source: main/adopters/nm-epht/branches/2.3-content/xml/html_content/environment/air/FireAndSmoke.xml @ 21395

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NMEPHT Environment Air Fire and Smoke Adding COVID-19 Smoke Facsheet

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1<?xml version="1.0" encoding="ISO-8859-1"?>
2
3<HTML_CONTENT xmlns:ibis="http://www.ibisph.org">
4
5        <TITLE>Protect Your Health During Fires and On Smoky Days</TITLE>
6
7        <CONTENT> 
8                <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="2">
9                        <TITLE>Use the 5-3-1 Visibility Method to Protect Your Health from Smoke</TITLE>
10                        <CONTENT>
11                                <img ibis:src="view/image/5-3-1version3withWhite480x640.jpg" style="float:right; width:50%; vertical-align:text-top; margin:0;" title="5-3-1 visibility method"/>
12                                Wildfires can spread rapidly giving only short notice to nearby residents and can
13                                quickly change air quality. Smoke from wildfires in neighboring regions and states
14                                could also impact your local air quality, although a fire could be far away.   
15                                When these occur, the first thing to consider is protecting your and your family's
16                                health from the hazards of smoke. Using visibility is an easy way to gauge if it is
17                                okay to go outside. Simply staying indoors when it is smoky outside can help you protect
18                                your health when the air quality outside is poor.
19                                <br/><br/>
20
21                                You can decide if you should remain indoors or if it's safe to go outdoors by taking a
22                                few easy actions, called the 5-3-1 Visibility Method.
23                                <br/><br/>
24
25                                <span class="Bold">Step one</span> is to determine how smoky it is based on how far you can see. This is an easy way to assess the air quality.
26                                <br/><br/>
27
28                                <span class="Bold">Step two</span> is to decide what you should do based on the quality of the air.
29                                <br/><br/>
30                                The 5-3-1 Visibility Method is a health campaign created by the New Mexico Department of
31                                Health Environmental Public Health Tracking Program and its locally-based state and federal
32                                partners specializing in air quality and wildfire management.
33                                <div style="clear: both;"/>
34                        </CONTENT>
35                </ibis:ExpandableContent>
36                <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="2">
37                        <TITLE>Método de Visibilidad 5-3-1 </TITLE>
38                        <CONTENT>
39                                <img ibis:src="view/image/5-3-1_white_bg_Espanol.jpg" style="float:right; width:50%; vertical-align:text-top; margin:0;" title="Metodo de Visibilidad 5-3-1"/>
40                                <br/><br/>
41                                Un incendio forestal se puede esparcir rápidamente y cambiar la calidad del aire enseguida.
42                                <br/><br/>
43                                Aprenda cómo proteger su salud cuando ésto suceda.
44                                <br/><br/>
45                                <span class="Bold">Paso 1: </span>Determine cuánto humo hay basado en cuán lejos usted pueda ver (en millas).
46                                <br/><br/>
47                                <span class="Bold">Paso 2: </span>Decida qué hacer basado en cuán lejos usted puede ver, su edad, y condiciones de salud.
48                                <br/><br/>
49                                Si usted puede ver:
50                                <ul class="Indent">
51                                                        <li>
52                                                                menos de 5 millas, la calidad el aire no es saludable para niños pequeños, adultos mayores de 65 años, mujeres embarazadas, y personas con condiciones de corazón y/o de pulmón, asma u otras enfermedades respiratorias.  Estas personas deben minimizar sus actividades recreacionales al aire libre o reprogramarlas para un día con mejor calidad de aire.
53                                                        </li>
54                                                        <li>
55                                                                como 3 millas, niños pequeños, adultos mayores de 65 años, mujeres embarazadas y personas con condiciones de corazón y/o de pulmón, asma u otras enfermedades respiratorias deben evitar todas las actividades al aire libre y permanecer adentro.  Las demás personas deben minimizar sus actividades al aire libre.
56                                                        </li>
57                                                        <li>
58                                                                menos de 1 milla; la calidad del aire no es saludable para nadie.  Todas las personas deben permanecer adentro
59                                                        </li>
60                                                        <li>
61                                                                No importa cuán lejos usted pueda ver, si usted siente efectos en su salud debido al humo, permanezca adentro o vaya a un área con mejor calidad de aire.  Usted debe ver a su doctor o personal del cuidado de la salud si es necesario.
