. Census 2010 boundary data. The Small Areas data set consists of combined Census tracts and was developed at the NM Department of Health. New Mexico Small Areas are 108 geographic areas across the state with population size that is just large enough to calculate rates for selected health events (e.g., asthma mortality, female breast cancer incidence). Most (95%) New Mexico small-area population sizes range from 9,000 to 30,000 persons. Some counties have multiple small areas (e.g., Bernalillo County has 34 small areas within its boundaries). In other cases, whole counties (e.g., Harding, Quay, and DeBaca) are combined to create a single small area. Please, note that some data queries and displays might be available only to those with restricted-access permissions. Mapped results for the interactive data query include options for a background with an NM base map or shaded relief. Both background maps are served from the NM Resource Geographic Information System (NM RGIS, rgis.unm.edu) or other servers hosted at UNM Earth Data Analysis Center.</procdesc>
     93<procdesc>NM EPHT data queries through nmtracking.org (NMTracking) result in query-specific data sets that are aggregated by geographic unit. These aggregated data are dynamically joined to boundary data sets for display in the NMTracking interactive map. Boundaries are for County, Census Tract, and Small Areas and are created using U.S. Census 2010 boundary data. The Small Areas data set consists of combined Census tracts and was developed at the NM Department of Health. New Mexico Small Areas are 108 geographic areas across the state with population size that is just large enough to calculate rates for selected health events (e.g., asthma mortality, female breast cancer incidence). Most (95%) New Mexico small-area population sizes range from 9,000 to 30,000 persons. Some counties have multiple small areas (e.g., Bernalillo County has 34 small areas within its boundaries). In other cases, whole counties (e.g., Harding, Quay, and DeBaca) are combined to create a single small area. Please, note that some data queries and displays might be available only to those with restricted-access permissions. NMTracking maps display a background with a New Mexico base map option. Both background maps are served from &copy; Thunderforest (www.thunderforest.com) and &copy; OpenStreetMap contributors (http://www.openstreetmap.org/copyright).</procdesc>
    9494<procdate>20170105</procdate>
    9595</procstep>
  • adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/epht-view-content/xml/metadata/PancreasCancerIncidence.xml

    r13364 r13393  
    9191</procstep>
    9292<procstep>
    93 <procdesc>NM EPHT data queries through nmtracking.org (NMTracking) result in query-specific data sets that are aggregated by geographic unit. These aggregated data are dynamically joined to boundary data sets for display in the NMTracking interactive map. Boundaries are for County, Census Tract, and Small Areas and are created using U.S. Census 2010 boundary data. The Small Areas data set consists of combined Census tracts and was developed at the NM Department of Health. New Mexico Small Areas are 108 geographic areas across the state with population size that is just large enough to calculate rates for selected health events (e.g., asthma mortality, female breast cancer incidence). Most (95%) New Mexico small-area population sizes range from 9,000 to 30,000 persons. Some counties have multiple small areas (e.g., Bernalillo County has 34 small areas within its boundaries). In other cases, whole counties (e.g., Harding, Quay, and DeBaca) are combined to create a single small area. Please, note that some data queries and displays might be available only to those with restricted-access permissions. Mapped results for the interactive data query include options for a background with an NM base map or shaded relief. Both background maps are served from the NM Resource Geographic Information System (NM RGIS, rgis.unm.edu) or other servers hosted at UNM Earth Data Analysis Center.</procdesc>
     93<procdesc>NM EPHT data queries through nmtracking.org (NMTracking) result in query-specific data sets that are aggregated by geographic unit. These aggregated data are dynamically joined to boundary data sets for display in the NMTracking interactive map. Boundaries are for County, Census Tract, and Small Areas and are created using U.S. Census 2010 boundary data. The Small Areas data set consists of combined Census tracts and was developed at the NM Department of Health. New Mexico Small Areas are 108 geographic areas across the state with population size that is just large enough to calculate rates for selected health events (e.g., asthma mortality, female breast cancer incidence). Most (95%) New Mexico small-area population sizes range from 9,000 to 30,000 persons. Some counties have multiple small areas (e.g., Bernalillo County has 34 small areas within its boundaries). In other cases, whole counties (e.g., Harding, Quay, and DeBaca) are combined to create a single small area. Please, note that some data queries and displays might be available only to those with restricted-access permissions. NMTracking maps display a background with a New Mexico base map option. Both background maps are served from &copy; Thunderforest (www.thunderforest.com) and &copy; OpenStreetMap contributors (http://www.openstreetmap.org/copyright).</procdesc>
    9494<procdate>20170105</procdate>
    9595</procstep>
  • adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/epht-view-content/xml/metadata/PercentLBWBirths.xml

