Changeset 12444 in main


Ignore:
Timestamp:
12/04/16 14:57:39 (6 years ago)
Author:
Garth Braithwaite
Message:

nm epht - removed wiki from content files. Updated NMEPHT to NM EPHT.

Location:
adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/epht-view-content/xml
Files:
22 edited
1 moved

Legend:

Unmodified
Added
Removed
  • adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/epht-view-content/xml/html_content/about/resources/publications/Factsheets.xml

    r12357 r12444  
    44
    55        <TITLE>Factsheets</TITLE>
    6         <!-- the following script enables wiki formatting -->
    7                 <OTHER_HEAD_CONTENT>
    8                 <script type="text/javascript" ibis:src="js/jquery.wikitohtml.js"/>
    9                 <script type="text/javascript">
    10                         // <![CDATA[
    11                         $(document).ready(function()
    12                         {
    13                                 $(".Content").wikiToHTML();
    14                         }); //~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ End of Function ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    15                         // ]]>
    16                 </script>
    17                 </OTHER_HEAD_CONTENT>
     6
    187        <CONTENT>
    19        
    20                 View NM EPHT Program Factsheets:
    21                 <br/><br/>
     8                <h3>View NM EPHT Program Factsheets:</h3>
    229                <ibis:SelectionsList>
    2310                        <SELECTIONS>
  • adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/epht-view-content/xml/html_content/about/resources/publications/Introduction.xml

    r12357 r12444  
    55        <TITLE>Publications</TITLE>
    66        <!-- the following script enables wiki formatting -->
    7                 <OTHER_HEAD_CONTENT>
    8                 <script type="text/javascript" ibis:src="js/jquery.wikitohtml.js"/>
    9                 <script type="text/javascript">
    10                         // <![CDATA[
    11                         $(document).ready(function()
    12                         {
    13                                 $(".Content").wikiToHTML();
    14                         }); //~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ End of Function ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    15                         // ]]>
    16                 </script>
    17                 </OTHER_HEAD_CONTENT>
     7
    188        <CONTENT>
    19                 The Publications page provides users with access to documents online and in pdf format
    20                 avaliable from the NM EPHT Program. You need to have [https://get.adobe.com/reader/ Adobe Reader]
    21                 to read PDF files.
    22                 <br/><br/>
    23                 View NM EPHT Program publications:
    24                 <br/><br/>
     9                The Publications page provides users with access to documents online and
     10                in pdf format avaliable from the NM EPHT Program. You need to have
     11                <a href="https://get.adobe.com/reader/">Adobe Reader</a> to read PDF files.
     12
     13                <h3>View NM EPHT Program publications:</h3>
    2514                <ibis:SelectionsList>
    2615                        <SELECTIONS>
     
    4231                        </SELECTIONS>
    4332                </ibis:SelectionsList>
     33                <SHOW/>
    4434        </CONTENT>
    4535
  • adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/epht-view-content/xml/html_content/dataportal/Introduction.xml

    r12433 r12444  
    99
    1010        <TITLE>Data Portal</TITLE>
     11        <OTHER_HEAD_CONTENT>
     12                <style>
     13                        #content .Sections h2
     14                        {
     15                                margin-top: 0.5em !important;
     16                        }
     17                        p
     18                        {
     19                                margin-top: 1em !important;
     20                        }
     21                </style>
     22        </OTHER_HEAD_CONTENT>
    1123       
    12         <OTHER_HEAD_CONTENT>
    13                 <script type="text/javascript" ibis:src="js/jquery.wikitohtml.js"/>
    14                 <script type="text/javascript">
    15                         // <![CDATA[
    16                         $(document).ready(function()
    17                         {
    18                                 $(".Content").wikiToHTML();
    19                         }); //~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ End of Function ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    20                         // ]]>
    21                 </script>
    22         </OTHER_HEAD_CONTENT>
    23 
    2424        <CONTENT>
    25 
    26         Welcome to the New Mexico EPHT Data Portal. On this page you can quickly access all of the
    27         data offered on this website:
    28                
    29                 <h2><a ibis:href="dataportal/query/PublicDatasetIndex.html">Queryable Public Datasets</a></h2>
    30                 The public NMEPHT dataset portal provides "EPHT Topics" (contextual information), "Indicator Reports"
    31                 (contextual information along with charts and data values), and "Queryable Datasets"
    32                 (user-defined data criteria with limited textual information).
    33                 These public datasets contain non-sensitive, de-identified data values
    34                
    35                 '''Secure Datasets'''
    36                 Some NMEPHT datasets can be queried in such a way that sensitive, small population data results are possible.
    37                 Users wishing to access these datasets must apply for and receive authorization before access is granted.
    38                 See the <a ibis:href="user/SecureDatasetRegistration.html">Request Access to to Secure Datasets</a> page for more information about secure datasets.
    39                 <br/><br/>
    40                 You can also set up a <a ibis:href="user/Registration.html">MyEPHT account</a>, which allows you
    41                 to save preferences and custom query definitions for future reference.
    42                
    43                 <h2><a ibis:href="dataportal/metadata/Index.html">Metadata</a></h2>
    44                 Metadata are data about NMEPHT-acquired data and datasets. Once obtained, NMEPHT datasets are critically examined to fully characterize
    45                 and describe the data elements, including the content, quality, and geographic and temporal extent.
    46                 Exploring metadata is a way to discover data and learn about the NMEPHT datasets, specifically.
    47                 <br/><br/>
    48                 For more information about NMEPHT Metadata see the <a ibis:href="dataportal/metadata/Introduction.html">Metadata Introduction</a> page.
     25                Welcome to the New Mexico EPHT Data Portal. The NM EPHT website provides
     26                different types of data which ranges from highly textual "EPHT Topics"
     27                (contextual information about <a ibis:href="health/Introduction.html">Health</a>
     28                and <a ibis:href="environment/Introduction.html">Environment</a>) down to
     29                access to numerical datasets.  The dataportal provides access to the more
     30                detailed information, charts, maps, and data about our EPHT Topics.  The
     31                dataportal provides:
    4932               
    5033                <h2><a ibis:href="dataportal/indicator/Index.html">Indicators and Indicator Reports</a></h2>
    51                 NMEPHT indicators are numeric measures of the state or condition of the environment and/or population health as a result of exposures to the
    52                 environment or other factors that we want to track. Indicator Reports provide online numeric data combined with public health
    53                 context (such as why it is important and what is being done to improve it) for environmental factors (e.g., levels of ozone as a way of gauging air quality)
    54                 or health outcomes (e.g., emergency department visits for asthma) potentially related to those environmental factors along with charts and data values.
    55                 <br/><br/>
    56                 For more detailed information about Indicator Reports see the <a ibis:href="dataportal/indicator/Introduction.html">Indicator Reports Introduction</a> page.
     34                NM EPHT indicators are numeric measures of the state or condition of the
     35                environment and/or population health as a result of exposures to the
     36                environment or other factors that we want to track. Indicator Reports provide
     37                online numeric data combined with public health context (such as why it is
     38                important and what is being done to improve it) for environmental factors
     39                (e.g., levels of ozone as a way of gauging air quality) or health outcomes
     40                (e.g., emergency department visits for asthma) potentially related to those
     41                environmental factors along with charts, maps, and data values.
     42
     43                <p>For more detailed information about Indicator Reports see the
     44                <a ibis:href="dataportal/indicator/Introduction.html">Indicator Reports Introduction</a> page.
     45                </p>
     46
     47                <h2><a ibis:href="dataportal/query/PublicDatasetIndex.html">Queryable Public Datasets</a></h2>
     48                "Queryable Datasets" provides access to public, deidentified datasets with
     49                user-defined data criteria.  The resulant data has limited contextual information
     50                when compared to an indicator report but provides more flexibility when
     51                analyzing data.  These datasets are public and do not contain sensitive,
     52                personal identifiable data values.
     53
     54                <h2><a ibis:href="secure/selection/Index.html">Queryable Secure Datasets</a></h2>
     55                Some NM EPHT datasets can be queried in such a way that sensitive, small
     56                population data results are possible.  Users wishing to access these datasets
     57                must apply for and receive authorization before access is granted. See the
     58                <a ibis:href="user/SecureDatasetRegistration.html">Request Access to to
     59                Secure Datasets</a> page for more information about secure datasets.
     60                <br/><br/>
     61
     62                <h2><a ibis:href="dataportal/metadata/Index.html">Metadata</a></h2>
     63                Metadata are data about NM EPHT-acquired data and datasets. Once obtained,
     64                NM EPHT datasets are critically examined to fully characterize and describe
     65                the data elements, including the content, quality, and geographic and temporal
     66                extent.  Exploring metadata is a way to discover data and learn about the
     67                NM EPHT datasets, specifically.
     68
     69                <p>
     70                For more information about NM EPHT Metadata see the
     71                <a ibis:href="dataportal/metadata/Introduction.html">Metadata Introduction</a> page.
     72                </p>
    5773               
    58                
    59                
    60                
    61                
    62 </CONTENT>
     74                <h2><a ibis:href="user/Introduction.html">MyEPHT</a></h2>
     75                You can also set up a <a ibis:href="user/Registration.html">MyEPHT account</a>,
     76                which allows you to save preferences custom query definitions for future
     77                reference, or share them with others.
     78        </CONTENT>
    6379</HTML_CONTENT>
    6480
  • adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/epht-view-content/xml/html_content/dataportal/indicator/Introduction.xml

    r12433 r12444  
    88        </ibis:doc>
    99
    10         <TITLE>NMEPHT Indicator Reports</TITLE>
    11        
    12         <OTHER_HEAD_CONTENT>
    13                 <script type="text/javascript" ibis:src="js/jquery.wikitohtml.js"/>
    14                 <script type="text/javascript">
    15                         // <![CDATA[
    16                         $(document).ready(function()
    17                         {
    18                                 $(".Content").wikiToHTML();
    19                         }); //~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ End of Function ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    20                         // ]]>
    21                 </script>
    22         </OTHER_HEAD_CONTENT>   
     10        <TITLE>NM EPHT Indicator Reports</TITLE>
    2311       
    2412        <CONTENT>
     13                NM EPHT indicators are numeric measures of the state or condition of the environment and/or population health as a result of exposures to
     14                the environment or other factors that we want to track.   They help the NM EPHT Program monitor trends, compare situations, and better
     15                understand the link between environment and health.  They also help environmental health community understand where we are,
     16                where we are going and how far we are from our goals.
     17                <br/><br/>
    2518
    26         NMEPHT indicators are numeric measures of the state or condition of the environment and/or population health as a result of exposures to
    27         the environment or other factors that we want to track.   They help the NMEPHT Program monitor trends, compare situations, and better
    28         understand the link between environment and health.  They also help environmental health community understand where we are,
    29         where we are going and how far we are from our goals.
    30         <br/><br/>
    31         NMEPHT indicators are based on recognized or anticipated/potential relationships between environmental exposures
    32         (e.g., ozone in outdoor air) and health outcomes (e.g., asthma).  They are assessed through direct measures (
    33         e.g., number of emergency visits for asthma) or indirect measures (e.g., levels of ozone in outdoor air as a measures of possible human exposure to ozone)
    34         that describe health or factors associated with health (e.g., environmental ozone or population age) in a defined/specified population. 
    35         They were developed in collaboration with national and the state environmental health partners.
    36         <br/><br/>
    37         Indicator Reports provide online numeric data combined with public health context (such as why it is important and what is being done to improve it)
    38         for environmental factors (e.g., levels of ozone as a way of gauging air quality) or health outcomes
    39         (e.g., emergency department visits for asthma) potentially related to those environmental factors along with charts and data values.
    40         <br/><br/>
    41         Visit the <a ibis:href="dataportal/indicator/Index.html">Indicator Reports Index</a> page
     19                NM EPHT indicators are based on recognized or anticipated/potential relationships between environmental exposures
     20                (e.g., ozone in outdoor air) and health outcomes (e.g., asthma).  They are assessed through direct measures (
     21                e.g., number of emergency visits for asthma) or indirect measures (e.g., levels of ozone in outdoor air as a measures of possible human exposure to ozone)
     22                that describe health or factors associated with health (e.g., environmental ozone or population age) in a defined/specified population. 
     23                They were developed in collaboration with national and the state environmental health partners.
     24                <br/><br/>
    4225
     26                Indicator Reports provide online numeric data combined with public health context (such as why it is important and what is being done to improve it)
     27                for environmental factors (e.g., levels of ozone as a way of gauging air quality) or health outcomes
     28                (e.g., emergency department visits for asthma) potentially related to those environmental factors along with charts and data values.
     29                <br/><br/>
     30
     31                Visit the <a ibis:href="dataportal/indicator/Index.html">Indicator Reports Index</a>
     32                page for a complete list of available reports.
    4333</CONTENT>
    4434</HTML_CONTENT>
  • adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/epht-view-content/xml/html_content/dataportal/metadata/Introduction.xml

