Changeset 12312 in main


Ignore:
Timestamp:
11/17/16 07:48:44 (6 years ago)
Author:
b.scott
Message:

Many edits to language from CK, added tile topic selection, cleaned up pages not needed at this time.

Location:
adopters/ky-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/ehl-view-content/xml/html_content
Files:
35 edited

Legend:

Unmodified
Added
Removed
  • adopters/ky-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/ehl-view-content/xml/html_content/about/Background.xml

    r11435 r12312  
    3333                <br/><br/>
    3434
    35                 Currently, there are 23 state health departments, one local health department, and five universities that participate in the
     35                Currently, there are 25 state health departments and one city health department in the
    3636                National Tracking Network.
    3737                <br/>
    3838
    39                 <img ibis:src="image/tracking_map_2012.jpg" alt="2006 grantee map" width="570" height="400" border="0"/>
    40                 <br/><br/>
     39<img ibis:src="image/GranteeMap.jpg" width="495" height="428" alt="2014 Grantee Map"></img><br/><br/>
    4140
    4241                <div class="Quote" style="">
  • adopters/ky-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/ehl-view-content/xml/html_content/about/ContactInformation.xml

    r11435 r12312  
    77        <CONTENT>
    88
    9                 <div class="Belt" style="background-image: url(../view/image/belt/contact.jpg);">
     9                <!--<div class="Belt" style="background-image: url(../view/image/belt/contact.jpg);">
    1010                        <div class="Selections">
    1111                                <a name="contextNavigationMenuJumpTo" class="ContextMenu">About EnviroHealthLink</a>
     
    1818                                </ul>
    1919                        </div>
    20                 </div>
     20                </div>-->
    2121               
    2222                <a name="top"/>
     
    4646
    4747                                <h4>Address</h4>
    48                                 <a href="http://health.Kentucky.gov/els/ElsContactUs.html" title="List of contacts for this office">
    49                                 Bureau of Epidemiology</a><br/>
    50                                 Kentucky Department of Health<br/>
    51                                 P.O. Box 142101<br/>
    52                                 Salt Lake City, UT 84114-2101<br/>
     48                                <a href="http://chfs.ky.gov/dph/info/phps/epht.htm" title="List of contacts for this office">
     49                                Environmental Public Heatlh Tracking </a><br/>
     50                                Kentucky Department for Public Health<br/>
     51                                275 E. Main St.<br/>
     52                                Frankfort, KY 40621<br/>
    5353                                <br/>
    5454
    55                                 For Fed-Ex, use:<br/>
    56                                 288 North 1460 West<br/>
    57                                 Salt Lake City, UT 84116<br/>
    58                                 <br/>
    5955
    6056                                <h4>Hours of Operation</h4>
    61                                 8:00 AM - 5:00 PM (Mountain Time)<br/>
     57                                8:00 AM - 4:00 PM (Eastern Time)<br/>
    6258                                <br/><br/>
    6359                        </div>
     
    6561                        <div class="LeftColumn">
    6662                                <h4>Kentucky EPHT Network</h4>
    67                                 Email: <a href="mailto:eep@Kentucky.gov">eep@Kentucky.gov</a><br/>
    68                                 Phone: (801) 538-6191<br/>
    69                                 Fax: (801) 538-6564 <br/>
     63                                Email: <a href="mailto:chfs.kyephtn@ky.gov">chfs.kyephtn@ky.gov</a><br/>
     64                                Phone: (502)564-4537<br/>
    7065                                <br/>
    71                                 <h4>Sam LeFevre</h4>
    72                                 Manager<br/>Environmental Epidemiology Program<br/>
    73                                 <a href="mailto:slefevre@Kentucky.gov">slefevre@Kentucky.gov</a><br/>
    74                                 (801) 538-6191<br/>
     66                                <h4>Janie Cambron</h4>
     67                                Program Manager<br/>Environmental Public Health Tracking Network<br/>
     68                                <a href="mailto:janie.cambron@ky.gov">janie.cambron@ky.gov</a><br/>
     69                                (502)564-4537 ext 4088<br/>
    7570                                <br/>
    76                                 <h4>Greg Williams</h4>
    77                                 Manager<br/>Environmental Public Health Tracking Network<br/>
    78                                 <a href="mailto:gregwilliams@Kentucky.gov">gregwilliams@Kentucky.gov</a><br/>
    79                                 (801) 538-9173<br/>
     71                                <h4>Ben Scott</h4>
     72                                Data Coordinator<br/>Environmental Public Health Tracking Network<br/>
     73                                <a href="mailto: benjamind.scott@ky.gov">benjamind.scott@ky.gov</a><br/>
     74                                (502)564-4537 ext 4228<br/>
     75                                <br/>
     76                                <h4>Colleen Kaelin</h4>
     77                                Environmental Epidemiologist<br/>Public Safety Branch<br/>
     78                                <a href="mailto: colleen.kaelin@ky.gov">colleen.kaelin@ky.gov</a><br/>
     79                                (502)564-4537 ext 4226<br/>
    8080                                <br/>
    8181                        </div>
  • adopters/ky-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/ehl-view-content/xml/html_content/about/DataStewards.xml

    r10898 r12312  
    1616                        </tr>
    1717<tr>
    18         <td><span class="Bold">WEB SAFE EMAIL ADDRESS EXAMPLE</span><br/> Deaths by cause, year, county, age, sex, race/ethnicity</td>
    19         <td>Tony Ortiz<br/><SCRIPT TYPE="text/javascript">emailE=('Tony.Ortiz@' + 'state.nm.us')
    20                 document.write('<a href="mailto:' + emailE + '">' + emailE + '</a>')</SCRIPT></td>
    21         <td>NMDOH Epidemiology and Response Division, Bureau of Vital Records and Health Statistics</td>
    22         <td>(505) 827-2510</td>
     18
    2319</tr>
    2420                        <!--tr>
     
    6460                                <td>(502) 564-3418</td>
    6561                        </tr>
    66                         <!--tr>
    67                                 <td>Pregnancy Risk Assessment and Monitoring System (PRAMS)</td>
    68                                 <td><a href="mailto:lbaksh@utah.gov">Laurie Baksh</a></td>
    69                                 <td>Reproductive Health</td>
    70                                 <td>(801)538-9146</td>
    71                         </tr-->
     62                        <tr>
     63                                <td>Drinking Water Quality</td>
     64                                <td><a href="mailto:LarryC.Taylor@ky.gov">Larry Taylor</a></td>
     65                                <td>Department for Environmental Protection</td>
     66                                <td>(502) 782-6785</td>
     67                        </tr>
    7268                </table>
    7369<br/><br/><br/><br/>
  • adopters/ky-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/ehl-view-content/xml/html_content/about/EnviroHealthLink.xml

    r11643 r12312  
    3131                        <br/><br/>
    3232                       
    33                         <img ibis:src="image/EH_VENN.jpg" width="200" height="200" alt="NEPHTN logo" style="float: right;"></img>
     33                        <img ibis:src="image/EH_VENN.jpg" width="200" height="200" alt="Venn" style="float: right;"></img>
    3434                <a name="top"/>
     35               
     36                        The environment is our air and water, as well as the all of our natural and built surroundings. Environmental causes of
     37                        diseases are often hard to identify. Here at EnviroHealthLink, we try to better understand environmental causes of disease by tracking environmental factors and health outcomes.  Tracking is type of health surveillance that includes how we         
     38                        collect, interpret, and report data about hazards in the environment, populations that may have been           
     39                        exposed to these hazards, and health problems that may be related to these exposures.
     40               
    3541                       
    36                
    37                         Environmental causes of diseases are often hard to identify.  Measuring amounts of
    38                         substances in our environment in a standard way, tracing the spread of these over time and
    39                         area, seeing how they show up in human tissues, and understanding how they may cause
    40                         illness is critical.
    41                         <br/><br/>
    42 
    43                         While there are many ways to define environmental health, for the purposes of this website,
    44                         it means how the environment might affect a person's health and how people might affect the
    45                         health of the environment.
    46                         <br/><br/>
    47 
    48                         The environment is our air, our water, and our surroundings.  Tracking describes how we         
    49                         collect, interpret, and report data. We are collecting data about hazards in the environment, populations that may have been exposed to these hazards, and health problems that may be related to these
    50                         exposures.
    5142                        <br/><br/>
    5243
     
    7162                        <br/><br/>
    7263                       
    73                         Environmental public health tracking is a type of surveillance. It is a way of incorporating data for
    74                         analysis and reporting. CDC's National Environmental Public Health Tracking Network is a website
    75                         website that brings together data concerning some health and environmental problems. The goal of
    76                         this network is to provide information to help improve where we live, work, and play.
     64                        By establishing and maintaining the Environmental Public Health Tracking Network in Kentucky, we can help gain valuable information about the health of our population and the environment.  This information can then be used to improve guide intervention and policy to improve the places we live, work, and play and the health of our population across the commonwealth and nation.
     65                       
    7766                        <br/><br/>
    7867
  • adopters/ky-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/ehl-view-content/xml/html_content/about/Resources.xml

    r11645 r12312  
    3333                        <ul>
    3434                                <li><a ibis:href="about/Background.html">Background</a></li>
    35                                 <li><a ibis:href="about/DataPartners.html">Data Partners</a></li>
     35                                <!--<li><a ibis:href="about/DataPartners.html">Data Partners</a></li>-->
    3636                                <li><a ibis:href="about/DataStewards.html">Data Stewards</a></li>
    37                                 <li><a ibis:href="about/Contributors.html">Contributors</a></li>
     37                                <!--<li><a ibis:href="about/Contributors.html">Contributors</a></li>-->
    3838                        </ul>
    3939
     
    4343                        </ul>
    4444
    45                         <h3>Calculations and Statistics</h3>
     45                        <!--<h3>Calculations and Statistics</h3>
    4646                        <ul>
    4747                                <li><a ibis:href="dataportal/Count_Rate.html">Counts, Computing Rates and Age Adjustment</a></li>
    4848                                                        <li><a ibis:href="dataportal/query/AgeAdjustRate.html">Age Adjustment Weights</a></li>
    4949                                <li><a href="http://www.animatedsoftware.com./elearning/Statistics%20Explained/glossary/se_glossary.html">Statistical Glossary</a></li>
    50                         </ul><br/>
     50                        </ul><br/>-->
    5151                </div>
    5252
  • adopters/ky-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/ehl-view-content/xml/html_content/about/Tracking101.xml

    r11435 r12312  
    2323                <br/><br/>
    2424
    25                 <h2>Tracking 101 via Kentucky's UTrain</h2>
     25                <!--<h2>Tracking 101 via Kentucky's UTrain</h2>
    2626                <ol>
    27                         <li>Go to <a href="http://www.Kentucky.train.org">www.Kentucky.train.org</a> and register/setup your free UTRAIN account</li>
     27                        <li>Go to <a href="https://ky.train.org">ky.train.org</a> and register/setup your free UTRAIN account</li>
    2828                        <li>Log onto to your just created UTRAIN account</li>
    2929                        <li>Search for EPHT Tracking 101 or course #1009900</li>
    3030                        <li>Proceed with registration instructions (you will be re-directed to another site)</li>
    31                 </ol><br/>
     31                </ol><br/>-->
    3232
    3333                <h2>Tracking 101 via NEHA's Website</h2>
     
    3838                <br/><br/>
    3939
    40                 Access the course through <a href="http://www.neha.org/tracking.html">NEHA's e-Learning Website</a>.
     40                Register and access the course through <a href="http://nehacert.org/moodle/course/category.php?id=41">NEHA's e-Learning Website</a>.
    4141                <br/><br/>
    4242<script>
  • adopters/ky-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/ehl-view-content/xml/html_content/community/BuiltEnvironment.xml

    r11643 r12312  
    3434
    3535<br/><br/>
    36 <a ibis:href="community/BuiltEnvironmentDetail.html">Explore built environment data</a>
    37 <br/><br/>
     36<!--<a ibis:href="community/BuiltEnvironmentDetail.html">Explore built environment data</a>
     37<br/><br/>-->
    3838<a ibis:href="community/BuiltEnvironmentDetail.html">Learn more about built environment</a>
    3939                </div>
  • adopters/ky-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/ehl-view-content/xml/html_content/community/BuiltEnvironmentDetail.xml

    r11134 r12312  
    2020                <a name="top"/>
    2121                <div style="padding: 0 1em 1em 1em;">
     22               
     23                <H2>Built Environment</H2><br/>
    2224
    2325                <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="2">
     
    4042
    4143                <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="2">
    42                         <TITLE>Why It's Important</TITLE>
     44                        <TITLE>Why it's important?</TITLE>
    4345                        <CONTENT>
    4446Community design is an important public health issue because it is closely connected to many health and behavioral issues. Many of the public health actions used to improve one health outcome also help other health outcomes. For example, reducing the speed limit in neighborhoods can reduce the number of motor vehicle-related injuries and encourage more people to be active by make it safer to walk and bicycle.<br/><br/>
     
    4850
    4951                <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="2">
    50                         <TITLE>What Is Known</TITLE>
     52                        <TITLE>What is known?</TITLE>
    5153                        <CONTENT>
    5254                Well-developed standards exist for some aspects of community design, such as building codes and street design for motor vehicles. But often these standards do not consider all groups equally. For example, transportation agencies routinely look at streets to determine how well they work for drivers. But official consideration for pedestrians and bicyclists is often an afterthought.
     