62                                                        </li>
63                                </ul>
64                                <br/><br/>
65                                Método de Visibilidad 5-3-1 es una campaña del Departamento de Salud de Nuevo México y sus socios estatales y federales.
66                                <div style="clear: both;"/>
67                        </CONTENT>
68                </ibis:ExpandableContent>
69
70                <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="2">
71                        <TITLE>How to Use 5-3-1 Visibility Method</TITLE>
72                        <CONTENT>
73                                <div class="Bold">If it is smoky outside find out how far you can see.</div>
74                                First, decide if the visibility is closer to 5 miles, 3 miles or 1 mile. pick a landmark you
75                                are familiar with and see if you can see it. Facing away from the sun, look for landmarks such
76                                as mountains, mesas, hills, or buildings in those mile ranges to help you estimate visibility.
77                                If these objects are not easy to see in these mile ranges, then decide:
78                                <br/><br/>
79
80                                <img ibis:src="view/image/5miles.jpg" style="float:left; vertical-align:text-top; margin:0 10px 0 0;" title="5 miles"/>
81                                <span class="Bold">Is the visibility under 5 miles?</span> If you can see less than 5 miles, the air quality is
82                                unhealthy for young children, adults over age 65, pregnant women, and people with heart and/or
83                                lung disease, asthma or other respiratory illness; they should minimize outdoor activity. These
84                                people should reschedule outdoor recreational activities for a day with better air quality. It
85                                is okay for adults in good health to be out and about but they should periodically check visibility
86                                especially when fires are nearby.
87                                <div style="clear: both;"/>
88                                <br/>
89
90                                <img ibis:src="view/image/3miles.jpg" style="float:left; vertical-align:text-top; margin:0 10px 0 0;" title="3 miles"/>
91                                <span class="Bold">Is the visibility just about 3 miles?</span> Young children, adults over age 65, pregnant women, and
92                                people with heart and/or lung disease, asthma or other respiratory illness should avoid all outdoor
93                                activities.  These people should stay indoors. All outdoor activities should be avoided, including
94                                running errands. Everyone else should try to stay indoors as much as possible. All outdoor recreational
95                                activities should be rescheduled for a day with better air quality.
96                                <div style="clear: both;"/>
97                                <br/>
98
99                                <img ibis:src="view/image/1mile.jpg" style="float:left; vertical-align:text-top; margin:0 10px 0 0;" title="1 mile"/>
100                                <span class="Bold">Is the visibility about 1 mile?</span> If you can see less than 1 mile that means the air quality
101                                is unhealthy for everyone. People should remain indoors and avoid all outdoor activities including
102                                running errands. Unless an evacuation has been issued, stay inside your home, indoor workplace,
103                                or in a safe shelter.
104                                <div style="clear: both;"/>
105                                <br/>
106
107                                Regardless of the visibility, if you are feeling as though you are having health effects from smoke,
108                                take precautions to avoid exposure to smoke and see your doctor or health professional as needed.
109                                <br/><br/>
110
111                                <div class="Note">Since the southwest United States typically has very low humidity, visibility can be an effective
112                                tool to determine if it is healthy to be outside when smoke is present. The visibility test is not
113                                appropriate or effective in areas with high humidity, such as the southeastern United States,
114                                where water vapor (fog) may limit visibility.
115                                </div>
116                        </CONTENT>
117                </ibis:ExpandableContent>
118
119                <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="2">
120                        <TITLE>What is the 5, 3, or 1-mile radius in your area?</TITLE>
121                        <CONTENT>
122                                <span class="Bold">Where are you?</span> NM EPHT created tool that
123                                helps you determine the visibility of landmarks by using your
124                                phone, computer or device. Use this on-line map to draw a 5-3-1-mile
125                                radius buffer to estimate the distance of landmarks that are visible
126                                from where you are standing.