    r12433 r12444  
    1212        <CONTENT>
    1313
    14         Metadata are data about NMEPHT-acquired data and datasets. Once obtained,
    15         NMEPHT datasets are critically examined to fully characterize and describe the data elements,
     14        Metadata are data about NM EPHT-acquired data and datasets. Once obtained,
     15        NM EPHT datasets are critically examined to fully characterize and describe the data elements,
    1616        including the content, quality, and geographic and temporal extent.
    17         Exploring metadata is a way to discover data and learn about the NMEPHT data.
     17        Exploring metadata is a way to discover data and learn about the NM EPHT data.
    1818        <br/><br/>
    19         Visit the <a ibis:href="dataportal/metadata/Index.html">Metadata Index</a> page for a complete list of NMEPHT metadata.
     19        Visit the <a ibis:href="dataportal/metadata/Index.html">Metadata Index</a> page for a complete list of NM EPHT metadata.
    2020
    2121</CONTENT>
  • adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/epht-view-content/xml/html_content/dataportal/query/Introduction.xml

    r12433 r12444  
    3232
    3333                <h3>Secure Datasets</h3>
    34                 Some NMEPHT datasets can be queried in such a way that sensitive, small population
     34                Some NM EPHT datasets can be queried in such a way that sensitive, small population
    3535                data results are possible.  See the <a ibis:href="dataportal/metadata/Index.html">Metadata Index</a>
    3636                for a list of available datasets. 
  • adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/epht-view-content/xml/html_content/environment/air/FireAndSmoke.xml

    r12368 r12444  
    44
    55        <TITLE>Protect Your Health During Fires and On Smoky Days</TITLE>
    6         <OTHER_HEAD_CONTENT> <!-- this permits the use of limited wiki formattting - see epht-view-content\xml\html_content\about\wiki_test.xml for more info" -->
    7                 <script type="text/javascript" ibis:src="js/jquery.wikitohtml.js"/>
    8                 <script type="text/javascript">
    9                         // <![CDATA[
    10                         $(document).ready(function()
    11                         {
    12                                 $(".Content").wikiToHTML();
    13                         }); //~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ End of Function ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    14                         // ]]>
    15                 </script>
    16                 <style>
    17                         .MyLarger
    18                         {
    19                                 font-size:larger;
    20                         }
    21                         .MyCustom
    22                         {
    23                                 cursor: pointer;
    24                                 color: black;
    25                                 background-color: #ffffff;
    26                         }
    27                 </style>
    28         </OTHER_HEAD_CONTENT>
     6
    297        <CONTENT>
    30                         <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="2">
     8                <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="2">
    319                        <TITLE>Use the 5-3-1 Visibility Method to Protect Your Health from Smoke</TITLE>
    3210                        <CONTENT>
     
    4018                                your health when the air quality outside is poor.
    4119                                <br/><br/>
     20
    4221                                You can decide if you should remain indoors or if it's safe to go outdoors by taking a
    4322                                few easy actions, called the 5-3-1 Visibility Method.
    4423                                <br/><br/>
    45                                 Step one is to determine how smoky it is based on how far you can see. This is an easy way to assess the air quality.
    46                                 <br/><br/>
    47                                 Step two is to decide what you should do based on the quality of the air.
    48                                 <br/><br/>
     24
     25                                <span class="Bold">Step one</span> is to determine how smoky it is based on how far you can see. This is an easy way to assess the air quality.
     26                                <br/><br/>
     27
     28                                <span class="Bold">Step two</span> is to decide what you should do based on the quality of the air.
     29                                <br/><br/>
     30
    4931                                The 5-3-1 Visibility Method is a health campaign created by the New Mexico Department of
    5032                                Health Environmental Public Health Tracking Program and its locally-based state and federal
     
    5234                                <div style="clear: both;"/>
    5335                        </CONTENT>
    54                         </ibis:ExpandableContent>
    55                         <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="2">
     36                </ibis:ExpandableContent>
     37
     38                <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="2">
    5639                        <TITLE>How to Use 5-3-1 Visibility Method</TITLE>
    5740                        <CONTENT>
    58                                 '''If it is smoky outside find out how far you can see.'''
    59                                 <br/><br/>
     41                                <div class="Bold">If it is smoky outside find out how far you can see.</div>
    6042                                First, decide if the visibility is closer to 5 miles, 3 miles or 1 mile. pick a landmark you
    6143                                are familiar with and see if you can see it. Facing away from the sun, look for landmarks such
    6244                                as mountains, mesas, hills, or buildings in those mile ranges to help you estimate visibility.
    63                                 If these objects are not easy to see in these mile ranges, '''then decide:'''
    64                                 <br/><br/>
     45                                If these objects are not easy to see in these mile ranges, then decide:
     46                                <br/><br/>
     47
    6548                                <img ibis:src="view/image/5miles.jpg" style="float:left; vertical-align:text-top; margin:0 10px 0 0;" title="5 miles"/>
    66                                 '''Is the visibility under 5 miles?''' If you can see less than 5 miles, the air quality is
     49                                <span class="Bold">Is the visibility under 5 miles?</span> If you can see less than 5 miles, the air quality is
    6750                                unhealthy for young children, adults over age 65, pregnant women, and people with heart and/or
    6851                                lung disease, asthma or other respiratory illness; they should minimize outdoor activity. These
     
    7255                                <div style="clear: both;"/>
    7356                                <br/>
     57
    7458                                <img ibis:src="view/image/3miles.jpg" style="float:left; vertical-align:text-top; margin:0 10px 0 0;" title="3 miles"/>
    75                                 '''Is the visibility just about 3 miles?''' Young children, adults over age 65, pregnant women, and
     59                                <span class="Bold">Is the visibility just about 3 miles?</span> Young children, adults over age 65, pregnant women, and
    7660                                people with heart and/or lung disease, asthma or other respiratory illness should avoid all outdoor
    7761                                activities.  These people should stay indoors. All outdoor activities should be avoided, including
     
    8064                                <div style="clear: both;"/>
    8165                                <br/>
     66
    8267                                <img ibis:src="view/image/1mile.jpg" style="float:left; vertical-align:text-top; margin:0 10px 0 0;" title="1 mile"/>
    83                                 '''Is the visibility about 1 mile?''' If you can see less than 1 mile that means the air quality
     68                                <span class="Bold">Is the visibility about 1 mile?</span> If you can see less than 1 mile that means the air quality
    8469                                is unhealthy for everyone. People should remain indoors and avoid all outdoor activities including
    8570                                running errands. Unless an evacuation has been issued, stay inside your home, indoor workplace,
     
    8772                                <div style="clear: both;"/>
    8873                                <br/>
     74
    8975                                Regardless of the visibility, if you are feeling as though you are having health effects from smoke,
    9076                                take precautions to avoid exposure to smoke and see your doctor or health professional as needed.
    9177                                <br/><br/>
    92                                 ''Since the southwest United States typically has very low humidity, visibility can be an effective
     78
     79                                <div class="Note">Since the southwest United States typically has very low humidity, visibility can be an effective
    9380                                tool to determine if it is healthy to be outside when smoke is present. The visibility test is not
    9481                                appropriate or effective in areas with high humidity, such as the southeastern United States,
    95                                 where water vapor (fog) may limit visibility.''
    96                         </CONTENT>
    97                         </ibis:ExpandableContent>
    98                         <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="2">
     82                                where water vapor (fog) may limit visibility.
     83                                </div>
     84                        </CONTENT>
     85                </ibis:ExpandableContent>
     86
     87                <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="2">
    9988                        <TITLE>What is the 5, 3, or 1-mile radius in your area?</TITLE>
    10089                        <CONTENT>
    101                                 '''Where are you?'''
    102                                 <br/><br/>
    103                                 NM EPHT created tool that helps you determine the visibility of landmarks by using your
    104                                 phone, computer or device. Use this on-line map to draw a 5-3-1-mile radius buffer to
    105                                 estimate the distance of landmarks that are visible from where you are standing.
    106                                 <br/><br/>
    107                                 <a href="https://nmtracking.org/WildFireSmoke" title="Try the 5-3-1 Mile Buffer Map tool">Try the 5-3-1 Mile Buffer Map tool</a>
    108                                 <img ibis:src="view/image/Buffermapforweb278x224.png" style="float:left; vertical-align:text-top; margin:0 10px 0 0;" title="Try the 5-3-1 Mile Buffer Map tool" onclick="javascript:location.href='https://nmtracking.org/WildFireSmoke'" />
     90                                <span class="Bold">Where are you?</span> NM EPHT created tool that
     91                                helps you determine the visibility of landmarks by using your
     92                                phone, computer or device. Use this on-line map to draw a 5-3-1-mile
     93                                radius buffer to estimate the distance of landmarks that are visible
     94                                from where you are standing.
     95                                <br/><br/>
     96
     97                                <a ibis:href="WildFireSmoke" title="Try the 5-3-1 Mile Buffer Map tool">Try the 5-3-1 Mile Buffer Map tool
     98                                        <img ibis:src="view/image/Buffermapforweb278x224.png"
     99                                        style="float:left; vertical-align:text-top; margin:0 10px 0 0;"
     100                                        title="Try the 5-3-1 Mile Buffer Map tool"/>
     101                                </a>
    109102                                <div style="clear: both;"/>
    110103                                <br/><br/>
    111                                 '''Examples of a five-mile radius in three New Mexico metro areas:'''
    112                                 <br/><br/>
    113                                 <img ibis:src="view/image/roadimage278x185.png" style="float:left; vertical-align:text-top; margin:0 10px 0 0;" title="Try the 5-3-1 Mile Buffer Map tool" />
     104
     105                                <div class="Bold">Examples of a five-mile radius in three New Mexico metro areas:</div>
     106                                <img ibis:src="view/image/roadimage278x185.png"
     107                                        style="float:left; vertical-align:text-top; margin:0.5em 10px 0 0;"
     108                                        title="Try the 5-3-1 Mile Buffer Map tool"
     109                                /><br/>
    114110                                <a ibis:href="view/pdf/environment/Albuquerque_5mi_buffer.pdf">Albuquerque Metro Area Five Mile Radius (1.2MB)</a><br/><br/>
    115111                                <a ibis:href="view/pdf/environment/Las_Cruces_5mi_buffer.pdf">Las Cruces Five Mile Radius (1.1 MB)</a><br/><br/>
    116112                                <a ibis:href="view/pdf/environment/Santa_Fe_5mi_buffer.pdf">Santa Fe Five Mile Radius (1.3 MB)</a><br/><br/>
    117                                 <div style="clear: both;"/>
     113                                <div style="clear: both;"/><br/>
     114
    118115                                If the fire is nearby follow all precautions and instructions given by fire management authorities in the area.
    119116                                All evacuation orders by the sheriff and/or local fire authority should be followed and any recommendation to
    120117                                leave the area due to unhealthy air quality should be seriously considered. <!-- Learn more about -->
    121118                        </CONTENT>
    122                         </ibis:ExpandableContent>
    123                         <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="2">
     119                </ibis:ExpandableContent>
     120
     121                <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="2">
    124122                        <TITLE>What else can you do to protect yourself on smoky days?</TITLE>
    125123                        <CONTENT>
     