    5557
    5658                <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="2">
    57                         <TITLE>Who Is at Risk</TITLE>
     59                        <TITLE>Who is at risk?</TITLE>
    5860                        <CONTENT>
    59                         Community design may affect certain populations more than others. For example, people who cannot drive because of age, income level, or disability rely on other types of transportation. Everyone is unable to drive at some point in their lives. When the design of communities makes walking, bicycling, or taking public transportation unsafe or difficult, vulnerable populations suffer.
     61Community design affects people who are unable to drive more than others.  When the design of a community makes walking, biking, or taking public transportation unsafe or inconvenient, younger people, older people, disabled people, and poor people have less access to the services and resources they need to stay healthy.
    6062                        </CONTENT>
    6163                </ibis:ExpandableContent>
    6264
    6365                <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="2">
    64                         <TITLE>How To Reduce Risk</TITLE>
     66                        <TITLE>How to reduce risk?</TITLE>
    6567                        <CONTENT>
    66                         The primary way to promote health through community design is to make sure there is access to many types of transportation, healthy food, safe housing, and public spaces that promote health. These include access to:
     68The best way to promote health through community design is to provide access to many types of transportation, healthy food, safe housing, and public spaces that promote exercise and spending time outdoors. <br/><br/>
     69The build environment can be improved by providing increasing access to:
    6770        <ul>
    68         <li>public transportation, like buses or trains</li>
    69         <li>sidewalks and bike paths</li>
    70         <li>stores that sell food, especially those stocked with fresh fruits and vegetables</li>
    71         <li>safe and energy efficient housing</li>
    72         <li>parks and public spaces</li>
     71        <li>Buses, Trains, and other types of public transportation</li>
     72        <li>Sidewalks, bike paths and trails</li>
     73        <li>Stores that sell fresh produce and other healthy foods</li>
     74        <li>Housing that is safe and energy efficient</li>
     75        <li>Parks and Public Spaces for everyone to enjoy</li>
    7376        </ul>           
    7477       
  • adopters/ky-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/ehl-view-content/xml/html_content/community/Demographics.xml

    r11643 r12312  
    2020                <div style="padding: 0 1em 1em 1em;">
    2121                        <H2>Demographics</H2><br/>
    22                                 Demographics can help predict the possible end results of health problems and your risk for
    23                                 certain diseases. They can also show how diseases can develop and change over time and from one place to another.<br/><br/>
    24                                 Demographic characteristics most commonly used in public health statistics include:
     22                                Demographics is defined as numerical data about a population and the groups in it.  Public Health professionals look at demographic data to see if a particular part of a population is at greater risk of a certain condition than the rest.  Demographics can also be used to show how diseases and the risk factors for those diseases can change over time and from one place to another.<br/><br/>
     23                                The demographic characteristics most useful for public health reports  include:
    2524                                <ul class="Indent">
    26                                         <li>Age</li>
    27                                         <li>Sex</li>
    28                                         <li>Race</li>
    29                                         <li>Ethnicity</li>
     25                                        <li>Age, because some conditions are more likely to occur in children or the elderly</li>
     26                                        <li>Sex, because some conditions are more likely to occur in males or in females</li>
     27                                        <li>Race, because the risk of certain conditions may be different for different racial groups</li>
     28                                        <li>Ethnicity, because the risk of certain conditions may be different for different ethnic groups</li>
    3029                                </ul>
    3130                                <br/>
    3231                               
    33                                 Tracking these demographic characteristics over time allows us to
     32                                Tracking these characteristics allows us to:
    3433                                <ul class="Indent">
    35                                         <li>better understand the factors that influence environmental exposures and human health across Kentucky</li>
    36                                         <li>track the effects of public health policies aimed at lessening the environmental burden on various populations</li>
    37                                         <li>make informed decisions about resources needed for public health response or public safety</li>
     34                                        <li>Better understand the differences in risk factors and health between different demographic groups</li>
     35                                        <li>Understand how health policies affect or do not affect the health of Kentucky's populations</li>
     36                                        <li>Make informed decisions about which demographic groups need the most resources for public health response</li>
    3837                                </ul><br/>
    3938
    40 EnviroHealthLink uses U.S. Census Bureau databases to obtain state and local data about population characteristics. This information is based on populations rather than individual members of a particular population. Therefore, individual health risk factors are not included in this information.
     39Data on Kentucky's populations can be found in data collected by the United States Census Bureau.  These databases provide number on Kentucky counties, cities, and zip codes.  No individual information is included in the Census Bureau databases.
    4140
    4241<br/><br/>
  • adopters/ky-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/ehl-view-content/xml/html_content/community/DemographicsDetail.xml

    r11134 r12312  
    1919                <a name="top"/>
    2020                <div style="padding: 0 1em 1em 1em;">
    21 
     21<h2>Demographics</h2> <br/>
    2222                <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="2">
    2323                        <TITLE>Description</TITLE>
     
    4949
    5050                <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="2">
    51                         <TITLE>Why It's Important</TITLE>
     51                        <TITLE>Why it's important?</TITLE>
    5252                        <CONTENT>
    5353                                Analysis of public health data by demographic characteristics is essential
     
    6969
    7070                <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="2">
    71                         <TITLE>What Is Known</TITLE>
     71                        <TITLE>What is known?</TITLE>
    7272                        <CONTENT>
    7373                                Certain demographic groups have consistently better outcomes than others on a variety
     
    9292                </ibis:ExpandableContent>
    9393        -->
    94                 <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="2">
    95                         <TITLE>How It's Tracked</TITLE>
    96                         <CONTENT>
    97                                 Demographic characteristics are tracked in most public health data sets including, but not limited to:
    98                                 <ul class="Indent">
    99                                         <li><a href="http://www.cdc.gov/brfss/index.htm">Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System</a></li>
    100                                         <li><a href="http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nvss.htm">Birth and death certificates</a></li>
    101                                         <li><a href="http://www.cdc.gov/cancer/npcr/index.htm">Cancer registries</a></li>
    102                                         <li><a href="http://www.census.gov/cps/">Current Population Survey</a></li>
    103                                         <li><a href="http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/imz-managers/coverage/imz-coverage.html">National Immunization Survey</a></li>
    104                                         <li><a href="http://www.census.gov/2010census/">U.S. Census</a></li>
    105                                         <li><a href="http://www.cdc.gov/HealthyYouth/yrbs/index.htm">Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System</a></li>
    106                                 </ul>
    107 
    108                         </CONTENT>
    109                 </ibis:ExpandableContent>
    110 
    111                 <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="2"><SHOW/>
    112                         <TITLE>Indicator Reports (Data tables, maps, charts, more detailed information)</TITLE>
    113                         <CONTENT>
    114                                 <ibis:SelectionsList id="IndicatorList">
    115                                 </ibis:SelectionsList>
    116                         </CONTENT>
    117                 </ibis:ExpandableContent>
    118 
    119                 <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="2">
    120                         <TITLE>Queryable Datasets</TITLE>
    121                         <CONTENT>
    122                                 <h3>Population Estimates</h3>
    123                                 <ibis:SelectionsList>
    124                                         <SELECTION>
    125                                                 <TITLE>Population Estimates by County and Region</TITLE>
    126                                                 <LOCAL_URL>dataportal/query/builder/pop/PopMain/Count.html</LOCAL_URL>
    127                                         </SELECTION>
    128                                         <SELECTION>
    129                                                 <TITLE>Population Estimates by New Mexico Small Area</TITLE>
    130                                                 <LOCAL_URL>dataportal/query/builder/pop/PopSarea/Count.html</LOCAL_URL>
    131                                         </SELECTION>
    132                                         <SELECTION>
    133                                                 <TITLE>Population Estimates by New Mexico 2010 Census Tract Geometries</TITLE>
    134                                                 <LOCAL_URL>dataportal/query/builder/pop/PopTract/Count.html</LOCAL_URL>
    135                                         </SELECTION>                   
    136                                 </ibis:SelectionsList>
    137                         </CONTENT>
    138                 </ibis:ExpandableContent>
    139 
     94               
    14095        <!--    <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="2">
    14196                        <TITLE>FAQs and Resources</TITLE>
  • adopters/ky-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/ehl-view-content/xml/html_content/community/SocialDeterminantsDetail.xml

    r11643 r12312  
    2020                <a name="top"/>
    2121                <div style="padding: 0 1em 1em 1em;">
    22 
    23                 <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="2"><SHOW/>
     22               
     23<h2>Social Determinants</h2> <br/>
     24                <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="2">
    2425                        <TITLE>Description</TITLE>
    2526                        <CONTENT>
     
    4647
    4748                <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="2">
    48                         <TITLE>Why It's Important</TITLE>
     49                        <TITLE>Why is it important?</TITLE>
    4950                        <CONTENT>
    5051                                According to the World Bank, in 2013 65.7% of the United States population was between the ages of 15 and 64, which is the
     
    7071
    7172                <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="2">
    72                         <TITLE>What Is Known</TITLE>
     73                        <TITLE>What is known?</TITLE>
    7374                        <CONTENT>
    7475                                Employment, like and income and poverty status, is used in many epidemiological studies and epidemiological surveillance activities.
     
    9394
    9495                <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="2">
    95                         <TITLE>Who Is at Risk</TITLE>
     96                        <TITLE>Who is at risk?</TITLE>
    9697                        <CONTENT>
    9798                                The following persons may be at risk for the negative effects of unemployment, underemployment, and other types of workplace conditions:
     
    117118
    118119                <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="2">
    119                         <TITLE>How To Reduce Risk</TITLE>
     120                        <TITLE>How to reduce risk?</TITLE>
    120121                        <CONTENT>
    121122                                According to the WHO, A healthy workplace is one in which workers and managers
     