    r13364 r13393  
    9797</procstep>
    9898<procstep>
    99 <procdesc>NM EPHT data queries through nmtracking.org (NMTracking) result in
    100 query-specific data sets that are aggregated by geographic unit. These
    101 aggregated data are dynamically joined to boundary data sets for display
    102 in the NMTracking interactive map. Boundaries are for County, Census
    103 Tract, and Small Areas and are created using U.S. Census 2010 boundary
    104 data.
    105 
    106 The Small Areas data set consists of combined Census tracts and was
    107 developed at the NM Department of Health. New Mexico Small Areas are 109
    108 geographic areas across the state with population size that is just
    109 large enough to calculate rates for selected health events (e.g., asthma
    110 mortality, female breast cancer incidence). Most (95%) New Mexico
    111 small-area population sizes range from 9,000 to 30,000 persons. Some
    112 counties have multiple small areas (e.g., Bernalillo County has 34 small
    113 areas within its boundaries). In other cases, whole counties (e.g.,
    114 Harding, Quay, and DeBaca) are combined to create a single small area.
    115 
    116 Please note that some data queries and displays might be available only
    117 to those with restricted-access permissions.
    118 
    119 Mapped results for the interactive data query include options for a
    120 background with an NM base map or shaded relief. Both background maps
    121 are served from the NM Resource Geographic Information System (NM RGIS,
    122 rgis.unm.edu) or other servers hosted at UNM Earth Data Analysis Center.
     99<procdesc>NM EPHT data queries through nmtracking.org (NMTracking) result in query-specific data sets that are aggregated by geographic unit. These aggregated data are dynamically joined to boundary data sets for display in the NMTracking interactive map. Boundaries are for County, Census Tract, and Small Areas and are created using U.S. Census 2010 boundary data. The Small Areas data set consists of combined Census tracts and was developed at the NM Department of Health. New Mexico Small Areas are 109 geographic areas across the state with population size that is just large enough to calculate rates for selected health events (e.g., asthma mortality, female breast cancer incidence). Most (95%) New Mexico small-area population sizes range from 9,000 to 30,000 persons. Some counties have multiple small areas (e.g., Bernalillo County has 34 small areas within its boundaries). In other cases, whole counties (e.g., Harding, Quay, and DeBaca) are combined to create a single small area. Please note that some data queries and displays might be available only to those with restricted-access permissions. NMTracking maps display a background with a New Mexico base map option. Both background maps are served from &copy; Thunderforest (www.thunderforest.com) and &copy; OpenStreetMap contributors (http://www.openstreetmap.org/copyright).
    123100</procdesc>
    124101<procdate>20170105</procdate>
  • adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/epht-view-content/xml/metadata/ThyroidCancerIncidence.xml