    209207                                </ibis:ExpandableContent>
    210208                        </CONTENT>
    211                         </ibis:ExpandableContent>
    212                         <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="2">
     209                </ibis:ExpandableContent>
     210
     211                <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="2">
    213212                        <TITLE>Smoke and Your Health</TITLE>
    214213                        <CONTENT>
     
    239238                                                        <li>Headaches</li>
    240239                                                        <li>If you have heart or lung disease, smoke might make your symptoms worse.</li>
    241                                                 </ul>
     240                                                </ul><br/>
     241
    242242                                                People who have heart disease might experience:
    243243                                                <ul class="Indent">
     
    246246                                                        <li>Shortness of breath</li>
    247247                                                        <li>Fatigue</li>
    248                                                 </ul>
     248                                                </ul><br/>
     249
    249250                                                Smoke may worsen symptoms for people who have pre-existing respiratory conditions
    250251                                                such as seasonal allergies, asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD),
     
    272273                                </ibis:ExpandableContent>
    273274                        </CONTENT>
    274                         </ibis:ExpandableContent>
    275                         <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="2">
     275                </ibis:ExpandableContent>
     276
     277                <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="2">
    276278                        <TITLE>Communications and Safety Decision Making Toolkit: Schools, Public Health Local Governments, Event or Recreation Organizers and Sports Coaches</TITLE>
    277279                        <CONTENT>
     
    280282                                not a fire within New Mexico state line boundaries the air quality can be impacted by forests burning in neighboring states.
    281283                                <br/><br/>
     284
    282285                                Be prepared to make decisions that will protect the health of the people in your community when forests, woodlands, grasslands
    283286                                and bosques catch fire and smoke travels into your community. If you are a community leader, an event/sports organizer, or
     
    285288                                baseball or softball game continue? Should that golf tournament be rescheduled? Should school be held school or recess held indoors? Do I cancel my outdoor event?
    286289                                <br/><br/>
     290
    287291                                The health of the participants, students, athletes and spectators is something that should be considered during wildfires
    288292                                season and smoky days, especially if they are part of a sensitive population.
     
    290294                                        <TITLE>Decisions That Local Leaders Must Make </TITLE>
    291295                                        <CONTENT>
    292                                         Poor air quality from nearby fires can mean unhealthy conditions for the people participating in the activity you
    293                                         organize or sponsor outdoors. When it is smoky outside the health of the participants, students, athletes and
    294                                         spectators, especially if they are part of a sensitive population, should be considered when determining if the event
    295                                         or game you organize should continue.
    296                                         <br/><br/>
    297                                                 '''If you''':
     296                                                Poor air quality from nearby fires can mean unhealthy conditions for the people participating in the activity you
     297                                                organize or sponsor outdoors. When it is smoky outside the health of the participants, students, athletes and
     298                                                spectators, especially if they are part of a sensitive population, should be considered when determining if the event
     299                                                or game you organize should continue.
     300                                                <br/><br/>
     301
     302                                                <div class="Bold">If you:</div>
    298303                                                <ul class="Indent">
    299304                                                        <li>
     
    308313                                                        <li>manage a city, county, or tribal government or are a local official</li>
    309314                                                        <li>manage a ranch, farm, or oversee outdoor labor</li>
    310                                                 </ul>
    311                                                 '''you need to make some quick decisions when it is smoky outside such as:'''
     315                                                </ul><br/>
     316
     317                                                <div class="Bold">you need to make some quick decisions when it is smoky outside such as:</div>
    312318                                                <ul class="Indent">
    313319                                                        <li>should that game go on?</li>
     
    318324                                                        <li>should work be done indoors?</li>
    319325                                                        <li>should transport services for sensitive population be delayed until it is safe to outdoors?</li>
    320                                                 </ul>
     326                                                </ul><br/>
     327
    321328                                                The health of the participants, students, athletes and spectators is something that should be considered
    322329                                                during wildfires season and smoky days, especially if they are part of a sensitive population. You should
     
    330337                                                of the people you serve and an estimation of quality of air based on the smoke visibility method.
    331338                                                <br/><br/>
     339
    332340                                                <img ibis:src="view/image/5-3-1version3withWhitesmall.jpg" style="float:right; vertical-align:text-top; margin:0;" title="5-3-1 visibility method"/>
    333341                                                Use the 5-3-1 Mile Visibility Method to make decisions especially if the people you serve are part of a
    334342                                                sensitive population. Then educate and communicate with the people you serve.
    335343                                                <br/><br/>
    336                                                 '''If it is smoky outside find out how far you can see.'''
    337                                                 <br/><br/>
     344
     345                                                <div class="Bold">If it is smoky outside find out how far you can see.</div>
    338346                                                First, decide if the visibility is closer to 5 miles, 3 miles or 1 mile. pick a landmark you are familiar
    339347                                                with and see if you can see it. Facing away from the sun, look for landmarks such as mountains, mesas,
    340348                                                hills, or buildings in those mile ranges to help you estimate visibility. If these objects are not easy to
    341                                                 see in these mile ranges, '''then decide:'''
    342                                                 <br/><br/>
     349                                                see in these mile ranges, then decide:
     350                                                <br/><br/>
     351
    343352                                                <img ibis:src="view/image/5miles.jpg" style="float:left; vertical-align:text-top; margin:0 10px 0 0;" title="5 miles"/>
    344                                                 '''Is the visibility under 5 miles?''' If you can see less than 5 miles, the air quality is unhealthy for young
     353                                                <span class="Bold">Is the visibility under 5 miles?</span> If you can see less than 5 miles, the air quality is unhealthy for young
    345354                                                children, adults over age 65, pregnant women, and people with heart and/or lung disease, asthma or other
    346355                                                respiratory illness; they should minimize outdoor activity.
    347356                                                <br/><br/>
    348                                                 <ul class="Indent">
    349                                                         <li>If your activity involves people from these groups you might '''consider moving your event indoors.'''</li>
    350                                                         <ul class="Indent">
    351                                                                 <li>
    352                                                                         Try to keep the indoor air as clean as possible by not allowing use of air fresheners (fragrances),
    353                                                                         chemicals, cigarettes, vapor cigarettes or anything else that could compromise the air quality.
    354                                                                 </li>
    355                                                                 <li>
    356                                                                         If it is warm, consider moving it into a place that is cooled with air conditioning
    357                                                                         (not swamp/evaporative coolers).
    358                                                                 </li>
    359                                                         </ul>
    360                                                         <li>
    361                                                                 If you cannot move your event indoors, '''consider rescheduling it for a day with better air quality.'''
     357
     358                                                <ul class="Indent">
     359                                                        <li>If your activity involves people from these groups you might <span class="Bold">consider moving your event indoors.</span>
     360                                                                <ul class="Indent">
     361                                                                        <li>
     362                                                                                Try to keep the indoor air as clean as possible by not allowing use of air fresheners (fragrances),
     363                                                                                chemicals, cigarettes, vapor cigarettes or anything else that could compromise the air quality.
     364                                                                        </li>
     365                                                                        <li>
     366                                                                                If it is warm, consider moving it into a place that is cooled with air conditioning
     367                                                                                (not swamp/evaporative coolers).
     368                                                                        </li>
     369                                                                </ul>
     370                                                        </li>
     371                                                        <li>
     372                                                                If you cannot move your event indoors, <span class="Bold">consider rescheduling it for a day with better air quality.</span>
    362373                                                        </li>
    363374                                                </ul>
    364375                                                <br/>
     376
    365377                                                It is okay for adults in good health to be out and about but they should periodically check visibility
    366378                                                especially when fires are nearby.
    367379                                                <br/><br/>
     380
    368381                                                <img ibis:src="view/image/3miles.jpg" style="float:left; vertical-align:text-top; margin:0 10px 0 0;" title="3 miles"/>
    369                                                 '''Is the visibility just about 3 miles?''' If it is, air quality is unhealthy. Everyone should try to stay
     382                                                <span class="Bold">Is the visibility just about 3 miles?</span> If it is, air quality is unhealthy. Everyone should try to stay
    370383                                                indoors as much as possible.
    371384                                                <div style="clear: both;"/>
    372385                                                <br/>
    373                                                 <ul class="Indent">
    374                                                         <li>'''Move your event indoors or reschedule it. '''</li>
    375                                                         <ul class="Indent">
    376                                                                 <li>
    377                                                                         Try to keep the indoor air as clean as possible by not allowing use of air fresheners
    378                                                                         (fragrances), chemicals, cigarettes, vapor cigarettes or anything else that could compromise
    379                                                                         the air quality.
    380                                                                 </li>
    381                                                                 <li>
    382                                                                         If it is warm, consider moving it into a place that is cooled with air conditioning (not swamp/evaporative coolers).
    383                                                                 </li>
    384                                                         </ul>
     386
     387                                                <ul class="Indent">
     388                                                        <li><span class="Bold">Move your event indoors or reschedule it. </span>
     389                                                                <ul class="Indent">
     390                                                                        <li>
     391                                                                                Try to keep the indoor air as clean as possible by not allowing use of air fresheners
     392                                                                                (fragrances), chemicals, cigarettes, vapor cigarettes or anything else that could compromise
     393                                                                                the air quality.
     394                                                                        </li>
     395                                                                        <li>
     396                                                                                If it is warm, consider moving it into a place that is cooled with air conditioning (not swamp/evaporative coolers).
     397                                                                        </li>
     398                                                                </ul>
     399                                                        </li>
    385400                                                        <li>
    386401                                                                Young children, adults over age 65, pregnant women, and people with heart and/or lung disease, asthma
     