127                                <br/><br/>
128
129                                <a ibis:href="WildFireSmoke" title="Try the 5-3-1 Mile Buffer Map tool">Try the 5-3-1 Mile Buffer Map tool
130                                        <img ibis:src="view/image/Buffermapforweb278x224.png" 
131                                        style="float:left; vertical-align:text-top; margin:0 10px 0 0;" 
132                                        title="Try the 5-3-1 Mile Buffer Map tool"/>
133                                </a>
134                                <div style="clear: both;"/>
135                                <br/><br/>
136
137                                <div class="Bold">Examples of a five-mile radius in three New Mexico metro areas:</div>
138                                <img ibis:src="view/image/roadimage278x185.png" 
139                                        style="float:left; vertical-align:text-top; margin:0.5em 10px 0 0;" 
140                                        title="Try the 5-3-1 Mile Buffer Map tool" 
141                                /><br/>
142                                <a ibis:href="view/pdf/environment/Albuquerque_5mi_buffer.pdf">Albuquerque Metro Area Five Mile Radius (1.2MB)</a><br/><br/>
143                                <a ibis:href="view/pdf/environment/Las_Cruces_5mi_buffer.pdf">Las Cruces Five Mile Radius (1.1 MB)</a><br/><br/>
144                                <a ibis:href="view/pdf/environment/Santa_Fe_5mi_buffer.pdf">Santa Fe Five Mile Radius (1.3 MB)</a><br/><br/>
145                                <div style="clear: both;"/><br/>
146
147                                If the fire is nearby follow all precautions and instructions given by fire management authorities in the area.
148                                All evacuation orders by the sheriff and/or local fire authority should be followed and any recommendation to
149                                leave the area due to unhealthy air quality should be seriously considered.
150                        </CONTENT>
151                </ibis:ExpandableContent>
152
153                <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="2">
154                        <TITLE>What else can you do to protect yourself on smoky days?</TITLE>
155                        <CONTENT>
156                                <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="3">
157                                        <TITLE>Keep indoor air clean</TITLE>
158                                        <CONTENT>
159                                                Staying indoors and keeping the indoor air as clean as possible is the easiest
160                                                way to protect your lungs when it is smoky outside
161                                                <br/><br/>
162                                                Here are tips for doing that:
163                                                <ul class="Indent">
164                                                        <li>
165                                                                If you cannot leave the smoky area, good ways to protect your lungs
166                                                                from wildfire smoke include staying indoors and reducing physical activity.
167                                                        </li>
168                                                        <li>Keep windows and doors closed.</li>
169                                                        <li>
170                                                                Avoid use of spray air fresheners (fragrances), artificially scented
171                                                                household products, and do not use electric fragrance dispensers because
172                                                                these all add to poor air quality.
173                                                        </li>
174                                                        <li>Do not smoke or use vapor cigarettes because these add to poor air quality.</li>
175                                                        <li>Do not use anything that burns, such as candles, fireplaces, or gas stoves.</li>
176                                                        <li>Do not vacuum because vacuuming stirs up particles already inside your home.</li>
177                                                        <li>
178                                                                If you cool your home with a swamp cooler do not run it when the outdoor air
179                                                                is filled with smoke because most swamp coolers have filter pore sizes that are
180                                                                much too large to filter out particles from smoke. If it smells like your swamp
181                                                                cooler is bringing in smoke from the outside, it's best to turn the unit off until
182                                                                the outside air quality improves.
183                                                        </li>
184                                                        <li>
185                                                                If you use an air conditioner keep the fresh-air intake closed and the filter
186                                                                clean to prevent outdoor smoke from getting inside and keep window covering closed.
187                                                        </li>
188                                                        <li>
189                                                                Do not rely on dust masks or wet handkerchiefs to protect your lungs. These will
190                                                                not filter out the fine particles from the air. It is better to stay inside
191                                                                when it is smoky outside and the visibility is low.
192                                                        </li>
193                                                </ul>
194                                                <br/>
195                                                <a ibis:href="view/pdf/environment/Smoke_Guide_for_HVAC_operation_7-21-08_dist.pdf">Guide for Operating HVACS During Smoke Days</a><br/><br/>
196                                        </CONTENT>
197                                </ibis:ExpandableContent>
198                                <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="3">
199                                        <TITLE>Staying Cool on Smoky Days: Should You Use a Swamp Coolers or an Air Conditioner?</TITLE>
200                                        <CONTENT>
201                                                Should you use your swamp cooler or the air conditioner in your car? It depends.
202                                                <br/><br/>
203                                                Avoid using your swamp cooler when the smoke levels are higher than normal because most swamp
204                                                coolers have filter pore sizes that are much too large to filter out particles from smoke.