    144145                </ibis:ExpandableContent>
    145146
    146                 <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="2">
    147                         <TITLE>How It's Tracked</TITLE>
    148                         <CONTENT>
    149                                 Employment, and employment level is tracked at national, state, county and other levels through surveys conducted by the United States Census, primarily the American Community Survey.
    150                         </CONTENT>
    151                 </ibis:ExpandableContent>
    152 
    153                 <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="2"><SHOW/>
    154                         <TITLE>Indicator Reports (Data tables, maps, charts, more detailed information)</TITLE>
    155                         <CONTENT>
    156                                 <ibis:SelectionsList id="IndicatorList">
    157                                         <SELECTION>
    158                                                 <TITLE>Unemployment in New Mexico</TITLE>
    159                                                 <LOCAL_URL>indicator/view/Unemploy.Year.NM_US.html</LOCAL_URL>
    160                                         </SELECTION>
    161                                 </ibis:SelectionsList>
    162                         </CONTENT>
    163                 </ibis:ExpandableContent>
    164 
    165                 <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="2"><SHOW/>
    166                         <TITLE>Queryable Datasets</TITLE>
    167                         <CONTENT>
    168                                 <h3>Employment, American Community Survey, by County, Small Area or Census Tract</h3>
    169                                 <ibis:SelectionsList>
    170                                         <SELECTION>
    171                                                 <TITLE>Percentage of Population Age 16 and Over in the Labor Force</TITLE>
    172                                                 <LOCAL_URL>query/builder/ACS/ACSEconomic/InLabFrc.html</LOCAL_URL>
    173                                         </SELECTION>
    174                                         <SELECTION>
    175                                                 <TITLE>Percentage of Civilian Population Age 16 and Older that is Unemployed</TITLE>
    176                                                 <LOCAL_URL>query/builder/ACS/ACSEconomic/Unemploy.html</LOCAL_URL>
    177                                         </SELECTION>
    178                                         <SELECTION>
    179                                                 <TITLE>People Age 16 or Older Living With Their Own Children Under Age 6, Where the Only Parent or Both Parents Are in the Labor Force</TITLE>
    180                                                 <LOCAL_URL>query/builder/ACS/ACSEconomic/PrntEmpl.html</LOCAL_URL>
    181                                         </SELECTION>
    182                                 </ibis:SelectionsList>
    183                                 <h3>Other query selections from the American Community Survey</h3>
    184                                 <ibis:SelectionsList>
    185                                         <SELECTION>
    186                                                 <TITLE>Selections for income, education, household structure, etc.</TITLE>
    187                                                 <LOCAL_URL>query/selection/ACS/ACSSelection.html</LOCAL_URL>
    188                                         </SELECTION>
    189                                 </ibis:SelectionsList>
    190                         </CONTENT>
    191                 </ibis:ExpandableContent>
     147               
    192148
    193149        <!--    <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="2">
  • adopters/ky-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/ehl-view-content/xml/html_content/dataportal/DatasetIndex.xml

    r11643 r12312  
    1414                                        <li class="Sticky On"><a ibis:href="dataportal/DatasetIndex.html">Datasets</a></li>
    1515                                        <li class="Sticky"><a ibis:href="dataportal/MetadataIndex.html">Metadata</a></li>
    16                                         <li class="Sticky"><a ibis:href="dataportal/ReportIndex.html">Reports</a></li>
    17                                         <li class="Sticky"><a ibis:href="dataportal/ComparisonReports.html">Comparisons</a></li>
    18                                         <li class="Sticky"><a ibis:href="dataportal/Help.html">Help</a></li>
     16                                        <li class="Sticky"><a ibis:href="dataportal/ReportIndexComingSoon.html">Reports</a></li>
     17                                        <!--<li class="Sticky"><a ibis:href="dataportal/ComparisonReports.html">Comparisons</a></li>
     18                                        <li class="Sticky"><a ibis:href="dataportal/Help.html">Help</a></li>-->
    1919                                </ul>
    2020                        </div>
     
    2222
    2323                <div style="padding: 0 1em 1em 1em;">
     24                <h2>Datasets</h2><br/>
    2425                        <span class="Bold">Listed below are the EHL queryable datasets.  To get
    2526                                started querying one of the available datasets follow these basic steps:
     
    4849                                                <h2>Explore Data by Topic</h2>
    4950                                                <ibis:SelectionsList>
    50                                                 <SELECTION>
    51                                                         <TITLE>Health</TITLE>
     51                                               
     52                                                        <h3>Health</h3>
    5253                                                                <SELECTIONS>
    5354                                                                        <SELECTION>
     
    6263                                                                        </SELECTION>
    6364                                                                </SELECTIONS>
    64                                                         </SELECTION>   
    65                                                 <SELECTION>
    66                                                         <TITLE>Environment</TITLE>
     65                                                               
     66                                               
     67                                                        <h3>Environment</h3>
    6768                                                                <SELECTIONS>
    6869                                                                        <SELECTION>
     
    8788                                                                        </SELECTION>
    8889                                                                </SELECTIONS>
    89                                                         </SELECTION>   
    90                                                         <SELECTION>
    91                                                         <TITLE>Community</TITLE>
     90                                                               
     91                                                       
     92                                                        <h3>Community</h3>
    9293                                                                <SELECTIONS>   
    9394                                                                        <SELECTION>
     
    9798                                                                        </SELECTION>                                                                                                           
    9899                                                                </SELECTIONS>   
    99                                                         </SELECTION>           
     100                                                                       
    100101                                                        </ibis:SelectionsList>
    101102                                                </div>
     
    109110                                                                <SELECTION>             
    110111                                                                        <LOCAL_URL>query/selection/eddd_epht/_eddd_ephtSelection.html</LOCAL_URL>
    111                                                                         <TITLE>Emergency Department Encounters (based on admission date)</TITLE>
     112                                                                        <TITLE>Emergency Department Visits (based on admission date)</TITLE>
    112113                                                                </SELECTION>
    113114                                                                <SELECTION>
    114115                                                                        <LOCAL_URL>query/selection/hidd_EPHT/_hidd_EPHTSelection.html</LOCAL_URL>
    115                                                                         <TITLE>Inpatient Hospital Discharges (based on admission date)</TITLE>
     116                                                                        <TITLE>Inpatient Hospitalizations (based on admission date)</TITLE>
    116117                                                                </SELECTION>           
    117118                                                                <SELECTION>
     
    137138                                                                <SELECTION>
    138139                                                                        <!--<LOCAL_URL>query/selection/ucr/EPHTUCRSelection.html</LOCAL_URL>-->
    139                                                                         <TITLE>Cancer Registry - Coming soon</TITLE>
     140                                                                        <TITLE>Cancer - Coming soon</TITLE>
    140141                                                                </SELECTION>
    141142                                                        </SELECTIONS>
     
    147148                        <div style="clear: both; padding-top: 1em;">
    148149                                The query system data are intended to support
    149                                 evidenced-based decision making for public health in New Mexico to plan and improve 
     150                                evidenced-based decision making for public health in Kentucky to plan and improve 
    150151                                service delivery, evaluate health care systems, and inform policy decisions. 
    151152                                Other uses are not permissible.
    152153
    153                                 You may also visit the "<a ibis:href="about/ABCs.html">ABC's of EHL</a>"
     154                        <!--    You may also visit the "<a ibis:href="about/ABCs.html">ABC's of EHL</a>"
    154155                page for some tips on how to get started using EHL.
    155156
     
    161162                                        <li><a ibis:href="dataportal/query/Privacy.html">Confidentiality and Privacy of Data</a></li>
    162163                                        <li><a href="http://health.Kentucky.gov/opha/IBIShelp/Glossary.htm">Glossaries of Public Health Jargon and Acronyms</a></li>
    163                                 </ul><br/>
     164                                </ul><br/>-->
    164165                        </div>
    165166
  • adopters/ky-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/ehl-view-content/xml/html_content/dataportal/Introduction.xml

    r11643 r12312  
    3333                                        <li class="Sticky"><a ibis:href="dataportal/DatasetIndex.html">Datasets</a></li>
    3434                                        <li class="Sticky"><a ibis:href="dataportal/MetadataIndex.html">Metadata</a></li>
    35                                         <li class="Sticky"><a ibis:href="dataportal/ReportIndex.html">Reports</a></li>
    36                                         <li class="Sticky"><a ibis:href="dataportal/ComparisonReports.html">Comparisons</a></li>
    37                                         <li class="Sticky"><a ibis:href="dataportal/Help.html">Help</a></li>
     35                                        <li class="Sticky"><a ibis:href="dataportal/ReportIndexComingSoon.html">Reports</a></li>
     36                                        <!--<li class="Sticky"><a ibis:href="dataportal/ComparisonReports.html">Comparisons</a></li>
     37                                        <li class="Sticky"><a ibis:href="dataportal/Help.html">Help</a></li>-->
    3838                                </ul>
    3939                        </div>
  • adopters/ky-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/ehl-view-content/xml/html_content/dataportal/MetadataIndex.xml

    r11435 r12312  
    77
    88        <CONTENT>
    9                 <div class="Belt" style="background-image: url(../view/image/belt/metadata.jpg);">
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    1010                        <div class="Selections">
    1111                                <a name="contextNavigationMenuJumpTo" ibis:href="dataportal/Introduction.html" class="ContextMenu">Data Portal</a>
     
    1313                                        <li class="Sticky"><a ibis:href="dataportal/DatasetIndex.html">Datasets</a></li>
    1414                                        <li class="Sticky On"><a ibis:href="dataportal/MetadataIndex.html">Metadata</a></li>
    15                                         <li class="Sticky"><a ibis:href="dataportal/ReportIndex.html">Reports</a></li>
    16                                         <li class="Sticky"><a ibis:href="dataportal/ComparisonReports.html">Comparisons</a></li>
    17                                         <li class="Sticky"><a ibis:href="dataportal/Help.html">Help</a></li>
     15                                        <li class="Sticky"><a ibis:href="dataportal/ReportIndexComingSoon.html">Reports</a></li>
     16                                        <!--<li class="Sticky"><a ibis:href="dataportal/ComparisonReports.html">Comparisons</a></li>
     17                                        <li class="Sticky"><a ibis:href="dataportal/Help.html">Help</a></li>-->
    1818                                </ul>
    1919                        </div>
  • adopters/ky-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/ehl-view-content/xml/html_content/environment/AirQuality.xml

    r11643 r12312  
    1313                                        <li class="Sticky On"><a ibis:href="environment/AirQuality.html">Air Quality</a></li>
    1414                                        <li class="Sticky"><a ibis:href="environment/DrinkingWater.html">Drinking Water</a></li>
    15                                         <li class="Sticky"><a ibis:href="environment/ClimateWeather.html">Climate &amp; Weather</a></li>
     15                                        <li class="Sticky"><a ibis:href="environment/ClimateWeather.html">Climate Change</a></li>
    1616                                        <li class="Sticky"><a ibis:href="environment/HealthyHomes.html">Healthy Homes</a></li>
    1717                                </ul>
     
    2323
    2424<H2>Air Quality </H2><br/>
    25 Air pollution refers to any biological, physical, or chemical particle that is in the air that should not be there. Pollutants come from many human activities such as factories, power plants, dry cleaners, cars, trains, airplanes, and buses. They can also come from environmental sources like wild fires, volcanic eruptions, and windblown dust. Air quality measures how much pollution is in the air.
     25Air pollution refers to any biological, physical, or chemical particle in the air that should not be there. Pollutants come from many human activities such as factories, power plants, dry cleaners, cars, trains, airplanes, and buses. They can also come from environmental sources like wild fires, volcanic eruptions, and windblown dust. Air quality standards tell us if the current level of pollution in the air is likely to be harmful to our health.
    2626<br/><br/>
    27 On average, adults breathe over 3,000 gallons of air each day; there is no way to avoid breathing.  The enormous amount of air we breathe means that our lungs and airways are exposed any contaminants or unwanted pollutants in that air.  This makes the quality of air we breathe very important to our health.
     27On average, adults breathe over 3,000 gallons of air each day. The enormous amount of air we breathe means that our lungs and airways are continuously exposed to any contaminants or unwanted pollutants in that air. When pollution is bad, it can irritate your eyes, nose, and throat; cause shortness of breath, and aggravate asthma and other respiratory conditions. Poor air quality also affects your heart and cardiovascular system, increasing the chances of heart attack and stroke.
    2828<br/><br/>
    29 National air quality has improved since the 1990's, but many challenges remain in protecting public health and the environment from air quality problems. When pollution is bad, it can irritate your eyes, nose, and throat, cause shortness of breath, aggravate asthma and other respiratory conditions. Poor air quality even affect your heart and cardiovascular, increasing the chances of heart attack and stroke. Breathing polluted air for long periods of time can cause more serious health problems.<br/>
    30  Two air pollutants of particular concern are ozone and PM2.5.
     29National air quality has improved since the 1990's, but many challenges remain in protecting our health from common air contaminants. Two air pollutants of particular concern are ozone and PM2.5.
    3130<br/><br/>
    3231
  • adopters/ky-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/ehl-view-content/xml/html_content/environment/AirQualityDetail.xml

    r11643 r12312  
    1313                                        <li class="Sticky On"><a ibis:href="environment/AirQuality.html">Air Quality</a></li>
    1414                                        <li class="Sticky"><a ibis:href="environment/DrinkingWater.html">Drinking Water</a></li>
    15                                         <li class="Sticky"><a ibis:href="environment/ClimateWeather.html">Climate &amp; Weather</a></li>
     15                                        <li class="Sticky"><a ibis:href="environment/ClimateWeather.html">Climate Change</a></li>
    1616                                        <li class="Sticky"><a ibis:href="environment/HealthyHomes.html">Healthy Homes</a></li>
    1717                                </ul>
     