    388403                                                                including going outside to get to your event even if your event was moved indoors.  If your activity
    389404                                                                involves young children, adults age 65 and over, pregnant women, and people with heart and/or lung
    390                                                                 disease, asthma or other respiratory illness, '''reschedule your event for a day with better air quality.'''
     405                                                                disease, asthma or other respiratory illness, <span class="Bold">reschedule your event for a day with better air quality.</span>
    391406                                                        </li>
    392407                                                </ul>
    393408                                                <br/>
     409
    394410                                                <img ibis:src="view/image/1mile.jpg" style="float:left; vertical-align:text-top; margin:0 10px 0 0;" title="1 mile"/>
    395411                                                Is the visibility about 1 mile? If you can see less than 1 mile that means the air quality is unhealthy for
    396412                                                everyone. People should remain indoors and avoid all outdoor activities including driving, biking and walking.
    397413                                                Unless an evacuation has been issued, people should stay inside their homes, indoor workplace, or in a safe shelter.
    398                                                 <br/><br/>
    399                                                 <ul class="Indent">
    400                                                         <li>
    401                                                                 '''Cancel or reschedule all events.''' Poor visibility outdoors means it could be dangerous for participants
    402                                                                 to drive to your event even if you move it indoors. Being outdoors including briefly walking outside could
    403                                                                 be unhealthy during this time.
    404                                                         </li>
    405                                                 </ul>
    406                                         </CONTENT>
    407                                 </ibis:ExpandableContent>
     414
     415                                                <span class="Bold">Cancel or reschedule all events.</span>
     416                                                Poor visibility outdoors means it could be dangerous
     417                                                for participants to drive to your event even if
     418                                                you move it indoors. Being outdoors including briefly
     419                                                walking outside could be unhealthy during this time.
     420                                        </CONTENT>
     421                                </ibis:ExpandableContent>
     422
    408423                                <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="3">
    409424                                        <TITLE>Communicate with Participants and Event-Goers</TITLE>
    410425                                        <CONTENT>
    411                                         As you postpone, reschedule, or cancel your event use communicate with members of your community and distribute
    412                                         the 5-3-1 Visibility message to them so they can make similar decisions for their families. 
    413                                         <br/><br/>
    414                                         First consider using your local means of mass communication to let your community know of changes in the schedule.
    415                                         Let them know that these changes were done to protect their health. Common ways to communicate with you participates
    416                                         include phone trees, e-mail listserv, social media feeds such as an event page or a team page on Facebook, an
    417                                         announcement on Twitter and, using your local media such as the newspaper and radio station to disseminate your message.
    418                                         Direct your participants to [https://nmfireinfo.com/] to learn about fires in the state and to [https://nmtracking.org/] to learn how they can protect their health on smoky days.
    419                                         <br/><br/>
    420                                         Next, help educate your participants on how they can make decision during smoky days. The 5-3-1 Visibility Method is
    421                                         public campaign from the New Mexico Department of Health, Environmental Public Health Tracking Program, and its state
    422                                         and federal partners.  You may print the following items and distribute them in our community, to your teams, and hang
    423                                         in your schools and workplaces,
    424                                                 <ul class="Indent">
    425                                                         <li>
    426                                                                 '''Poster: Print and Post.''' Use this in areas frequented by general audiences. For example, near hiking trails,
     426                                                As you postpone, reschedule, or cancel your event use communicate with members of your community and distribute
     427                                                the 5-3-1 Visibility message to them so they can make similar decisions for their families. 
     428                                                <br/><br/>
     429
     430                                                First consider using your local means of mass communication to let your community know of changes in the schedule.
     431                                                Let them know that these changes were done to protect their health. Common ways to communicate with you participates
     432                                                include phone trees, e-mail listserv, social media feeds such as an event page or a team page on Facebook, an
     433                                                announcement on Twitter and, using your local media such as the newspaper and radio station to disseminate your message.
     434                                                Direct your participants to <a href="https://nmfireinfo.com/">nmfireinfo.com</a>
     435                                                to learn about fires in the state and to <a ibis:href="">nmtracking.org</a> to learn how they can protect their health on smoky days.
     436                                                <br/><br/>
     437
     438                                                Next, help educate your participants on how they can make decision during smoky days. The 5-3-1 Visibility Method is
     439                                                public campaign from the New Mexico Department of Health, Environmental Public Health Tracking Program, and its state
     440                                                and federal partners.  You may print the following items and distribute them in our community, to your teams, and hang
     441                                                in your schools and workplaces,
     442                                                <ul class="Indent">
     443                                                        <li>
     444                                                                <span class="Bold">Poster: Print and Post.</span> Use this in areas frequented by general audiences. For example, near hiking trails,
    427445                                                                sports fields or community gathering areas.
    428446                                                                <br/><br/>
    429                                                                 <a ibis:href="view/pdf/environment/5-3-1_Factsheet_poster.pdf">5-3-1 Smoke Visibility Method Poster (154.4 KB)</a><br/><br/>
     447
     448                                                                <a ibis:href="view/pdf/environment/5-3-1_Factsheet_poster.pdf">5-3-1 Smoke Visibility Method Poster (154.4 KB)</a>
     449                                                                <br/><br/>
    430450                                                        </li> 
    431451                                                        <li>
    432                                                                 '''Patient Education: Print, Post and Distribute.''' Post this in senior and community centers,
     452                                                                <span class="Bold">Patient Education: Print, Post and Distribute.</span> Post this in senior and community centers,
    433453                                                                libraries, community gathering areas, schools, sports fields, and medical centers. This can also be
    434454                                                                distributed as part of patient education to sensitive populations or used in door-to-door education
    435455                                                                during wildfires.
    436456                                                                <br/><br/>
     457
    437458                                                                <a ibis:href="view/pdf/environment/5-3-1.PatientEducation.Factsheet.pdf">5-3-1 Visibility Method Bulletin and Patient Education Information Sheet (151.4 KB)</a>
     459                                                                <br/><br/>
    438460                                                                <!-- commented out until we have spanish version, be sure to change pdf name in url
    439461                                                                <a ibis:href="view/pdf/environment/5-3-1.PatientEducation.Factsheet..pdf">5.3.1.In Spanish. En Espanol. (138.3 KB)</a><br/><br/>-->
    440462                                                        </li>
    441463                                                        <li>
    442                                                                 '''Quick Guide: Print and Distribute.''' The postcard sized guides can be printed double-sided and given
     464                                                                <span class="Bold">Quick Guide: Print and Distribute.</span> The postcard sized guides can be printed double-sided and given
    443465                                                                out to all populations. Ask residents to keep it handy, such as posting it on their refrigerator, so
    444466                                                                they may be prepared and know what to do when it quickly becomes smoky outside.
    445467                                                                <br/><br/>
     468
    446469                                                                <a ibis:href="view/pdf/environment/5-3-1.Card.Guide.pdf">  5-3-1 Visibility Method Card Guide (192.5 KB)</a>
    447470                                                        </li>
     
    450473                                </ibis:ExpandableContent>
    451474                        </CONTENT>
    452                         </ibis:ExpandableContent>
     475                </ibis:ExpandableContent>
    453476        </CONTENT>
    454477</HTML_CONTENT>
  • adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/epht-view-content/xml/html_content/environment/water/Introduction.xml

    r12194 r12444  
    44
    55        <TITLE>Water Quality</TITLE>
    6        
    7         <OTHER_HEAD_CONTENT>
    8                 <script type="text/javascript" ibis:src="js/jquery.wikitohtml.js"/>
    9                 <script type="text/javascript">
    10                         // <![CDATA[
    11                         $(document).ready(function()
    12                         {
    13                                 $(".Content").wikiToHTML();
    14                         }); //~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ End of Function ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
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    16                 </script>
    17                 <style>
    18                         .MyLarger
    19                         {
    20                                 font-size:larger;
    21                         }
    22                         .MyCustom
    23                         {
    24                                 cursor: pointer;
    25                                 color: blue;
    26                                 background-color: #eee;
    27                         }
    28                 </style>
    29         </OTHER_HEAD_CONTENT>
    30        
     6
    317        <CONTENT>
    32 
    33                 <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="2"><SHOW/>
     8                <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="2">
    349                        <TITLE>Description</TITLE>
    3510                        <CONTENT>
     
    3813                                decrease in diseases such as typhoid and cholera. Most New Mexicans have access to
    3914                                drinking water that meets standards under the national Safe Drinking Water Act.
    40                                 <h4>Sources of Drinking Water in New Mexico </h4>
     15
     16                                <h3>Sources of Drinking Water in New Mexico </h3>
    4117                                New Mexicans access drinking water in three primary ways:
    4218                                from community water systems, private wells or a water hauling system.
     
    5329                                        or 15 or more household connections.</li>
    5430                                </ul>
    55                                 <h4>How can things get into drinking water? </h4>
     31
     32                                <h3>How can things get into drinking water? </h3>
    5633                                Drinking water quality can be influenced by:
    5734                                <ul class="Indent">
    5835                                        <li> Natural sources, like bedrock.</li>
    5936                                        <li> Man-made sources, like chemicals, agricultural run-off, or plumbing fixtures.</li>
    60                                 </ul>
     37                                </ul><br/>
     38
    6139                                We call these constituents. Common constituents in groundwater in New Mexico may include:
    6240                                arsenic, uranium, manganese, selenium, nitrates, fluoride, sulfate, and bacteria.
     
    7048                </ibis:ExpandableContent>
    7149
    72                 <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="2"><SHOW/>
     50                <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="2">
    7351                        <TITLE>Topic Pages: Water Quality</TITLE>
    7452                        <CONTENT>
     
    9876                                </ibis:SelectionsList>
    9977                        </CONTENT>
     78                        <SHOW/>
    10079                </ibis:ExpandableContent>
    101                 <br/>
    10280
    10381        </CONTENT>
  • adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/epht-view-content/xml/html_content/health/Introduction.xml

    r11948 r12444  
    1212                        Health outcome data may help us better understand how some chronic diseases and health conditions may be linked to environmental conditions.
    1313                        <br/><br/>     
    14                         The NMEPHT Network serves to understand how environmental factors influence human health.
     14                        The NM EPHT Network serves to understand how environmental factors influence human health.
    1515                        Many adverse health outcomes have links to the environment, such as air pollution and an increased risk of asthma or heart attacks.
    1616                        Having reliable data about these health outcomes provides a clearer picture of how the environment impacts public health in New Mexico.
  • adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/epht-view-content/xml/html_content/health/_NOTUSED/_co_tracking/co_tracking.xml

    r11373 r12444  
    7272                        <strong>Epidemiology Report: Burden of Unintentional Carbon Monoxide Poisonings in New Mexico</strong>
    7373                </p>
    74                 <p>This report analyzes data on morbidity and mortality from unintentional CO poisoning from NMEPHT Network from 2008-2013 to: 1) summarize the burden of unintentional CO poisoning in New Mexico, 2) examine special trends by New Mexico health regions and counties, and 3) focus public health interventions to prevent potential exposure to CO and reduce the burden of CO poisoning.  <p class="plugin_file">
     74                <p>This report analyzes data on morbidity and mortality from unintentional CO poisoning from NM EPHT Network from 2008-2013 to: 1) summarize the burden of unintentional CO poisoning in New Mexico, 2) examine special trends by New Mexico health regions and counties, and 3) focus public health interventions to prevent potential exposure to CO and reduce the burden of CO poisoning.  <p class="plugin_file">
    7575                                <a ibis:href="view/pdf/Burden of CO poisoning in NM_NM Epi Report_June2015.pdf">
    7676                                        <img ibis:src="image/icon/16/pdf.gif" alt="pdf" />
  • adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/epht-view-content/xml/html_content/health/_NOTUSED/_co_tracking/index.xml

    r11373 r12444  
    7272                </p><p>This report
    7373analyzes data on morbidity and mortality from unintentional CO poisoning from
    74 NMEPHT Network from 2008-2013 to: 1) summarize the burden of unintentional CO
     74NM EPHT Network from 2008-2013 to: 1) summarize the burden of unintentional CO
    7575poisoning in New Mexico, 2) examine special trends by New Mexico health regions
    7676and counties, and 3) focus public health interventions to prevent potential
  • adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/epht-view-content/xml/html_content/newsroom/newstrack/InTheNews.xml