205                                                If it smells like your swamp cooler is bringing in smoke from the outside, it's best to
206                                                turn the unit off until the outside air quality improves. The same rule applies to
207                                                automobile air-conditioning unless motorists use re-circulated air.
208                                                <ul class="Indent">
209                                                        <li>
210                                                                If it is extremely hot run an air conditioner (refrigerated air)
211                                                                if you have one, but keep the fresh-air intake closed and the filter
212                                                                clean to prevent outdoor smoke from getting inside and keep window
213                                                                covering closed.
214                                                        </li>
215                                                        <li>
216                                                                If you do not have an air conditioner and it is too warm to stay inside with
217                                                                the windows closed, seek shelter elsewhere such as at a cooling center or at a
218                                                                relative's or friend's home. During the day consider going to public libraries,
219                                                                senior center and other public places that may have air conditioning. Learn more
220                                                                about <a ibis:href="health/heatstress/Heat.html">avoiding heat-related health problems</a> 
221                                                                (heat stress and heat stroke).
222                                                        </li>
223                                                </ul>
224                                        </CONTENT>
225                                </ibis:ExpandableContent>
226                                <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="3">
227                                        <TITLE>What if you must go outside?</TITLE>
228                                        <CONTENT>
229                                                Using visibility and staying indoors when it is smoky outside is an easy way to protect
230                                                your health. If you must go outside, only certain masks may offer protection (i.e. N95, N100, P100)
231                                                from wildfire smoke. These special masks are called a "particulate respirator".
232                                                <br/><br/>
233                                                <a ibis:href="view/pdf/environment/Smoke_and_Masks.01.18.13.pdf">  Learn how and which masks to use during fires. (520.3 KB)</a><br/><br/>
234                                                Do not rely on dust masks or wet handkerchiefs to protect your lungs. These will
235                                                not filter out the fine particles from the air. It is better to stay inside when it
236                                                is smoky outside and the visibility is low.  (Paper "comfort" or "dust" masks commonly
237                                                found at hardware stores are designed to trap large particles, such as sawdust. 
238                                                These masks will not protect your lungs from smoke).
239                                        </CONTENT>
240                                </ibis:ExpandableContent>
241                        </CONTENT>
242                </ibis:ExpandableContent>
243
244                <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="2">
245                        <TITLE>Smoke and Your Health</TITLE>
246                        <CONTENT>
247                                In healthy people, symptoms of smoke exposure usually include irritation of eyes,
248                                nose and throat or breathing discomfort. More severe symptoms may include chest
249                                tightness, wheezing, shortness of breath, and coughing.
250                                <br/><br/>
251                                Prolonged exposure to smoke of all kinds is harmful to people of all ages.
252                                Like cigarette smoke, smoke from fires can eventually damage your body's ability
253                                to remove large particles and excess phlegm from your lungs and airway. But, the
254                                healthy lung has a great ability to recover from the effects of smoke, provided
255                                there is time to recover
256                                <br/><br/>
257                                Smoke is a complex mixture of carbon dioxide, water vapor, carbon monoxide, particulate
258                                matter, hydrocarbons and other organic chemicals, nitrogen oxides, and metals. This mixture
259                                can irritate and even injure the mouth, nose, throat, and lung tissue.
260                                <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="3">
261                                        <TITLE>How to tell if smoke is affecting you</TITLE>
262                                        <CONTENT>
263                                                Smoke can cause:
264                                                <ul class="Indent">
265                                                        <li>Coughing</li>
266                                                        <li>A scratchy throat</li>
267                                                        <li>Irritated sinuses</li>
268                                                        <li>Headaches</li>
269                                                        <li>Stinging eyes</li>
270                                                        <li>A runny nose</li>
271                                                        <li>Headaches</li>
272                                                        <li>If you have heart or lung disease, smoke might make your symptoms worse.</li>
273                                                </ul><br/>
274
275                                                People who have heart disease might experience:
276                                                <ul class="Indent">
277                                                        <li>Chest pain</li>
278                                                        <li>Rapid heartbeat</li>
279                                                        <li>Shortness of breath</li>
280                                                        <li>Fatigue</li>
281                                                </ul><br/>
282
283                                                Smoke may worsen symptoms for people who have pre-existing respiratory conditions
284                                                such as seasonal allergies, asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD),
285                                                in the following ways:
286                                                <ul class="Indent">
287                                                        <li>Inability to breathe normally</li>
288                                                        <li>Cough with or without mucus</li>
289                                                        <li>Chest discomfort</li>
290                                                        <li>Wheezing and shortness of breath</li>
291                                                </ul>
292                                        </CONTENT>
293                                </ibis:ExpandableContent>
294                                <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="3">
295                                        <TITLE>What does smoke do to a person with asthma, lung disease or cardiovascular disease?</TITLE>
296                                        <CONTENT>
297                                                Smoke exposure can aggravate conditions such as asthma, a chronic lung disease, or cardiovascular disease.