    2323
    2424
    25 <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="2">
    26 <TITLE>Learn About Air Quality</TITLE>
    27 <CONTENT>
     25<h2>Air Quality</h2><br/>
    2826                <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="2">
    29                         <TITLE>Why Important</TITLE>
     27                        <TITLE>Why is this important?</TITLE>
    3028                        <CONTENT>
    31 On average, adults breathe over 3,000 gallons of air each day; there is no way to avoid breathing. If that air is contaminated, there is no way to avoid exposure to those pollutants. Furthermore, it damages trees, crops, plants, animals, rivers, and lakes. This damages ecoystems and alters natural processes. It can also damage buildings and statues. Because air is ubiquitous, poor air quality affects everything around us.
     29On average, adults breathe over 3,000 gallons of air each day. There is no way to avoid exposure to the pollutants in the air we breathe. Air pollution also harms other living things in the ecosystem as well as the built environment where we live and work.  Poor air quality affects everything around us.
    3230                        </CONTENT>
    3331                </ibis:ExpandableContent>
    3432
    3533                <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="2">
    36                         <TITLE>What is Known</TITLE>
     34                        <TITLE>What is known?</TITLE>
    3735                        <CONTENT>
    38         Air pollution affects health in a number of ways. They range from coughing and shortness of breath to exacerbating conditions such as asthma, emphysema, and bronchitis. Air pollution has also been linked to higher occurrence of heart attacks and strokes and low birth weight in infants. Two air pollutants of particular concern are ozone and PM2.5.
     36 Air pollution affects health in a number of ways. They range from coughing and shortness of breath to exacerbating conditions such as asthma, emphysema, and bronchitis. Air pollution has also been linked to higher occurrence of heart attacks and strokes and low birth weight in infants. Two air pollutants of particular concern are Ozone and PM2.5.
    3937<br></br><br></br>
    40 <span Class="Bold">Ozone: </span>Ground-level ozone, not to be confused with the atmosphere's protective ozone layer, is created by reactions between environmental pollutants and light and heat. Ozone is the main component of smog and is dangerous to health and the environment. The creation of ozone is facilitated by warm weather and sunshine; therefore, ozone levels are usually higher in the summer and in the mid-afternoon.
     38<span Class="Bold">Ozone: </span>Ground-level ozone, not to be confused with the atmosphere's protective ozone layer, is created by reactions between environmental pollutants and light and heat. Ozone is the main component of smog and is dangerous to health and the environment. The creation of ozone is facilitated by warm weather and sunshine; therefore, ozone levels are usually higher in the summer and in the mid-afternoon. 
    4139
    4240<br></br><br></br>
    43 <span Class="Bold">PM2.5: </span>"PM" stands for "particulate matter," which is a mixture of extremely small particles and liquid droplets. PM has many different components like acids, organic chemicals, metals, and soil. PM is measured in micrometers, so PM10 refers to particulate matter that is 10 micrometers long and PM2.5, 2.5 micrometers long. The important thing with PM is its size. The size of the particle is directly linked with their ability to harm human health; the smaller the particle, the easier it can pass through the nose and throat and enter the lungs. Once inhaled, PM can affect the heart and lungs, causing serious health consequences.
     41<span Class="Bold">PM2.5: </span>"PM" stands for "particulate matter," which is a mixture of extremely small particles and liquid droplets. PM has many different components like acids, organic chemicals, metals, and soil. PM is measured in micrometers, so PM2.5 refers to particulate matter that is 2.5 micrometers long. The important thing with PM is its small size. The smaller the particle, the more easily it can pass through the nose and throat and enter the lungs. Once inhaled, PM can affect the heart and lungs, causing serious health consequences.
    4442<br/><br/>
    45 These and four other pollutants are categorized as the six <a href="http://www.health.utah.gov/utahair/pollutants/">"criteria pollutants"</a> by the US Environmental Protection Agency. To learn more, click the following links:     
     43These and four other pollutants are categorized as the six "criteria pollutants" by the US Environmental Protection Agency.
    4644<ul>
    47 <li><a href="http://www.health.utah.gov/utahair/pollutants/CO/">Carbon Monoxide</a></li>
    48 <li><a href="http://www.health.utah.gov/utahair/pollutants/lead/">Lead</a></li>
    49 <li><a href="http://www.health.utah.gov/utahair/pollutants/NO2/">Nitrogen Dioxide</a></li>
    50 <li><a href="http://www.health.utah.gov/utahair/pollutants/SO2/">Sulfur Dioxide</a></li>
    51 <li><a href="http://www.health.utah.gov/utahair/pollutants/O3/">Ozone</a></li>
    52 <li><a href="http://www.health.utah.gov/utahair/pollutants/PM/">Particulate Matter</a></li>
     45<li>Carbon Monoxide</li>
     46<li>Lead</li>
     47<li>Nitrogen Dioxide</li>
     48<li>Sulfur Dioxide</li>
     49<li>Ozone</li>
     50<li>Particulate Matter</li>
    5351</ul>
    5452</CONTENT>
     
    5654
    5755                <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="2">
    58                         <TITLE>Who is at Risk</TITLE>
     56                        <TITLE>Who is at risk?</TITLE>
    5957                        <CONTENT>
    6058        Air pollution affects everyone, but certain people are more susceptible to its effects. Sensitive populations include people with lung or heart issues, young children, and older adults.
     
    6462
    6563                <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="2">
    66                         <TITLE>How to Reduce Risk</TITLE>
     64                        <TITLE>How to reduce risk?</TITLE>
    6765                        <CONTENT>
    6866Even though we may assume that our individual choices do not affect air quality, they do. Reducing air pollution and improving air quality is everybody's responsibility:
     
    7775</ul>   
    7876<br/><br/>
    79 For more suggestions, please visit these websites for more ideas:
     77<!--For more suggestions, please visit these websites for more ideas:
    8078<ul>
    8179<li><a href="http://www.epa.gov/airquality/peg_caa/reduce.html">Ways to Reduce Air Pollution</a> - U.S. Environmental Protection Agency</li>
    82 </ul>
     80</ul>-->
    8381                        </CONTENT>
    8482                </ibis:ExpandableContent>
     
    9492<ul>
    9593<li><a href="https://www.epa.gov/clean-air-act-overview/plain-english-guide-clean-air-act">The Plain English Guide to the Clean Air Act - U.S. Environmental Protection Agency</a></li>
    96 <li><a href="http://www.epa.gov/air/airpollutants.html">List of air pollutants and explanations - U.S. Environmental Protection Agency</a></li>
     94<li><a href="https://www.epa.gov/learn-issues/learn-about-air">List of air pollutants and explanations - U.S. Environmental Protection Agency</a></li>
    9795</ul>
    9896<br/>
     
    104102                        </CONTENT>
    105103                </ibis:ExpandableContent>
    106 </CONTENT>
     104
    107105<SHOW/>
    108 </ibis:ExpandableContent>
     106
    109107                </div>
    110108        </CONTENT>
  • adopters/ky-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/ehl-view-content/xml/html_content/environment/ClimateWeather.xml

    r11643 r12312  
    1313                                        <li class="Sticky"><a ibis:href="environment/AirQuality.html">Air Quality</a></li>
    1414                                        <li class="Sticky"><a ibis:href="environment/DrinkingWater.html">Drinking Water</a></li>
    15                                         <li class="Sticky On"><a ibis:href="environment/ClimateWeather.html">Climate &amp; Weather</a></li>
     15                                        <li class="Sticky On"><a ibis:href="environment/ClimateWeather.html">Climate Change</a></li>
    1616                                        <li class="Sticky"><a ibis:href="environment/HealthyHomes.html">Healthy Homes</a></li>
    1717                                </ul>
     
    2121                <a name="top"/>
    2222                <div style="padding: 0 1em 1em 1em;">
    23 <H2> Climate &amp; Weather </H2>
     23<H2> Climate Change </H2>
    2424<br/>
    2525Climate change is any major change that has been occurring for at least 10 years in the temperature, precipitation, wind, and other weather patterns that we measure. Across the planet in general, temperatures are rising and rainfall is increasing, but changes are not occurring everywhere. In some places temperatures may stay the same or drop, while other places may have far less rainfall. As a result of the changing climate, serious weather events such as heat waves, droughts, floods, and tropical cyclones happen more often. Some types of air pollution may also increase. These changes have the potential to affect human health in several direct and indirect ways, some of them severe.
     
    2929Our changing climate may affect some of the things you need to be healthy such as clean air and water, enough food, and a place to live. According to the World Health Organization , about 1.2 million people worldwide die each year due to health problems caused by breathing bad air from air pollution. About 3.5 million people worldwide die because they do not get enough food to eat, and 2.2 million people get severe diarrhea because they do not have a clean water supply and proper sanitation.
    3030<br/><br/>
    31 Changes in climate also can affect infectious diseases. For example, climate change may result in changing distribution of vector-borne and zoonotic diseases prevalent in the U.S. This could cause diseases such as dengue fever, Lyme disease, or West Nile Virus to re-emerge, or spread to areas previously unaffected. Also, changes in climate can help the introduction and spread of new diseases, such as Chikungunya and Zika.  In addition, climate directly affects the number of cases of waterborne through effects on water temperature and precipitation frequency and intensity.
     31Changes in climate also can affect some infectious diseases that spread from animals to man or by mosquitoes, ticks, and other biting insects. For example, climate change could cause diseases such as Dengue fever, Lyme disease, or West Nile Virus to re-emerge, or spread to previously unaffected areas. Also, changes in climate can increase the introduction and spread of new diseases like the Zika virus.  In addition, heavy precipitation can increase the number of cases of waterborne illnesses. 
    3232<br/><br/>
    33 While climate change is recognized as a global issue, the effects of climate change will vary across geographic regions and populations.
     33While climate change is recognized as a global issue, the effects will vary from one area and one group of people to another.
    3434
    3535<br/><br/>
  • adopters/ky-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/ehl-view-content/xml/html_content/environment/ClimateWeatherDetail.xml

    r11643 r12312  
    1313                                        <li class="Sticky On"><a ibis:href="environment/AirQuality.html">Air Quality</a></li>
    1414                                        <li class="Sticky"><a ibis:href="environment/DrinkingWater.html">Drinking Water</a></li>
    15                                         <li class="Sticky On"><a ibis:href="environment/ClimateWeather.html">Climate &amp; Weather</a></li>
     15                                        <li class="Sticky On"><a ibis:href="environment/ClimateWeather.html">Climate Change</a></li>
    1616                                        <li class="Sticky"><a ibis:href="environment/HealthyHomes.html">Healthy Homes</a></li>
    1717                                </ul>
     
    2323
    2424               
    25 <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="2">
    26 <TITLE>Learn About Climate and Weather</TITLE>
    27 <CONTENT>
    28                 <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="2">
    29                         <TITLE>Why Important</TITLE>
    30                         <CONTENT>
    31 Changes in temperature, precipitation, and extreme weather events have the ability to negatively affect the health of populations throughout Kentucky and the entire world. Meteorological changes can negatively impact agriculture, increase heat waves, reduce air quality, and increase food-, water-, and animal-borne diseases.
    32 
    33                         </CONTENT>
    34                 </ibis:ExpandableContent>
    35 
    36                 <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="2">
    37                         <TITLE>What is Known</TITLE>
    38                         <CONTENT>
    39         Kentucky's geographic diversity may allow for certain Kentucky communities to be disproportionately affected over others. This is why extensive study of meteorological indicators is necessary: to establish which populations within Kentucky will be the most vulnerable to adverse health outcomes due to climate change.
    40 
    41 
    42                         </CONTENT>
    43                 </ibis:ExpandableContent>
    44 
    45                 <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="2">
    46                         <TITLE>Who is at Risk</TITLE>
    47                         <CONTENT>
    48         Climate change affects everyone.
    49 
    50                         </CONTENT>
    51                 </ibis:ExpandableContent>
    52 
    53                 <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="2">
    54                         <TITLE>How to Reduce Risk</TITLE>
     25<h2>Climate Change</h2><br/>
     26                <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="2">
     27                        <TITLE>Why is this important?</TITLE>
     28                        <CONTENT>
     29Changes in temperature, precipitation, and extreme weather events like floods have the ability to negatively affect the health of people throughout Kentucky and the entire world. Injuries and even deaths can be caused by storms, heat waves, and other extreme weather events, and trends such as increases in average temperature can cause poor air quality and impact agriculture.
     30
     31                        </CONTENT>
     32                </ibis:ExpandableContent>
     33
     34                <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="2">
     35                        <TITLE>What is known?</TITLE>
     36                        <CONTENT>
     37Kentucky's geographic diversity means that some Kentucky communities will be affected more severely by climate and weather than others. Extensive study of climate indicators is necessary for us to know which people in Kentucky will be the most likely to experience adverse health outcomes due to climate change.
     38
     39
     40                        </CONTENT>
     41                </ibis:ExpandableContent>
     42
     43                <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="2">
     44                        <TITLE>Who is at risk?</TITLE>
     45                        <CONTENT>
     46Climate change affects everyone, but some people are more likely than others to suffer negative health outcomes from climate-related exposures.  For example, agricultural workers are at greater risk to suffer the health effects of heat waves because they are more likely to be exposed to extreme temperatures.  Other people, such as children, the elderly, and those with pre-existing medical conditions are more sensitive to the effects of factors like severe cold or poor air quality. And some people, such as communities in isolated and medically underserved areas, are less able to adapt to the potential impacts of extreme weather events and the changing climate because of their limited resources.
     47
     48                        </CONTENT>
     49                </ibis:ExpandableContent>
     50
     51                <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="2">
     52                        <TITLE>How to reduce risk?</TITLE>
    5553                        <CONTENT>
    5654       
     