    r12341 r12444  
    44
    55        <TITLE>In The News</TITLE>
    6         <OTHER_HEAD_CONTENT> <!-- this permits the use of limited wiki formattting - see epht-view-content\xml\html_content\about\wiki_test.xml for more info" -->
    7                 <script type="text/javascript" ibis:src="js/jquery.wikitohtml.js"/>
    8                 <script type="text/javascript">
    9                         // <![CDATA[
    10                         $(document).ready(function()
    11                         {
    12                                 $(".Content").wikiToHTML();
    13                         }); //~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ End of Function ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    14                         // ]]>
    15                 </script>
    16                 <style>
    17                         .MyLarger
    18                         {
    19                                 font-size:larger;
    20                         }
    21                         .MyCustom
    22                         {
    23                                 cursor: pointer;
    24                                 color: blue;
    25                                 background-color: #eee;
    26                         }
    27                 </style>
    28         </OTHER_HEAD_CONTENT>
     6
    297        <CONTENT>
    30                 What is going on in the field of environmental public health? Check here to learn about
    31                 exciting innovations in tracking environmental and health data, the implications of these,
    32                 and successes in the field.<br/><br/>
    33                 Sometimes NM EPHT makes the news. Come here to find out which outlets feature our program.
    34                         <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="3"><SHOW/>
     8                Sometimes NM EPHT makes the news. Come here to find out which outlets feature
     9                our program.  This page also lists the latest on what is going on in the
     10                field of environmental public health? Check here to learn about exciting
     11                innovations in tracking environmental and health data, the implications
     12                of these, and successes in the field.<br/><br/>
     13
     14                <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="3"><SHOW/>
    3515                        <TITLE>Consumer Product Safety Concerns: Portable Generators and Carbon Monoxide</TITLE>
    3616                        <CONTENT>
    37                                 The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission has determined preliminarily that there
     17                                <a href="https://www.federalregister.gov/documents/2016/11/21/2016-26962/safety-standard-for-portable-generators" class="Bold">CPSC
     18                                Portable Generators and Carbon Monoxide Report</a>.  The U.S. Consumer
     19                                Product Safety Commission has determined preliminarily that there
    3820                                may be an unreasonable risk of injury and death associated with portable generators.
    3921                                To address this risk, the Commission proposes a rule that limits CO emissions from
    40                                 operating portable generators. Learn more about this proposed rule at [https://www.federalregister.gov/documents/2016/11/21/2016-26962/safety-standard-for-portable-generators]. 
     22                                operating portable generators. Learn more about this proposed rule at
    4123                                <br/><br/>
    42                                 NM EPHT provides practical tips for preventing [https://nmtracking.org/health/poisonings/CarbonMonoxidePoisoning.html carbon monoxide poisoning] 
    43                                 and [https://nmtracking.org/dataportal/indicator/view/EnvHlthCOPoisED.AARate.Cnty.html searchable data]
     24
     25                                NM EPHT provides practical tips for preventing
     26                                <a ibis:href="health/poisonings/CarbonMonoxidePoisoning.html" class="Bold">carbon
     27                                monoxide poisoning</a> and <a ibis:href="dataportal/indicator/view/EnvHlthCOPoisED.AARate.Cnty.html" class="Bold">detailed data</a>
    4428                                about CO poisonings in New Mexico.
    4529                        </CONTENT>
    46                         </ibis:ExpandableContent>
    47                         <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="3"><SHOW/>
     30                </ibis:ExpandableContent>
     31
     32                <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="3"><SHOW/>
    4833                        <TITLE>Kidde Recalls Combination Smoke/CO Alarms Due to Alarm Failure</TITLE>
    4934                        <CONTENT>
     
    5136                                If you do, check to see if it is one the recently recalled models from Kidde.
    5237                                The recall is due to a malfunction in the alarm system when it reaches its
    53                                 seven-year end-of-life. You can learn more about the recall here: [https://www.cpsc.gov/Recalls/2017/Kidde-Recalls-Combination-Smoke-CO-Alarms]. 
     38                                seven-year end-of-life.  <a href="https://www.cpsc.gov/Recalls/2017/Kidde-Recalls-Combination-Smoke-CO-Alarms" class="Bold">Learn
     39                                more about CPSC Kidde CO Alarm Recalls</a>.
    5440                                <br/><br/>
     41
    5542                                One of the best ways to prevent carbon monoxide poisoning is to check your home
    5643                                heating sources such as furnaces, water heaters, wood stoves, and portable heaters
    5744                                for leaks, cracks and proper function every year. It is still important to replace
    5845                                batteries annually in both the carbon monoxide and smoke detectors in your home and
    59                                 replace detectors every few years based on the manufacturer
    60                                 [https://nmtracking.org/health/poisonings/CarbonMonoxidePoisoning.html Learn more about preventing carbon monoxide poisoning.]
     46                                replace detectors every few years based on the manufacturer. 
     47                                <a ibis:href="health/poisonings/CarbonMonoxidePoisoning.html" class="Bold">Learn
     48                                more about preventing carbon monoxide poisoning</a>.
    6149                        </CONTENT>
    62                         </ibis:ExpandableContent>
     50                </ibis:ExpandableContent>
    6351        </CONTENT>
    6452</HTML_CONTENT>
  • adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/epht-view-content/xml/html_content/newsroom/trackinginaction/PublicHealthActions.xml

    r12268 r12444  
    55        <TITLE>Public Health Actions</TITLE>
    66
    7         <!-- the following script enables wiki formatting -->
    8                 <OTHER_HEAD_CONTENT>
    9                 <script type="text/javascript" ibis:src="js/jquery.wikitohtml.js"/>
    10                 <script type="text/javascript">
    11                         // <![CDATA[
    12                         $(document).ready(function()
    13                         {
    14                                 $(".Content").wikiToHTML();
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    16                         // ]]>
    17                 </script>
    18                 </OTHER_HEAD_CONTENT>
     7        <CONTENT>
     8                New Mexico Environmental Public Health Tracking program has proved to be an asset to New Mexico's
     9                public health system and community networks. It often serves as the platform for
     10                stimulating actions that result in improved public health services and responses.
     11                New Mexico's successes are featured on the <a href="http://www.cdc.gov/nceh/tracking/success/newmexico.htm">
     12                CDC's website</a>.
     13                <br/><br/>
    1914
    20                 <CONTENT>
    21                         New Mexico Environmental Public Health Tracking program has proved to be an asset to New Mexico's
    22                         public health system and community networks. It often serves as the platform for
    23                         stimulating actions that result in improved public health services and responses.
    24                         <br/><br/>
    25                         New Mexico's successes are featured on CDC's site: <br/><br/>
    26                         [http://www.cdc.gov/nceh/tracking/success/newmexico.htm]
    27                         <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="2"><SHOW/>
     15                <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="2">
     16                        <SHOW/>
    2817                        <TITLE>Public Health Action: New Mexicans protect themselves from smoke during wildland fires.</TITLE>
    2918                        <CONTENT>
    30                         </CONTENT>
    31                         </ibis:ExpandableContent>
    3219                                <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="3"><SHOW/>
    3320                                        <TITLE>Wildfire Smoke Affects Health</TITLE>
     
    5643                                        </CONTENT>
    5744                                </ibis:ExpandableContent>
     45                        </CONTENT>
     46                </ibis:ExpandableContent>
     47
    5848                <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="2"><SHOW/>
    5949                        <TITLE>Residents Can Now Take Action to Protect Health</TITLE>
     
    6858                                visibility tool for use in their forest management programs.
    6959                                <br/><br/>
    70                                 ''"Before the tracking network came up with the 5-3-1 tool we had a system which
     60
     61                                <p class="Quote">
     62                                "Before the tracking network came up with the 5-3-1 tool we had a system which
    7163                                was wholly convoluted and complicated. It was very difficult for us to use as
    72                                 people trying to help inform the public and for the public to understand."''
    73                                 <br/><br/>
     64                                people trying to help inform the public and for the public to understand."
     65                                </p>
    7466                                -- Chuck Maxwell, Predictive Services Meteorologist, Southwest Coordination Center
    7567                        </CONTENT>
    7668                </ibis:ExpandableContent>
    77                
    78                         </CONTENT>
     69       
     70        </CONTENT>
    7971       
    8072</HTML_CONTENT>
  • adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/epht-view-content/xml/html_content/newsroom/trackinginaction/SuccessStories.xml

    r12443 r12444  
    55        <TITLE>Public Health Actions</TITLE>
    66
    7         <!-- the following script enables wiki formatting -->
    8                 <OTHER_HEAD_CONTENT>
    9                 <script type="text/javascript" ibis:src="js/jquery.wikitohtml.js"/>
    10                 <script type="text/javascript">
    11                         // <![CDATA[
    12                         $(document).ready(function()
    13                         {
    14                                 $(".Content").wikiToHTML();
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    16                         // ]]>
    17                 </script>
    18                 </OTHER_HEAD_CONTENT>
     7        <CONTENT>
     8                New Mexico Environmental Public Health program has proved to be an asset to New Mexico's
     9                public health system and community networks. It often serves as the platform for
     10                stimulating actions that result in improved public health services and responses.
     11                New Mexico's successes are featured on the
     12                <a href="http://www.cdc.gov/nceh/tracking/success/newmexico.htm">CDC's website</a>.
     13                Listed below are more success stories:
     14                <br/><br/>
    1915
    20                 <CONTENT>
    21                         New Mexico Environmental Public Health program has proved to be an asset to New Mexico's
    22                         public health system and community networks. It often serves as the platform for
    23                         stimulating actions that result in improved public health services and responses.
    24                         <br/><br/>
    25                         New Mexico's successes are featured on CDC's site: <br/><br/>
    26                         [http://www.cdc.gov/nceh/tracking/success/newmexico.htm]
    27                         <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="2"><SHOW/>
     16                <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="2">
     17                        <SHOW/>
    2818                        <TITLE>Public Health Action: New Mexicans protect themselves from smoke during wildland fires.</TITLE>
    2919                        <CONTENT>
    30                         </CONTENT>
    31                         </ibis:ExpandableContent>
    3220                                <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="3"><SHOW/>
    3321                                        <TITLE>Wildfire Smoke Affects Health</TITLE>
     
    4129                                        </CONTENT>
    4230                                </ibis:ExpandableContent>
     31
    4332                                <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="3"><SHOW/>
    4433                                        <TITLE>Tracking Program Helps Residents Determine Smoke Danger</TITLE>
     
    5645                                        </CONTENT>
    5746                                </ibis:ExpandableContent>
     47                        </CONTENT>
     48                </ibis:ExpandableContent>
     49
    5850                <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="2"><SHOW/>
    5951                        <TITLE>Residents Can Now Take Action to Protect Health</TITLE>
     