298                                                <ul class="Indent">
299                                                        <li>People with heart or lung disease should follow their health management plan from their health care provider.</li>
300                                                        <li>People with asthma should follow a prescribed asthma management plan.</li>
301                                                </ul>
302                                                Follow your doctor's advice about medicines if you have asthma or another lung disease. In smoky conditions,
303                                                if you develop symptoms which do not respond to your usual medication, see your health care provider
304                                                immediately. Call your doctor if your symptoms worsen.
305                                        </CONTENT>
306                                </ibis:ExpandableContent>
307                        </CONTENT>
308                </ibis:ExpandableContent>
309                <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="2">
310                        <TITLE>Smoke and COVID-19 Safety</TITLE>
311                        <CONTENT>
312                                There is an ongoing COVID-19 pandemic in New Mexico, and the wildfire season is now underway. Wildfire smoke is a complex mixture of air pollutants that can harm your health such as irritate your lungs, cause inflammation and may alter immune function that makes it harder to fight COVID-19 and other respiratory infections. Smoke from wildfires may cause people to have more severe reactions if they are infected COVID-19
313                                <br/><br/>
314                                <span class="Bold">Who is at most risk?</span>
315                                <ul class="Indent">
316                                        <li>
317                                                Those who have been diagnosed with COVID-19 or another respiratory infection, even after symptoms have resolved.
318                                        </li>
319                                        <li>
320                                                Those who have pre-existing respiratory conditions such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), interstitial lung disease (ILD), or lung cancer.
321                                        </li>
322                                        <li>
323                                                Anyone at increased risk for COVID-19 infection. See <a href="https://cv.nmhealth.org/">CV.nmhealth.org</a> for further guidance.
324                                        </li>
325                                </ul>
326                                <br/><br/>
327                                <span class="Bold">What should you do if you have symptoms?</span>
328                                <ul class="Indent">
329                                        <li>
330                                                Exposure to wildfire smoke and COVID-19 can both cause respiratory symptoms such as a dry cough, sore throat, or difficulty breathing. If you have severe symptoms such as difficulty breathing or chest pain, call 911 right away or get to an Emergency Department.
331                                        </li>
332                                        <li>
333                                                If you have mild symptoms call your healthcare provider.
334                                        </li>
335                                </ul>
336                                <br/><br/>
337                                <span class="Bold">How can you find cleaner air during the COVID-19 pandemic?</span>
338                                <ul class="Indent">
339                                        <li>
340                                                The best way to protect against the potentially harmful effects of wildfire smoke is to reduce exposure and seek cleaner air spaces. However, finding cleaner air can be more challenging under strict physical distancing guidelines, because public facilities such as libraries, community centers, and shopping malls are closed. You can create a cleaner air space at home to protect yourself from wildfire smoke during the COVID-19 pandemic by following the tips on the Indoor Air Quality page <a ibis:href="environment/air/IndoorQuality.html">https://nmtracking.org/environment/air/IndoorQuality.html</a>
341                                        </li>
342                                       
343                                </ul>
344                                <br/><br/>
345                                <span class="Bold">What else can you do to stay healthy if it gets smoky this summer?</span>
346                                <ul class="Indent">
347                                        <li>
348                                                Get prepared for the wildfire smoke season as you would do in any other summer.
349                                        </li>
350                                        <li>
351                                                Use the <a ibis:href="environment/air/FireAndSmoke.html">5-3-1 Visibility Method</a>, listed above) to assess air quality conditions in your area.
352                                        </li>
353                                        <li>
354                                                If you have a chronic health condition, work with your healthcare providers to create a management plan for smoky conditions. If you use rescue medications, make sure that you always have an ample supply at home and carry them with you during the wildfire season.