    6260<li>Protecting water supplies, sources, and infrastructure,</li>
    6361<li>Strengthening disaster response capability, and </li>
    64 <li>Protecting the environment, such as mangrove forests and coral reefs .</li>
     62<li>Protecting the environment, such as local forests and wetlands  </li>
    6563</ul>   
    6664</CONTENT>
     
    7270                <ul>
    7371<li><a href="http://nca2014.globalchange.gov/report/sectors/human-health"> Third National Climate Assessment's Health Chapter</a></li>
    74 <li><a href="https://www.cdc.gov/climateandhealth/default.htm">Climate and Health - CDC </a></li>
    75 <li><a href="http://www.epa.gov/agriculture/tned.html">Natural Events and Disasters - U.S. Environmental Protection Agency</a></li>             
     72<li><a href="https://www.cdc.gov/climateandhealth/factsheet.htm">Climate and Health - CDC </a></li>
     73<li><a href="https://www.epa.gov/natural-disasters">Natural Events and Disasters - U.S. Environmental Protection Agency</a></li>               
    7674<li><a href="http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/">National Climatic Data Center - National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration</a></li>
    7775
     
    8078                        </CONTENT>
    8179                </ibis:ExpandableContent>
    82 </CONTENT>
    83 <SHOW/>
    84 </ibis:ExpandableContent>
     80
     81
    8582               
    8683<!--<ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="2">
  • adopters/ky-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/ehl-view-content/xml/html_content/environment/DrinkingWater.xml

    r11643 r12312  
    1313                                        <li class="Sticky"><a ibis:href="environment/AirQuality.html">Air Quality</a></li>
    1414                                        <li class="Sticky On"><a ibis:href="environment/DrinkingWater.html">Drinking Water</a></li>
    15                                         <li class="Sticky"><a ibis:href="environment/ClimateWeather.html">Climate &amp; Weather</a></li>
     15                                        <li class="Sticky"><a ibis:href="environment/ClimateWeather.html">Climate Change</a></li>
    1616                                        <li class="Sticky"><a ibis:href="environment/HealthyHomes.html">Healthy Homes</a></li>
    1717                                </ul>
  • adopters/ky-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/ehl-view-content/xml/html_content/environment/DrinkingWaterDetail.xml

    r11643 r12312  
    1313                                        <li class="Sticky"><a ibis:href="environment/AirQuality.html">Air Quality</a></li>
    1414                                        <li class="Sticky On"><a ibis:href="environment/DrinkingWater.html">Drinking Water</a></li>
    15                                         <li class="Sticky"><a ibis:href="environment/ClimateWeather.html">Climate &amp; Weather</a></li>
     15                                        <li class="Sticky"><a ibis:href="environment/ClimateWeather.html">Climate Change</a></li>
    1616                                        <li class="Sticky"><a ibis:href="environment/HealthyHomes.html">Healthy Homes</a></li>
    1717                                </ul>
     
    2323
    2424
    25                
    26 <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="2">
    27 <TITLE>Learn About Drinking Water Quality</TITLE>
    28 <CONTENT>
     25<h2>Drinking Water</h2><br/>
     26
    2927                <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="2">
    30                         <TITLE>Why Important</TITLE>
     28                        <TITLE>Why is this important?</TITLE>
    3129                        <CONTENT>
    3230
    33 Water is used for many purposes such as drinking, cooking, bathing, cleaning, and recreation. Contaminants in even a single drinking water system can harm many people. Because water is so important and common in daily life, there are many opportunities for contaminated water to enter the body. In some cases, people can inhale contaminated water through steam from dishwashers, showers, or washing clothes. However, this is only true for volatile organic compouds (VOCs). Some contaminants can be absorbed through the skin as well. It is important to remember that all contaminants do not act the same way; some contaminants can make people sick very quickly and others require exposure over many years before negative health effects are seen.
     31Contaminants in even a single drinking water system can harm many people. Because water is so important in daily life, there are many opportunities for contaminated water to enter the body, not only by drinking but by other types of exposure. For example, Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC's) can be inhaled through steam from dishwashers, showers, or washing clothes. Some contaminants can be absorbed through the skin as well. It is important to remember that all contaminants do not act the same way; some contaminants can make people sick very quickly and others require exposure over many years before negative health effects are seen.  Health effects are also influenced by the amount of contaminant a person is exposed to and the frequency and duration of the exposure.
    3432
    3533
     
    3836
    3937                <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="2">
    40                         <TITLE>What is Known</TITLE>
     38                        <TITLE>What is known?</TITLE>
    4139                        <CONTENT>
    42 There are many ways in which contaminants can enter a drinking water system. Human activities such as fertilizer, pesticide, livestock operations, and manufacturing processes use chemicals that could enter the drinking water. Contaminants can also enter the water through naturally occuring chemicals and minerals such as arsenic, radon, and uranium. Other times, sewers overflow, wastewater treatment plants malfunction, or other accidents happen that can contaminate drinking water. Contaminants in drinking water can lead to a number of health issues, such as gastrointestial illness, reproductive problems, and neurological disorders. It is important to remember that the type of health issue and its severity depends on which contaminant type, its concentration in the water, and how long the exposure was.             
     40There are many ways in which a contaminant can enter a drinking water system. Human activities such as agriculture and manufacturing use chemicals that may leak or be disposed of in areas that can run into community drinking water systems. Some contaminants such as arsenic, radon, and uranium are a naturally occurring part of the soil and will enter drinking water systems through natural processes. Occasionally, malfunctioning wastewater treatment plants can contaminate drinking water. Contaminants in drinking water can lead to a number of health issues.  It is important to remember that the type of health issue and its severity depends on the contaminant in question, its concentration in the water, and how long the exposure was.
    4341<br></br><br></br>     
    4442The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has the authority to set and oversee standards to protect drinking water and make sure it is safe for consumption (see the <a href="http://water.epa.gov/lawsregs/rulesregs/sdwa/">Safe Drinking Water Act</a>).
     
    4846                        </CONTENT>
    4947                </ibis:ExpandableContent>
     48               
    5049
    5150                <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="2">
    52                         <TITLE>Who is at Risk</TITLE>
     51                        <TITLE>Who is at risk?</TITLE>
    5352                        <CONTENT>
    5453                        People who may be especially susceptible to contaminated water are
     
    6463
    6564                <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="2">
    66                         <TITLE>How to Reduce Risk</TITLE>
     65                        <TITLE>How to reduce risk?</TITLE>
    6766                        <CONTENT>
    6867<span Class="Bold">Be informed about your water</span>
     
    112111                        </CONTENT>
    113112                </ibis:ExpandableContent>
    114 </CONTENT>
    115         <SHOW/>
    116 </ibis:ExpandableContent>
     113
    117114               
    118115
  • adopters/ky-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/ehl-view-content/xml/html_content/environment/EnvironmentalHazards.xml

    r10899 r12312  
    1313                                        <li class="Sticky"><a ibis:href="environment/AirQuality.html">Air Quality</a></li>
    1414                                        <li class="Sticky"><a ibis:href="environment/DrinkingWater.html">Drinking Water</a></li>
    15                                         <li class="Sticky On"><a ibis:href="environment/ClimateWeather.html">Climate &amp; Weather</a></li>
     15                                        <li class="Sticky On"><a ibis:href="environment/ClimateWeather.html">Climate Change</a></li>
    1616                                        <li class="Sticky"><a ibis:href="environment/HealthyHomes.html">Healthy Homes</a></li>
    1717                                </ul>
  • adopters/ky-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/ehl-view-content/xml/html_content/environment/EnvironmentalHazardsDetail.xml

    r10899 r12312  
    1313                                        <li class="Sticky"><a ibis:href="environment/AirQuality.html">Air Quality</a></li>
    1414                                        <li class="Sticky"><a ibis:href="environment/DrinkingWater.html">Drinking Water</a></li>
    15                                         <li class="Sticky On"><a ibis:href="environment/ClimateWeather.html">Climate &amp; Weather</a></li>
     15                                        <li class="Sticky On"><a ibis:href="environment/ClimateWeather.html">Climate Change</a></li>
    1616                                        <li class="Sticky"><a ibis:href="environment/HealthyHomes.html">Healthy Homes</a></li>
    1717                                </ul>
  • adopters/ky-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/ehl-view-content/xml/html_content/environment/HealthBehaviors.xml

    r10899 r12312  
    1313                                        <li class="Sticky"><a ibis:href="environment/AirQuality.html">Air Quality</a></li>
    1414                                        <li class="Sticky"><a ibis:href="environment/DrinkingWater.html">Drinking Water</a></li>
    15                                         <li class="Sticky"><a ibis:href="environment/ClimateWeather.html">Climate &amp; Weather</a></li>
     15                                        <li class="Sticky"><a ibis:href="environment/ClimateWeather.html">Climate Change</a></li>
    1616                                        <li class="Sticky On"><a ibis:href="environment/HealthBehaviors.html">Behaviors</a></li>
    1717                                        <li class="Sticky"><a ibis:href="environment/HealthyHomes.html">Healthy Homes</a></li>
  • adopters/ky-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/ehl-view-content/xml/html_content/environment/HealthBehaviorsDetail.xml

    r10984 r12312  
    1313                                        <li class="Sticky"><a ibis:href="environment/AirQuality.html">Air Quality</a></li>
    1414                                        <li class="Sticky"><a ibis:href="environment/DrinkingWater.html">Drinking Water</a></li>
    15                                         <li class="Sticky"><a ibis:href="environment/ClimateWeather.html">Climate &amp; Weather</a></li>
     15                                        <li class="Sticky"><a ibis:href="environment/ClimateWeather.html">Climate Change</a></li>
    1616                                        <li class="Sticky On"><a ibis:href="environment/HealthBehaviors.html">Behaviors</a></li>
    1717                                        <li class="Sticky"><a ibis:href="environment/HealthyHomes.html">Healthy Homes</a></li>
  • adopters/ky-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/ehl-view-content/xml/html_content/environment/HealthyHomes.xml

    r11643 r12312  
    1313                                        <li class="Sticky"><a ibis:href="environment/AirQuality.html">Air Quality</a></li>
    1414                                        <li class="Sticky"><a ibis:href="environment/DrinkingWater.html">Drinking Water</a></li>
    15                                         <li class="Sticky"><a ibis:href="environment/ClimateWeather.html">Climate &amp; Weather</a></li>
     15                                        <li class="Sticky"><a ibis:href="environment/ClimateWeather.html">Climate Change</a></li>
    1616                                        <li class="Sticky On"><a ibis:href="environment/BuiltEnvironment.html">Healthy Homes</a></li>
    1717                                </ul>
     