    6860                                visibility tool for use in their forest management programs.
    6961                                <br/><br/>
    70                                 ''"Before the tracking network came up with the 5-3-1 tool we had a system which
    71                                 was wholly convoluted and complicated. It was very difficult for us to use as
    72                                 people trying to help inform the public and for the public to understand."''
    73                                 <br/><br/>
     62
     63                                <p class="Quote">
     64                                        "Before the tracking network came up with the 5-3-1 tool we
     65                                        had a system which was wholly convoluted and complicated. It
     66                                        was very difficult for us to use as people trying to help
     67                                        inform the public and for the public to understand."
     68                                </p>
    7469                                -- Chuck Maxwell, Predictive Services Meteorologist, Southwest Coordination Center
    7570                        </CONTENT>
    7671                </ibis:ExpandableContent>
    77                
    78                         </CONTENT>
     72        </CONTENT>
    7973       
    8074</HTML_CONTENT>
  • adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/epht-view-content/xml/menu/navigation/NewsroomSelection.xml

    r12429 r12444  
    125125                                                <SELECTION>
    126126                                                        <TITLE>Program Highlights</TITLE>
    127                                                         <LOCAL_URL>newsroom/trackinginaction/SucessStories.html</LOCAL_URL>
     127                                                        <LOCAL_URL>newsroom/trackinginaction/SuccessStories.html</LOCAL_URL>
    128128                                                        <DESCRIPTION/>
    129129                                                </SELECTION>
  • adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/epht-view-content/xml/metadata/Atrazine_CommunityWater.xml

    r11544 r12444  
    9494</procstep>
    9595<procstep>
    96 <procdesc>NM EPHT receives drinking water data for community water systems (CWS) from the NM Environment Department Safe Drinking Water Information System (SDWIS). Data are received in MS Excel spreadsheet, with location coordinates in four different datums: three geographic and one unknown.  NMEPHT uses Esri ArcGIS 10.0 to prepare a shapefile from the spreadsheet data, geocode the shapefile, and re-project the CWS data to the Geographic Coordinate System, WGS84 Spheroid, and WGS84 Datum.  Geocoded and re-projected CWS data are de-identified using Esri models to merge multiple facilities within a CWS and to geographically mask a single-point CWS. Coordinates for a CWS that contain one facility are masked to de-identify exact location by randomly displacing the point according to buffer parameters (200 m to 500 m) and while locating the point within the CWS County. CWSs that contain multiple facilities require one final set of coordinates. For each CWS, the multiple points are merged by computing their centroid/arithmetic mean coordinates.</procdesc>
     96<procdesc>NM EPHT receives drinking water data for community water systems (CWS) from the NM Environment Department Safe Drinking Water Information System (SDWIS). Data are received in MS Excel spreadsheet, with location coordinates in four different datums: three geographic and one unknown.  NM EPHT uses Esri ArcGIS 10.0 to prepare a shapefile from the spreadsheet data, geocode the shapefile, and re-project the CWS data to the Geographic Coordinate System, WGS84 Spheroid, and WGS84 Datum.  Geocoded and re-projected CWS data are de-identified using Esri models to merge multiple facilities within a CWS and to geographically mask a single-point CWS. Coordinates for a CWS that contain one facility are masked to de-identify exact location by randomly displacing the point according to buffer parameters (200 m to 500 m) and while locating the point within the CWS County. CWSs that contain multiple facilities require one final set of coordinates. For each CWS, the multiple points are merged by computing their centroid/arithmetic mean coordinates.</procdesc>
    9797<procdate>20160505</procdate>
    9898</procstep>
    9999<procstep>
    100 <procdesc>NMEPHT data queries through nmtracking.org (NMTracking) result in query-specific data sets that are aggregated by geographic unit. These aggregated data are dynamically joint to boundary data sets for display in the NMTracking interactive map.  Boundaries are for County, Census Track, and Small Areas data sets and are created using U.S. Census 2010 boundary data. The Small Areas data set consists of combined census tracts and was developed at the NM Department of Health. NM Small Areas  are 109 geographic areas across the state with population size that is just large enough to calculate rates for selected health events (e.g., asthma mortality, female breast cancer incidence). Most (95%) NM small-area population sizes range from 9,000 to 30,000 persons. Some counties have multiple small areas (e.g., Bernalillo County has 34 small areas within its boundaries). In other cases, whole counties (e.g., Harding, Quay, and DeBaca) are combined to create a single small area. Mapped results for the interactive data query include options for a background with a NM base map or shaded relief. Both background maps are served from the NM Resource Geographic Information System (NM RGIS), rgis.unm.edu) or other servers hosted at UNM Earth Data Analysis Center.</procdesc>
     100<procdesc>NM EPHT data queries through nmtracking.org (NMTracking) result in query-specific data sets that are aggregated by geographic unit. These aggregated data are dynamically joint to boundary data sets for display in the NMTracking interactive map.  Boundaries are for County, Census Track, and Small Areas data sets and are created using U.S. Census 2010 boundary data. The Small Areas data set consists of combined census tracts and was developed at the NM Department of Health. NM Small Areas  are 109 geographic areas across the state with population size that is just large enough to calculate rates for selected health events (e.g., asthma mortality, female breast cancer incidence). Most (95%) NM small-area population sizes range from 9,000 to 30,000 persons. Some counties have multiple small areas (e.g., Bernalillo County has 34 small areas within its boundaries). In other cases, whole counties (e.g., Harding, Quay, and DeBaca) are combined to create a single small area. Mapped results for the interactive data query include options for a background with a NM base map or shaded relief. Both background maps are served from the NM Resource Geographic Information System (NM RGIS), rgis.unm.edu) or other servers hosted at UNM Earth Data Analysis Center.</procdesc>
    101101<procdate>20160505</procdate>
    102102</procstep>
  • adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/epht-view-content/xml/metadata/DEHP_CommunityWater.xml

    r11544 r12444  
    9494</procstep>
    9595<procstep>
    96 <procdesc>NM EPHT receives drinking water data for community water systems (CWS) from the NM Environment Department Safe Drinking Water Information System (SDWIS). Data are received in MS Excel spreadsheet, with location coordinates in four different datums: three geographic and one unknown.  NMEPHT uses Esri ArcGIS 10.0 to prepare a shapefile from the spreadsheet data, geocode the shapefile, and re-project the CWS data to the Geographic Coordinate System, WGS84 Spheroid, and WGS84 Datum.  Geocoded and re-projected CWS data are de-identified using Esri models to merge multiple facilities within a CWS and to geographically mask a single-point CWS. Coordinates for a CWS that contain one facility are masked to de-identify exact location by randomly displacing the point according to buffer parameters (200 m to 500 m) and while locating the point within the CWS County. CWSs that contain multiple facilities require one final set of coordinates. For each CWS, the multiple points are merged by computing their centroid/arithmetic mean coordinates.</procdesc>
     96<procdesc>NM EPHT receives drinking water data for community water systems (CWS) from the NM Environment Department Safe Drinking Water Information System (SDWIS). Data are received in MS Excel spreadsheet, with location coordinates in four different datums: three geographic and one unknown.  NM EPHT uses Esri ArcGIS 10.0 to prepare a shapefile from the spreadsheet data, geocode the shapefile, and re-project the CWS data to the Geographic Coordinate System, WGS84 Spheroid, and WGS84 Datum.  Geocoded and re-projected CWS data are de-identified using Esri models to merge multiple facilities within a CWS and to geographically mask a single-point CWS. Coordinates for a CWS that contain one facility are masked to de-identify exact location by randomly displacing the point according to buffer parameters (200 m to 500 m) and while locating the point within the CWS County. CWSs that contain multiple facilities require one final set of coordinates. For each CWS, the multiple points are merged by computing their centroid/arithmetic mean coordinates.</procdesc>
    9797<procdate>20160505</procdate>
    9898</procstep>
    9999<procstep>
    100 <procdesc>NMEPHT data queries through nmtracking.org (NMTracking) result in query-specific data sets that are aggregated by geographic unit. These aggregated data are dynamically joint to boundary data sets for display in the NMTracking interactive map.  Boundaries are for County, Census Track, and Small Areas data sets and are created using U.S. Census 2010 boundary data. The Small Areas data set consists of combined census tracts and was developed at the NM Department of Health. NM Small Areas  are 109 geographic areas across the state with population size that is just large enough to calculate rates for selected health events (e.g., asthma mortality, female breast cancer incidence). Most (95%) NM small-area population sizes range from 9,000 to 30,000 persons. Some counties have multiple small areas (e.g., Bernalillo County has 34 small areas within its boundaries). In other cases, whole counties (e.g., Harding, Quay, and DeBaca) are combined to create a single small area. Mapped results for the interactive data query include options for a background with a NM base map or shaded relief. Both background maps are served from the NM Resource Geographic Information System (NM RGIS), rgis.unm.edu) or other servers hosted at UNM Earth Data Analysis Center.</procdesc>
     100<procdesc>NM EPHT data queries through nmtracking.org (NMTracking) result in query-specific data sets that are aggregated by geographic unit. These aggregated data are dynamically joint to boundary data sets for display in the NMTracking interactive map.  Boundaries are for County, Census Track, and Small Areas data sets and are created using U.S. Census 2010 boundary data. The Small Areas data set consists of combined census tracts and was developed at the NM Department of Health. NM Small Areas  are 109 geographic areas across the state with population size that is just large enough to calculate rates for selected health events (e.g., asthma mortality, female breast cancer incidence). Most (95%) NM small-area population sizes range from 9,000 to 30,000 persons. Some counties have multiple small areas (e.g., Bernalillo County has 34 small areas within its boundaries). In other cases, whole counties (e.g., Harding, Quay, and DeBaca) are combined to create a single small area. Mapped results for the interactive data query include options for a background with a NM base map or shaded relief. Both background maps are served from the NM Resource Geographic Information System (NM RGIS), rgis.unm.edu) or other servers hosted at UNM Earth Data Analysis Center.</procdesc>
    101101<procdate>20160505</procdate>
    102102</procstep>
  • adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/epht-view-content/xml/metadata/Nitrate_CommunityWater.xml

    r11544 r12444  
    9393</procstep>
    9494<procstep>
    95 <procdesc>NM EPHT receives drinking water data for community water systems (CWS) from the NM Environment Department Safe Drinking Water Information System (SDWIS). Data are received in MS Excel spreadsheet, with location coordinates in four different datums: three geographic and one unknown.  NMEPHT uses Esri ArcGIS 10.0 to prepare a shapefile from the spreadsheet data, geocode the shapefile, and re-project the CWS data to the Geographic Coordinate System, WGS84 Spheroid, and WGS84 Datum.  Geocoded and re-projected CWS data are de-identified using Esri models to merge multiple facilities within a CWS and to geographically mask a single-point CWS. Coordinates for a CWS that contain one facility are masked to de-identify exact location by randomly displacing the point according to buffer parameters (200 m to 500 m) and while locating the point within the CWS County. CWSs that contain multiple facilities require one final set of coordinates. For each CWS, the multiple points are merged by computing their centroid/arithmetic mean coordinates.</procdesc>
     95<procdesc>NM EPHT receives drinking water data for community water systems (CWS) from the NM Environment Department Safe Drinking Water Information System (SDWIS). Data are received in MS Excel spreadsheet, with location coordinates in four different datums: three geographic and one unknown.  NM EPHT uses Esri ArcGIS 10.0 to prepare a shapefile from the spreadsheet data, geocode the shapefile, and re-project the CWS data to the Geographic Coordinate System, WGS84 Spheroid, and WGS84 Datum.  Geocoded and re-projected CWS data are de-identified using Esri models to merge multiple facilities within a CWS and to geographically mask a single-point CWS. Coordinates for a CWS that contain one facility are masked to de-identify exact location by randomly displacing the point according to buffer parameters (200 m to 500 m) and while locating the point within the CWS County. CWSs that contain multiple facilities require one final set of coordinates. For each CWS, the multiple points are merged by computing their centroid/arithmetic mean coordinates.</procdesc>
    9696<procdate>20151015</procdate>
    9797</procstep>
    9898<procstep>
    99 <procdesc>NMEPHT data queries through nmtracking.org (NMTracking) result in query-specific data sets that are aggregated by geographic unit. These aggregated data are dynamically joint to boundary data sets for display in the NMTracking interactive map.  Boundaries are for County, Census Track, and Small Areas data sets and are created using U.S. Census 2010 boundary data. The Small Areas data set consists of combined census tracts and was developed at the NM Department of Health. NM Small Areas  are 109 geographic areas across the state with population size that is just large enough to calculate rates for selected health events (e.g., asthma mortality, female breast cancer incidence). Most (95%) NM small-area population sizes range from 9,000 to 30,000 persons. Some counties have multiple small areas (e.g., Bernalillo County has 34 small areas within its boundaries). In other cases, whole counties (e.g., Harding, Quay, and DeBaca) are combined to create a single small area. Mapped results for the interactive data query include options for a background with a NM base map or shaded relief. Both background maps are served from the NM Resource Geographic Information System (NM RGIS), rgis.unm.edu) or other servers hosted at UNM Earth Data Analysis Center.</procdesc>
     99<procdesc>NM EPHT data queries through nmtracking.org (NMTracking) result in query-specific data sets that are aggregated by geographic unit. These aggregated data are dynamically joint to boundary data sets for display in the NMTracking interactive map.  Boundaries are for County, Census Track, and Small Areas data sets and are created using U.S. Census 2010 boundary data. The Small Areas data set consists of combined census tracts and was developed at the NM Department of Health. NM Small Areas  are 109 geographic areas across the state with population size that is just large enough to calculate rates for selected health events (e.g., asthma mortality, female breast cancer incidence). Most (95%) NM small-area population sizes range from 9,000 to 30,000 persons. Some counties have multiple small areas (e.g., Bernalillo County has 34 small areas within its boundaries). In other cases, whole counties (e.g., Harding, Quay, and DeBaca) are combined to create a single small area. Mapped results for the interactive data query include options for a background with a NM base map or shaded relief. Both background maps are served from the NM Resource Geographic Information System (NM RGIS), rgis.unm.edu) or other servers hosted at UNM Earth Data Analysis Center.</procdesc>
    100100<procdate>20151015</procdate>
    101101</procstep>
  • adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/epht-view-content/xml/metadata/Old Metadata/Atrazine_CommunityWater.xml