355                                        </li>
356                                        <li>
357                                                Limit outdoor exercise when it is smoky outside or choose lower-intensity activities.
358                                        </li>
359                                        <li>
360                                                Use adequate filtration on your HVAC system or consider purchasing a portable air filter. Swamp coolers which draw in air from the outside are NOT recommended. See "What else can you do to protect yourself on smoky days above (<a ibis:href="environment/air/FireAndSmoke.html">https://nmtracking.org/environment/air/FireAndSmoke.html</a>) for more recommendations.
361                                        </li>
362                                        <li>
363                                                Whenever possible, use air conditioners, heat pumps, fans, and window shades to keep your cleaner air space comfortably cool on hot days. Overheating can cause serious health problems. Get tips for staying cool at: <a ibis:href="health/heatstress/Heat.html">https://nmtracking.org/health/heatstress/Heat.html</a>.
364                                        </li>
365                                        <li>
366                                                Although some face masks can provide protection from wildfire smoke, medical masks and N95 respirators MUST be reserved for frontline healthcare workers during the pandemic. Cloth masks do not provide adequate protection from wildfire smoke but are recommended to prevent the spread of COVID-19.
367                                        </li>
368                                </ul>
369                                <br/>
370                                <a ibis:href="view/pdf/environment/Smoke_COVID_Factsheet_NMEPHT_2020.pdf">Smoke and COVID-19 Safety Factsheet Sheet (195 KB)</a>
371                                <br/><br/><br/>
372                        </CONTENT>
373                </ibis:ExpandableContent>
374                <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="2">
375                        <TITLE>Communications and Safety Decision Making Toolkit: Schools, Public Health Local Governments, Event or Recreation Organizers and Sports Coaches</TITLE>
376                        <CONTENT>
377                                New Mexico offers great outdoor opportunities for fun and recreation throughout the year. However, during wildfire season
378                                the air quality can change rapidly leaving health, school, and community leaders to make quick decisions. Even when there is
379                                not a fire within New Mexico state line boundaries the air quality can be impacted by forests burning in neighboring states.
380                                <br/><br/>
381
382                                Be prepared to make decisions that will protect the health of the people in your community when forests, woodlands, grasslands
383                                and bosques catch fire and smoke travels into your community. If you are a community leader, an event/sports organizer, or
384                                someone who serves a sensitive population you may be asking yourself some questions when it is smoky outside: Should that
385                                baseball or softball game continue? Should that golf tournament be rescheduled? Should school be held or recess held indoors? Do I cancel my outdoor event?
386                                <br/><br/>
387
388                                The health of the participants, students, athletes and spectators is something that should be considered during wildfires
389                                season and smoky days, especially if they are part of a sensitive population.
390                                <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="3">
391                                        <TITLE>Decisions That Local Leaders Must Make </TITLE>
392                                        <CONTENT>
393                                                Poor air quality from nearby fires can mean unhealthy conditions for the people participating in the activity you
394                                                organize or sponsor outdoors. When it is smoky outside the health of the participants, students, athletes and
395                                                spectators, especially if they are part of a sensitive population, should be considered when determining if the event
396                                                or game you organize should continue.
397                                                <br/><br/>
398
399                                                <div class="Bold">If you:</div>
400                                                <ul class="Indent">
401                                                        <li>
402                                                                provide services for sensitive populations (young children, senior citizens, people with certain health conditions)
403                                                        </li>
404                                                        <li>organize outdoor community events</li>
405                                                        <li>coach sports</li>
406                                                        <li>manage recreation programs</li>
407                                                        <li>make decisions for a school or daycare center</li>
408                                                        <li>coordinate activities at a community center or senior center</li>
409                                                        <li>guide fishing or outdoor adventures or excursions</li>
410                                                        <li>manage a city, county, or tribal government or are a local official</li>
411                                                        <li>manage a ranch, farm, or oversee outdoor labor</li>
412                                                </ul><br/>
413
414                                                <div class="Bold">you need to make some quick decisions when it is smoky outside such as:</div>
415                                                <ul class="Indent">
416                                                        <li>should that game go on?</li>
417                                                        <li>should recess or playtime be done indoors?</li>
418                                                        <li>should the tournament be rescheduled?</li>
419                                                        <li>should that outdoor event be canceled?</li>
420                                                        <li>should that outdoor adventure or fishing trip be postponed?</li>
421                                                        <li>should work be done indoors?</li>
422                                                        <li>should transport services for sensitive population be delayed until it is safe to outdoors?</li>
423                                                </ul><br/>
424
425                                                The health of the participants, students, athletes and spectators is something that should be considered
426                                                during wildfires season and smoky days, especially if they are part of a sensitive population. You should
427                                                use the 5-3-1 Visibility Method to make decisions.