    2626                The home we live in is one of the major influences on our health and wellness. People spend half of every day, sometimes more, inside their homes. Tracking exposures and health problems in the home can help people understand how often they and their families experience unhealthy living conditions. These data will also help doctors, researchers, and public health officials understand how our homes can be improved to help us stay healthy.  Lead in the home, environmental tobacco smoke, radon, and carbon monoxide are all possible harmful exposures in the home.  Lead can be detrimental to the mental development of children.  Radon exposure is one of the largest risk factors for developing lung cancer, second only to smoking.  Smoking or secondhand smoke may also have a synergistic effect with radon amplifying risk of lung cancer.  Carbon monoxide poisoning can quickly become deadly with little warning.  In addition to these exposures, poor housing conditions like the presense of damp or dusty areas or pests can contribute to the development of respiratory conditions like asthma. 
    2727                <br/><br/>
    28 In 2007, HUD conducted the American Housing Survey, which showed that six million households live with moderate or severe physical housing problems. Anyone can suffer from housing related injury and illness; although certain groups such as children, the elderly, or individuals with chronic illness are more vulnerable.
     28In 2007, the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) conducted the American Housing Survey, which showed that six million households live with moderate or severe physical housing problems. Anyone can suffer from housing related injury and illness; although certain groups such as children, the elderly, or individuals with chronic illness are more vulnerable.
    2929<br/><br/>
    30 Children, who typically spend the majority of their time indoors, are more at risk to the effects of biological, chemical, and physical exposures. It is important to make every effort to minimize the possible dangers in and around your home. These possible dangers include allergens, asbestos, combustion products (e.g., furnace, water heater, and generator), pests (e.g., cockroaches, bed bugs, mice, etc.), lead based paint, mold, household/automotive cleaners, pesticides/herbicides, radon, take home hazards, and injury hazards. The developing child from pre-birth through the toddler stage, make children more susceptible when exposed to environmental hazards.
     30Children, who typically spend the majority of their time indoors, are more at risk to the effects of biological, chemical, and physical exposures. It is important to make every effort to minimize the possible dangers in and around your home. These possible dangers include allergens, asbestos, combustion products (e.g., furnace, water heater, and generator), pests (e.g., cockroaches, bed bugs, mice, etc.), lead based paint, mold, household/automotive cleaners, pesticides/herbicides, radon, and injury hazards. Children are more susceptible to health effects from environmental hazards, especially very young children from pre-birth through the toddler stage.
     31
    3132<br/><br/>
    32 These environmental hazards and associated health risks tend to be interrelated. Having an increase in moisture/humidity, poor indoor air quality and increased levels of contaminated dust are all common causes for these environmental hazards. For instance, taking care of excess moisture/humidity, in the home, can help take care of the health conditions associated with allergies and asthma, as well as the deterioration of lead-based paint, preventing possible poisoning from lead exposure.
    33 <br/><br/>
    34 You can help make your home a healthier place to live, for you and your family by following The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development - <span Class="Bold">Seven Healthy Homes Principles:</span>
     33You can help make your home a healthier place to live, for you and your family by following The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development - <span Class="Bold">Eight Healthy Homes Principles:</span>
    3534<br/><br/>
    3635<a ibis:href="query/selection/crossref_selections/HealthyHomesSelection.html">Explore healthy homes data</a>
  • adopters/ky-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/ehl-view-content/xml/html_content/environment/HealthyHomesDetail.xml

    r11643 r12312  
    1313                                        <li class="Sticky"><a ibis:href="environment/AirQuality.html">Air Quality</a></li>
    1414                                        <li class="Sticky"><a ibis:href="environment/DrinkingWater.html">Drinking Water</a></li>
    15                                         <li class="Sticky"><a ibis:href="environment/ClimateWeather.html">Climate &amp; Weather</a></li>
     15                                        <li class="Sticky"><a ibis:href="environment/ClimateWeather.html">Climate Change</a></li>
    1616                                        <li class="Sticky On"><a ibis:href="environment/BuiltEnvironment.html">Healthy Homes</a></li>
    1717                                </ul>
     
    2222                <div style="padding: 0 1em 1em 1em;">
    2323
    24 
     24<h2>Healthy Homes</h2><br/>
    2525        <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="2">
    2626                <TITLE>Healthy Homes Principles</TITLE>
    2727                        <CONTENT>
    2828                        You can help make your home a healthier place to live, for you and your family by following The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban   
    29                         Development - <span Class="Bold">Seven Healthy Homes Principles:</span>
     29                        Development - <a href="http://portal.hud.gov/hudportal/HUD?src=/program_offices/healthy_homes/healthyhomes">Eight Healthy Home Principles</a>
    3030                        <br/><br/>
    3131                                <ol>
    32                                         <li><span Class="Bold">Keep your home Dry</span>
     32                                        <li><span Class="Bold">Keep it Dry</span>
    3333                                        <br/>Damp houses provide a nurturing environment for mites, roaches, rodents, and molds, all of which are associated with asthma.</li><br/>
    34                                         <li><span Class="Bold">Keep your home Clean</span>
     34                                        <li><span Class="Bold">Keep it Clean</span>
    3535                                        <br/>Clean homes help reduce pest infestations and exposure to contaminants.</li><br/>
    36                                         <li><span Class="Bold">Keep your home Safe</span>
     36                                        <li><span Class="Bold">Keep it Safe</span>
    3737                                        <br/>The majority of injuries among children occur in the home. Falls are the most frequent cause of residential injuries to children, followed by injuries from       
    3838                                        objects in the home, burns, and poisonings.</li><br/>
    39                                         <li><span Class="Bold">Keep your home Ventilated</span><br/>
     39                                        <li><span Class="Bold">Keep it Ventilated</span><br/>
    4040                                        Studies show that increasing the fresh air supply in a home improves respiratory health.</li><br/>
    41                                         <li><span Class="Bold">Keep your home Pest-Free</span>
     41                                        <li><span Class="Bold">Keep it Pest-Free</span>
    4242                                        <br/>Recent studies show a causal relationship between exposure to mice and cockroaches and asthma episodes in children; yet inappropriate treatment for
    4343                                        pest infestations can exacerbate health problems, since pesticide residues in homes pose risks for neurological damage and cancer.</li><br/>
    44                                         <li><span Class="Bold">Keep your home Contaminant-Free</span>
     44                                        <li><span Class="Bold">Keep it Contaminant-Free</span>
    4545                                        Chemical exposures include lead, radon, pesticides, volatile organic comp<br/>ounds, and environmental tobacco smoke. Exposures to asbestos particles,
    4646                                        radon gas, carbon monoxide, and second-hand tobacco smoke are far higher indoors than outside.</li><br/>
    47                                         <li><span Class="Bold">Keep your home Maintained</span>
     47                                        <li><span Class="Bold">Keep it Maintained</span>
    4848                                        <br/>Poorly-maintained homes are at risk for moisture and pest problems. Deteriorated lead-based paint in older housing is the primary cause of lead                   
    49                                         poisoning, which affects some 240,000 U.S. children.</li></ol>
     49                                        poisoning, which affects some 240,000 U.S. children.</li><br/>
     50                                       
     51                                        <li><span Class="Bold">Keep it Thermally Controlled</span>
     52                                        <br/>Houses that do not maintain adequate temperature may  increase the residents' risk from exposure to extreme cold or heat.</li></ol>
    5053                        </CONTENT>
    5154                </ibis:ExpandableContent>
     
    6063                        <TITLE>Lead</TITLE><CONTENT>
    6164                                <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="3">
    62                                 <TITLE>Why Important</TITLE><CONTENT>
     65                                <TITLE>Why is this important?</TITLE><CONTENT>
    6366                                 Lead can affect almost every system in the human body and is especially detrimental to the neurological development of unborn babies
    6467                                 and children.  Exposure to lead early in life can result in:
     
    7679
    7780                                <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="3">
    78                                 <TITLE>What is Known</TITLE><CONTENT>
     81                                <TITLE>What is known?</TITLE><CONTENT>
    7982                               
    8083Lead is a naturally-occuring element in the earths crust and can be found in high concentrations in some areas.  Other areas have been contaminated by human activity. Lead was used as an additive in gasoline to reduce engine knock until phasing out leaded gasoline began in the 1970s.  Lead-based paint was also commonly used for housing until being banned in 1978. Despite discontinued use of lead-based paint and leaded gasoline, lead can now be found in the soil in many places and millions of houses still have lead paint.  <br/><br/>
     
    8790               
    8891                                <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="3">
    89                                 <TITLE>Who is at Risk</TITLE><CONTENT>
     92                                <TITLE>Who is at risk?</TITLE><CONTENT>
    9093                                <ul>
    9194                                        <li>Children living in pre-1978 housing</li>
     
    114117                               
    115118                                <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="3">
    116                                 <TITLE>How to Reduce Risk</TITLE><CONTENT>
     119                                <TITLE>How to reduce risk?</TITLE><CONTENT>
    117120                                        <ul>
    118121                                                <li>Have paint and dust from your home tested</li>
     
    124127                                        </ul>
    125128                                </CONTENT></ibis:ExpandableContent>             
    126 
    127                                 <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="3">
    128                                 <TITLE>Explore lead data</TITLE><CONTENT>
    129                                 </CONTENT></ibis:ExpandableContent>             
    130 
    131129                        </CONTENT>
    132130                </ibis:ExpandableContent>
     
    139137                        <TITLE>Carbon Monoxide</TITLE><CONTENT>
    140138                                <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="3">
    141                                 <TITLE>Why Important</TITLE><CONTENT>
    142                                         Carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning is one of the leading causes of unintentional poisoning deaths in the United States. CO is a colorless, odorless gas that is produced whenever fuel or other organic materials are burned. Each year, more than 400 Americans die from unintentional CO poisoning not linked to fires, more than 20,000 visit the emergency room, and more than 4,000 are hospitalized. Over 60% of these exposures occurred in the home.
    143                                 </CONTENT></ibis:ExpandableContent>
    144 
    145                                 <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="3">
    146                                 <TITLE>What is Known</TITLE><CONTENT>
    147                                 CO is found in fumes produced any time you burn fuel in cars or trucks, small engines, stoves, lanterns, grills, fireplaces, gas ranges, or furnaces. CO can    build up indoors and poison people and animals who breathe it.  The most common symptoms of CO poisoning are headache, dizziness, weakness, upset stomach, vomiting, chest pain, and confusion. CO symptoms are often described asf flu-like. If you breathe in a lot of CO it can make you pass out or kill you. People who are sleeping or drunk can die from CO poisoning before they have symptoms.
    148                        
    149                                 </CONTENT></ibis:ExpandableContent>
    150                
    151                                 <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="3">
    152                                 <TITLE>Who is at Risk</TITLE><CONTENT>
    153                                 Everyone is at risk for CO poisoning.
    154                        
    155                                 </CONTENT></ibis:ExpandableContent>
    156                                
    157                                 <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="3">
    158                                 <TITLE>How to Reduce Risk</TITLE><CONTENT>
     139                                <TITLE>Why is this important?</TITLE><CONTENT>
     140                                        Carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning is one of the leading causes of unintentional poisoning deaths in the United States. CO is a colorless, odorless gas that is produced whenever fuel or other organic materials are burned. Every year, exposure to Carbon Monoxide fumes results in more than 20,000 emergency room visits, 4,000 hospitalizations and more than 400 deaths in the United States.  The easiest and best way to reduce the risk of Carbon Monoxide poisoning is to install and properly maintain a battery operated CO detector in your home.
     141                                </CONTENT></ibis:ExpandableContent>
     142
     143                                <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="3">
     144                                <TITLE>What is known?</TITLE><CONTENT>
     145                                CO is found in fumes produced any time you burn fuel in cars or trucks, small engines, stoves, lanterns, grills, fireplaces, gas ranges, or furnaces. CO can    build up indoors and poison people and animals who breathe it. The symptoms of CO poisoning are described as being similar to the flu.  Breathing CO in large amounts can lead to a loss of consciousness or death.  People who are asleep, or under the influence of alcohol can die from CO poisoning before they have symptoms.
     146                       
     147                                </CONTENT></ibis:ExpandableContent>
     148               
     149                                <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="3">
     150                                <TITLE>Who is at risk?</TITLE><CONTENT>
     151                                Everyone is at risk for CO poisoning. The risk for CO poisoning increases during power outages, where people sometimes do things to restore power and stay warm that will make CO poisoning more likely, like using a gas range or grill to heat their home or installing emergency generators close to the home where CO can get inside and cause people to get sick.  For more information, see the How to Reduce Risk section below.
     152                       
     153                                </CONTENT></ibis:ExpandableContent>
     154                               
     155                                <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="3">
     156                                <TITLE>How to reduce risk?</TITLE><CONTENT>
    159157                                        <ul>
    160158                                                <li>Install a battery operated CO detector in your home - check and replace batteries twice a year</li>
     
    169167                                                <li>Never use a portable campstove indoors</li>
    170168                                                <li>Never use a generator inside your home</li>
    171                                         </ul>
     169                                        </ul> <br/>                                     For information on how to prevent CO poisoning during power outages, please visit the <a href="http://www.cdc.gov/features/copoisoning/"> CDC CO Poisoning Prevention</a> web site.
    172170                                </CONTENT></ibis:ExpandableContent>             
    173                                                                 <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="3">
    174                                 <TITLE>Explore carbon monoxide poisoning data</TITLE><CONTENT>
    175                                 </CONTENT></ibis:ExpandableContent>             
     171                                                                       
    176172                        </CONTENT>
    177173                </ibis:ExpandableContent>
     