    r11544 r12444  
    9494</procstep>
    9595<procstep>
    96 <procdesc>NM EPHT receives drinking water data for community water systems (CWS) from the NM Environment Department Safe Drinking Water Information System (SDWIS). Data are received in MS Excel spreadsheet, with location coordinates in four different datums: three geographic and one unknown.  NMEPHT uses Esri ArcGIS 10.0 to prepare a shapefile from the spreadsheet data, geocode the shapefile, and re-project the CWS data to the Geographic Coordinate System, WGS84 Spheroid, and WGS84 Datum.  Geocoded and re-projected CWS data are de-identified using Esri models to merge multiple facilities within a CWS and to geographically mask a single-point CWS. Coordinates for a CWS that contain one facility are masked to de-identify exact location by randomly displacing the point according to buffer parameters (200 m to 500 m) and while locating the point within the CWS County. CWSs that contain multiple facilities require one final set of coordinates. For each CWS, the multiple points are merged by computing their centroid/arithmetic mean coordinates.</procdesc>
     96<procdesc>NM EPHT receives drinking water data for community water systems (CWS) from the NM Environment Department Safe Drinking Water Information System (SDWIS). Data are received in MS Excel spreadsheet, with location coordinates in four different datums: three geographic and one unknown.  NM EPHT uses Esri ArcGIS 10.0 to prepare a shapefile from the spreadsheet data, geocode the shapefile, and re-project the CWS data to the Geographic Coordinate System, WGS84 Spheroid, and WGS84 Datum.  Geocoded and re-projected CWS data are de-identified using Esri models to merge multiple facilities within a CWS and to geographically mask a single-point CWS. Coordinates for a CWS that contain one facility are masked to de-identify exact location by randomly displacing the point according to buffer parameters (200 m to 500 m) and while locating the point within the CWS County. CWSs that contain multiple facilities require one final set of coordinates. For each CWS, the multiple points are merged by computing their centroid/arithmetic mean coordinates.</procdesc>
    9797<procdate>20160505</procdate>
    9898</procstep>
    9999<procstep>
    100 <procdesc>NMEPHT data queries through nmtracking.org (NMTracking) result in query-specific data sets that are aggregated by geographic unit. These aggregated data are dynamically joint to boundary data sets for display in the NMTracking interactive map.  Boundaries are for County, Census Track, and Small Areas data sets and are created using U.S. Census 2010 boundary data. The Small Areas data set consists of combined census tracts and was developed at the NM Department of Health. NM Small Areas  are 109 geographic areas across the state with population size that is just large enough to calculate rates for selected health events (e.g., asthma mortality, female breast cancer incidence). Most (95%) NM small-area population sizes range from 9,000 to 30,000 persons. Some counties have multiple small areas (e.g., Bernalillo County has 34 small areas within its boundaries). In other cases, whole counties (e.g., Harding, Quay, and DeBaca) are combined to create a single small area. Mapped results for the interactive data query include options for a background with a NM base map or shaded relief. Both background maps are served from the NM Resource Geographic Information System (NM RGIS), rgis.unm.edu) or other servers hosted at UNM Earth Data Analysis Center.</procdesc>
     100<procdesc>NM EPHT data queries through nmtracking.org (NMTracking) result in query-specific data sets that are aggregated by geographic unit. These aggregated data are dynamically joint to boundary data sets for display in the NMTracking interactive map.  Boundaries are for County, Census Track, and Small Areas data sets and are created using U.S. Census 2010 boundary data. The Small Areas data set consists of combined census tracts and was developed at the NM Department of Health. NM Small Areas  are 109 geographic areas across the state with population size that is just large enough to calculate rates for selected health events (e.g., asthma mortality, female breast cancer incidence). Most (95%) NM small-area population sizes range from 9,000 to 30,000 persons. Some counties have multiple small areas (e.g., Bernalillo County has 34 small areas within its boundaries). In other cases, whole counties (e.g., Harding, Quay, and DeBaca) are combined to create a single small area. Mapped results for the interactive data query include options for a background with a NM base map or shaded relief. Both background maps are served from the NM Resource Geographic Information System (NM RGIS), rgis.unm.edu) or other servers hosted at UNM Earth Data Analysis Center.</procdesc>
    101101<procdate>20160505</procdate>
    102102</procstep>
  • adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/epht-view-content/xml/metadata/Old Metadata/DEHP_CommunityWater.xml

    r11544 r12444  
    9494</procstep>
    9595<procstep>
    96 <procdesc>NM EPHT receives drinking water data for community water systems (CWS) from the NM Environment Department Safe Drinking Water Information System (SDWIS). Data are received in MS Excel spreadsheet, with location coordinates in four different datums: three geographic and one unknown.  NMEPHT uses Esri ArcGIS 10.0 to prepare a shapefile from the spreadsheet data, geocode the shapefile, and re-project the CWS data to the Geographic Coordinate System, WGS84 Spheroid, and WGS84 Datum.  Geocoded and re-projected CWS data are de-identified using Esri models to merge multiple facilities within a CWS and to geographically mask a single-point CWS. Coordinates for a CWS that contain one facility are masked to de-identify exact location by randomly displacing the point according to buffer parameters (200 m to 500 m) and while locating the point within the CWS County. CWSs that contain multiple facilities require one final set of coordinates. For each CWS, the multiple points are merged by computing their centroid/arithmetic mean coordinates.</procdesc>
     96<procdesc>NM EPHT receives drinking water data for community water systems (CWS) from the NM Environment Department Safe Drinking Water Information System (SDWIS). Data are received in MS Excel spreadsheet, with location coordinates in four different datums: three geographic and one unknown.  NM EPHT uses Esri ArcGIS 10.0 to prepare a shapefile from the spreadsheet data, geocode the shapefile, and re-project the CWS data to the Geographic Coordinate System, WGS84 Spheroid, and WGS84 Datum.  Geocoded and re-projected CWS data are de-identified using Esri models to merge multiple facilities within a CWS and to geographically mask a single-point CWS. Coordinates for a CWS that contain one facility are masked to de-identify exact location by randomly displacing the point according to buffer parameters (200 m to 500 m) and while locating the point within the CWS County. CWSs that contain multiple facilities require one final set of coordinates. For each CWS, the multiple points are merged by computing their centroid/arithmetic mean coordinates.</procdesc>
    9797<procdate>20151229</procdate>
    9898</procstep>
    9999<procstep>
    100 <procdesc>NMEPHT data queries through nmtracking.org (NMTracking) result in query-specific data sets that are aggregated by geographic unit. These aggregated data are dynamically joint to boundary data sets for display in the NMTracking interactive map.  Boundaries are for County, Census Track, and Small Areas data sets and are created using U.S. Census 2010 boundary data. The Small Areas data set consists of combined census tracts and was developed at the NM Department of Health. NM Small Areas  are 109 geographic areas across the state with population size that is just large enough to calculate rates for selected health events (e.g., asthma mortality, female breast cancer incidence). Most (95%) NM small-area population sizes range from 9,000 to 30,000 persons. Some counties have multiple small areas (e.g., Bernalillo County has 34 small areas within its boundaries). In other cases, whole counties (e.g., Harding, Quay, and DeBaca) are combined to create a single small area. Mapped results for the interactive data query include options for a background with a NM base map or shaded relief. Both background maps are served from the NM Resource Geographic Information System (NM RGIS), rgis.unm.edu) or other servers hosted at UNM Earth Data Analysis Center.</procdesc>
     100<procdesc>NM EPHT data queries through nmtracking.org (NMTracking) result in query-specific data sets that are aggregated by geographic unit. These aggregated data are dynamically joint to boundary data sets for display in the NMTracking interactive map.  Boundaries are for County, Census Track, and Small Areas data sets and are created using U.S. Census 2010 boundary data. The Small Areas data set consists of combined census tracts and was developed at the NM Department of Health. NM Small Areas  are 109 geographic areas across the state with population size that is just large enough to calculate rates for selected health events (e.g., asthma mortality, female breast cancer incidence). Most (95%) NM small-area population sizes range from 9,000 to 30,000 persons. Some counties have multiple small areas (e.g., Bernalillo County has 34 small areas within its boundaries). In other cases, whole counties (e.g., Harding, Quay, and DeBaca) are combined to create a single small area. Mapped results for the interactive data query include options for a background with a NM base map or shaded relief. Both background maps are served from the NM Resource Geographic Information System (NM RGIS), rgis.unm.edu) or other servers hosted at UNM Earth Data Analysis Center.</procdesc>
    101101<procdate>20151229</procdate>
    102102</procstep>
  • adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/epht-view-content/xml/metadata/Old Metadata/Nitrate_CommunityWater.xml