428                                        </CONTENT>
429                                </ibis:ExpandableContent>
430                                <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="3">
431                                        <TITLE>How to Make That Decision</TITLE>
432                                        <CONTENT>
433                                                The following are general recommendations for decision-making based on the age and health conditions
434                                                of the people you serve and an estimation of quality of air based on the smoke visibility method.
435                                                <br/><br/>
436
437                                                <img ibis:src="view/image/5-3-1version3withWhitesmall.jpg" style="float:right; width:50%; vertical-align:text-top; margin:0;" title="5-3-1 visibility method"/>
438                                                Use the 5-3-1 Mile Visibility Method to make decisions especially if the people you serve are part of a
439                                                sensitive population. Then educate and communicate with the people you serve.
440                                                <br/><br/>
441
442                                                <div class="Bold">If it is smoky outside find out how far you can see.</div>
443                                                First, decide if the visibility is closer to 5 miles, 3 miles or 1 mile. pick a landmark you are familiar
444                                                with and see if you can see it. Facing away from the sun, look for landmarks such as mountains, mesas,
445                                                hills, or buildings in those mile ranges to help you estimate visibility. If these objects are not easy to
446                                                see in these mile ranges, then decide:
447                                                <br/><br/>
448
449                                                <img ibis:src="view/image/5miles.jpg" style="float:left; vertical-align:text-top; margin:0 10px 0 0;" title="5 miles"/>
450                                                <span class="Bold">Is the visibility under 5 miles?</span> If you can see less than 5 miles, the air quality is unhealthy for young
451                                                children, adults over age 65, pregnant women, and people with heart and/or lung disease, asthma or other
452                                                respiratory illness; they should minimize outdoor activity.
453                                                <br/><br/>
454
455                                                <ul class="Indent">
456                                                        <li>If your activity involves people from these groups you might <span class="Bold">consider moving your event indoors.</span>
457                                                                <ul class="Indent">
458                                                                        <li>
459                                                                                Try to keep the indoor air as clean as possible by not allowing use of air fresheners (fragrances),
460                                                                                chemicals, cigarettes, vapor cigarettes or anything else that could compromise the air quality.
461                                                                        </li>
462                                                                        <li>
463                                                                                If it is warm, consider moving it into a place that is cooled with air conditioning
464                                                                                (not swamp/evaporative coolers).
465                                                                        </li>
466                                                                </ul>
467                                                        </li>
468                                                        <li>
469                                                                If you cannot move your event indoors, <span class="Bold">consider rescheduling it for a day with better air quality.</span>
470                                                        </li>
471                                                </ul>
472                                                <br/>
473
474                                                It is okay for adults in good health to be out and about but they should periodically check visibility
475                                                especially when fires are nearby.
476                                                <br/><br/>
477
478                                                <img ibis:src="view/image/3miles.jpg" style="float:left; vertical-align:text-top; margin:0 10px 0 0;" title="3 miles"/>
479                                                <span class="Bold">Is the visibility just about 3 miles?</span> If it is, air quality is unhealthy. Everyone should try to stay
480                                                indoors as much as possible.
481                                                <div style="clear: both;"/>
482                                                <br/>
483
484                                                <ul class="Indent">
485                                                        <li><span class="Bold">Move your event indoors or reschedule it. </span>
486                                                                <ul class="Indent">
487                                                                        <li>
488                                                                                Try to keep the indoor air as clean as possible by not allowing use of air fresheners
489                                                                                (fragrances), chemicals, cigarettes, vapor cigarettes or anything else that could compromise
490                                                                                the air quality.
491                                                                        </li>
492                                                                        <li>
493                                                                                If it is warm, consider moving it into a place that is cooled with air conditioning (not swamp/evaporative coolers).