    183179                        <TITLE>Radon</TITLE><CONTENT>
    184180                                <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="3">
    185                                 <TITLE>Why Important</TITLE><CONTENT>
    186         Exposure to radon is a leading risk factor for lung cancer, second only to smoking.  The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency estimates that radon exposure is responsible for more than 20,000 lung cancer deaths each year. 
    187 
    188                                 </CONTENT></ibis:ExpandableContent>
    189 
    190                                 <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="3">
    191                                 <TITLE>What is Known</TITLE><CONTENT>
    192                                         Radon is an invisible tasteless odorless gas that forms naturally when radioactive metals uranium, thorium, or radium break down in rocks, soil, and
    193                                         groundwater.  Radon can enter your home from the ground through cracks in the floor or basement walls or gaps in suspended floors. Radon can also be
    194                                         present in the water that comes into a home if the source is groundwater, like a well.  Breathing in radioactive radon particles over a long period of time increases risk of lung cancer.  Typically, it takes years of exposure before health problems become apparent.  Smoking and radon act as synergistic risk factors for developing lung cancer. 
    195                        
    196                                 </CONTENT></ibis:ExpandableContent>
    197                
    198                                 <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="3">
    199                                 <TITLE>Who is at Risk</TITLE><CONTENT>
    200                                         <ul>
    201                                                 <li>People living in high radon concentration areas</li>
    202                                                 <li> Smokers and those exposed to sencondhand smoke in the home</li>
     181                                <TITLE>Why is this important?</TITLE><CONTENT>
     182Exposure to radon is the second leading risk factor for lung cancer after smoking.  According to the Environmental Protection Agency, radon exposure is responsible for more than 20,000 lung cancer deaths each year.
     183
     184                                </CONTENT></ibis:ExpandableContent>
     185
     186                                <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="3">
     187                                <TITLE>What is known?</TITLE><CONTENT>
     188                                        Radon is an invisible, tasteless, and odorless gas that forms naturally when radioactive metals like uranium, thorium, or radium break down in rocks, soil, and groundwater.  Radon enters a home from the ground through cracks in the floor, basement walls, or gaps in suspended floors.  If groundwater is the home's primary source of drinking water, like a well, radon can be present.  Exposure to radioactive radon particles over a long period of time increases a person's risk of lung cancer.  The risk of lung cancer from exposure to radon particles is especially high for people who smoke.
     189                       
     190                                </CONTENT></ibis:ExpandableContent>
     191               
     192                                <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="3">
     193                                <TITLE>Who is at risk?</TITLE><CONTENT>
     194                                        <ul>
     195                                                <li>People who live in homes with radon concentrations above the EPA reference level of 4 picocuries per liter</li>
     196                                                <li> People who smoke and people who live with others who smoke in the home</li>
    203197                                        </ul>
    204198                                </CONTENT></ibis:ExpandableContent>
    205199                               
    206200                                <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="3">
    207                                 <TITLE>How to Reduce Risk</TITLE><CONTENT>
     201                                <TITLE>How to reduce risk?</TITLE><CONTENT>
    208202                                        <ul>
    209203                                                <li>Test your home or office for radon</li>
    210204                                                <li> Install a radon mitigation system if levels found to be high</li>
    211                                         </ul>                           
    212                        
     205                                        </ul><br/>                                     
     206                       
     207                        For information on how to prevent radon exposure, please visit the <a href="https://www.epa.gov/radon/health-risk-radon/"> EPA's Health Risk of Radon</a> page.
    213208                                </CONTENT></ibis:ExpandableContent>             
    214209               
    215                                 <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="3">
     210                                <!--<ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="3">
    216211                                <TITLE>Explore radon data</TITLE><CONTENT>
    217                                 </CONTENT></ibis:ExpandableContent>             
     212                                </CONTENT></ibis:ExpandableContent>             -->
    218213                        </CONTENT>
    219214                </ibis:ExpandableContent>
  • adopters/ky-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/ehl-view-content/xml/html_content/environment/Introduction.xml

    r11058 r12312  
    33<HTML_CONTENT xmlns:ibis="http://www.ibisph.org">
    44
    5         <TITLE>New Mexico Indicator-based Information System for Public Health (NM-IBIS) Topics</TITLE>
     5        <TITLE>Environment Topics</TITLE>
    66        <HTML_CLASS>HasBelt</HTML_CLASS>
    77
     
    1313                                        <li class="Sticky"><a ibis:href="environment/AirQuality.html">Air Quality</a></li>
    1414                                        <li class="Sticky"><a ibis:href="environment/DrinkingWater.html">Drinking Water</a></li>
    15                                         <li class="Sticky"><a ibis:href="environment/ClimateWeather.html">Climate &amp; Weather</a></li>
     15                                        <li class="Sticky"><a ibis:href="environment/ClimateWeather.html">Climate Change</a></li>
    1616                                        <li class="Sticky"><a ibis:href="environment/HealthyHomes.html">Healthy Homes</a></li>
    1717                                </ul>
     
    2121                <a name="top"/>
    2222                <div style="padding: 0 1em 1em 1em;">
     23                <div class="ColumnContainer">
     24                <div class="LeftColumn">
     25               
    2326                        The environment is everything around us - the air we breathe, water we drink, the food we eat,
    2427                        the buildings and communities in which we live, learn, work and play.  Certain elements in the
     
    2831                        carbon monoxide poisoning, to the developmental issues associated with childhood lead
    2932                        poisoning, or heat stress and stroke due to sun exposure. For more information on how the
    30                         environment affects health select a topic from the lower navigation bar.
    31 
     33                        environment affects health select a topic to explore.
     34                        </div>
     35                       
     36                        <div class="RightColumn">                       
     37                                <br/><br/>
     38                                <a ibis:href="environment/HealthyHomes.html" style="float:  right;"> 
     39                                <img ibis:src="image/HH_thumb2.jpg" width="135" height="135" alt="NEPHTN logo; click image to visit the NEPHTN homepage at cdc.gov"></img></a>
     40                               
     41                                <a ibis:href="environment/ClimateWeather.html" style="float:  right;"> 
     42                                <img ibis:src="image/CC_thumb3.jpg" width="135" height="135" alt="NEPHTN logo; click image to visit the NEPHTN homepage at cdc.gov"></img></a>                         
     43                               
     44                                <a ibis:href="environment/DrinkingWater.html" style="float: right;"> 
     45                                <img ibis:src="image/WQ_thumb2.jpg" width="135" height="135" alt="NEPHTN logo; click image to visit the NEPHTN homepage at cdc.gov"></img></a>
     46                               
     47                                <a ibis:href="environment/AirQuality.html" style="float: right;"> 
     48                                <img ibis:src="image/AQ_thumb2.jpg" width="135" height="135" alt="NEPHTN logo; click image to visit the NEPHTN homepage at cdc.gov"></img></a>
     49                               
     50                        </div>
    3251                </div>
     52                </div>
     53               
    3354        </CONTENT>
    3455</HTML_CONTENT>
  • adopters/ky-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/ehl-view-content/xml/html_content/health/Cancer.xml

    r11098 r12312  
    2424                <H2> Cancer </H2>
    2525                Cancer is a group of diseases in which abnormal cells divide without control and are able to invade other
    26                 tissues.  Cancer is not just one disease by many different diseases. There are more than 100 different
     26                tissues.  There are more than 100 different
    2727                types of cancer.  Cancer is one of the most common group of chronic diseases in the United States. It is the
    2828                leading cause of death after heart disease.  As a state Kentucky, has one of the highest rates of new cancers and deaths from cancer in the nation.
     
    3636                with environmental exposures.
    3737                <br/><br/>
    38                 <a ibis:href="dataPortal/Introduction.html">Explore Cancer Data</a><br/>
    39                 <br/> <a ibis:href="health/CancerDetail.html">Learn more about cancer</a>
     38                <!--<a ibis:href="dataPortal/Introduction.html">Explore Cancer Data</a><br/><br/>-->
     39                <a ibis:href="health/CancerDetail.html">Learn more about cancer</a>
    4040
    41        
    42                
    43                
    4441                </div>
    4542        </CONTENT>
  • adopters/ky-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/ehl-view-content/xml/html_content/health/CancerDetail.xml

    r11098 r12312  
    2222                <div style="padding: 0 1em 1em 1em;">
    2323
     24<H2>Cancer</H2>
     25<br></br>
    2426                <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="2">
    2527                        <TITLE>General Cancer Information</TITLE>
     
    2830        <CONTENT>
    2931                        <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="2">
    30                                 <TITLE>Why Important</TITLE>
     32                                <TITLE>Why is this important?</TITLE>
    3133                                <CONTENT>
    3234                        Cancer is the second leading cause of death in the United States and Kentucky; one in three women and one in two men will be diagnosed with cancer at some point during their life. The financial costs of cancer are substantial, with an overall annual cost estimated at $228.1 billion in 2009. Treatment for lung, prostate, and breast cancers account for more than half of the direct medical costs.
     
    3739
    3840                        <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="2">
    39                                 <TITLE>What is Known</TITLE>
     41                                <TITLE>What is known?</TITLE>
    4042                                <CONTENT>
    4143                               
     
    4547
    4648                        <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="2">
    47                                 <TITLE>Who is at Risk</TITLE>
     49                                <TITLE>Who is at risk?</TITLE>
    4850                                <CONTENT>
    4951        Nobody is immune from getting cancer. Even though scientific studies have shown that specific risk factors increase the risk for cancer, sometimes people who have no risk factors still develop cancer and people who have many risk factors do not develop cancer. The following list are common cancer risk factors. It is important to remember that some these modifiable and some are not:
     
    6264
    6365                        <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="2">
    64                                 <TITLE>How to Reduce Risk</TITLE>
     66                                <TITLE>How to reduce risk?</TITLE>
    6567                                <CONTENT>
    6668                                There are many ways to reduce your risk for cancer. Following these guidelines will not only reduce your risk for cancer, but improve your     
     
    191193                                                <li>Down syndrome - Children with Down syndrome are 20 times more likely to develop ALL.</li>
    192194                                                <li>neurofibromatosis</li>
    193                                                 <li>Shwachman syndrom</li>
     195                                                <li>Shwachman syndrome</li>
    194196                                                <li>Bloom syndrome</li>
    195197                                                <li>ataxia telangiectasia</li>
     
    481483                                                <li>Heavy alcohol use has been linked to an increased risk of liver cancer by causing cirrhosis.</li>
    482484                                                <li>Evidence suggests that smokers are at increased risk for liver cancer.</li>
    483                                                 <li>Eating foods tainted with aflatoxin. This is a poison from a fungusExternal Web Site Icon that can grow on foods, such as grains and nuts, that have not been stored properly.</li>
     485                                                <li>Eating foods tainted with aflatoxin. This is a poison from a fungus that can grow on foods, such as grains and nuts, that have not been stored properly.</li>
    484486                                                </ul>                                   
    485487                                                <li>Exposure to arsenic</li>
  • adopters/ky-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/ehl-view-content/xml/html_content/health/HeartDiseaseDetail.xml

    r11098 r12312  
    2121                <a name="top"/>
    2222                <div style="padding: 0 1em 1em 1em;">
    23        
     23        <H2>Heart Health</H2><br></br>
    2424
    2525                                <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="2">
    26                                         <TITLE>Why Important</TITLE>
     26                                        <TITLE>Why is this important?</TITLE>
    2727                                        <CONTENT>
    2828                                        Heart attacks (myocardial infarctions) are the primary killer of Americans. According to a report from the <a href="http://circ.ahajournals.org/content/125/1/188.full">American Heart Association</a>, each year, about 715,000 Americans have a heart attack. Of these 525,000 are a first heart attack and 190,000 happen in people who have already had a heart attack. Furthermore, about 15% of people who have a heart attack will die from it.
     