    r13364 r13393  
    9191</procstep>
    9292<procstep>
    93 <procdesc>NM EPHT data queries through nmtracking.org (NMTracking) result in query-specific data sets that are aggregated by geographic unit. These aggregated data are dynamically joined to boundary data sets for display in the NMTracking interactive map. Boundaries are for County, Census Tract, and Small Areas and are created using U.S. Census 2010 boundary data.&#13;
    94 &#13;
    95 The Small Areas data set consists of combined Census tracts and was developed at the NM Department of Health. New Mexico Small Areas are 108 geographic areas across the state with population size that is just large enough to calculate rates for selected health events (e.g., asthma&#13;
    96 mortality, female breast cancer incidence). Most (95%) New Mexico small-area population sizes range from 9,000 to 30,000 persons. Some counties have multiple small areas (e.g., Bernalillo County has 34 small areas within its boundaries). In other cases, whole counties (e.g.,&#13;
    97 Harding, Quay, and DeBaca) are combined to create a single small area.&#13;
    98 &#13;
    99 Please note that some data queries and displays might be available only to those with restricted-access permissions.&#13;
    100 &#13;
    101 Mapped results for the interactive data query include options for a background with an NM base map or shaded relief. Both background maps are served from the NM Resource Geographic Information System (NM RGIS,&#13;
    102 rgis.unm.edu) or other servers hosted at UNM Earth Data Analysis Center.</procdesc>
     93<procdesc>NM EPHT data queries through nmtracking.org (NMTracking) result in query-specific data sets that are aggregated by geographic unit. These aggregated data are dynamically joined to boundary data sets for display in the NMTracking interactive map. Boundaries are for County, Census Tract, and Small Areas and are created using U.S. Census 2010 boundary data. The Small Areas data set consists of combined Census tracts and was developed at the NM Department of Health. New Mexico Small Areas are 108 geographic areas across the state with population size that is just large enough to calculate rates for selected health events (e.g., asthma mortality, female breast cancer incidence). Most (95%) New Mexico small-area population sizes range from 9,000 to 30,000 persons. Some counties have multiple small areas (e.g., Bernalillo County has 34 small areas within its boundaries). In other cases, whole counties (e.g., Harding, Quay, and DeBaca) are combined to create a single small area. Please note that some data queries and displays might be available only to those with restricted-access permissions. NMTracking maps display a background with a New Mexico base map option. Both background maps are served from &copy; Thunderforest (www.thunderforest.com) and &copy; OpenStreetMap contributors (http://www.openstreetmap.org/copyright).</procdesc>
    10394<procdate>20170105</procdate>
    10495</procstep>
  • adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/epht-view-content/xml/query/module/fire/Fire.xml

    r13291 r13393  
    1010                <versions>
    1111                        <version><date>02.09.2017</date><who>Jason</who><description>initial query development</description></version>
     12                        <version><date>03.06.2017</date><who>Jason</who><description>split single query into two queries</description></version>
    1213                </versions>
    1314        </ibis:doc>
    1415
    1516        <NAME>Fire</NAME>
    16         <TITLE>Wildfire: Acres Burned and Number of Large Fires</TITLE>
    1717        <DESCRIPTION>Fire 1992-2013</DESCRIPTION>
    1818        <KEYWORDS>Fire Climate Environment Climate Change</KEYWORDS>
     
    3939        <CONFIGURATIONS>
    4040                <CONFIGURATION>
    41                         <NAME>Fire</NAME>
    42                         <DESCRIPTION>Acres Burned and Number of Fires</DESCRIPTION>
     41                        <NAME>AcresBurned</NAME>
     42                        <TITLE>Acres Burned by Wildfires</TITLE>
     43                        <DESCRIPTION>Acres Burned</DESCRIPTION>
    4344                        <DEFAULT_MEASURE_NAME>Count</DEFAULT_MEASURE_NAME>
    4445                        <DEFAULT_CATEGORY_DIMENSION_NAME>GeoProxy</DEFAULT_CATEGORY_DIMENSION_NAME>
     
    4647                                <MEASURE>
    4748                                        <NAME>Count</NAME>
    48                                         <TITLE>Value</TITLE>
    49                                         <DESCRIPTION>Annual number of acres burned and large fires by year and county</DESCRIPTION>
     49                                        <TITLE>Acres burned</TITLE>
     50                                        <DESCRIPTION>Acres burned by year and county</DESCRIPTION>
    5051                                        <XSLT_FORMAT_PATTERN>,##0</XSLT_FORMAT_PATTERN>
    5152                                </MEASURE>
     