494                                                                        </li>
495                                                                </ul>
496                                                        </li>
497                                                        <li>
498                                                                Young children, adults over age 65, pregnant women, and people with heart and/or lung disease, asthma
499                                                                or other respiratory illness should avoid all outdoor activities.  These people should not be outdoors
500                                                                including going outside to get to your event even if your event was moved indoors.  If your activity
501                                                                involves young children, adults age 65 and over, pregnant women, and people with heart and/or lung
502                                                                disease, asthma or other respiratory illness, <span class="Bold">reschedule your event for a day with better air quality.</span> 
503                                                        </li>
504                                                </ul>
505                                                <br/>
506
507                                                <img ibis:src="view/image/1mile.jpg" style="float:left; vertical-align:text-top; margin:0 10px 0 0;" title="1 mile"/>
508                                                Is the visibility about 1 mile? If you can see less than 1 mile that means the air quality is unhealthy for
509                                                everyone. People should remain indoors and avoid all outdoor activities including driving, biking and walking.
510                                                Unless an evacuation has been issued, people should stay inside their homes, indoor workplace, or in a safe shelter.
511
512                                                <span class="Bold">Cancel or reschedule all events.</span> 
513                                                Poor visibility outdoors means it could be dangerous
514                                                for participants to drive to your event even if
515                                                you move it indoors. Being outdoors including briefly
516                                                walking outside could be unhealthy during this time.
517                                        </CONTENT>
518                                </ibis:ExpandableContent>
519
520                                <ibis:ExpandableContent titleLevel="3">
521                                        <TITLE>Communicate with Participants and Event-Goers</TITLE>
522                                        <CONTENT>
523                                                As you postpone, reschedule, or cancel your event, first consider using your local means of mass communication to let your community know of changes in the schedule. Let the community or participants know that these changes were done to protect their health. Common ways to communicate with you participates
524                                                include phone trees, e-mail listserv, social media feeds such as an event page or a team page on Facebook, an announcement on Twitter and, using your local media such as the newspaper and radio station to disseminate your message. Direct your participants to <a href="https://nmfireinfo.com/">nmfireinfo.com</a> 
525                                                to learn about fires in the state and to <a ibis:href="">nmtracking.org</a> to learn how they can protect their health on smoky days.
526                                                <br/><br/>
527                                                Next, help educate your participants on how they can make decision during smoky days. The 5-3-1 Visibility Method is public campaign from the New Mexico Department of Health, Environmental Public Health Tracking Program, and its state and federal partners. You may print and post or share the following items:
528                                                <br/><br/>
529                                                <ul class="Indent">
530                                                        <li>
531                                                                <span class="Bold">Public and Patient Education: Print, Post and Distribute.</span> Post this in senior and community centers, near trailheads, campgrounds, libraries, community gathering areas, schools, sports fields, and medical centers. This can also be distributed as part of patient education to sensitive populations or used in door-to-door education during wildfires.
532                                                                <br/><br/>
533
534                                                                <a ibis:href="view/pdf/environment/5-3-1.PatientEducation.Factsheet.pdf">5-3-1 Visibility Method Bulletin and Patient Education Information Sheet (151.4 KB)</a>
535                                                                <br/><br/>
536                                                                <a ibis:href="view/pdf/environment/5-3-1_Poster_Spanish.pdf">5-3-1 Visibility Method Bulletin and Patient Education in Spanish</a>
537                                                                <br/><br/>
538                                                        </li>
539                                                        <li>
540                                                                <span class="Bold">Quick Guide: Print and Distribute.</span> The postcard sized guides can be printed double-sided and given out to all populations. Ask residents to keep it handy, such as posting it on refrigerators and near doorways, so they may know what to do when it quickly becomes smoky outside.
541                                                                <br/><br/>
542                                                                <a ibis:href="view/pdf/environment/5-3-1.Card.Guide.pdf">  5-3-1 Visibility Method Card Guide (192.5 KB)</a>
543                                                                <br/><br/>
544                                                                <a ibis:href="view/pdf/environment/5-3-1_postcard_Espanol_2018.pdf">  5-3-1 Visibility Method Card Guide in Spanish</a>
545                                                        </li>
546                                                </ul>
547                                        </CONTENT>
548                                </ibis:ExpandableContent>
549                        </CONTENT>
550                </ibis:ExpandableContent>
551        </CONTENT>
552</HTML_CONTENT> 
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