    3131
    3232                                <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="2">
    33                                         <TITLE>What is Known</TITLE>
     33                                        <TITLE>What is known?</TITLE>
    3434                                        <CONTENT>
    3535                The National Heart Attack Alert Program explains the major signs for a heart attack:
     
    4747
    4848                                <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="2">
    49                                         <TITLE>Who is at Risk</TITLE>
     49                                        <TITLE>Who is at risk?</TITLE>
    5050                                        <CONTENT>
    5151                The primary risk factors for heart attack are due to lifestyle and genetics:
     
    6767
    6868                                <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="2">
    69                                         <TITLE>How to Reduce Risk</TITLE>
     69                                        <TITLE>How to reduce risk?</TITLE>
    7070                                        <CONTENT>
    71                 You can reduce the risk of having a heart attack by losing weight, not smoking, exercising regularly, and having a healthy diet. People who are at risk for a heart attack should avoid strenuous activity in areas with elevated particulate air pollution, such as not jogging along a busy street. Regularly check the <a href="http://www.health.utah.gov/utahair/AQI/"> Utah Air Quality Index</a> to avoid overexposure to air pollution.
    72                 </CONTENT>
     71                You can reduce the risk of having a heart attack by losing weight, not smoking, exercising regularly, and having a healthy diet. People who are at risk for a heart attack should avoid strenuous activity in areas with elevated particulate air pollution, such as not jogging along a busy street.           </CONTENT>
    7372                </ibis:ExpandableContent>
    7473
  • adopters/ky-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/ehl-view-content/xml/html_content/health/Introduction.xml

    r11283 r12312  
    1414                        <div class="Selections">
    1515                                <a name="contextNavigationMenuJumpTo" ibis:href="health/Introduction.html" class="ContextMenu">Health</a>
    16                                 <ul class="HorizontalMenu HorizontalTabList">
     16                        <ul class="HorizontalMenu HorizontalTabList">
     17
    1718                                        <li class="Sticky"><a ibis:href="health/Cancer.html">Cancer</a></li>
    1819                                        <li class="Sticky"><a ibis:href="health/HeartDisease.html">Heart</a></li>
     
    2526                <a name="top"/>
    2627                <div style="padding: 0 1em 1em 1em;">
    27 
     28                        <div class="ColumnContainer">
     29                       
     30                                <div class="LeftColumn">
    2831                Health outcomes are a product of our genes, behaviors, and environment. This site focuses on how the environment                 
    2932                influences our health here in the Commonwealth of Kentucky. Factors like air pollution or high temperatures can lead to
    3033                more heart attacks or asthma exacerbations. Excess exposure to tobacco smoke and radon can increase the likelihood
    31                 of developing lung cancer. By providing the data on this site publicly, we hope to be a resource for citizens, students, and local health departments working to create more informed and healthier communities across the Commonwealth. To further explore the health outcomes in Kentucky select one of
    32                 the health topics from the green navigation bar above.
     34                of developing lung cancer. By providing the data on this site publicly, we hope to be a resource for citizens, students, and local health departments working to create more informed and healthier communities across the commonwealth. To further explore the health outcomes in Kentucky, select one of
     35                the health topics.<br/><br/>
     36                        </div>
     37                        <div class="RightColumn">                       
     38                                <br/><br/>
     39                        <a ibis:href="health/RespiratoryHealth.html" style="float:  right;"> 
     40                                <img ibis:src="image/resp_thumb1.jpg" width="135" height="135" alt="NEPHTN logo; click image to visit the NEPHTN homepage at cdc.gov"></img></a>
     41                               
     42                                <a ibis:href="health/ReproductiveHealth.html" style="float:  right;"> 
     43                                <img ibis:src="image/repro_thumb1.jpg" width="135" height="135" alt="NEPHTN logo; click image to visit the NEPHTN homepage at cdc.gov"></img></a>
     44                               
     45                                <a ibis:href="health/HeartDisease.html" style="float: right;"> 
     46                                <img ibis:src="image/heart_thumb1.jpg" width="135" height="135" alt="NEPHTN logo; click image to visit the NEPHTN homepage at cdc.gov"></img></a>
     47                               
     48                                <a ibis:href="health/Cancer.html" style="float: right;"> 
     49                                <img ibis:src="image/cancer_thumb1.jpg" width="135" height="135" alt="NEPHTN logo; click image to visit the NEPHTN homepage at cdc.gov"></img></a>
     50                               
     51                        </div>
    3352                </div>
    34 
     53                </div>
    3554        </CONTENT>
    3655</HTML_CONTENT>
  • adopters/ky-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/ehl-view-content/xml/html_content/health/ReproductiveHealth.xml

    r11098 r12312  
    3131Adverse reproductive health outcomes can greatly impact a child's survival and health through the rest of his or her life. Because the fetus is vulnerable during pregnancy, environmental toxins and exposures can affect the fetus before birth. However, environmental exposures may not always be the direct cause of poor reproductive and birth outcomes; many other factors, like access to healthcare, can play a role as well.
    3232
    33                         <br/><br/><a ibis:href="dataPortal/Introduction.html">Explore Reproductive Health Data</a>      <br/><br/>
     33                        <br/><br/>
     34                        <!--<a ibis:href="dataPortal/Introduction.html">Explore Reproductive Health Data</a>    <br/><br/>-->
    3435                       
    3536                       
  • adopters/ky-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/ehl-view-content/xml/html_content/health/ReproductiveHealthDetail.xml

    r11098 r12312  
    2121                <a name="top"/>
    2222                <div style="padding: 0 1em 1em 1em;">
     23                <H2>Reproductive Health</H2><br></br>
    2324
    2425                <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="2">
    25                         <TITLE>Why Important</TITLE>
     26                        <TITLE>Why is this important?</TITLE>
    2627                        <CONTENT>
    2728        Reproductive and birth outcomes are important because they directly affect both the mother's and child's health. In the United States, 1 in 8 babies is born premature each year.
    28 
    29 
    30 
    3129Adverse reproductive health outcomes can greatly impact a child's survival and health through the rest of his or her life. Because the fetus is vulnerable during pregnancy, environmental toxins and exposures can affect the fetus before birth. However, environmental exposures may not always be the direct cause of poor reproductive and birth outcomes; many other factors, like access to healthcare, can play a role as well.
    3230
     
    3836
    3937                <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="2">
    40                         <TITLE>What is Known</TITLE>
     38                        <TITLE>What is known?</TITLE>
    4139                        <CONTENT>
    4240
     
    4442<span Class="Bold">Infant mortality</span> refers to infant deaths before 1 year of age; <span Class="Bold">perinatal mortality</span> refers to infant death in the first week of life after 24th week of pregnancy. Outdoor air pollution (PM10) has been associated with a higher risk of infant death, specifically from respiratory causes and <a href="http://www.cdc.gov/SIDS/">Sudden Infant Death Syndrome</a> (SIDS).
    4543<br></br><br></br>
    46 <span Class="Bold">Maternal mortality</span> refers to the death of a woman while she is pregnant or within 42 of giving birth and where the cause of death is related to the pregnancy itself.
     44<span Class="Bold">Maternal mortality</span> refers to the death of a woman while she is pregnant or within 42 days of giving birth and where the cause of death is related to the pregnancy itself.
    4745<br></br><br></br>
    4846<span Class="Bold">Preterm birth</span> is the leading cause of death of newborn babies. A baby is considered preterm if he or she is born before the 37th week of pregnancy. Preterm birth increases the risk of many health problems such as intellecutal disabilities, cerebral palsy, breathing problems, vision and hearing loss, and feeding and digestive problems. Many of these problems can be a lifelong issue for the child. It is important to remember that every birth is different and many preterm babies do not have any serious health complications.
     
    5755
    5856                <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="2">
    59                         <TITLE>Who is at Risk</TITLE>
     57                        <TITLE>Who is at risk?</TITLE>
    6058
    6159                        <CONTENT>
    6260        Factors such as parents' age, genetics, medical health, socioeconomic status, behavior, diet, access to health care, and environmental exposures can all play a role in reproductive and birth outcomes. The following factors increase a woman's risk of poor reproductive and birth outcomes:
    6361<ul>
    64 <li>Environmental exposures such as secondhand smoke, <a href="http://www.health.utah.gov/utahair/birthoutcomes/">air pollution</a>, biocides, mercury and lead</li>
     62<li>Environmental exposures such as secondhand smoke, air pollution, biocides, mercury and lead</li>
    6563<li>Behaviors such as smoking, drinking alcohol, and using illicit drugs</li>
    6664<li>Medical conditions such as diabetes, high blood pressure, blood clotting disorders, and cervical or uterine problems </li>
     
    7371
    7472                <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="2">
    75                         <TITLE>How to Reduce Risk</TITLE>
     73                        <TITLE>How to reduce risk?</TITLE>
    7674                        <CONTENT>
    7775Women can reduce their risk of negative reproductive and birth outcomes by getting prenatal care before becoming pregnant and <span Class="Bold">avoiding</span> the following:
  • adopters/ky-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/ehl-view-content/xml/html_content/health/RespiratoryHealth.xml

    r11643 r12312  
    4545                <a ibis:href="health/RespiratoryHealthDetail.html">Learn more about asthma</a><br/><br/>
    4646               
    47                 <h2> COPD</h2>
    48                 Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, or COPD, refers to a group of diseases that cause airflow blockage and breathing-related problems. It includes emphysema, chronic bronchitis, and in some cases asthma. In the United States, tobacco smoke is a key factor in the development and progression of COPD, although exposure to air pollutants in the home and workplace, genetic factors, and respiratory infections also play a role. In the developing world, indoor air quality is thought to play a larger role in the development and progression of COPD than it does in the United States.<br/><br/><a ibis:href="dataPortal/Introduction.html">Explore COPD Data</a>
     47                <!--<h2> COPD</h2>
     48                Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, or COPD, refers to a group of diseases that cause airflow blockage and breathing-related problems. It includes emphysema, chronic bronchitis, and in some cases asthma. In the United States, tobacco smoke is a key factor in the development and progression of COPD, although exposure to air pollutants in the home and workplace, genetic factors, and respiratory infections also play a role. In the developing world, indoor air quality is thought to play a larger role in the development and progression of COPD than it does in the United States.<br/><br/><a ibis:href="dataPortal/Introduction.html">Explore COPD Data</a>-->
    4949               
    5050               
  • adopters/ky-epht/trunk/src/main/webapps/ehl-view-content/xml/html_content/health/RespiratoryHealthDetail.xml

    r11098 r12312  
    2727
    2828                <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="2">
    29                         <TITLE>Why Important</TITLE>
     29                        <TITLE>Why is this important?</TITLE>
    3030                        <CONTENT>
    3131                The CDC National Asthma Control Program reports that 1 in 12 children and 1 in 13 adults have asthma. In the year 2012, there were 10.5 million doctor visits, 1.8 million emergency department visits, 439,000 hospitalizations, and 3,630 deaths due to asthma.
     
    3636
    3737                <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="2">
    38                         <TITLE>What is Known</TITLE>
     38                        <TITLE>What is known?</TITLE>
    3939                        <CONTENT>
    4040
     
    5555
    5656                <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="2">
    57                         <TITLE>Who is at Risk</TITLE>
     57                        <TITLE>Who is at risk?</TITLE>
    5858                        <CONTENT>
    5959There are many factors that influence the risk of developing asthma. The CDC reports that risk is increased in the following areas:
     
    7070
    7171                <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="2">
    72                         <TITLE>How to Reduce Risk</TITLE>
     72                        <TITLE>How to reduce risk?</TITLE>
    7373                        <CONTENT>
    7474Even though asthma has no cure, you can reduce the risk of severe complications, hospitalizations, and death due to asthma by properly taking prescribed medication and knowing your triggers. When you know your triggers, you can take preventive action to avoid them, thus, preventing asthma attacks.
     
    7676Once you are diagnosed with asthma, your healthcare provider will advise you on how to properly manage it. Asthma can usually be managed in an outpatient setting, reducing the need for emergency department visits. The majority of problems associated with asthma, including emergency department visits, are preventable if asthma is managed according to established guidelines. Effective management includes control of exposures to factors that trigger exacerbations, adequate pharmacological management, continual monitoring of the disease, and patient education in asthma care.
    7777<br/><br/>
     78Factors in the environmental that are known to increase the risk of an asthma attack include tobacco smoke, wood smoke, dust mites, mold and pollen, animal dander, cold weather and certain types of outdoor air pollution.  Monitoring and avoiding these factors can help to decrease the risk of an asthma attack.<br/><br/>
    7879People who work in school-based health centers are also able to help children manage their asthma. This includes helping reduce exposures to environmental asthma triggers, education, case management, improving indoor air quality, improving students' home environments, and improving outdoor air quality around the school and community. Click here to read more about <a href="http://www.phi.org/resources/?resource=asthma-environmental-intervention-guide-for-school-based-health-centers">"Asthma Environmental Intervention Guide for School-Based Health Centers."</a>
    7980                        </CONTENT>
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