    5455                                <PARAMETER>
    5556                                        <NAME>func</NAME>
    56                                         <VALUE>Count.def</VALUE>
     57                                        <VALUE>acres.def</VALUE>
     58                                </PARAMETER>
     59                        </PARAMETERS>
     60                        <DATA_NOTES>
     61                                <ibis:include href="data_note/Fire.xml"/>
     62                        </DATA_NOTES>
     63                        <DATA_SOURCES>
     64                                <ibis:include href="data_source/USFS.xml"/>
     65                        </DATA_SOURCES>
     66                        <DATA_ISSUES>
     67                                <ibis:include href="data_issue/USFS.xml"/>
     68                        </DATA_ISSUES>
     69                </CONFIGURATION>
     70
     71                <CONFIGURATION>
     72                        <NAME>NumberWildfires</NAME>
     73                        <TITLE>Number of Wildfires over 100 acres</TITLE>
     74                        <DESCRIPTION>Number of Wildfires over 100 acres</DESCRIPTION>
     75                        <DEFAULT_MEASURE_NAME>Count</DEFAULT_MEASURE_NAME>
     76                        <DEFAULT_CATEGORY_DIMENSION_NAME>GeoProxy</DEFAULT_CATEGORY_DIMENSION_NAME>
     77                        <MEASURES>
     78                                <MEASURE>
     79                                        <NAME>Count</NAME>
     80                                        <TITLE>Number of wildfires over 100 acres</TITLE>
     81                                        <DESCRIPTION>Number of wildfires over 100 acres by year and county</DESCRIPTION>
     82                                        <XSLT_FORMAT_PATTERN>,##0</XSLT_FORMAT_PATTERN>
     83                                </MEASURE>
     84                        </MEASURES>
     85                        <PARAMETERS>
     86                                <PARAMETER>
     87                                        <NAME>func</NAME>
     88                                        <VALUE>number_fires.def</VALUE>
    5789                                </PARAMETER>
    5890                        </PARAMETERS>
     
    76108                        <ibis:include href="section/GeoCnty.xml"/>
    77109                        <ibis:include href="section/Year.xml"/>
    78                         <ibis:include href="section/Metric.xml"/>
    79110                </SECTIONS>
    80111        </CRITERIA>
     
    85116                <ibis:include href="dimension/YearProxy.xml"/>
    86117                <ibis:include href="dimension/Year.xml"/>
    87                 <ibis:include href="dimension/MetricProxy.xml"/>
    88                 <ibis:include href="dimension/Metric.xml"/>
    89118        </DIMENSIONS>
    90119       
  • adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/epht-view-content/xml/query/module/fire/data_issue/USFS.xml

    r13271 r13393  
    44        <NAME>NLDAS</NAME>             
    55        <TEXT>
    6         These data were provided as centroids (i.e. the location of the fire was identified using the point at the center of that fire's burn area). Those centroid coordinates were then used to assign each fire to a county. As such, fires that spanned more than one county are presented here as only having occurred in the county where the most burned acreage occurred.
     6        These data were provided as centroids (i.e., the location of the fire was identified using the point at the center of that fire's burn area). Those centroid coordinates were then used to assign each fire to a county. As such, fires that spanned more than one county are presented here as only having occurred in the county where the most burned acreage occurred.
    77        <br/>
    88        <br/>
  • adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/epht-view-content/xml/query/module/fire/dimension/GeoCnty.xml

    r13271 r13393  
    3939                <VALUE>59<TITLE>Union</TITLE></VALUE>
    4040                <VALUE>61<TITLE>Valencia</TITLE></VALUE>
    41                 <VALUE>99<TITLE>Unknown</TITLE><NOT_SELECTABLE_FLAG/></VALUE>
    42                 <VALUE>.<TITLE>Total</TITLE><NOT_SELECTABLE_FLAG/></VALUE>
    4341        </VALUES>
    4442</DIMENSION>
  • adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/epht-view-content/xml/query/module/temperature/Temperature.xml

    r13296 r13393  
    4747                                <MEASURE>
    4848                                        <NAME>Count</NAME>
    49                                         <TITLE>Number of Days per Year</TITLE>
     49                                        <TITLE>Days per year over selected temperature or heat index threshold</TITLE>
    5050                                        <DESCRIPTION>Number of Days Over Temperature Thresholds by Year and County</DESCRIPTION>
    5151                                        <XSLT_FORMAT_PATTERN>,##0</XSLT_FORMAT_PATTERN>
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