    r11544 r12444  
    9393</procstep>
    9494<procstep>
    95 <procdesc>NM EPHT receives drinking water data for community water systems (CWS) from the NM Environment Department Safe Drinking Water Information System (SDWIS). Data are received in MS Excel spreadsheet, with location coordinates in four different datums: three geographic and one unknown.  NMEPHT uses Esri ArcGIS 10.0 to prepare a shapefile from the spreadsheet data, geocode the shapefile, and re-project the CWS data to the Geographic Coordinate System, WGS84 Spheroid, and WGS84 Datum.  Geocoded and re-projected CWS data are de-identified using Esri models to merge multiple facilities within a CWS and to geographically mask a single-point CWS. Coordinates for a CWS that contain one facility are masked to de-identify exact location by randomly displacing the point according to buffer parameters (200 m to 500 m) and while locating the point within the CWS County. CWSs that contain multiple facilities require one final set of coordinates. For each CWS, the multiple points are merged by computing their centroid/arithmetic mean coordinates.</procdesc>
     95<procdesc>NM EPHT receives drinking water data for community water systems (CWS) from the NM Environment Department Safe Drinking Water Information System (SDWIS). Data are received in MS Excel spreadsheet, with location coordinates in four different datums: three geographic and one unknown.  NM EPHT uses Esri ArcGIS 10.0 to prepare a shapefile from the spreadsheet data, geocode the shapefile, and re-project the CWS data to the Geographic Coordinate System, WGS84 Spheroid, and WGS84 Datum.  Geocoded and re-projected CWS data are de-identified using Esri models to merge multiple facilities within a CWS and to geographically mask a single-point CWS. Coordinates for a CWS that contain one facility are masked to de-identify exact location by randomly displacing the point according to buffer parameters (200 m to 500 m) and while locating the point within the CWS County. CWSs that contain multiple facilities require one final set of coordinates. For each CWS, the multiple points are merged by computing their centroid/arithmetic mean coordinates.</procdesc>
    9696<procdate>20130411</procdate>
    9797</procstep>
    9898<procstep>
    99 <procdesc>NMEPHT data queries through nmtracking.org (NMTracking) result in query-specific data sets that are aggregated by geographic unit. These aggregated data are dynamically joint to boundary data sets for display in the NMTracking interactive map.  Boundaries are for County, Census Track, and Small Areas data sets and are created using U.S. Census 2010 boundary data. The Small Areas data set consists of combined census tracts and was developed at the NM Department of Health. NM Small Areas  are 109 geographic areas across the state with population size that is just large enough to calculate rates for selected health events (e.g., asthma mortality, female breast cancer incidence). Most (95%) NM small-area population sizes range from 9,000 to 30,000 persons. Some counties have multiple small areas (e.g., Bernalillo County has 34 small areas within its boundaries). In other cases, whole counties (e.g., Harding, Quay, and DeBaca) are combined to create a single small area. Mapped results for the interactive data query include options for a background with a NM base map or shaded relief. Both background maps are served from the NM Resource Geographic Information System (NM RGIS), rgis.unm.edu) or other servers hosted at UNM Earth Data Analysis Center.</procdesc>
     99<procdesc>NM EPHT data queries through nmtracking.org (NMTracking) result in query-specific data sets that are aggregated by geographic unit. These aggregated data are dynamically joint to boundary data sets for display in the NMTracking interactive map.  Boundaries are for County, Census Track, and Small Areas data sets and are created using U.S. Census 2010 boundary data. The Small Areas data set consists of combined census tracts and was developed at the NM Department of Health. NM Small Areas  are 109 geographic areas across the state with population size that is just large enough to calculate rates for selected health events (e.g., asthma mortality, female breast cancer incidence). Most (95%) NM small-area population sizes range from 9,000 to 30,000 persons. Some counties have multiple small areas (e.g., Bernalillo County has 34 small areas within its boundaries). In other cases, whole counties (e.g., Harding, Quay, and DeBaca) are combined to create a single small area. Mapped results for the interactive data query include options for a background with a NM base map or shaded relief. Both background maps are served from the NM Resource Geographic Information System (NM RGIS), rgis.unm.edu) or other servers hosted at UNM Earth Data Analysis Center.</procdesc>
    100100<procdate>20130411</procdate>
    101101</procstep>
  • adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/epht-view-content/xml/metadata/Old Metadata/PCE_CommunityWater.xml

    r11544 r12444  
    9494</procstep>
    9595<procstep>
    96 <procdesc>NM EPHT receives drinking water data for community water systems (CWS) from the NM Environment Department Safe Drinking Water Information System (SDWIS). Data are received in MS Excel spreadsheet, with location coordinates in four different datums: three geographic and one unknown.  NMEPHT uses Esri ArcGIS 10.0 to prepare a shapefile from the spreadsheet data, geocode the shapefile, and re-project the CWS data to the Geographic Coordinate System, WGS84 Spheroid, and WGS84 Datum.  Geocoded and re-projected CWS data are de-identified using Esri models to merge multiple facilities within a CWS and to geographically mask a single-point CWS. Coordinates for a CWS that contain one facility are masked to de-identify exact location by randomly displacing the point according to buffer parameters (200 m to 500 m) and while locating the point within the CWS County. CWSs that contain multiple facilities require one final set of coordinates. For each CWS, the multiple points are merged by computing their centroid/arithmetic mean coordinates.</procdesc>
     96<procdesc>NM EPHT receives drinking water data for community water systems (CWS) from the NM Environment Department Safe Drinking Water Information System (SDWIS). Data are received in MS Excel spreadsheet, with location coordinates in four different datums: three geographic and one unknown.  NM EPHT uses Esri ArcGIS 10.0 to prepare a shapefile from the spreadsheet data, geocode the shapefile, and re-project the CWS data to the Geographic Coordinate System, WGS84 Spheroid, and WGS84 Datum.  Geocoded and re-projected CWS data are de-identified using Esri models to merge multiple facilities within a CWS and to geographically mask a single-point CWS. Coordinates for a CWS that contain one facility are masked to de-identify exact location by randomly displacing the point according to buffer parameters (200 m to 500 m) and while locating the point within the CWS County. CWSs that contain multiple facilities require one final set of coordinates. For each CWS, the multiple points are merged by computing their centroid/arithmetic mean coordinates.</procdesc>
    9797<procdate>20160513</procdate>
    9898</procstep>
    9999<procstep>
    100 <procdesc>NMEPHT data queries through nmtracking.org (NMTracking) result in query-specific data sets that are aggregated by geographic unit. These aggregated data are dynamically joint to boundary data sets for display in the NMTracking interactive map.  Boundaries are for County, Census Track, and Small Areas data sets and are created using U.S. Census 2010 boundary data. The Small Areas data set consists of combined census tracts and was developed at the NM Department of Health. NM Small Areas  are 109 geographic areas across the state with population size that is just large enough to calculate rates for selected health events (e.g., asthma mortality, female breast cancer incidence). Most (95%) NM small-area population sizes range from 9,000 to 30,000 persons. Some counties have multiple small areas (e.g., Bernalillo County has 34 small areas within its boundaries). In other cases, whole counties (e.g., Harding, Quay, and DeBaca) are combined to create a single small area. Mapped results for the interactive data query include options for a background with a NM base map or shaded relief. Both background maps are served from the NM Resource Geographic Information System (NM RGIS), rgis.unm.edu) or other servers hosted at UNM Earth Data Analysis Center.</procdesc>
     100<procdesc>NM EPHT data queries through nmtracking.org (NMTracking) result in query-specific data sets that are aggregated by geographic unit. These aggregated data are dynamically joint to boundary data sets for display in the NMTracking interactive map.  Boundaries are for County, Census Track, and Small Areas data sets and are created using U.S. Census 2010 boundary data. The Small Areas data set consists of combined census tracts and was developed at the NM Department of Health. NM Small Areas  are 109 geographic areas across the state with population size that is just large enough to calculate rates for selected health events (e.g., asthma mortality, female breast cancer incidence). Most (95%) NM small-area population sizes range from 9,000 to 30,000 persons. Some counties have multiple small areas (e.g., Bernalillo County has 34 small areas within its boundaries). In other cases, whole counties (e.g., Harding, Quay, and DeBaca) are combined to create a single small area. Mapped results for the interactive data query include options for a background with a NM base map or shaded relief. Both background maps are served from the NM Resource Geographic Information System (NM RGIS), rgis.unm.edu) or other servers hosted at UNM Earth Data Analysis Center.</procdesc>
    101101<procdate>20160513</procdate>
    102102</procstep>
  • adopters/nm-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/epht-view-content/xml/metadata/Old Metadata/TCE_CommunityWater.xml

    r11544 r12444  
    9494</procstep>
    9595<procstep>
    96 <procdesc>NM EPHT receives drinking water data for community water systems (CWS) from the NM Environment Department Safe Drinking Water Information System (SDWIS). Data are received in MS Excel spreadsheet, with location coordinates in four different datums: three geographic and one unknown.  NMEPHT uses Esri ArcGIS 10.0 to prepare a shapefile from the spreadsheet data, geocode the shapefile, and re-project the CWS data to the Geographic Coordinate System, WGS84 Spheroid, and WGS84 Datum.  Geocoded and re-projected CWS data are de-identified using Esri models to merge multiple facilities within a CWS and to geographically mask a single-point CWS. Coordinates for a CWS that contain one facility are masked to de-identify exact location by randomly displacing the point according to buffer parameters (200 m to 500 m) and while locating the point within the CWS County. CWSs that contain multiple facilities require one final set of coordinates. For each CWS, the multiple points are merged by computing their centroid/arithmetic mean coordinates.</procdesc>
     96<procdesc>NM EPHT receives drinking water data for community water systems (CWS) from the NM Environment Department Safe Drinking Water Information System (SDWIS). Data are received in MS Excel spreadsheet, with location coordinates in four different datums: three geographic and one unknown.  NM EPHT uses Esri ArcGIS 10.0 to prepare a shapefile from the spreadsheet data, geocode the shapefile, and re-project the CWS data to the Geographic Coordinate System, WGS84 Spheroid, and WGS84 Datum.  Geocoded and re-projected CWS data are de-identified using Esri models to merge multiple facilities within a CWS and to geographically mask a single-point CWS. Coordinates for a CWS that contain one facility are masked to de-identify exact location by randomly displacing the point according to buffer parameters (200 m to 500 m) and while locating the point within the CWS County. CWSs that contain multiple facilities require one final set of coordinates. For each CWS, the multiple points are merged by computing their centroid/arithmetic mean coordinates.</procdesc>
    9797<procdate>20160513</procdate>
    9898</procstep>
    9999<procstep>
    100 <procdesc>NMEPHT data queries through nmtracking.org (NMTracking) result in query-specific data sets that are aggregated by geographic unit. These aggregated data are dynamically joint to boundary data sets for display in the NMTracking interactive map.  Boundaries are for County, Census Track, and Small Areas data sets and are created using U.S. Census 2010 boundary data. The Small Areas data set consists of combined census tracts and was developed at the NM Department of Health. NM Small Areas  are 109 geographic areas across the state with population size that is just large enough to calculate rates for selected health events (e.g., asthma mortality, female breast cancer incidence). Most (95%) NM small-area population sizes range from 9,000 to 30,000 persons. Some counties have multiple small areas (e.g., Bernalillo County has 34 small areas within its boundaries). In other cases, whole counties (e.g., Harding, Quay, and DeBaca) are combined to create a single small area. Mapped results for the interactive data query include options for a background with a NM base map or shaded relief. Both background maps are served from the NM Resource Geographic Information System (NM RGIS), rgis.unm.edu) or other servers hosted at UNM Earth Data Analysis Center.</procdesc>
     100<procdesc>NM EPHT data queries through nmtracking.org (NMTracking) result in query-specific data sets that are aggregated by geographic unit. These aggregated data are dynamically joint to boundary data sets for display in the NMTracking interactive map.  Boundaries are for County, Census Track, and Small Areas data sets and are created using U.S. Census 2010 boundary data. The Small Areas data set consists of combined census tracts and was developed at the NM Department of Health. NM Small Areas  are 109 geographic areas across the state with population size that is just large enough to calculate rates for selected health events (e.g., asthma mortality, female breast cancer incidence). Most (95%) NM small-area population sizes range from 9,000 to 30,000 persons. Some counties have multiple small areas (e.g., Bernalillo County has 34 small areas within its boundaries). In other cases, whole counties (e.g., Harding, Quay, and DeBaca) are combined to create a single small area. Mapped results for the interactive data query include options for a background with a NM base map or shaded relief. Both background maps are served from the NM Resource Geographic Information System (NM RGIS), rgis.unm.edu) or other servers hosted at UNM Earth Data Analysis Center.</procdesc>
    101101<procdate>20160513</procdate>
    102102</procstep>
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